Utah State History

Utah State History Utah State History is home to the Utah Historical Quarterly, Utah State Historical Society, Research Library and Collections, the State Historic Preservation Office (archaeology and historic buildings), and Antiquities Section.
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State History is a state agency. We're part of the Utah Department of Heritage and Arts.

Mission: Preserving and sharing the past for the present and future.

Looking for sources for teaching the importance of Holocaust and Genocide education? The Utah Education Network website ...
12/31/2019
Holocaust and Genocide Education - UEN

Looking for sources for teaching the importance of Holocaust and Genocide education? The Utah Education Network website provides many lesson plans and resources, including contact information for available speakers and witnesses.

Resources to help teachers teach about the holocaust and genocide.

☃️ Photo of men and women together on a toboggan, sliding down a snow-covered hill.  Salt Lake Tribune photographer Ray ...
12/26/2019

☃️ Photo of men and women together on a toboggan, sliding down a snow-covered hill. Salt Lake Tribune photographer Ray King in the front, January 12, 1932.

MSS C 1977 The Ray King Photograph Collection, 1918-1951

For more information please contact the Research Center

https://history.utah.gov/library-collections/

🧤🧣🎩❄️☃️  Utah State Capitol at night with lighted Christmas tree, December 26, 1933. Shipler Commercial Photography #72H...
12/25/2019

🧤🧣🎩❄️☃️ Utah State Capitol at night with lighted Christmas tree, December 26, 1933.

Shipler Commercial Photography #72

Happy Merry everyone!

For more information please contact the Research Center :

https://history.utah.gov/library-collections/

Here is this week's cool blog post on urban revitalization in Utah's "rural" downtowns by Steve Cornell, our Historical ...
12/24/2019
Urban Revitilization in Utah’s “Rural” Downtowns | Utah Division of State History

Here is this week's cool blog post on urban revitalization in Utah's "rural" downtowns by Steve Cornell, our Historical Architect. Enjoy. https://history.utah.gov/urban-revitilization-in-utahs-rural-downtowns/

Urban Revitilization in Utah’s “Rural” Downtowns Kevin Fayles December 24, 2019 History Main Blog By Steve Cornell, Historical Architect, Division of State History Let’s look at Lehi.  I happen to reside here so I’m looking closely, perhaps a little too closely.  Lehi was an outlying far...

Anna Madsine Rosenkilde was born in Denmark in 1883 to Jens Rosenkilde and Mouuritse Elizabeth Sophie Frederickson. Many...
12/23/2019

Anna Madsine Rosenkilde was born in Denmark in 1883 to Jens Rosenkilde and Mouuritse Elizabeth Sophie Frederickson. Many family trees show Anna as married to Abraham Owen Woodruff in what would have been a plural marriage. No reference is found to verify that marriage. However, Anna was employed by his wife Helen as a young immigrant to help care for the home and children.

Anna immigrated here in 1900 as a 16-year old and quickly found work as a servant in the Knudsen house in Lehi. Anna seemed to gravitate toward care of others. Anna was naturalized in 1917 in Salt Lake City and as a graduate of LDS Hospital School of Nursing in 1918 she enlisted in the Army Nurses Corp during World War I. She received orders to train at Camp Doniphan at Fort Sill in Oklahoma along with her fellow nursing graduate Mary Preston. Anna and Mary then sailed from New York in June 1918 to France and were assigned to a hospital in Angers. At times they had as many as 5,000 patients. She was quoted once as saying, "One could so wish to be alone someplace and give way to grief. This was never possible."

She became the first nurse hired at the old Primary Children's Hospital and served as superintendent from 1922 to 1945. In 1922 the children's hospital was located in a two-story house at 44 W North Temple and had 35 beds. It was officially named Primary Children's Hospital in 1934. By 1940 Anna had convinced LDS authorities that the house was too small to meet the growing needs. In 1952 when construction was completed on the LDS hospital at 320 12th Avenue a children's ward was included in that design.

Anna became known as "Mama Rose" and was credited with the creation of Primary Children's Hospital.

Anna came to be the foster mother of Don Melvin Lee. Little Don was 9 months old when his legs were badly burned in a bonfire. In order to save his life both of his legs were amputated. His parents could not afford his care so Anna stepped in to oversee his recovery. When he was fully recovered the family didn't take him back. When asked why, Anna replied "we just don't talk about it." Anna took care of Don for the rest of his life. He was formally adopted in 1951. Anna nurtured Don and by the age of 18 Don achieved earning his Eagle Scout badge in 1949. Using his artificial legs he completed the 14-mile hike and swimming requirements for the badge. A story of triumph that was reported in newspapers across the country.

Don Rosenkilde went on to become a mechanical engineer working for many companies from Hercules to Hill Air Force Base. He died in 2004 in Florida leaving a wife of 49 years and 4 children.

Mama Rose died in 1973 and is buried in Lake Hills Cemetery in Sandy Utah.

To read more about nurses in WWI check out the 1990 issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly https://issuu.com/utah10/docs/uhq_volume58_1990_number4/28

#utahstatehistory #utahcemeteries #annarosenkilde #primarychildrenshospital #armynursescorp #redcrossnurses

🏡  Caithness (Riter) Apartments, 80 B Street, Salt Lake City. December 17th, 1908. Shipler Commercial Photographers Coll...
12/22/2019

🏡 Caithness (Riter) Apartments, 80 B Street, Salt Lake City. December 17th, 1908.

Shipler Commercial Photographers Collection, #8843.

For more information please contact the Research Center, we'd love to hear from you!

https://history.utah.gov/library-collections/

An older article and study, but good ones. We love historic windows at Utah State History. If you have questions about y...
12/20/2019
MAHONEY: Old windows part of the soul of our past

An older article and study, but good ones. We love historic windows at Utah State History. If you have questions about your historic windows, please contact the Utah State Historic Preservation Office.

Shannon Kyles says replacing them on a building is ‘like poking its eyes out.”

🌟  🎬 What vintage photography gear famously crossed-over to pop culture? Check out the YouTube video through the link be...
12/20/2019

🌟 🎬 What vintage photography gear famously crossed-over to pop culture?

Check out the YouTube video through the link below to find out how the handle of a Grayflex flash gun made movie history.

https://youtu.be/zeLNSyketnE

Luuuuuke

Thomas Ackley Lyne was born in Philadelphia in 1806. He was an American tragedian actor. He was the son of Quaker parent...
12/16/2019

Thomas Ackley Lyne was born in Philadelphia in 1806. He was an American tragedian actor. He was the son of Quaker parents John and Hester. Thomas initially followed in his fathers steps and became a "mariner."

His acting career had ended before voice recording had been invented and only 2 photographs of him survive. The documentation of his prolific career come to us in theater bills, press notices, witness remembrances and articles written over the ages.

Billed as T.A. Lyne he first hit the stage at Philadelphia's Walnut Street Theatre in 1829 in the play "William Tell."
He traveled the country performing in various acting troupes.

It is reported in May 1840 he wed fellow actress Mercy Adams. Thomas first was exposed to Mormonism in 1844 by way of his brother-in-law and a recent convert himself George Adams. Thomas struggled with alcoholism and it is postulated that his conversion came about in a personal effort to change his trajectory with the bottle. Thomas and Mercy packed up and went to Nauvoo, Illinois in 1844. It was here he converted and performed in the Masonic Hall. The play, " Pizzaro" was intended as a benefit to raise money for Joseph Smith.

Shortly afterward Thomas and his brother-in-law George formed the Nauvoo Dramatic Association and traveled along the Mississippi River. Thomas petitioned for a divorce later that year. By 1846 he was married again to Mary Ann Hess and they moved back to Philadelphia and had 2 sons, Thomas and William. Thomas seemed to become disaffected with religion at this point as prosthelytizing was not suitable to him. Mary Ann died in 1852 suddenly and Thomas had 2 sons to raise. He soon married again in 1854 to another fellow thespian Caroline "Carrie" Cogswell. He saw the birth of 2 more children a son Walter and daughter Mary. In 1859 his oldest son Thomas died and was buried in Philadelphia. By 1861 he returned to religious ideals and by the spring of 1862 the family headed out West playing theaters in the mining towns of Colorado. By that winter Carrie filed for divorce.

In December Thomas wrote to Brigham Young offering his services for the new Salt Lake Theater. Young was the producer of the Deseret Dramatic Association and in need of an acting coach. Thus, Thomas A Lyne moved to Utah and by Christmas night led them in the performance of "The Honeymoon and Patty Miles' Boy." He returned to Denver to finalize his divorce. Carrie got custody of Mary and Thomas got custody of Walter.

The Deseret News reported a marriage on December 6, 1864 to Madelaine Bartad of Nata France in Salt Lake City. Through the 1860s he continued to perform and coach young actors with the Salt Lake Theater. By 1870 his dissenting views of Mormonism saw his career at the theater draw to a close. He gave a reading at the Corinne Opera House, but chose not to take up residence there. By 1871 he was semi-retired and joined the Liberal institute that was intended to foster free thinking through literature and political discourse. He gave a rousing rendition of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1871 with Susan B. Anthony in attendance.

Ill health and old age took Thomas Ackley Lyne on March 31, 1890. Based on Thomas's last will he left assets primarily to Madeline, but also named heirs Samuel W. Lyne, Walter Lyne and grandson Henry Pascoe. At the time of his death he was living at 447 E 100 S. His son Walter became a city councilman his residence at 1135 E South Temple is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Numerous newspapers wrote a notice of his death and referenced Lyne as "the oldest American actor."

Thomas Ackley Lyne is buried in Mt. Olivet Cemetery with a modern headstone that simply says "Actor" inscribed at the bottom.

#utahstatehistory #utahcemeteries #thomasalyne #utahactor

☃️  Windsor V. Rice residence, 163 East South Temple, December 28th, 1905.  📸  Shipler Commercial Photographers Collecti...
12/14/2019

☃️ Windsor V. Rice residence, 163 East South Temple, December 28th, 1905.

📸 Shipler Commercial Photographers Collection photo #02020

For more information please contact the Research Center:

https://history.utah.gov/library-collections/

Utah teen lobbies Congress to acknowledge top-secret military unit
12/13/2019
Utah teen lobbies Congress to acknowledge top-secret military unit

Utah teen lobbies Congress to acknowledge top-secret military unit

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4 News) – A Utah teenager is pushing Congress to recognize an elite Army unit that is credited for saving countless lives without ever firing a shot in World War II. The mission …

🏡 The Gardo House (Amelia's Palace, 70 East South Temple) when it was the Red Cross Headquarters. Committee Meeting, Dec...
12/12/2019

🏡 The Gardo House (Amelia's Palace, 70 East South Temple) when it was the Red Cross Headquarters. Committee Meeting, December 1917.

Shipler Commercial Photographers photo #18488.

For more information, please contact the Research Center:

https://history.utah.gov/library-collections/

Check out our latest blog called "In Search of the Spanish Trail: Santa Fe to Los Angeles, 1829-1948" with some great ph...
12/12/2019
In Search of the Spanish Trail: Santa Fe to Los Angeles, 1829-1948 – Steven K. Madsen’s Research and Photographing The Old Spanish Trail | Utah Division of State History

Check out our latest blog called "In Search of the Spanish Trail: Santa Fe to Los Angeles, 1829-1948" with some great photos! https://history.utah.gov/in-search-of-the-spanish-trail-santa-fe-to-los-angeles-1829-1948-steven-k-madsens-research-and-photographing-the-old-spanish-trail/

In Search of the Spanish Trail: Santa Fe to Los Angeles, 1829-1948 – Steven K. Madsen’s Research and Photographing The Old Spanish Trail Kevin Fayles December 12, 2019 History Main Blog, Uncategorized By Lisa Barr, Museum & Historical Collections Curator As a historical collections curator for U...

Oscar Swett was born in Payson in 1890 to Lyman Swett and Ellen Langston.  The Swett family moved to Vernal in 1902 and ...
12/10/2019

Oscar Swett was born in Payson in 1890 to Lyman Swett and Ellen Langston. The Swett family moved to Vernal in 1902 and bought a farm next to Ellen's brother in the northern part of the valley. There they farmed, had an orchard and several beehives. Oscar's father died in 1907 at which time his mother gave him $100. He used that money to buy cattle and along with his brothers they bought permits from the government to run cattle up in the mountains.

After Lyman's death the older Swett boys and Ellen filed homestead claims on land in Greendale. In 1909, Ellen filed for 151 acres on behalf of her minor son Oscar and in 1915 he field for another 9 to round it out to 160 acres. At the time of the original filing Oscar and his brothers built a one-room cabin to improve their claim.

It was in 1909 that Oscar met Emma Eliza Osiek and they married in 1913. Emma was born in Heber City in 1892 to Louis Osiek and Eliza Bethers. Together they had nine children and raised them on their homestead the Swett Ranch. Over the years they cleared the land to create hay fields, dredged a ditch for 15 miles to create the Greendale Canal to irrigate the land. During the first years the young family only lived on the land in the summer months.

Their main income came from cattle and lumber. In 1921 Oscar bought a steam-powered saw mill. The boiler exploded and killed an elderly man (Andrew Oley Neilson) there to show him how to use it. In 1922 he bought a water-powered saw mill in Price and hauled it back up to Greendale. The mill was located toward the Green River and he diverted the canal water to power the mill. He would collect lumber in the Ashley National Forest tagged by the Forest Service.

Oscar and Emma struggled to have enough cash. In 1922 Oscar's land was impounded by Daggett County for five years of non-payment of his taxes. He was able to save the $41.63 to pay that notice.

In 1933 the area north of Green River was added to the Ashley National Forest and the few homestead settlements that remained became islands of private land surrounded by national forest in an ever shrinking Greendale. They struggled through the years until WWII brought some prosperity in the cattle business. In 1942, Oscar and Emma purchased their first pickup truck. Oscar still kept his team of horses to work the land until his death in 1968. He once told a forest ranger he couldn't afford to covert to motorized machinery.

Oscar and Emma saw many changes over the years from their homestead. The most striking came in 1956 when Congress authorized the construction of Flaming Gorge Dam. From that roads were paved and the small town of Dutch John grew in the meadow he used to use to winter his cattle. When campgrounds emerged near Greendale and the prominent springs Oscar could no longer water his cattle. The loss of public resources ultimately forced Oscar to stop his cattle business. In 1957 his neighbor sold his land to Oscar and Emma who now owned 397 acres and were the only original settlers of remaining of Greendale.

Oscar and Emma hung on in the twilight years until Oscar died in 1968 forcing Emma to sell the land. Emma passes away in 1971 and in 1972 the Forest Service buys the ranch from the new owners to complete the National Forest.

The Oscar Swett Ranch is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is operated as a museum by the Forest Service.

Oscar and Emma are buried in the Rock Point Cemetery in Maeser, Utah.

You can read more about the Swett Homestead in the 1994 issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly. https://issuu.com/utah10/docs/uhq_volume62_1994_number2/34

#utahstatehistory #utahcemeteries #swettranch #daggettcounty #greendaleutah #ashleynationalforest #flaminggorge #nationalregister #dutchjohn

With the 75th anniversary of the ending of World War II coming (1945-2020), and with the 78th anniversary of Pearl Harbo...
12/08/2019
Internment camp survivor and assemblywoman Mary Previte dies at 87

With the 75th anniversary of the ending of World War II coming (1945-2020), and with the 78th anniversary of Pearl Harbor (yesterday December 7), this coming year will include a lot of recognition and the retelling of history. Here’s a three minute start to this year of remembrance.

Mary Previte, who spent years in a Chinese internment camp during WWII and went on to become the first woman to be president of the New Jersey Juvenile Detention Association and won a seat in the state’s general assembly, died last month at age 87. Sunday TODAY’s Willie Geist remembers a life we...

🇺🇸 🦅  This U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor replica is a representation of the original medal awarded to Chief Petty Of...
12/07/2019

🇺🇸 🦅 This U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor replica is a representation of the original medal awarded to Chief Petty Officer Peter Tomich who died aboard the USS Utah amidst the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941. Tomich (spelled "Tonic" prior to immigrating to the United States) was born on June 3, 1893 in Prolog, a Balkan village located in what was then known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire. He immigrated to the United States in 1913 with his cousin, John Tonic and enlisted in the U.S. Army at the onset of the First World War. During his service, Tomich received U.S. citizenship and served in the military for the rest of his life, moving from the Army into the Navy in the 1920s and becoming Chief Watertender of the USS Utah. He was 48 years old when his ship was attacked at Pearl Harbor by Japanese forces. Upon the attack, Tomich reportedly responded by issuing an evacuation to his crew, but ignored the order himself and stayed aboard to stabilize the ship's boilers, avoiding additional explosions that likely would have killed more people. During the attack, the Utah rolled over on its side and capsized. Tomich was one of 64 from the USS Utah that did not survive and his remains still lie underwater with the ship.

Several months after the attack, President Franklin D. Roosevelt awarded Peter Tomich the Congressional Medal of Honor for distinguished conduct, but his family could not be located to receive the award. Instead, the medal was housed and displayed on the USS Tomich (DE-242), a destroyer escort named in his honor in 1943. When the ship was "mothballed" in 1946, Utah Governor Herbert B. Maw publicly declared Tomich an honorary citizen of Utah and guardianship of his medal was granted to the state. By 1989, however, it was moved to the Senior Enlisted Academy in Newport, Rhode Island and put on display. It wasn't until 1997 that the search for Tomich's family was rejuvenated by Rear Admiral J. Robert Lunney, who found a family connection in Croatia after traveling to the honorary veteran's home village and conducting detailed research. On May 18, 2006, Lunney presented the original medal to a distant cousin of Tomich's: Lieutenant Colonel Srecko Herzeg-Tonic, who served with the Croatian Armed Forces.

This replica Congressional Medal of Honor was presented to the Utah State Historical Society in 1993 by the Naval Historical Center, Department of the United States Navy, as an honorary replacement for the original medal that Utah housed for the deceased Peter Tomich, Chief Petty Officer, from 1947 to 1989.

For more information, please contact the Research

https://history.utah.gov/library-collections/

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300 S Rio Grande St
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