Museum of Flight

Museum of Flight Our Mission: To raise the public's awareness of aviation through the flight of historical aircraft while supporting our local children's hospital.
The Museum of Flight in Hixson opened on May 25, 2010. The 18,000 sq. ft. facility is located right beside the 3,005 ft. runway at Dallas Bay Skypark (1A0). Come on by the hangar! Most days work is being done on the aircraft, other days we're out flying. Love to see you there!
(51)

Rosie the Riveter Day March 21, 2020 Rome Georgia
01/19/2020

Rosie the Riveter Day March 21, 2020 Rome Georgia

We are so excited to be honoring the Rome area Rosie the Riveters again this year, commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the ending of WWII. We could use your help. Anyone interested in helping in the areas of making deployment boxes, knows a dance studio that would come teach kids the dances of the 1940’s, knows a WWII vet that would be willing to come tell their story or just wants to volunteer please reach out to me Christine Lewis by calling 423-800-3455 or emailing me at [email protected].

17 December 1903, 10:35 a.m. - This Day in Aviation
12/17/2019
17 December 1903, 10:35 a.m. - This Day in Aviation

17 December 1903, 10:35 a.m. - This Day in Aviation

17 December 1903, 10:35 a.m.: Orville and Wilbur Wright, two brothers from Dayton, Ohio, had been working on the development of a machine capable of flight since 1899. They started with kites and gliders before moving on to powered aircraft. At the Kill Devil Hills near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, o...

Our last request of the day. Let's keep our T-34C “TURBO-MENTOR” up and flying! You can donate here: http://ow.ly/uAwy50...
12/04/2019

Our last request of the day. Let's keep our T-34C “TURBO-MENTOR” up and flying! You can donate here: http://ow.ly/uAwy50xoRM0. Once again, thank you to everyone who has supported the Museum of Flight today on Giving Tuesday! #KeepemFlying

This hour its our T-28A “TROJAN” we're trying to keep up and flying. Donate here, http://ow.ly/y4Fu50x8jOp.  #KeepemFlyi...
12/04/2019

This hour its our T-28A “TROJAN” we're trying to keep up and flying. Donate here, http://ow.ly/y4Fu50x8jOp. #KeepemFlying

We're getting close to the end of the day. Help our BTD-1 Destroyer stay up and flying. You can donate here, http://ow.l...
12/03/2019

We're getting close to the end of the day. Help our BTD-1 Destroyer stay up and flying. You can donate here, http://ow.ly/JHFC50x71Ub. Thank you for all you have already supported the Museum today! #KeepemFlying

This hour you can keep our C-45H “EXPEDITOR" up and flying. You can donate here, http://ow.ly/EvDv50x71T1. #KeepemFlying
12/03/2019

This hour you can keep our C-45H “EXPEDITOR" up and flying. You can donate here, http://ow.ly/EvDv50x71T1. #KeepemFlying

This hour, help keep our T-28B “TROJAN” up and flying. You can donate here, http://ow.ly/2spS50x8jNL . And if you have a...
12/03/2019

This hour, help keep our T-28B “TROJAN” up and flying. You can donate here, http://ow.ly/2spS50x8jNL . And if you have already donated, help us out by sharing this post! #KeepemFlying

This hour you can help keep our TAYLORCRAFT BC12-D “TWOSOME” up and flying. You can donate here: http://ow.ly/fEIB50x71G...
12/03/2019

This hour you can help keep our TAYLORCRAFT BC12-D “TWOSOME” up and flying. You can donate here: http://ow.ly/fEIB50x71GQ.
Please share this post so we can get the word out and keep our planes in the air! #KeepemFlying

The F-14 TOMCATToday is Giving Tuesday! Please consider supporting us and helping us #KeepemFlying Donate today: http://...
12/03/2019

The F-14 TOMCAT

Today is Giving Tuesday! Please consider supporting us and helping us #KeepemFlying Donate today: http://ow.ly/jYXi50xpBds

The BTD-1 DestroyerTomorrow's the day! Please consider supporting us on Giving Tuesday this year! #KeepemFlying
12/02/2019

The BTD-1 Destroyer

Tomorrow's the day! Please consider supporting us on Giving Tuesday this year! #KeepemFlying

The T-28A “TROJAN”Tuesday is coming fast folks, let's #KeepemFlying! You can donate at Mofts.org
12/01/2019

The T-28A “TROJAN”

Tuesday is coming fast folks, let's #KeepemFlying! You can donate at Mofts.org

The T-28B “TROJAN”As we look ahead to next Tuesday, will you consider supporting us on Giving Tuesday this year? You can...
11/30/2019

The T-28B “TROJAN”

As we look ahead to next Tuesday, will you consider supporting us on Giving Tuesday this year? You can donate online at mofts.org to help #KeepemFlying!

The T-34C “TURBO-MENTOR”As Giving Tuesday approaches next week, we are asking you to help us #KeepemFlying! Next Tuesday...
11/29/2019

The T-34C “TURBO-MENTOR”

As Giving Tuesday approaches next week, we are asking you to help us #KeepemFlying! Next Tuesday, you can join the Museum of Flight to preserve our historic aircraft and raise awareness of aviation and the important role it has played in shaping our nation’s history

Please consider supporting us on Giving Tuesday this year! It is on December 3rd and by supporting us you can help #Keep...
11/27/2019

Please consider supporting us on Giving Tuesday this year! It is on December 3rd and by supporting us you can help #KeepemFlying

#MotivationMonday  If these guys can do this, you can get through this Monday! Happy Monday!
11/25/2019

#MotivationMonday
If these guys can do this, you can get through this Monday! Happy Monday!

"Hours before sunrise on June 6, 1944, B-26 Marauder pilots stationed in England woke up to find their airplanes freshly...
11/22/2019
B-26 Marauders, A-26 Invaders

"Hours before sunrise on June 6, 1944, B-26 Marauder pilots stationed in England woke up to find their airplanes freshly painted in black and white stripes: The Allied invasion of occupied Europe was under way. Any airplane without stripes was likely to be shot down by Allied gunners.

The Marauders took off in rain. A low cloud front pushed them down as low as 3,500 feet, where the bombardiers could see their targets: German guns aimed at anything that tried to cross the narrow strand code-named Utah Beach. Nearly 300 Marauders dropped more than a million pounds of explosives, keeping losses among landing forces low, compared to the carnage on Omaha Beach, targeted by high-flying heavy bombers."

By Heather Goss
Air & Space Magazine
February 11, 2015

Hours before sunrise on June 6, 1944, B-26 Marauder pilots stationed in England woke up to find their airplanes freshly painted in black and white stripes: The Allied invasion of occupied Europe was under way. Any airplane without stripes was likely to be shot down by Allied gunners.

TAYLORCRAFT BC12-D“TWOSOME”: The designer, Clarence Gilbert Taylor, can be called the father of private aviation in Amer...
11/20/2019

TAYLORCRAFT BC12-D“TWOSOME”: The designer, Clarence Gilbert Taylor, can be called the father of private aviation in America, as he designed the original Taylor Cub in 1931 at Bradford, Pennsylvania. Taylor formed his own company in 1935 as Taylor Aircraft Company, renamed Taylorcraft Aviation Corporation in 1939. Taylor designed the BC12-D and it was manufactured in 1946.

*Updated Picture: Glad to know y'all are paying attention! Credit to Darren for helping us out on the photo"Grumman F6F ...
11/18/2019

*Updated Picture: Glad to know y'all are paying attention! Credit to Darren for helping us out on the photo

"Grumman F6F Hellcats - The barrel-chested, carrier-based Hellcat destroyed more than 5,100 aircraft—more than any other naval fighter of the war. It was powerful, maneuverable, and designed to bring its pilots back to the ship, with a bullet-resistant windshield and more than 200 pounds of cockpit armor. Its younger brother the Bearcat was lighter and had a higher climb rate and could have been a menace to Japanese fighters but entered the war too late to see combat." - NASM

Source: Air & Space Magazine

"Grumman F6F Hellcats - The barrel-chested, carrier-based Hellcat destroyed more than 5,100 aircraft—more than any other...
11/18/2019

"Grumman F6F Hellcats - The barrel-chested, carrier-based Hellcat destroyed more than 5,100 aircraft—more than any other naval fighter of the war. It was powerful, maneuverable, and designed to bring its pilots back to the ship, with a bullet-resistant windshield and more than 200 pounds of cockpit armor. Its younger brother the Bearcat was lighter and had a higher climb rate and could have been a menace to Japanese fighters but entered the war too late to see combat." - NASM

Source: Air & Space Magazine

11/16/2019
Toys For Tots Campaign 2019

Time to get into the holiday spirit and donate to Toys For Tots! Get a free child admission when you drop off a new, unwrapped toy during the collection period. Make a difference in the life of a child this year.

"For military pilots during the 1930s and ’40s, the primary trainer was the Stearman biplane, and the PT-17 was the most...
11/15/2019
The Basics: Four Trainers

"For military pilots during the 1930s and ’40s, the primary trainer was the Stearman biplane, and the PT-17 was the most numerous of the more than 10,000 built by the Boeing Stearman company. It sported a serious radial engine making more than 200 horsepower to haul its nearly one-ton empty weight around the sky.

Roscoe Brown was one of the many thousands who made a first flight in a Stearman. A member of the Tuskegee Airmen, a group of black pilots trained at Alabama’s Tuskegee Institute for military service, Brown’s World War II experience was not typical, but his progress through military trainers was. Of the Stearman, he recalls, 'It was the first time you really got the feeling of flying. You would fly in the back, the instructor would fly in the front. It had fixed landing gear and the gear was narrow, so you had to be careful not to ground-loop when you landed it, which helped to build up your skill.'"

By George C. Larson
Air & Space Magazine
February 11, 2015

Read more at https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/training-day-180954059/#9zYXuVgYHqWZs0fZ.99

The U.S. Army Air Corps was a force of 21,000 airmen with 1,800 aircraft when General Hap Arnold became its chief in 1938. By the end of World War II, Arnold commanded 2.3 million people and oversaw 79,000 airplanes. In his memoir, Arnold recalled that the expansion began with a meeting at the White...

We do not only strive to provide education about aviation, but we also want to provide real life engagement with the pla...
11/11/2019

We do not only strive to provide education about aviation, but we also want to provide real life engagement with the planes that we teach about. Through the donations we receive we are able to maintain airplanes of our own that we can then put out for show at the Museum. If you would like to donate today, please follow the link below to our secure giving portal.

https://mkt.com/hixsonflightmuseum?square_lead=button

Thank you to all of our donors and patrons! We could not continue to deliver education and wonderful experiences around ...
11/08/2019

Thank you to all of our donors and patrons! We could not continue to deliver education and wonderful experiences around aviation without your generosity. From all of us here at the Museum of Flight, Thank You!

This is the first time a T-28 has landed at Whiting Field in 35 years.  It was great to take the aircraft home to share ...
11/08/2019

This is the first time a T-28 has landed at Whiting Field in 35 years. It was great to take the aircraft home to share their history with up and coming military pilots in training.

Naval heritage was on full display at NAS Whiting Field's south field today. T-28 Trojan aircraft, "warbirds," from the Museum of Flight collection, Rome, Georgia were available for all to see. They are also here for the Blue Angels Homecoming Show where they will fly this weekend. These aircraft were the primary fixed wing trainers at Whiting from the 1960s to 1983. Pilots and members of the Museum of Flight team were on hand to show off these mighty birds--they spoke with Training Air Wing Five students and instructor pilots about the aircraft's history and combat operations, as well as leadership development and commitment. #MOFTS #FlyNavy mofts.org

We are in GOOD company in Pensacola for the Blue Angel's Homecoming Airshow.
11/06/2019

We are in GOOD company in Pensacola for the Blue Angel's Homecoming Airshow.

"Hours before sunrise on June 6, 1944, B-26 Marauder pilots stationed in England woke up to find their airplanes freshly...
11/06/2019
B-26 Marauders, A-26 Invaders

"Hours before sunrise on June 6, 1944, B-26 Marauder pilots stationed in England woke up to find their airplanes freshly painted in black and white stripes: The Allied invasion of occupied Europe was under way. Any airplane without stripes was likely to be shot down by Allied gunners.

The Marauders took off in rain. A low cloud front pushed them down as low as 3,500 feet, where the bombardiers could see their targets: German guns aimed at anything that tried to cross the narrow strand code-named Utah Beach. Nearly 300 Marauders dropped more than a million pounds of explosives, keeping losses among landing forces low, compared to the carnage on Omaha Beach, targeted by high-flying heavy bombers."

By Heather Goss
AIR & SPACE MAGAZINE
FEBRUARY 11, 2015

Read more at https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/low-blow-180954074/#oOkOKHUjKmZsOF43.99

Hours before sunrise on June 6, 1944, B-26 Marauder pilots stationed in England woke up to find their airplanes freshly painted in black and white stripes: The Allied invasion of occupied Europe was under way. Any airplane without stripes was likely to be shot down by Allied gunners.

Please consider donating today! Follow the link below to our secure online portal where you can give. We are dependant o...
11/04/2019

Please consider donating today! Follow the link below to our secure online portal where you can give. We are dependant on your donations to be able to continue our mission. Please consider donating today. Thank you very much!

https://mkt.com/hixsonflightmuseum?square_lead=button

Come see us!  We are having a great time at the Wings Over South Georgia Airshow at Moody AFB.  Our members Johnny Shook...
11/01/2019

Come see us! We are having a great time at the Wings Over South Georgia Airshow at Moody AFB. Our members Johnny Shook WWII B-29 waist gunner, and Gil Espy Vietnam veteran are the stars of the show.

The importance of aviation in The United States is larger than most people think. It has left its mark on our lives from...
11/01/2019

The importance of aviation in The United States is larger than most people think. It has left its mark on our lives from wars we were in, all the way to getting packages in a matter of days instead of weeks. It is only through your continued support that we can continue to educate people about this important part of American history. From all of us, Thank You!

We are excited and thankful to the Richard B. Russell airport to be getting some hangar upgrades while our aircraft are ...
10/31/2019

We are excited and thankful to the Richard B. Russell airport to be getting some hangar upgrades while our aircraft are at the Moody and Pensacola airshows. Also a huge thank you to our hangar mates Tiger Flight for sharing a bit of their space with us!!!
We will be closed Oct. 31st - Nov 12th as this hangar maintenance is done.
Come see us Nov 1st and 2nd at Wings Over South Georgia Moody AFB and Nov 9th and 10th at the Blues Homecoming Airshow in Pensacola Florida!

"By 1944, the Luftwaffe was struggling to survive. In a single week that February, the Allies sought to hasten the end. ...
10/30/2019
B-17s and a Big Week of Bombing

"By 1944, the Luftwaffe was struggling to survive. In a single week that February, the Allies sought to hasten the end. Operation Argument, better known as “The Big Week,” was a series of Royal Air Force and U.S. bombing raids on aviation factories; on several raids, more than 1,000 bombers were sent against the targets. The raids were also intended to bait German fighters into the air, where nearly 900 P-47s and P-51s engaged them. One B-17 gunner reported, “The Luftwaffe had all their planes up but their trainers.”

The Luftwaffe lost a third of its remaining single-engine fighters that month, and 18 percent of its pilots. But the bait suffered as well. In more than 3,000 sorties, 247 B-17s were lost, despite the bomber’s almost uncanny ability to withstand damage and bring airmen home."

By Richard P. Hallion
Air & Space Magazine
February 11, 2015

Read more at https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/big-week-180954072/#JCobvAVTpPHymjIF.99

By 1944, the Luftwaffe was struggling to survive. In a single week that February, the Allies sought to hasten the end. Operation Argument, better known as “The Big Week,” was a series of Royal Air Force and U.S. bombing raids on aviation factories; on several raids, more than 1,000 bombers were ...

As we continue to share information and educate the public about aviation in the United States, your donations are a cru...
10/28/2019

As we continue to share information and educate the public about aviation in the United States, your donations are a crucial part of that mission! We are donation and patron driven, which means all of your donations go toward continuing our mission to educate people about aviation. Follow the link below to donate today through our secure online portal.

https://mkt.com/hixsonflightmuseum?square_lead=button

"The C-47s were the first to take off. Before 2,200 bombers struck at German positions near the French coast, before the...
10/25/2019
C-47s on D-Day

"The C-47s were the first to take off. Before 2,200 bombers struck at German positions near the French coast, before the naval bombardment of coastal batteries and seawalls, and before landing craft carried 130,000 men to fight their way onto the beaches, nearly 1,000 U.S. Army Air Force C-47s and Royal Air Force Dakotas dropped paratroopers in the dark to capture roads that would permit the assault troops to progress inland. Derived from the Douglas DC-3, the C-47 Skytrain was the most important transport of the war. Its pilots called it “Gooney Bird,” possibly because, like the gooneys once were in the southern hemisphere, C-47s could be seen everywhere.

C-47s flew in every combat theater—on search-and-rescue missions, on medical evacuation flights, and on special operations inserting and recovering covert agents and sabotage teams, and supporting the activities of resistance fighters behind enemy lines. Some even flew as rudimentary bombers."

By Richard P. Hallion
AIR & SPACE MAGAZINE
FEBRUARY 11, 2015

Read more at https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/invasion-180954073/#B7lk5HA1Xc5tsdeD.99

The C-47s were the first to take off. Before 2,200 bombers struck at German positions near the French coast, before the naval bombardment of coastal batteries and seawalls, and before landing craft carried 130,000 men to fight their way onto the beaches, nearly 1,000 U.S. Army Air Force C-47s and Ro...

Today we are very thankful for all of the donors and patrons of the Museum! Your continued support is vital to what we d...
10/24/2019

Today we are very thankful for all of the donors and patrons of the Museum! Your continued support is vital to what we do, and we cannot say thank you enough. Today, on this #ThankfulThursday, we just want to say Thank You!

Do you want to support us, but you can't make it to the Museum? Well, we take donations online through our secure portal...
10/22/2019

Do you want to support us, but you can't make it to the Museum? Well, we take donations online through our secure portal! Follow the link below to the secure portal and make a donation today! Every donation goes to help us continue to provide aviation education!

https://mkt.com/hixsonflightmuseum?square_lead=button

"The Supermarine Spitfire could bob and weave, but North American Aviation’s P-51 Mustang was the fighter that could go ...
10/18/2019
All the Way to Berlin with Mustangs

"The Supermarine Spitfire could bob and weave, but North American Aviation’s P-51 Mustang was the fighter that could go the distance—and it did, escorting B-17s and B-24s on bombing missions deep inside Germany. When outfitted with external fuel tanks, the Mustang could fly more than 2,000 miles without a refill, but with a top speed of 437 mph, it was more akin to a racehorse than a camel. Four Browning.50- caliber machine guns (increased to six in the P-51Ds) made the Mustang a prodigious dogfighter, though pilots rarely passed up the opportunity to strafe Luftwaffe airfields on their way"

By Chris Klimek
Air & Space Magazine
February 11, 2015

Read more at http://ow.ly/78tv50wKcU7

The Supermarine Spitfire could bob and weave, but North American Aviation’s P-51 Mustang was the fighter that could go the distance—and it did, escorting B-17s and B-24s on bombing missions deep inside Germany. When outfitted with external fuel tanks, the Mustang could fly more than 2,000 miles ...

Address

304 Russell Field Rd NE
Rome, GA
30165

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00
Sunday 13:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(423) 228-2359

Website

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Museum of Flight posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Museum of Flight:

Videos

Category

Help Keep Them Flying

The Museum of Flight is dedicated to raising awareness of aviation and the important role it has played in shaping our nation’s history. Not only do we provide displays, a vast collection of historic flight and military memorabilia and maintain these planes, the museum also donates to the local children’s hospital. The Museum of Flight has donated $25,000.00 dollars to the child life department and pediatric intensive care unit at Children’s Hospital. The museum is also involved with Toys for Tots, regular blood drives and will be found promoting aviation with flyovers and static displays at various events and air shows around the southeastern United States.

The museum was established in the spring of 2010 and we are still in our infancy. One of the best features of the museum is that we have planes that actually fly. The airplane collection currently includes a T-28 “Trojan” Alpha Model, a T-28 “Trojan” Bravo Model and a Beechcraft C-45. Vehicles include also a tug and a M38A-1 Jeep.

Nearby museums


Comments

Flying to London-Corbin KY😎
Heading to London-Corbin KY. 😎
Thought you'd like to see a pic of the BTD-1 Destroyer back at the Florence, SC museum. Photo by Ken Peck, scanned from his slide.
Loved having you guys at the Crossville Memorial Airport yesterday. You put in a great display!
I set this to my wish-list or bucket-list in november trip to USA!!
Good to see you all at the show. Hopefully, catch you again in Calhoun,Ga sometime soon.
Photo shoot before Floyd County Wildlife Ass. event. Richard & I in C-45. Larry in 'Alpha' and Fred in 'Bravo'. Thanks to photographers Andy Butler and Chris Boyd for fantastic pics!!!
Photo shoot before Floyd County Wildlife Ass. event. Richard & I in C-45. Larry in 'Alpha' and Fred in 'Bravo'. Thanks to photographers Andy Butler and Chris Boyd for fantastic pics!!!
Photo shoot before Floyd County Wildlife Ass. event. Richard & I in C-45. Larry in 'Alpha' and Fred in 'Bravo'. Thanks to photographers Andy Butler and Chris Boyd for fantastic pics!!!
Photo shoot before Floyd County Wildlife Ass. event. Richard & I in C-45. Larry in 'Alpha' and Fred in 'Bravo'. Thanks to photographers Andy Butler and Chris Boyd for fantastic pics!!!
Photo shoot before Floyd County Wildlife Ass. event. Richard & I in C-45. Larry in 'Alpha' and Fred in 'Bravo'. Thanks to photographers Andy Butler and Chris Boyd for fantastic pics!!!