Minnesota Historical Society Press

Minnesota Historical Society Press Check out our blog at http://discussions.mnhs.org/10000books/ On Twitter @MNHSPress

Minnesota Historical Society Press publishes books on the history, art, and culture of the Upper Midwest. Founded in 1859, it is the oldest publisher in the state and the largest historical society press in the country. We seek to publish books for a broad audience of general readers and specialists. Understanding that where we come from is crucial to who we are, the press publishes books that explore the importance of place in this rich and varied region we call home. Borealis Books, the national trade imprint of Minnesota Historical Society Press, strives to publish works of enduring value that illuminate our shared quest for identity, place, and heritage. A lively magazine about the history of the state and the Upper Midwest, Minnesota History features well-researched, engaging articles on fresh topics ranging from the early jazz scene in Minneapolis and a historic high-school basketball “dream team” to rural school consolidation and the birth of civil rights in Minnesota.

MNopedia: "Race and Policing in the Twin Cities"
05/27/2020

MNopedia: "Race and Policing in the Twin Cities"

From MNopedia: The history of law enforcement in the Twin Cities, as in the rest of the United States, has been deeply influenced by race. Since the early twentieth century, many Minnesotans of color have responded to racial targeting and police brutality by forming community organizations and citizen patrols; others have served as officers themselves and grappled with racial inequality inside the police force. Image: St. Paul Police Deputy James S. Griffin, ca. 1960s. Minnesota Historical Society Photograph Collection. https://www.mnopedia.org/race-and-policing-twin-cities

From "People Like Us" by David Lawrence Grant in "A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota" edited by Sun Yung ShinM...
05/26/2020

From "People Like Us" by David Lawrence Grant
in "A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota" edited by Sun Yung Shin

Minnesota Not-Nice

"Anyone who has ever been in a difficult, complicated relationship knows that the opposite of love is not hate. It’s indifference. Neglect is indifference’s twin sister. And there is no such thing as benign neglect. Neglect is, in its truest meaning, a verb. And like twin horsemen of the apocalypse, Neglect and Indifference have teamed up to cause a lot of damage."

"The evidence of the damage is everywhere to be seen: failing schools; high concentrations of persistent poverty in failing neighborhoods; the egregious over-incarceration of people of color; an alarming number of annual incidents in which people of color are shot by the police or end up dead in police custody. How did things get so bad, even here?"

http://discussions.mnhs.org/10000books/2016/07/20/people-like-us-by-david-lawrence-grant/

05/26/2020
Bell Museum

ICYMI: "Secrets of the Loon" storytime and interviews with the author and photographer with our friends at the Bell Museum!

Secrets of the Loon Storytime - Grab a seat at home and settle in for this celebration of Minnesota’s state bird!

Take advantage of our History at Home E-book Sale! Select e-books are only $4.99 from your favorite e-book vendors. http...
05/22/2020

Take advantage of our History at Home E-book Sale! Select e-books are only $4.99 from your favorite e-book vendors. https://bit.ly/2Tw4X6m

And for an even deeper dive, check out "The Relentless Business of Treaties" by Martin Case at https://www.mnhs.org/mnhs...
05/20/2020

And for an even deeper dive, check out "The Relentless Business of Treaties" by Martin Case at https://www.mnhs.org/mnhspress/books/relentless-business-treaties
and Mni Sota Makoce by Gwen Westerman and Bruce White at https://www.mnhs.org/mnhspress/books/mni-sota-makoce

Today on #HumanitiesToGo we are featuring "Why Treaties Matter: Self-Government in the Dakota and Ojibwe Nations," This nationally recognized, award-winning exhibit was made in partnership with the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian.

Learn more and explore the virtual exhibit here: http://treatiesmatter.org/exhibit/
Be sure to check out the permanent exhibit at the state capitol post-epidemic!

On this day in 1857, Duluth was incorporated as a town. For more history on the ups and downs of this fascinating Minnes...
05/19/2020

On this day in 1857, Duluth was incorporated as a town. For more history on the ups and downs of this fascinating Minnesota city, check out Tony Dierckins' book, Duluth. https://bit.ly/2ZnxZbZ #Duluth

This is fantastic. Did you know we publish Dakota and Ojibwe language learning books? Our new book by Anton Treuer, "The...
05/19/2020
MPR News

This is fantastic. Did you know we publish Dakota and Ojibwe language learning books? Our new book by Anton Treuer, "The Language Warrior's Manifesto" details the importance of preserving indigenous languages. https://www.mnhs.org/mnhspress/books/2

These days, Dakota — the native language of the Prairie Island Indian Community — isn't widely spoken. But the tribe is trying to change that and the pandemic has offered them an unusual opportunity to do so: by bringing language classes online, they’ve been able to reach more members than ever before.

Thanks for the classroom connections, Michelle Heidenrich Barnes, Writer! Be sure to read the blog post to find out how ...
05/15/2020

Thanks for the classroom connections, Michelle Heidenrich Barnes, Writer! Be sure to read the blog post to find out how you can WIN a copy of "Secrets of the Loon" & for tips on how to integrate this versatile title into your lesson plans.

The #TodaysLittleDitty #classroom is back in session with Laura Purdie Salas! Find out how her latest rhyming picture book SECRETS OF THE LOON (@MNHSPress, 2020) can enhance your #distancelearning plans, and engage your #students with fun and #poetry. https://michellehbarnes.blogspot.com/2020/05/classroom-connections-with-laura-purdie.html #ClassroomConnections #TeachWrite #PoetryFriday

In recognition of Hmong American Day, our titles written by & about the Hmong in MN: https://shop.mnhs.org/collections/b...
05/14/2020
Books: Hmong in Minnesota – Minnesota Historical Society

In recognition of Hmong American Day, our titles written by & about the Hmong in MN: https://shop.mnhs.org/collections/books-hmong Which have you read & which one are you reading next?

Books: Hmong in Minnesota Sort by Featured Price: Low to High Price: High to Low A-Z Z-A Best Selling Browse by category All Ethnic Studies Hmong Master New Title People Of Minnesota Regional Bride Price, The: A Hmong Wedding Story $ 16.95 Staring Down ...

Last couple of days to stream Jim Northrup's "Rez Road 2000". Join the discussion with History Theatre and Pat Northrup ...
05/13/2020

Last couple of days to stream Jim Northrup's "Rez Road 2000". Join the discussion with History Theatre and Pat Northrup this Friday. Details below. For a brief bio of Jim, please read our recent MNopedia piece about him at https://www.mnopedia.org/person/northrup-james-warren-1943-2016

NEW EVENT!

Rez Road 2000 Afterthoughts Happy Hour - Friday, May 15, 7:30-8pm. Hosted by Ron Peluso with special guest: Pat Northrup

Free event; via zoom link.

Message us here or email [email protected] to RSVP and get the zoom link!

There's still time to watch Rez Road 2000 - Stream!
https://www.historytheatre.com/at-home/rez-road-2000

April showers have brought May flowers. What are the lilac blooms telling us? Invaluable tips for gardening by nature si...
05/13/2020
Northern Gardener

April showers have brought May flowers. What are the lilac blooms telling us? Invaluable tips for gardening by nature signs from Mary Lahr Schier’s “The Northern Gardener”: https://bit.ly/3bts5Zj

“As climate shifts, many gardeners have turned to nature signs to guide their planting decisions. Also called phenology, this practice involves watching for natural phenomena, such as bird migration and the leafing out of trees, to time planting. No doubt this approach is similar to how ancient people decided when to plant their crops. Most phenology practices are geared toward spring, which is when a false move can cause the most trouble in the garden. Not all the nature signs are completely practical, however. For instance, the advice to plant corn when the white oak leaves are the size of a squirrel’s ear requires more in-depth knowledge than most of us have about squirrel anatomy. Still, as we adjust to a climate that is variable and harsh to begin with, any tips from nature are welcome.

Here are a few phenology practices to consider.

-When crocuses bloom, remove the mulch on your strawberries.

-When yellow forsythia bloom, prune roses and fertilize the lawn.

-When leaves first emerge on lilacs, plant lettuce, beets, spinach, and other cool-weather crops.

-When the aspens have leafed out, plant pansies and other hardy annuals.

-When lilacs are in full bloom and the barn swallows return, set out your tomato plants and basil.

-When irises bloom, set out your squash and melon transplants.

-When the first dandelion blooms, plant potatoes.

-When dandelions go to seed, it’s time to plant petunias.

-When the spring peepers start to sing, plant peas.”

Gardening in a northern clime has its own unique set of challenges. Yet, despite the shorter growing season, gardening remains a popular passion for millions of green thumbs in Minnesota and the Upper Midwest. Northern gardeners can successfully grow a ...

Thanks to our friends over at Next Chapter Booksellers for hosting author Curt Brown this Thursday via Zoom! Sign up her...
05/12/2020

Thanks to our friends over at Next Chapter Booksellers for hosting author Curt Brown this Thursday via Zoom! Sign up here. #HistoryatHomeMN

1918 was a tough year, too, but Minnesota got through it. Hear how when Curt Brown talks about flu, fire, and war--Thursday, at 7pm.

Register now: https://bit.ly/2YGFhYc

Today is International Nurses Day & the end of National Nurses Week during Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. In rec...
05/12/2020
Woman's War, Too

Today is International Nurses Day & the end of National Nurses Week during Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. In recognition, we're sharing the story of Fumiye Yoshida, a Japanese American nurse who left the Minidoka internment camp for the nursing program at Saint Marys Hospital (Rochester, MN) in 1943, from Virginia Wright-Peterson's “A Woman’s War, Too”: https://bit.ly/2zzh8b

“Fumiye’s nursing class at Saint Marys included thirteen Nisei students. Fumiye was excited about the opportunity to get out of the camp and study at a well-known institution, but she was also nervous about her family’s reaction and expectations. . . . On January 21, 1943, when the camp ‘gates clanged behind [her] . . . [she] left with mixed feelings . . . elated on one hand to be rid of the morbid situation, disheartened at leaving [her] family behind, and then apprehensive, after all the negative propaganda, about what kind of reception awaited [her].’ She knew she ‘had to excel for [her] folks, for [herself], and for all people of Japanese ancestry.’

Fumiye arrived in Rochester by train and found her experience to be a silver lining in the dark cloud that had descended on her and her family. Rochester could be bitter cold in the winter, but the accommodations were good and the Japanese students were accepted by the staff, fellow students, and even patients from the Midwest, who were unused to seeing Asian people. Once as Fumiye cared for a patient, she felt the woman’s eyes following her around the room. In response, Fumiye slowed down and gave the woman time to get used to how she looked. Over the two weeks that the patient was hospitalized, Fumiye won her over with patience and by providing excellent care. At the time of her discharge, the woman extended an invitation to Fumiye to visit her in Iowa. Fumiye hoped this patient would tell others of her positive experience and help change attitudes toward Japanese Americans. Fumiye had to be tolerant. While she was helping organize newspapers spread across another woman’s bed, the patient asked her, ‘My dear, can you read?’ Fumiye responded to the woman’s racist comment by explaining that she would not be a nursing student if she could not read.

. . .

After three years of nursing training at Saint Marys, she graduated in May 1946 and returned to Tacoma, Washington, as a surgical nurse. Eleven other women from Minidoka Camp also became students at Saint Marys School of Nursing.”

Watch: History-at-Home Author Talk

05/11/2020
Minnesota Historical Society

Tune in at 3pm today for the MNHS Storytime with Molly Beth Griffin - Author Page!

Join author Molly Beth Griffin on a hike alongside Rhoda as she collects rock after rock, “red ones and blue ones and stripy ones,” from forest and river and lake, on a north woods adventure.

A video of Molly Beth reading Rhoda's Rock Hunt is launching via Facebook premiere at 3:00 pm on the Minnesota Historical Society's page.

The book's charming illustrations are by Jennifer A. Bell.

Happy Birthday Minnesota! Immerse yourself in the stories & histories that have shaped our state with "Creating Minnesot...
05/11/2020

Happy Birthday Minnesota! Immerse yourself in the stories & histories that have shaped our state with "Creating Minnesota: A History from the Inside Out": https://bit.ly/2YSi6Kp

Happy Statehood Day! On this date in 1858 Minnesota became the 32nd state.
This painted and embroidered Minnesota State Flag was handmade by the Fjelde Sisters of Minneapolis and presented to the 15th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, circa 1898.

Happy Mother's Day! Here we have a tale of "mother knows best" by MaiThao Xiong, excerpted from "Staring Down the Tiger"...
05/10/2020
Staring Down the Tiger

Happy Mother's Day! Here we have a tale of "mother knows best" by MaiThao Xiong, excerpted from "Staring Down the Tiger": https://bit.ly/2LcoqV0 To set the scene, imagine traveling as a group of eight family members . . .

. . .

"As we sat waiting, Mom pulled a lump of aluminum foil the size of a soccer ball from the plastic bag that she had stowed into her carry-on backpack. Slowly, she peeled back the layers of foil, revealing the center of the lump—a white, unchopped, full-sized, boiled chicken, seasoned in black pepper and salt. The aroma of moist meat permeated the arrival area.

'Nej puas noj?' 'Do you want to eat?' she asked loudly. Non-Hmong passengers arriving from baggage claim slowed down and cast glances toward the Hmong woman in a leopard-print blouse and black dress pants that clashed with tennis shoes and a fake leather cross-body purse, fat protruding like a pregnant woman’s belly, waving the naked chicken at our faces. Tall, smartly dressed men and women hurried away from our group of eight spread out across the floor, smelling like chicken. But Mom wasn’t concerned with anything but her chicken and the thought of feeding her children.

'Nej puas noj?' Mom asked again. We shook our heads, 'No,' to eating boiled chicken at the airport.

'Suit yourself,' Mom said. Her hands, wrinkled and calloused from too many hours in the garden, tore a leg from the chicken. A satisfying snap of the bones. She grinned. 'Mmm, so good.'

I don’t know why I felt self-conscious to eat Hmong food in that public space. I had learned to embrace my Hmong American identity, but I guess Denver was not like Minnesota, where most folks knew about Hmong people and our foods. Maybe it was the day—people had been staring at our group, the flight took longer than expected, it was 4 PM and we had not eaten since 10 AM, our ride was late, people were still staring at us. And there was Mom, who had casually packed a full boiled chicken for a two-hour flight.

Mom, whose own mother passed away when she was a young girl, took care of her siblings until she married. She, along with my father, was a slash-and-burn farmer with land and livestock in Laos but fled due to threats of Hmong genocide after the Vietnam War in 1975. She was pregnant with her first child at the time. Later, she came to America with my father, my five older sisters, and me in 1992. Whenever things went wrong, she relied on what she knew in order to survive a situation. She always packed boiled chicken to travel because that was the food she could rely on.

. . .

. . . The first leg found its way into the hands of Madelyn, who took it without a second thought. Another snap, and Mom shoved a leg into Adam’s palms. His teeth shredded the meat, lips smacking in satisfaction. Keeping her eyes on her children’s reactions, Mom said, 'I also brought kua txob,' producing a snack-size Ziploc bag packed with a red and yellow Thai pepper sauce that had been ground and seasoned with salt, lime juice, and fish sauce.

That was when we gave in."

AVAILABLE MARCH 2020

Happy #MothersDay weekend! For apropos reading, add "Riding Shotgun: Women Write About Their Mothers" to the top of your...
05/08/2020
Riding Shotgun

Happy #MothersDay weekend! For apropos reading, add "Riding Shotgun: Women Write About Their Mothers" to the top of your to-read stack: https://bit.ly/2LagMub

A group of America's celebrated literary women have come together to tackle a topic close to their hearts: Mom. These highly personal yet often universal stories offer windows into those influential mother-daughter moments that have forever shaped the l...

Ready for rhubarb season? We have a weekend recipe for ya from “Potluck Paradise,” our community cookbook of recipes fro...
05/08/2020
Potluck Paradise

Ready for rhubarb season? We have a weekend recipe for ya from “Potluck Paradise,” our community cookbook of recipes from the 1950s: https://bit.ly/35G4hQI Enjoy! 😋

Rhubarb Crunch

YIELD: 16 (2-INCH) SQUARES

1 cup white sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 cup water
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup sifted flour
¾ cup quick-cooking oats, not instant
1 cup brown sugar, firmly packed
1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ cup melted butter or shortening
4 cups rhubarb cut into ¼ inch dice

Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease an 8-inch square pan that is at least 3 inches deep. Put white sugar and cornstarch into a 2-quart saucepan and whisk together. Gradually add water and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until this sauce is thickened. Remove from heat, cool slightly and add vanilla. Combine flour, oats, brown sugar and cinnamon in a small mixing bowl. Slowly pour melted butter over the dry ingredients, stirring with a fork until well blended and crumbly. Pour half the crumb mixture into the bottom of the pan and press firmly. Sprinkle diced rhubarb over the top. Next, pour on the cooled sugar sauce, then sprinkle the remaining crumb mixture on top. Bake for 55 to 60 minutes. Top will be brown and the rhubarb will bubble around the sides. Cool for at least 30 minutes before serving. Cut into squares and serve warm or cold with whipped cream or ice cream.

Here is the book that answers the age-old question: What should I bring?

For #NationalNursesWeek, we're sharing the story of a group of MN nurses supporting each other after serving in Vietnam ...
05/07/2020
Sisterhood of War

For #NationalNursesWeek, we're sharing the story of a group of MN nurses supporting each other after serving in Vietnam from Kim Heikkila’s “Sisterhood of War": https://bit.ly/3drkuMm #ThankYouNurses, past and present!

“By the mid-1980s, Kay Bauer had been in military service in one form or another—as a student, as an active-duty Navy nurse, as a Reservist—for twenty-five years. After her tour in Vietnam, she had cared for war-wounded Marines at Quantico, recruited for the Navy Nurse Corps, gotten married and started a family, dealt with the aftermath of a bomb blast in the office building where she worked, been spurned by the Veterans of Foreign Wars, implemented a Tri-Service Nurses Program to coordinate nursing practice in the three military services, helped establish an advocacy group for women who had served their country (the Minnesota Association of Civilian and Veteran Women, or MACVW), and begun working on behalf of the project to build a memorial to women Vietnam veterans in Washington, D.C. . . . As she got to know other Vietnam nurses through her work with MACVW and the memorial project, she saw a need for them to talk about the war and its impact on their postwar lives. . . . Bauer continued to support the memorial but turned most of her attention to helping the nurses in ‘the here and now.’ And so she started a support group for nurses who had served in Vietnam.

It wasn’t easy. After meeting with these fellow nurses informally for some time and realizing that they needed the input of professionals, Bauer called the Minneapolis VA. The main VA directed her to the Post-Traumatic Stress Recovery unit, where she met Kay Ryan, a therapist whom many of the nurses I met now credit with rescuing them from the downward spiral of PTSD. Ryan told Bauer that a previous attempt to establish a women veterans’ PTSD group had failed but that she would offer whatever support she could if Bauer wanted to try it again.

. . .

One by one, the nurses drew each other in, convincing each new member that there was an alternative way of coping with postwar stress that involved neither silent suffering nor the task of trying to fit in with men’s groups. The group met weekly with Kay Ryan for ‘six or seven years,’ its membership varying from year to year, month to month. Some stayed for only a short while; some stayed for the duration. The group existed on the periphery of the main VA, associated with it but never clearly part of it. Bauer described it as a ‘dichotomy between the VA and the PTSD unit’ in which ‘you could never coalesce the two, and you could never travel from one to the other.’ Nevertheless, the group provided its members with a safe place to talk about their war experiences, the camaraderie of other women veterans, and the dedicated support of a skilled therapist. For Penny Kettlewell, the group was ‘an absolute lifeline’ and Kay Ryan an ‘angel in disguise.’”

In January 1966, navy nurse Lieutenant Kay Bauer stepped off a pan am airliner into the stifling heat of Saigon and was issued a camouflage uniform, boots, and a rifle. “What am I supposed to do with this?” she said of the weapon. “I'm a nurse.” Bauer w...

Address

345 Kellogg Blvd W
Saint Paul, MN
55102

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 20:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(651) 259-3200

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Comments

THANK U 4 KEEPIN HIM ALIVE IN OUR HEARTS
RIP Prince and rest well in Heaven💜💜
Hello, just a note to inform you of a 1905 photo album with lots of Ramsey County photos in it. Thank you
The Dakota War of 1862. America’s most forgotten Indian War. Hundreds of movies have been made about the battles between the troops of the US Army and the warriors of the Plains Indians but none were ever made about this war or these battles. The now bucolic countryside of southwestern Minnesota doesn’t seem to be a proper setting for an Indian War. How could anything heroic, or bloody, ever have happened there? Yet there was a war there. A bloody one. Over a hundred white soldiers were killed in action. Only the Battle of the Little Big Horn had more casualties. Hundreds of white settlers were killed, most of them murdered in cold blood. The number of Dakota Indians who died during the war is unknown, but those who died afterwards-executed in the biggest mass hanging in US history and confined in prison camps and forced onto wretched reservations, runs well into the hundreds. Much blood was spilled, both white and red, still little note has been taken of the carnage. Indian Blood is one modern man’s search for the truth behind stories his Great Aunt told him about “The Uprising” when he was a child. A search for his ancestors. Ancestors whose lives were intertwined with the Dakota War. Though he didn’t know that when he began searching. His search spans more than 30 years. It takes him along a winding frustrating path with many dead ends and detours. Some of his childish questions are answered, but for each question answered a new more vexing question is raised. He needs a lot of help to find the truth. Murder and blood are at the source of that truth. But finding that bloody truth is not enough. He must do something about that long-hidden truth once he has found it. Search “Indian Blood”, including parentheses, on Amazon and you’ll find out the whole story.
I'm thrilled that Minnesota Historical Society Press will b publishing "Prince - Before The Rain" with the iconic Prince photography by Allen Beaulieu. I can't wait 2 get my hands on the book with 224 pages of awesomeness!
Who do I speak with about this rare cabinet photo of a white male and white female being carried in sedan chairs, note the address in the right corner..
Thank you Sharon Anderson!!!
Just read Larry Millett's article on Castle Rock. My photo shows the before & after. On the back is written "Castle Rock, Dakota Co. Minn. Before and after the storm of 1899." Mr. Millett's date for the storm of 1920 perhaps is off by a couple of decades.