Albany Historical Society

Albany Historical Society Museum in Northeast Kansas, about 2 miles north of Sabetha. Early American town on the Underground Railroad. Original Rock school and many other building

Thanks to the Friendly Indian and Pilgrim Albany's trunk or treat was successful.
10/31/2019

Thanks to the Friendly Indian and Pilgrim Albany's trunk or treat was successful.

Albany Museum
10/18/2019

Albany Museum

Albany Museum is hosting workshops on November 23rd! NE Kansas Heritage and Folk School Presents: Introduction to Blacksmithing & Fiber Processing and Hand Spinning. All proceeds will fund improvements at Albany Museum.

If you would like to attend any of the three workshops on November 23, Click the link below and fill out the form to register.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfPIFOkTsH7J7MBmzQsIJMIGAkT3GhMwxle5x_QU5D7bVlHMA/viewform?usp=sf_link

If you have any questions, please send an email to [email protected]
Crafts

09/11/2019
09/09/2019

Grinding apples with a steam engine at Albany Days

09/08/2019

FOUND: Wallet with no ID in it. Please contact Alan or Colleen Meyer at 785-285-0025 or 0026. Wallet was found near the Rock School on Saturday, September 7th.

09/08/2019

Thank You to Everyone who came and helped make Albany Days an success for 2019.

2019 Albany Volunteer Workers
09/03/2019
2019 Albany Volunteer Workers

2019 Albany Volunteer Workers

SignUp.com makes it easy to coordinate school events & classroom activities, fundraisers, snack schedules, potlucks & more!

Albany Museum
09/03/2019

Albany Museum

Oil field pump engine is set in place

Airplane built near Bern Kansas
08/14/2019

Airplane built near Bern Kansas

Airplane built near Bern Kansas

Saturday 7/27/2019
07/30/2019

Saturday 7/27/2019

07/17/2019
Albany Museum

Albany Museum

A large cottonwood log is slabbed in preparation for cutting 1X12 siding boards. Don Harvey of Bern Kansas is at the controls. The bottom side has already been slabbed; once all four sides are cut the right dimensions, the boards will be cut off very quickly. The sawmill runs both days of Old Albany Days in September.

Albany Museum
07/17/2019

Albany Museum

After the oats were cut, the Albany crew worked hard in the sawmill all afternoon, making siding boards for the new barn that is coming along well. We hope to have all the siding on before the show.

07/17/2019
Albany Museum

Albany Museum

Paul Huffman on the Binder, and Don Harvey driving the WC Allis make short work of the oat crop Saturday morning. The oats will dry for at least a week and then it will be time to load them on racks and store them until Old Albany Days, September 7th and 8th.

Albany Museum
07/17/2019

Albany Museum

The oats are cut and shocked; the Albany volunteers had a busy Saturday morning preparing the oats to be threshed at Old Albany Days in September.

Albany Museum
07/05/2019

Albany Museum

Old Albany Days Show Bills are here! Share with your friends and we will see you in September!

05/11/2019
05/11/2019
It's alive! Lucy is back together with a rebuilt motor.
05/04/2019

It's alive! Lucy is back together with a rebuilt motor.

New pulling track under construction
04/07/2019

New pulling track under construction

Albany Bake sale at Orscheln starting at 8:30
12/08/2018

Albany Bake sale at Orscheln starting at 8:30

Photos from Albany Historical Society's post
10/13/2018

Photos from Albany Historical Society's post

Albany Museum
08/15/2018

Albany Museum

The show is coming up soon! Preparations are being made, you don't want to miss this!

08/09/2018
Albany Museum

Albany Museum

Dry Times in Kansas: Part III
Submitted by Travis McCoy
The garden flourishes in the warm sunlight with large green beans, ripening crimson tomatoes, and long ears of sweet corn with whiskery silk shooting from their tops. The ground is cool and damp with water, a scarce commodity until now. Muddy footprints and muddy feet are signs of a little girl’s hard work in the garden, keeping the weeds at bay and the fresh vegetables in an ever-filling basket.
Our “giant” windmill towers above the little farmyard and hums along happily. Fresh clean water flows abundantly into the little wooden tank as the pump rod moves up and down in its metronomic beat. The girl is kept busy hauling buckets of this wonderful water up to the garden and making sure the plants are kept happy. When the cows arrive after their nap, the scene becomes competitive as they begin slurping up the water as fast as it comes pouring out.
As the cows drink, the tank begins to empty. Water has stopped flowing from the pipe, and a whining metallic creak can be heard above at the head of the windmill. The wheel freezes in place, and the pump rod has stopped its constant beat. The breeze has stopped, making the air warm and muggy once again.
Cicadas and grasshoppers can be heard chuckling among themselves as the little girl trots along to the woodshed where a strange wheeled machine is parked under the lean-to. Papa stops splitting firewood and helps to push the contraption up to the windmill, with his daughter at the helm, pulling and steering the tiny cart.
An incentive to buy the windmill; the strange contraption, called a “gasoline engine” was included to be used on a trial basis for 30 days. Papa is still on the fence about whether to purchase such a costly and complicated little machine. In a few short minutes the pump rod is disconnected from the motionless windmill, and the pumpjack is connected. A long belt that resembles a looped ribbon links the pumpjack to the little engine.
“Can I start it Papa?” The little girl asks as she gazes at the bright paint and the shiny spoked wheels of the engine. Papa nods but remains watchful for any trouble. The switch to the batteries is pulled, fuel valve opened, and with a short “flip” of the flywheels, the little contraption begins to snort and pop merrily. The engine fires with a crack, then breathes and coasts as the belt and pumpjack start turning. A small puff of smoke can be seen occasionally with the pop of the exhaust.
At the other end of the belt, the pumpjack is turning, the gears meshing and the arms raising and falling with the sucker rod. The water returns, bubbling and gushing as if it had never been absent. The tank fills up again and the thirsty cows come back to drink some more.

I hope you enjoyed this final part of Dry Times in Kansas. Join us at Old Albany Days on September 8th and 9th and check us out on facebook.com/AlbanyMuseum. We will be sharing The Story of Water on the American Frontier with everyone. Thank you!

Albany Museum
08/02/2018

Albany Museum

Albany Drink Shack

Photos from Albany Historical Society's post
08/01/2018

Photos from Albany Historical Society's post

Photos from Albany Historical Society's post
08/01/2018

Photos from Albany Historical Society's post

Albany Museum
07/29/2018

Albany Museum

The 2018 Fliers are Here! Hope to be posting them at businesses soon!

Albany Museum
07/26/2018

Albany Museum

Dry Times in Kansas
Submitted by Travis McCoy

The creek is dry and showing its muddy bed only in the lowest spots as the hot July sun reaches out with its warm fingers of light, vaporizing what was once wet and dry baking the soil, plants, and animals left behind. The once green, lush grasses of the fields have turned brown in the hot dry air, and for once, even the weeds seem to be struggling for survival. Great cracks have opened in the dark brown soil, as if threating to swallow up features of this world and send them into the depths below.
Something must be done if the farm is to survive this arduous drought. The stock cattle need water, as do the horses, hogs, and chickens. The vegetables in the garden that will ensure plenty of food for the long winter must have water as well. Some of the livestock had to be sold last week due to limited forage in the pasture, and a paltry hay crop was gathered that has left the hay mow only half full. In trying times like this, the determined, stubborn, and tenacious will of the farm family shines through.
A spade, bucket, and rope are brought up from the barn and the digging begins. Grandfather used a forked green willow branch to “divine” where the water might be, and so marked the spot before dirt was disturbed. The going is strenuously difficult, and often a pickaxe is needed to cut through the hard soil and dried roots as the hole begins to drop deeper and deeper into the parched earth. Eventually the hole reaches 20 feet in depth, and while damp, water has not been found. A week of back-breaking work yields no more than some mud in the bottom of a seemingly bottomless hole.
As the next day dawns and chores are completed, a curious young girl peers over the edge of the hole and drops in a small dirt clod. A splash is heard echoing back as the little girl stands up and runs whooping with joy to find her mother and father. “Water in the hole! Water!” She screams in delight as mother and father come to investigate the commotion. The casing of the well begins in earnest, so as to keep the earthen walls from caving in.

I hope you enjoyed this 1st part of a short story about dry times on the frontier. It seems remarkable to me that even a century or more later, the sobering truth of a drought in farm country is no less worrisome.
We are celebrating the discovery and utilization of Water on the American Frontier at the 52nd Annual Old Albany Days. Windmills, pumps, drilling rigs, and the like are all part of the show. Come join us September 8th and 9th at the Albany Museum.
This article was published in the 7-25-18 edition of the Sabetha Herald Newspaper.

05/29/2018
Albany Museum

Albany Museum

Memorial Day at Albany, Spending the day removing the separators and tractors from the Ackerman building. Cleaning out the dust and relaying crushed rock on the west side. The Port Huron Steam engine saw the daylight and got a bath for the first time in many years. Reminder to all who would be interested, we have work night every Tuesday evening and open every weekend from now until show time from 2 to 5.

A couple of pictures from the work day.
03/13/2018

A couple of pictures from the work day.

Albany Museum
12/13/2017

Albany Museum

Looking for an easy way to check some names off your shopping list for the holiday? Come to the Albany Historical Society Bake Sale this Saturday starting at 8:00 AM!

Albany Historical Society's cover photo
09/11/2017

Albany Historical Society's cover photo

Camping spots available
08/14/2017
Albany Museum

Camping spots available

Our mission is to preserve our local history: Early KS settlements, agricultural history, railroads, trails, small towns, history of NE KS communities.

02/27/2017

The funds collected are going to be used for new landscaping around several buildings on the Albany grounds.

02/27/2017

Thank You!!! To any and all that helped make our 1st chilli and cinnamon roll cook-off a success!

Photos from Albany Historical Society's post
02/25/2017

Photos from Albany Historical Society's post

Team Pierson
02/25/2017

Team Pierson

Albany Historical Society's cover photo
02/06/2017

Albany Historical Society's cover photo

Albany Historical Society's cover photo
02/06/2017

Albany Historical Society's cover photo

Address

415 Grant St
Sabetha, KS
66534

Opening Hours

Saturday 14:00 - 17:00
Sunday 14:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(785) 285-0025

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