Utah State History

Utah State History Utah State History is home to the Utah Historical Quarterly, Utah State Historical Society, Research Library and Collections, the State Historic Preservation Office (archaeology and historic buildings), and Antiquities Section.
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State History is a state agency. We're part of the Utah Department of Heritage and Arts.

Mission: Preserving and sharing the past for the present and future.

🏎️ 🏁  Hudson Motor Co., Captain George Eyston and Speed of the Wind at Salt Flats, August 1935.Clifton L. Bray photograp...
08/13/2020

🏎️ 🏁 Hudson Motor Co., Captain George Eyston and Speed of the Wind at Salt Flats, August 1935.

Clifton L. Bray photograph collection, 1933-1938
MSS C 321 Box 3 No. 172-D

The Research Center is available to respond to requests for records and information by phone and email.

Email: [email protected]

Phone: (801) 531-3847

The summer issue of Utah Historical Quarterly is now out! Among the offerings is a piece appropriate for the season: on ...
08/12/2020
Q&A with J. Michael Hunter on Bees and Beekeeping | Utah Division of State History

The summer issue of Utah Historical Quarterly is now out! Among the offerings is a piece appropriate for the season: on beekeeping in territorial Utah. Check out the author's responses to a few questions regarding his interest in bees and their significance to the beehive state: https://history.utah.gov/qa-with-j-michael-hunter-on-bees-and-beekeeping/

Q&A with J. Michael Hunter on Bees and Beekeeping Jedediah Rogers August 6, 2020 History Main Blog, UHQ Blog, UHQ Extras Editors’ note: J. Michael Hunter’s article “Laying the Foundation for Utah’s Beekeeping Success” appears in the summer 2020 issue of Utah Historical Quarterly. In this Q...

This is a BetterDays2020 Dispatch: Take a moment and examine this primary source entitled "Form of Oath for a Woman."Aft...
08/12/2020

This is a BetterDays2020 Dispatch: Take a moment and examine this primary source entitled "Form of Oath for a Woman."

After the passing of the Edmunds Anti-Polygamy Act of 1882, the US Congress called for and the US President Chester A. Arthur appointed, a five-man "Utah Commission," established to supervise all aspects of the electoral process in the Utah Territory. The commission was to confirm that all elections were free and open, and that those who practiced polygamy were no longer allowed to vote in any elections.

One of the first measures the Utah Commission implemented was to require all who wished to vote, to first swear and sign an oath, in the presence of a county registrar, regarding a strict following of the Edmunds Act.

In signing this Utah women attested that: (a) they were either born in the USA or was a naturalized citizen, (b) were twenty-one years old or older, (c) had lived in the same county for at least six months, and then swear to the following:

"I am not a bigamist or a polygamist,..." and "I am not the wife of a polygamist; nor have I entered into any relations with any man in violation of the laws of United States concerning bigamy and polygamy."

Thousands of LDS Church women were disenfranchised from voting because of their practice of polygamy (even though they were given the right to vote in 1870).

Stay tuned for more Utah women suffrage history, leading up to August 18, 2020 which is the hundred anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which prohibited any state from denying the vote on the basis of sex.

Thanks to Ron Fox for allowing us to copy and present this document.

08/11/2020
CONTENTdm

This is a BetterDay2020 Dispatch: In the mid to late 1890s Utah had 19 branches of the Woman Suffrage Association (WSA). Established in Utah in 1889, these local auxiliaries of this national association (lead by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton), where encouraged by the Women Relief Society (a then semi-autonomous organization of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) to have members educate themselves in regards to political and civic matters, and to fight for a woman's right to vote.

The Beaver County Woman’s Suffrage Association was one of these branches. The Association's papers (BYU Sp. Collections, MSS SC 48, includes meeting minutes, handwritten newsletters and a copy of the "Woman's Exponent" publication "Utah Woman Suffrage Song Book," which can all be read, studied and enjoyed, online at:

https://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/digital/collection/p15999coll24/search/searchterm/Beaver%20County%20Woman's%20Suffrage%20Association%20papers/field/collec/mode/exact/conn/and

🎼🎻  In 1981, this baton and case were presented to Maurice Abravanel, music director and conductor of the Utah Symphony ...
08/08/2020

🎼🎻 In 1981, this baton and case were presented to Maurice Abravanel, music director and conductor of the Utah Symphony from 1947 to 1979. The baton itself represents the Gold Baton Award, which is the most prestigious honor a music director can receive from the League of American Orchestras.

Maurice Abravanel first started with the Utah Symphony Orchestra in 1947 when it was a part-time community ensemble. Prior to coming to Utah, Abravanel established a prominent reputation in music between Europe and the United States. He conducted his first orchestra in Switzerland at the age of sixteen, and from the 1920s through the 1940s he earned highly-esteemed positions leading music ensembles like the Berlin State Opera in Germany, the Paris State Opera House in France, and New York's Metropolitan Opera. Sporting an internationally renown reputation, Abravanel's arrival in Salt Lake City in 1947 to lead the Utah Symphony was well reported in newspapers across the area. In his first season as maestro, Abravanel managed to get ten of the orchestra's concerts broadcasted live, and the following year brought the ensemble to NBC's "Orchestras of the Nation" radio series for the first time. He went on to organize four major international tours for the group, the first beginning in 1966 with concerts in New York's Carnegie Hall and Athens' Herod Atticus Amphitheater at the base of the Acropolis. Aside from the international travel, Abravanel recurringly made a point to recognize Utah's local interests. He had a love for bringing music to people who didn't always have access to symphony concerts, particularly in rural areas, and he insisted on personally presiding over the orchestra's many secondary school concerts. He also included musical pieces written by Utah composers like Leroy J. Robertson and Crawford Gates in the group's performances all around the world.

Artifact no. 1994-009-014

Please feel free to contact the Research Center with any Utah history related questions. We're happy to assist you, and it's free!

http://heritage.utah.gov/history/library-collections-history

This is a BetterDay2020 Dispatch: Keeping to social distancing and wearing a face mask, slip into BYU's Lee Library's ma...
08/08/2020

This is a BetterDay2020 Dispatch: Keeping to social distancing and wearing a face mask, slip into BYU's Lee Library's main entry exhibition area, and soak up this smallest yet possibly the most rewarding of all exhibits about Utah women and their fifty-year quest (1870-1920) for suffrage or the right to vote. The exhibit title is "Women Arise: A Utah Women's Suffrage History."

Due to COVID-19 this exhibit has been left up for the foreseeable future. Go see it before its taken down.

The exhibit has numerous cases that allow careful artifact study of such things as 1880-1890 Utah women clothing, original whole issues of 1870s Deseret News (describing the legislature's interest and passing of women suffrage in 1870), the masthead for the 1880-1883 Salt Lake City newspaper the "Anti-Polygamy Standard" with the motto "Let Every Man Have His Own Wife, and Let Every Women Have Her Own Husband --1 Corinthians 7:2), a handwritten letter and promotional campaign material written by Jennie A. Froiseth author of "The Women of Mormonism (1881) and editor of the "Anti-Polygamy Standard," materials from the Utah Woman Suffrage Association and dozens of other storytelling artifacts.

This is a BetterDays2020 Dispatch: How does Utah show up in the big story of women suffrage and the 19th Amendment in 20...
08/07/2020
Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote

This is a BetterDays2020 Dispatch: How does Utah show up in the big story of women suffrage and the 19th Amendment in 2020? Here is one example.

The National Archives's exhibit "Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote" remains unfortunately closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic; however, there is still much to learn with on-line components.

Thumb through the digital exhibits, select "How Did Women Win the 19th Amendment? Strategies for Suffrage," go to slide 7 entitled "Congress Disfranchises Utah Women," and read about how the US Congress disfranchised the voting rights for Utah women, which was granted them in 1870.

In 1887 the right to vote by Utah Territory women was taken away because, as the US Congress reasoned, women in plural marriages in the 1880s, would not be able to vote independently of their polygamy husbands.

Celebrate the 19th Amendment’s centennial and discover the diverse struggle for women's voting rights throughout American history.

This is a BetterDays2020 dispatch: Join us in attending various National Archives virtual events in August regarding Wom...
08/06/2020
19th Amendment Centennial Events

This is a BetterDays2020 dispatch: Join us in attending various National Archives virtual events in August regarding Women Suffrage and the 19th Amendment.

As all US citizens prepare to vote on Nov. 3rd, consider how the ability to vote--which is fundamental to the enjoyment of full citizenship--was long denied to American women. Aug. 18, 2020 will be the one hundred anniversary for the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which prohibited any state from denying the vote on the basis of sex.

Join in, watch and listen, to programming in partnership with numerous presidential libraries and museums, the National Constitution Center, the nationwide Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission and the National Archives Foundation. Subject include "Betty Ford and the Equal Rights Amendment" and authors Rebecca Roberts and Lucinda Robb, previewing their book, "The Suffragist Playbook: Your Guide to Changing the World," and finally family programming featuring a conversation with Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, and Alice Paul as portrayed by with American Historical Theater interpreters.

🏍️🚗🚚  27 West 400 South, Salt Lake CityAugust 5th, 1916Shipler Commercial Photographers CollectionMSS C 275Photo nos. 16...
08/06/2020

🏍️🚗🚚 27 West 400 South, Salt Lake City
August 5th, 1916

Shipler Commercial Photographers Collection
MSS C 275
Photo nos. 16347, 16346
Glass plate negatives

https://bit.ly/2XhMj4P

Do you like to learn about prehistoric rock imagery?Of course you do.You should join us Aug 26th at noon for a presentat...
08/04/2020

Do you like to learn about prehistoric rock imagery?

Of course you do.

You should join us Aug 26th at noon for a presentation on Newspaper Rock!

https://bit.ly/33mdPRH or at the Utah SHPO Facebook Event page!

📜✏️📂  New manuscript collection!Copperton Study Guild Records, 1945-20021.75 linear feet (4 boxes)MSS B 2027The collecti...
08/01/2020

📜✏️📂 New manuscript collection!

Copperton Study Guild Records, 1945-2002
1.75 linear feet (4 boxes)
MSS B 2027

The collection contains correspondence, constitutions and by-laws, minutes and records, programs, photographs, and scrapbooks related to the Copperton Study Guild.

Finding aid: https://bit.ly/2XfiSQ8

Copperton was built as a model mining town for employees of the Utah Copper Company when Bingham became overcrowded.

Photo info: https://bit.ly/30iNX7n

07/31/2020

How has America’s ideal to have universal franchise or voting for all Americans (and Utahns) evolved in history? Join in and participate in this USU History Dept. symposium to find out.

Need a little inspiration? In honor of the Americans with Disabilities Act's 30th anniversary, here are a few artifacts ...
07/30/2020

Need a little inspiration? In honor of the Americans with Disabilities Act's 30th anniversary, here are a few artifacts from the spectacular Utah-hosted 2002 Paralympic Winter Games. With the theme “Awaken the Mind – Free the Body – Inspire the Spirit,” the 2002 games were the first Winter Paralympics held in the Americas. 415 athletes competed representing 36 countries.

Never say never!

From our Olympic Legacy collection:

Pennant 2002-023-006
Pin 2002-056-035
Cowbell 2002-063-003
Poster 2002-020-037

For more information, please contact the Research Center
https://bit.ly/2XhMj4P

"When you are visiting archaeological or historical sites, or even looking at the architecture and images in your built ...
07/28/2020
Why the Whiteness of Archaeology Is a Problem

"When you are visiting archaeological or historical sites, or even looking at the architecture and images in your built environment, ask yourself: Who and what is foregrounded here? What, and who, is missing from this story?"

I'm an archaeologist, though a lot of people reading this post may not be. We have a crisis of diversity in archaeology that extends back centuries to the very roots of our discipline. As students of history, we all can understand the influence that has over us, and our discipline is working hard to wrestle that influence to the ground and open our hearts. I'd love it if you could help us grow in this regard, here's how:

- find one community organization that works within communities of color to build historical/archaeological information, then join it
- read a new article about anti-racism in archaeology and history. The one below is a great place to start!
- share this challenge with a colleague or friend. (Copy and paste if you want to, or just kindly pass along these ideas)

Archaeology remains a profession with an overwhelmingly white workforce. Two archaeologists ask why that matters and what can be done about it.

These Utah Sales Tax Tokens once belonged to John Niezgoda, a Civilian Conservation Corps enrollee in the late 1930s, wh...
07/25/2020

These Utah Sales Tax Tokens once belonged to John Niezgoda, a Civilian Conservation Corps enrollee in the late 1930s, who worked at the Leeds Camp in Washington County, Utah.

Tax tokens were first introduced to Utahns in 1937, four years after the first state sales tax legislation was enacted as a response to the hardships of the Great Depression.The tokens were fractional cent devices used by consumers to pay taxes on price totals that added up to less than fifty cents. Revenues that were collected from this sales tax were deposited into an Emergency Relief Fund for the state.

Artifact no. 2005-011-005

For more information, please contact the Research Center

https://bit.ly/2XhMj4P

🏡 ---🗽    Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Company Pioneer Day Parade float parked in front of the Evans funeral ...
07/23/2020

🏡 ---🗽 Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Company Pioneer Day Parade float parked in front of the Evans funeral home on 48 South State Street, Salt Lake City, July 24, 1915.
Shipler Commercial Photographers Collection
MSS C 275, photo number 16324

https://bit.ly/2XhMj4P

📐🛠️ 🚧  Utah Gas and Coke Company steam-powered trench digging machine on a Salt Lake City street, July 17th, 1906.Shiple...
07/18/2020

📐🛠️ 🚧 Utah Gas and Coke Company steam-powered trench digging machine on a Salt Lake City street, July 17th, 1906.

Shipler Commercial Photographers Collection
Glass plate negative no. 02239

https://bit.ly/2XhMj4P

👒 🕶  This hat is from the Alice Merrill Horne hat collection. Horne was one of the first female politicians in Utah and ...
07/16/2020

👒 🕶 This hat is from the Alice Merrill Horne hat collection. Horne was one of the first female politicians in Utah and an advocate for the arts. Born in 1868 in Fillmore, Utah and called a “civic visionary” and “cultural mover,” Horne’s legislative efforts in early Utah included fighting for cleaner air, preserving the Eagle Gate over State Street, and securing and creating the first state-sponsored art institute in the United States - now the Utah Arts Council, part of the Utah Division of Arts & Museums.

Artifact collection 2016-002-019

For more information, please contact the Research Center
https://history.utah.gov/library-collections/

"An Act in relation to Service" was an attempt to compromise between three contradictory goals: abolish the status of ‘s...
07/14/2020
The True Policy for Utah: Servitude, Slavery, and "An Act in Relation to Service" - Issuu

"An Act in relation to Service" was an attempt to compromise between three contradictory goals: abolish the status of ‘slave’, honor property rights of Southern slaveholders who brought their slaves to Utah, and to uphold the appearance of neutrality towards slavery in order to strengthen the bid for statehood. Read about the policy here >

On February 4, 1852, the first annual session of the Utah Territorial Legislature passed a law entitled "An Act in Relation to Service." Although this statute was little noted outside of Utah, it quietly took part in a dispute which was nudging the United States ever closer toward a bloody civil war...

Boxers Charles Redfoot, Elwin Duchesne, David Torchcloud, Glenn Appawoo, and Charles Queacut, February 11th, 1954.Salt L...
07/11/2020

Boxers Charles Redfoot, Elwin Duchesne, David Torchcloud, Glenn Appawoo, and Charles Queacut, February 11th, 1954.

Salt Lake Tribune Negative Collection, MSS C 400
photo no. 23607

Please contact the Research Center with any questions or research assistance needs
https://bit.ly/2XhMj4P

07/09/2020
What's in the basement? 1920s bathing suits

🎪🏖️🏊 Are you watching the @fox13 news series What's in the Basement? SOOOO fun!

https://bit.ly/3edgleX

Pieces of Utah's past are stored in the basement of the Rio Grande Train Station in Salt Lake City. Today, we're taking a look at some men's and women's bath...

Utah Public Archaeology Network has their monthly newsletter out! Check it out at the link below, and if you like what y...
07/07/2020
April's Public Archaeology Newsletter is out now!

Utah Public Archaeology Network has their monthly newsletter out! Check it out at the link below, and if you like what you see be sure to sign up to get it in your inbox!

Explore Utah's archaeology online and across the state... while staying 6 feet apart, of course!

🏯 🎠🎡  Crowd at Saltair on July 4th, 1913. Shipler Commercial Photographers Collection, #14865.
07/04/2020

🏯 🎠🎡 Crowd at Saltair on July 4th, 1913.

Shipler Commercial Photographers Collection, #14865.

Enjoy some contempo LGBTQIA Utah history. With the 51st anniversary of the NYC Stonewall Riots (June 28-July 03), DHA "S...
07/03/2020
Speaking About Utah’s LGBTQ+ History | Utah Department of Heritage & Arts

Enjoy some contempo LGBTQIA Utah history. With the 51st anniversary of the NYC Stonewall Riots (June 28-July 03), DHA "Speak Your Piece" host Brad Westwood interviews historian J. Seth Anderson, about the fascinating and diverse stories of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning, intersex, and asexual or allied communities in Salt Lake City, Utah and beyond. A 2nd 35 min. podcast with Seth will be released July 6.

🍊 🍒 🍅 Utah Canners Association exhibit, July 2, 1938.Clifton L. Bray Photograph Collection, 1933-1938MSS C 321 Box 22, N...
07/02/2020

🍊 🍒 🍅 Utah Canners Association exhibit, July 2, 1938.
Clifton L. Bray Photograph Collection, 1933-1938
MSS C 321 Box 22, No. 1245

Please contact the Research Center for more information
https://bit.ly/2XhMj4P

In the late 19th century, Samuel Davidson Chambers and his wife Amanda Leggroan began farming and growing fruit in Salt ...
06/30/2020

In the late 19th century, Samuel Davidson Chambers and his wife Amanda Leggroan began farming and growing fruit in Salt Lake City’s Eigth Ward. Eventually settling in the Mill Creek area, the pair cultivated small fruits - currants, grapes, cherries, and gooseberries among others - that won prizes at local fairs. Learn more about their journey here > https://bit.ly/2BQ3AJx

Address

300 S Rio Grande St
Salt Lake City, UT
84101

General information

State History serves a lot of different folks! We serve cultural resource management companies, heritage trade industries, building owners and developers, media, professional researchers and genealogists, heritage tourism businesses,educators, federal and state agencies, cities and counties seeking to develop heritage resources, and of course, the general public. We provide all services and information as a non-regulatory, business-friendly agency. The Department of Heritage and Arts encourages open and civil discussion. Any comments that are disrespectful, offensive, denigrating of others or defamatory will be rejected and removed. All comments are subject to the Utah Government Records Access and Management Act.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(801) 245-7225

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State History's mission is to preserve and share Utah's past for present and future generations.

We are an organization of historical resources composed of Utah's State Historic Preservation Office (UT-SHPO - which includes the Office of Archaeology & Antiquities and Utah's Historic Preservation Office), the Utah Historical Quarterly, the Utah State Historical Society, Library & Collections (publications, photographs, archives, artifacts, etc.), Utah History Day Program and a group of Utah history related online resources and databases.

Nearby museums


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Did anyone on here ever know Harold and Mary Osborne. Harold was a WW1 vet, and also raised a certain breed of dog, I can't remember. I used to clean house for them in the early 80's and I would love to have a picture of them, they were good people❤️ They lived somewhere on the east side of town
Our founding document. Today we commemorate our historic founding by the county court, July 21, 1874. Though today we are known as the Magna Township, our original name was Pleasant Green. Few know of our rich pioneer history three generations before industry came along. Mark this day on your calendars and keep it marked for the years that come, because this is our day. --Photo by Robert Goble
https://www.facebook.com/groups/2797690810465115 Come join our movement as we promote unity in the community, respect and a conversation. We can disagree on lots of things, but we can't give up on our brothers and sisters. WE GOT YOUR B.A.C.K. WE ARE BELIEVERS IN ACCOUNTABILITY, COMMUNITY, & KINDNESS.
Salt Lake City and the 1918 Influenza Pandemic: A Lone Voice Warns that the Vaccine Proposed to be Used by Utah is Ineffective. https://www.facebook.com/kafper/posts/2681135898879154 Images: Left: Medical Student Lewis W. Oaks. Right: Salt Lake City Health Commissioner Samuel G. Paul. Summary of Article: On December 18, 1918 during the 1918 Influenza Pandemic, the Utah State Board of Health and the Salt Lake City Board of Health started a free inoculation program using the new Rosenow vaccine. In a national conference of the American Public Health Association in Chicago during Dec. 9 to Dec. 13, 1918, the Rosenow vaccine was not recommended for general public distribution because it was found to be infective. In the small-town eastern Utah newspaper, the Vernal Express, a balancing voice was heard. A telegram from medical student Lewis W. Oaks (pictured above), originally from Vernal, Utah, and who was then working in the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia warned against the new Rosenow vaccine. Oaks had received two copies of his hometown Vernal paper in the mail in which influenza vaccines had been highly praised. Philadelphia was one of the worst hit cities in the country, over 12,000 died in six weeks, and after working through the peak of that city's influenza outbreak, Lewis paused and composed a lengthy telegram to warn the people that he grew up with of the false hope that the Rosenow vaccine held.
Salt Lake City’s Great Mask Debate of November 29, 1918 by Kurt A. Fisher https://www.facebook.com/kafper/posts/2681097392216338 and References to "Salt Lake City's Great Mask Debate of November 29, 1918" https://www.facebook.com/kafper/posts/2681099028882841 (Right-click to open in a new tab.) In order to better understand Utah's experience of the current Covid-19 pandemic, I have written a historical retrospective of Salt Lake City's experience of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic with respect to voluntary or mandatory mask wearing. In November and December 1918, Salt Lake City public health officials struggled with the issue of mask wearing should be voluntary or mandatory. Initially there was an inadequate supply of masks during the initial period of both the 1918 and 2020 outbreaks. Otherwise, the physical differences between mask materials in 1918 and 2020 and the general improvement of sanitation make for weak parallels between the two pandemics. Salt Lake City’s 1918 use of mask wearing guidance changed as more scientific and experiential information became available. In both 1918 and 2020, social messaging by appeal to community good was employed by public health officers. Significant opposition from hyper-individualists did not occur in Salt Lake City in 1918, but business resistance to closures was substantial both in 1918 and 2020. To enjoy the historical experience, I recommend that you open a second copy of the References section in your browser. Scroll down the References section, which is organized primary in date order, as you read the main text and then you can click on the hyperlinked newspaper articles of 1918 and get a sense of how Salt Lake City residents of that era saw events unfold. Please send any corrections to me be Facebook message and post criticisms in response to this post. ------------ TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction II. Utah State Health Commissioner Dr. Beatty Considers a Statewide Mask Wearing Order. Business Pushes Back - October 26, 1918. . III. New Flu Cases Reach a New Peak - November 17, 1918. IV. In Response, Business Interests Back New Controls Including Limited Mask Wearing - November 19, 1918. V. The Salt Lake City Commission Proposes a Mask Wearing Ordinance and this Leads to The Great Mask Debate - November 29, 1918. VI. Surrounding Smaller Cities and Counties Attempt to Quarantine Salt Lake City - December 4, 1918. VII. The State Health Board and Salt Lake City Force an Early Reopening of the State's Economy - December 7, 1918. VIII. Dr. Beatty Uses State Preemption Doctrine to Override the Surrounding Communities' Quarantine of Salt Lake City - December 9, 1918. IX. Dr. Beatty's Decision to not Mandate General Public Mask Wearing was Science and Data-Driven. X. In 1918 and 2020, Public Health Officers use Appeal to Community Good to Message Voluntary Compliance. XI. The Role of Voluntary Guidelines vs. Mandatory Orders during the 1918 Influenza Pandemic and the 2020 Covid-19 Pandemic. XII. Opposition to Mask Wearing in 1918 and 2020. References A. Newspaper and Journal Articles 1918-1930 - Date Order B. Newspaper Articles 2019-2020 - Date Order C. Other References - Author Order ------------ Image Credit: Salt Lake Telegram. October 18, 1918. Newsies Don New Gauze Masks to Ward off Flu Strident Tones Not Silenced by Covered Mouth Telegram Army Photographed in Sanitary Attire. Salt Lake Telegram. https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s60g8vpp
Because of its size (9' x 5') I have not been able to get a museum or historical society to accept this flag as a gift. SO I have displayed it now in my own home. It dates back probably to the Mormon Battalion and was the first American flag in the Utah area. There was a beehive first painted on and then an eagle was painted over that. John Smith, oldest son of Hyrum Smith, was the flag bearer in the 1800s. He is on his horse here with the flag.
This group may be a interest here. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1440353432815693/
Does anyone remember this train collision near Salina, Utah near Highway 89 in 1962? I am looking for a personal connection.
SLC, Utah 1950
Greetings! I'm hoping you can provide more context for a photograph that it looks like the Utah State Historical Society has in its possession. In the slideshow at this link (https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10215748167954178&set=a.1632370086126&type=3&eid=ARCErkPeHL6IenlGJssAS3_kcqeVh3EcQA1hBsQljQUuojF6gIjfWcU_m3ufWZh2QVXRoiO6Y8AI7oQ_), it's the 3rd picture, which is described as follows: "Uidentified child, probably at Castle Gate. Finlander--9 years old. He worked in the Castle Gate Mine near the turn of the century. He carried explosives and searched for "Bad Air" and cleaned entries from animal debris and loose coal." I'm puzzled by the pickaxe he's standing with that seems far too large for him to employ, and the pipe that seems to be empty. I know there were children working in mines in awful conditions at that time, but this picture strikes me as odd. Is this a child worker who's been put in the 'costume' of an adult laborer by a photographer or do the pickaxe and pipe actually belong to this child? I realize, having worked in archives myself, that the answer may well be that you don't know, but I'm very interested in any further details you may have. Thanks so much!
During the coming year (2020), Utahns and the nation will be remembering and recognizing the end of World War II (1939-1945). Now and in the coming year, we urge that you visit Utah's World War II related sites, scattered across the state. Please visit one or more of the memorials and monuments, museums, and site of conscience shared below. 2020 has two very important WWII history related dates: May 8, 2020, 75th anniversary of V-E Day (Victory in Europe) and September 2, 2020, 75th anniversary of V-J Day (Victory over Japan).
This beautiful landmark, the Utah Theater, is slated to be torn down. It is important that the citizens of Salt Lake City and Utah not let this happen. Please sign this petition http://chng.it/2y6YVJNDTD and let the Salt Lake Mayor know that you want this beautiful building saved and restored.