Albany Museum

Albany Museum Our mission is to preserve our local history: Early KS settlements, agricultural history, railroads, trails, small towns, history of NE KS communities.
(11)

Albany Museum is hosting workshops on November 23rd!  NE Kansas Heritage and Folk School Presents: Introduction to Black...
10/17/2019

Albany Museum is hosting workshops on November 23rd! NE Kansas Heritage and Folk School Presents: Introduction to Blacksmithing & Fiber Processing and Hand Spinning. All proceeds will fund improvements at Albany Museum.

If you would like to attend any of the three workshops on November 23, Click the link below and fill out the form to register.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfPIFOkTsH7J7MBmzQsIJMIGAkT3GhMwxle5x_QU5D7bVlHMA/viewform?usp=sf_link

If you have any questions, please send an email to [email protected]
Crafts

09/08/2019
Albany Historical Society

Albany Historical Society

Thank You to Everyone who came and helped make Albany Days an success for 2019.

09/08/2019
Albany Historical Society

Albany Historical Society

FOUND: Wallet with no ID in it. Please contact Alan or Colleen Meyer at 785-285-0025 or 0026. Wallet was found near the Rock School on Saturday, September 7th.

09/08/2019
09/04/2019

It's running!

2019 Albany Volunteer Workers
09/03/2019
2019 Albany Volunteer Workers

2019 Albany Volunteer Workers

SignUp.com makes it easy to coordinate school events & classroom activities, fundraisers, snack schedules, potlucks & more!

Oil field pump engine is set in place
09/03/2019

Oil field pump engine is set in place

08/29/2019
Getting closer
08/21/2019

Getting closer

Starting to look like a building.
08/18/2019

Starting to look like a building.

Albany Historical Society
08/14/2019

Albany Historical Society

Airplane built near Bern Kansas

The siding is on. Now on to trim, doors, and flooring.
08/01/2019

The siding is on. Now on to trim, doors, and flooring.

07/14/2019
Albany Sawmill cuts barn boards Saturday 7/13

A large cottonwood log is slabbed in preparation for cutting 1X12 siding boards. Don Harvey of Bern Kansas is at the controls. The bottom side has already been slabbed; once all four sides are cut the right dimensions, the boards will be cut off very quickly. The sawmill runs both days of Old Albany Days in September.

After the oats were cut, the Albany crew worked hard in the sawmill all afternoon, making siding boards for the new barn...
07/14/2019

After the oats were cut, the Albany crew worked hard in the sawmill all afternoon, making siding boards for the new barn that is coming along well. We hope to have all the siding on before the show.

07/14/2019
Albany Volunteers cut and shock 2019 Oat Crop

Paul Huffman on the Binder, and Don Harvey driving the WC Allis make short work of the oat crop Saturday morning. The oats will dry for at least a week and then it will be time to load them on racks and store them until Old Albany Days, September 7th and 8th.

The oats are cut and shocked; the Albany volunteers had a busy Saturday morning preparing the oats to be threshed at Old...
07/14/2019

The oats are cut and shocked; the Albany volunteers had a busy Saturday morning preparing the oats to be threshed at Old Albany Days in September.

Old Albany Days Show Bills are here!  Share with your friends and we will see you in September!
06/08/2019

Old Albany Days Show Bills are here! Share with your friends and we will see you in September!

The new barn already has its first residents.
06/02/2019

The new barn already has its first residents.

Another wall has siding.
06/02/2019

Another wall has siding.

Just a little shrinkage. These were nailed on tight together.
06/01/2019

Just a little shrinkage. These were nailed on tight together.

Getting closer
05/17/2019

Getting closer

More progress pictures for the barn. May have a roof by the weekend.
04/30/2019

More progress pictures for the barn. May have a roof by the weekend.

Progress!
04/27/2019

Progress!

Thank's to a donation from Schenck Process the Albany Drink Shack has a counter top!
03/04/2019

Thank's to a donation from Schenck Process the Albany Drink Shack has a counter top!

Albany bake sale at Orscheln's starting at 8:30
12/08/2018

Albany bake sale at Orscheln's starting at 8:30

The rain came and the mud stayed, but we held on and had a great show!  A huge thanks to all the volunteers and exhibito...
09/11/2018

The rain came and the mud stayed, but we held on and had a great show! A huge thanks to all the volunteers and exhibitors that came and pitched in to make the show a success! Thanks also to the City of Sabetha and the surrounding community for all the support. THANK YOU!

The rain came and the mud stayed, but we held on and had a great show! A huge thanks to all the volunteers and exhibitors that came and pitched in to make the show a success! Thanks also to the City of Sabetha and the surrounding community for all the support. THANK YOU!

Antiques Collectibles And Vintage   Helena, Missouri
09/10/2018

Antiques Collectibles And Vintage Helena, Missouri

Took this picture today at the Old Albany Days in Sabetha Kansas. I would love to have a room set up with this display in my home ❤️❤️❤️

09/08/2018

Breakfast served until 10:00, Come on out and enjoy the day!

09/08/2018
Breakfast is being served until 10:00,  come on out and enjoy the day!
09/08/2018

Breakfast is being served until 10:00, come on out and enjoy the day!

Starting to come together. Come and see this weekend.
09/07/2018

Starting to come together. Come and see this weekend.

Albany Museum's cover photo
08/28/2018

Albany Museum's cover photo

08/28/2018

"Where's Papa gone to?" Asked Eliza when Mother and Johnny return from hanging the first load up to dry. Eliza was still trying hard to work the sudsy clothes on the washboard, but the work was getting to her, and her fingers were already pink from the lye soap she was using.

"I think I hear a wagon." Johnny spoke up as he stepped beside his sister. Running outside, excited for anything happening that could distract him from the dreary wash-day blues. Billy and Joe the red mules were standing in the drive, and behind them was Papa and the lumber wagon.

"Just the young man I need. Come help me with this load, my boy. It's a surprise for mother."

Johnny boy came up and struggled to help unload a strange, round wooden barrel looking thing from the back of the wagon.

As they carried it onto the back porch, Eliza and Mother came to see what was going on.

"What is all this?" Asked mother with a stern glance at Papa.

"I bought it at the general store in town my dear. Had it sent off for about two weeks ago, and it finally came in on the train. I have felt so bad for you and the little ones working so hard on Monday, that I thought everyone would like this."

"It's a washing machine mama!" Cried Eliza in excitement. "Just like the ones I saw in the Montgomery Ward catalog."

Mama didn't know what to make of it, but the tub was filled with warm water from the stove and then clothes and lye soap.

A long wooden handle was attached to it, and father demonstrated it, working the agitator back and forth. Then, after rinsing, the wringer crank was turned to press the water out.

"Keep your fingers away from the rollers, else they'll get pinched." Warned Father.

Soon, Eliza and Johnny were eagerly taking turns swinging the handle back and forth with mama supervising.

"It works so easily and quickly", Mother said, "I can hardly believe it."

"Well", said Papa, "I hope it will make Wash Day a bit easier for all of you."

I hope this story made your Monday a bit brighter. Come see us at Old Albany Days, Sabetha, KS. The show is September 8th and 9th, and we will be celebrating the Story of Water on the American Frontier.

08/27/2018

The washtubs are slowly filled with water from the strange little bucket, and many trips are taken by Johnny from the well to the house. Eliza helps her mother sort clothes and they begin washing and rinsing, with the clothes making a strange bumping sound as they are run across the washboard.

Eliza takes her turn at the washboard while her mother heats up more water on the cook stove. She begins to think her mother's fingers must be made of iron, the way she scrubs and cleans the dirty clothes for hours on end without a word of complaint. Fatigue and soreness in her hands begins, and she says to mother, " Mama, is laundry always this hard?"

Mother turns around, smiles and says, "Yes, and the more you think about it the harder it gets." Papa and Johnny know that mother works hard, especially on Wash Day, and try to avoid getting really dirty, but on a farm it's not easy to stay clean.

"Here's the last bucket, Mama." Johnny says as be pours the bucket into a pan on the stove.

"Thank you dear, now take these out to the clothesline and I will be out to help you hang them."

Johnny did as he was asked, carrying a heavily heaped wicker basket of damp clothes out the door to the clothesline off the back porch.

The clothesline is far above his head, but he is determined to help and manages to get one end of a pair of papa's trousers over the line. As he grabs clothespins, a gust of wind blows the trousers off and into the dirt and grass at his feet.

In a moment, mother is there, helping him brush off the debris and grass. "There there, that will be okay, no harm done, but you need to be a little taller before you hang clothes, Johnny."

"Yes mother." Johnny replies as he hands the damp clothes up to her.

I hope you enjoyed this part of a little story for Monday. Mondays were the traditional wash day for many folks, and as rough as your Monday might seem, it probably isn't as bad as scrubbing clothes by hand on a washboard.

Come out and learn about the story of Water on The American Frontier at Old Albany Days, September 8th and 9th. You won't want to miss it!

It was Monday again, little Eliza and Johnny  realized as they stirred before dawn.  Yesterday had been the church picni...
08/27/2018

It was Monday again, little Eliza and Johnny realized as they stirred before dawn. Yesterday had been the church picnic, and so today must be Monday. As they padded softly into the kitchen the proof could be seen; two washtubs and a copper washboard.

"It's your turn to fetch the water Johnny." Eliza said as she started off to help mother gather up the clothes. Johnny knew it was his turn and did his chores, feeding the chickens, gathering eggs, and tending to the bottle calf that was being kept in the small pen. On his way back to the house he stopped at the little well under the sycamore tree in the yard.

A peculiar little bucket sat on the casing that rose about three feet above the ground. Attached to the bail was a heavy iron ring and a rope. The bottom had a little weighted trap door.

"I hope it doesn't burn me this time." He said as he recalled a harrowing incident two weeks ago in which the rope slipped through his fingers and left a nasty rope burn. So, carefully he lowered the strange little bucket with the trapdoor into the well, and watched it disappear about 10 feet down. The rope went slack, and waiting a few seconds, he began to draw the rope back up, this time the weight was much heavier.

The little bucket re-appeared and with it cool fresh water. Unhooked from the rope, the little bucket with water dribbled here and there a bit as the young man went dashing off to the kitchen where the washtubs waited.

I hope you enjoyed this little story. Not every well had a hand pump, windmill, or pumpjack on it. Some were of the old style, and used a simple pulley, bucket and rope to retrieve the water. As tomorrow is Monday, a wash-day story seems appropriate to lessen the blues.

Come out and join us in 12 days at Old Albany Days at Sabetha, Kansas. September 8th and 9th we will be celebrating the meaning of precious water on the American frontier, how it was used, and what it took to use it.

The show is coming up soon!  Preparations are being made, you don't want to miss this!
08/15/2018

The show is coming up soon! Preparations are being made, you don't want to miss this!

08/09/2018

Dry Times in Kansas: Part III
Submitted by Travis McCoy
The garden flourishes in the warm sunlight with large green beans, ripening crimson tomatoes, and long ears of sweet corn with whiskery silk shooting from their tops. The ground is cool and damp with water, a scarce commodity until now. Muddy footprints and muddy feet are signs of a little girl’s hard work in the garden, keeping the weeds at bay and the fresh vegetables in an ever-filling basket.
Our “giant” windmill towers above the little farmyard and hums along happily. Fresh clean water flows abundantly into the little wooden tank as the pump rod moves up and down in its metronomic beat. The girl is kept busy hauling buckets of this wonderful water up to the garden and making sure the plants are kept happy. When the cows arrive after their nap, the scene becomes competitive as they begin slurping up the water as fast as it comes pouring out.
As the cows drink, the tank begins to empty. Water has stopped flowing from the pipe, and a whining metallic creak can be heard above at the head of the windmill. The wheel freezes in place, and the pump rod has stopped its constant beat. The breeze has stopped, making the air warm and muggy once again.
Cicadas and grasshoppers can be heard chuckling among themselves as the little girl trots along to the woodshed where a strange wheeled machine is parked under the lean-to. Papa stops splitting firewood and helps to push the contraption up to the windmill, with his daughter at the helm, pulling and steering the tiny cart.
An incentive to buy the windmill; the strange contraption, called a “gasoline engine” was included to be used on a trial basis for 30 days. Papa is still on the fence about whether to purchase such a costly and complicated little machine. In a few short minutes the pump rod is disconnected from the motionless windmill, and the pumpjack is connected. A long belt that resembles a looped ribbon links the pumpjack to the little engine.
“Can I start it Papa?” The little girl asks as she gazes at the bright paint and the shiny spoked wheels of the engine. Papa nods but remains watchful for any trouble. The switch to the batteries is pulled, fuel valve opened, and with a short “flip” of the flywheels, the little contraption begins to snort and pop merrily. The engine fires with a crack, then breathes and coasts as the belt and pumpjack start turning. A small puff of smoke can be seen occasionally with the pop of the exhaust.
At the other end of the belt, the pumpjack is turning, the gears meshing and the arms raising and falling with the sucker rod. The water returns, bubbling and gushing as if it had never been absent. The tank fills up again and the thirsty cows come back to drink some more.

I hope you enjoyed this final part of Dry Times in Kansas. Join us at Old Albany Days on September 8th and 9th and check us out on facebook.com/AlbanyMuseum. We will be sharing The Story of Water on the American Frontier with everyone. Thank you!

Photos from Albany Museum's post
08/07/2018

Photos from Albany Museum's post

Dry Times in Kansas: Part II Submitted by Travis McCoyPublished in the 8-1-18 edition of the Sabetha HeraldThe dry, swel...
08/02/2018

Dry Times in Kansas: Part II
Submitted by Travis McCoy

Published in the 8-1-18 edition of the Sabetha Herald

The dry, sweltering heat persists as the days of summer drag along, occasionally broken by a stray thunderstorm, promising much but delivering little. Often the clouds gather darkly, only to veer off to the north or south, as if some unseen force is deflecting them.
A heavily laden freight wagon makes its way up the dusty drive as the family dog begins barking, heralding the strange arrival. The wagon is filled with long galvanized angle iron, pipes, and pieces that resemble something cut from an enormous metallic pie.
Work begins in earnest as the driver of the wagon and his assistants begin unloading bits and pieces. The pump head, pipe and cylinder are the first to go in, making the connection between the precious water deep in the ground and the family who needs it on the surface.
Pieces of iron and steel begin finding their place; being joined together with nuts and bolts. A long, tapered boxy-looking structure takes shape as the pile of parts slowly dwindles. A strange looking piece with gears and arms is mounted on the small end of this structure. The pie pieces take shape to form a wheel. A sleeping giant has been born!
This giant does not remain at rest but is carefully positioned and fitted with an A-frame made of timbers. Dust dances lightly as the horses step forward, their shoulders lean into the collars and harness creaks as the load begins to rise. Up, up, up and farther still the giant rises, the galvanized iron begins to gleam in the fading light of day. With a light thump the four legs of the giant finally rest on the ground and the steel structure rattles with the impact.
The lever on the tower is released and a hush falls over everyone as their eyes gaze intently upon the head of the giant. The vane is unlatched and jumps out to turn the wheel into the prevailing wind. A warm breeze picks up and the wheel begins to turn, creating a rhythmic, poetic motion as the pump rod rises and falls. The man and his assistants call the giant a “windmill” and soon the water comes bouncing and gurgling from the pipe and into the little wooden tank.

I hope you enjoyed part two of this little story about dry times in Kansas. While some remain in service pumping water for grazing cattle, many windmills today stand in silence. Harsh wind and rain weather them, but still they stand as lonely sentinels in the countryside, a reminder of the value of water.
We invite you to join us for Old Albany Days, September 8th and 9th. We are celebrating the discovery and utilization of Water on the American Frontier. Become a part of the story as we explore windmills, pumps, drilling rigs, and much more!

Albany Drink Shack
08/02/2018

Albany Drink Shack

Albany Drink Shack

Albany Museum's cover photo
07/30/2018

Albany Museum's cover photo

Albany Museum's cover photo
07/30/2018

Albany Museum's cover photo

Address

Sabetha, KS
66534

Opening Hours

Saturday 14:00 - 17:00
Sunday 14:00 - 17:00

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Albany Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Albany Museum:

Videos

Nearby museums


Other Sabetha museums

Show All