SUVCW John A. Logan Camp #26

SUVCW John A. Logan Camp #26 We are an organization dedicated to honoring Union Veterans, Preserving the GAR, and Patriotic Instruction. Membership is open to those with ancestors who were Union Veterans, and others with an interest in Civil War history.
Sons of Union Veterans of Civil War is nonprofit organization dedicated to honoring Union Veterans, supporting veterans of all wars, and patriotic instruction.
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06/06/2020
The Gettysburg Museum Of History
06/04/2020

The Gettysburg Museum Of History

A Confederate Civil War Veteran at the 1913 Gettysburg reunion. Original Photo from The Gettysburg Museum of History
www.GettysburgMuseumOfHistory.com
#Gettysburg1913Reunion #GettysburgMuseumOfHistory #ConfederateVeterans

10 Facts: Cold Harbor
05/31/2020
10 Facts: Cold Harbor

10 Facts: Cold Harbor

The American Battlefield Trust's webpage presenting 10 important facts about the Civil War battle of Cold Harbor, Virginia.

Alonzo H. Cushing
05/25/2020
Alonzo H. Cushing

Alonzo H. Cushing

On July 3rd 1863, at approximately 2:30pm., at the height of Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg, a hole opened in the Union line. Rebel troops poured through the gap at “the Angle.” However, a young and determined Union First Lieutenant named Alonzo H. Cushing stood directly in their w...

Saving Lincoln
05/25/2020

Saving Lincoln

May we all remember what Memorial Day is truly about...

National Chaplain - Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War
05/25/2020

National Chaplain - Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

Honor the Brave

05/24/2020
2020 Memorial Day Tribute

2020 Memorial Day Tribute

The National Woman's Relief Corps (NWRC) has fulfilled its promise to the Grand Army of the Republic, to honor the graves of the fallen Union soldiers. The y...

The Death of Colonel Ellsworth
05/24/2020
The Death of Colonel Ellsworth

The Death of Colonel Ellsworth

The first Union officer killed in the Civil War was a friend of President Lincoln's

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War - National Organization
05/24/2020

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War - National Organization

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s service. Over two dozen cities and towns claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day. While Waterloo N.Y. was officially declared the birthplace of Memorial Day by President Lyndon Johnson in May 1966, it’s difficult to prove conclusively the origins of the day.
Regardless of the exact date or location of its origins, one thing is clear – Memorial Day was borne out of the Civil War and a desire to honor our dead. It was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11, and was first observed on 30 May 1868, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery.

The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war).

It is now celebrated in almost every State on the last Monday in May with Congressional passage of the National Holiday Act of 1971 (P.L. 90 – 363). This helped ensure a three day weekend for Federal holidays, though several southern states have an additional separate day for honoring the Confederate war dead: January 19th in Texas; April 26th in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi; May 10th in South Carolina; and June 3rd (Jefferson Davis’ birthday) in Louisiana and Tennessee.

05/24/2020
WSBT-TV

WSBT-TV

The 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing create a Memorial Day tribute video.

Raging Patriots
05/24/2020

Raging Patriots

10 Things to Remember About Memorial Day
05/20/2020
10 Things to Remember About Memorial Day

10 Things to Remember About Memorial Day

Memorial Day is more than just a chance to get the year's first sunburn. It's a time to remember the men and women who sacrificed their lives for their country.

Civil War Defenses of Washington
05/19/2020

Civil War Defenses of Washington

THE CITIZEN SOLDIER

As the victorious Union armies converged on Washington DC to participate in the Grand Review in May 1865, Major General John A. Logan, commanding Fifteenth Army Corps, earns the promotion he has long sought:

Commanding General of the Army of the Tennessee.

"HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Alexandria, Va., May 19, 1865.

Bvt. Major General JOHN A. RAWLINS,

Chief of Staff, Armies of the United States, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to apply for the appointment of Major General John A. Logan, U. S. Volunteers, to the command of the Army of the Tennesse, vice Major General O. O. Howard, assigned to duty in the War Department (Freedmen's Burea). Also for the appointment of Major General W. B. Hazen, U. S. Volunteers, to the command of the Fifteenth Corps, in the event of the transfer of General Logan.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, U. S. Army, Commanding."

General Sherman's request was approved that day by President Andrew Johnson. General Logan proudly lead the vanguard of the Army of the Tennessee during the Grand Review of the Armies on May 24, 1865. He was mustered out of Federal service and returned to politics. Logan never forgave his perceived slight against the Regular US Army, and in the coming years voted for a major reduction in funds for the armed forces. General Logan was appointed as the second commander of the Grand Army of the Republic from 1868 to 1871, and helped lead the call for creation of Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, as a national public holiday. Logan resided in Washington DC after the war (Logan Circle) until his death in 1886.

Major General John A. Logan is interred United States Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery in Washington DC.

Image: Major General John A. Logan (Library of Congress).

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War - National Organization
05/19/2020

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War - National Organization

05/18/2020
HISTORY

HISTORY

An inside look at the "time capsule that is Grant Cottage;" the final home of General and President Ulysses S. Grant.
#Grant on @History this Memorial Day

Military Images
05/18/2020

Military Images

MEET THE MAN WHO KEPT LETTERS COMING TO ARMY OF THE POTOMAC SOLDIERS.—The gent standing, David B. Parker, began his military service began like many other Northern volunteers. In 1861 he enlisted as a private in his hometown company. It became part of the 72nd New York Infantry, shipped out to the South and joined the Army of the Potomac.

This is where the similarity to other soldiers ends. In June 1862, Pvt. Parker was detailed as a mail agent in his regiment's division, which was commanded by Maj. Gen. Joe Hooker. He was appointed to handle the mail not because he was a poor soldier, but because he was a energetic and possessed a gift for cutting through red tape and making things happen. Before long Parker ran the entire mail service for all of the Army of the Potomac.

Thanks to Parker, mail delivery went virtually interrupted no matter where the army was—Gettysburg, Spotsylvania, the front lines of Petersburg and Appomattox Court House. The work he did kept up the morale of the men as the letters and packages from home flowed into camp literally without interruption.

His career after the war was stellar, including many years of association with most of the Presidents of the U.S. and Bell Telephone.

He died in 1910. Two years letter, his memoir, "A Chautauqua Boy in '61 and Afterward," was published. In it, Parker tells his story and includes anecdotes of the top Union leaders with whom he was associated, including generals George G. Meade and U.S. Grant, and President Abraham Lincoln. For example, here’s one I have not heard about Gen. Meade: “General Meade went to the Adjutant General’s office, which was a Sibley tent, and opened the flap to stoop and enter, as a soldier, who was building a fire in the stove and taking up ashes, was coming out. The pan of ashes struck General Meade’s breast and covered him. he showed a very irascible temper and cursed the soldier roundly. All that I saw of General Meade afterwards, however, was a reserved courtly gentleman. He was not personally popular with his staff officers, but no one could criticize his conduct or his patriotism.”

Parker, standing, is pictured here with Capt. Charles E. Scoville of the 94th New York Infantry. Officially Parker was acting assistant quartermaster for the Army of the Potomac responsible for mail delivery.

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The Gettysburg Museum Of History
05/17/2020

The Gettysburg Museum Of History

Aerial view of the 1938 Gettysburg reunion encampment. Original photo from the Gettysburg Museum Of History archives.
www.GettysburgMuseumOfHistory.com
#1938GettysburgReunion #GettysburgMuseumOfHistory #GettysburgFromTheArchvies

05/14/2020
Auxiliary to Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

Auxiliary to Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

Sad news but it is official now:"The Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery has been cancelled. The Secretary of Defense will be laying the wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers, but they do not yet know if the President will be in attendance. There will be NO ceremony in the Amphitheater. You can only get into the cemetery if you have a pass to allow you to visit the grave of a loved one on that day, so they will not issue seats at the amphitheater."

The Gettysburg Museum Of History
05/12/2020

The Gettysburg Museum Of History

On this day May 12, 1864 156 years ago. The battle of Spotsylvania. Grant used Upton's assault technique on a much larger scale on May 12 when he ordered the 15,000 men of Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock's corps to assault the Mule Shoe. Hancock was initially successful, but the Confederate leadership rallied and repulsed his incursion. Attacks by Maj. Gen. Horatio Wright on the western edge of the Mule Shoe, which became known as the "Bloody Angle", involved almost 24 hours of desperate hand-to-hand fighting, some of the most intense of the Civil War. Supporting attacks by Warren and by Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside were unsuccessful. See this very large "War Log" containing 4 bullets from the battle of Spotsylvania at The Gettysburg Museum Of History. We included a photo of the log at an angle next to some uniforms for size comparison. Sorry for the quality of the photos. This artifact is very difficult to photograph.
www.GettysburgMuseumOfHistory.com
#Muleshoe #HistoryToday #Spotsylvania #WarLog #GettysburgMuseumOfHistory

Battle of Palmito Ranch Facts & Summary
05/12/2020
Battle of Palmito Ranch Facts & Summary

Battle of Palmito Ranch Facts & Summary

Union Col. Theodore H. Barrett, commanding forces at Brazos Santiago, Texas, dispatched an expedition composed of 250 men of the 62nd U.S. Colored Infantry Regiment and 50 men of the 2nd Texas Cavalry Regiment under the command of Lt. Col. David Branson to the mainland, on May 11, 1865, to attack re...

The Death of John Sedgwick
05/12/2020
The Death of John Sedgwick

The Death of John Sedgwick

Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick was one of the most experienced and competent officers in the Army of the Potomac. He was also greatly respected and beloved by his men. Born in 1813, he graduated from West Point in 1837, later serving in the Seminole War, the Mexican War, and at various posts in the West. H...

Friends of the Hunley
05/06/2020

Friends of the Hunley

When what appeared to be nothing more than a blob of mud (above) was found in the Hunley crew compartment during excavation, it was hard to detect is was a fascinating – and beautiful – piece of history. By working closely with Conservator Mary Ballard with the Smithsonian, we were able to save this silk bandana (below) worn around the neck of Hunley crewmember James Wicks the night of the submarine’s fateful mission and mysterious disappearance in 1864.

National Chaplain - Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War
04/29/2020

National Chaplain - Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

National Chaplain, Rev Dr Peter-Michael Preble has reported for duty to provide Chaplain support in Massachusetts as part of Joint Task Force Minuteman. Chaplain Preble will primarily assigned to Boston Hope Medical Center and will be ministering to military, patients, and staff.

Auxiliary to Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War
04/28/2020

Auxiliary to Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

“Grant and his generals”. Note that Black Jack Logan is in the background immediately to Grant’s right.
04/28/2020

“Grant and his generals”. Note that Black Jack Logan is in the background immediately to Grant’s right.

Ulysses S. Grant
04/27/2020
Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant served as U.S. general and commander of the Union armies during the late years of the American Civil War, later becoming the 18th U.S. president.

The Sultana Disaster
04/27/2020
The Sultana Disaster

The Sultana Disaster

A Civil War Trust history article describing the S.S. Sultana explosion, which remains the deadliest maritime disaster in U.S. history.

The Center for Civil War Photography
04/24/2020

The Center for Civil War Photography

LINCOLN IN DEATH
On April 24, 1865, as Lincoln's body lay in state in an open casket in the Governor's Room of New York's City Hall, Benjamin Gurney, son of the famous Jeremiah Gurney, Jr., and a well-known studio photographer of the city in his own right, exposed two views. One of those views, made with a multi-lens camera, showed Lincoln's body. Lloyd Ostendorf dubbed it "The Last Photograph From The Flesh." He wrote:

"THE PRESIDENT LIES IN STATE, flanked by Admiral Charles H. Davis (left) and General Edward D. Townsend ... As soon as Secretary of War Stanton heard of the photographs, he ordered their destruction. General John A. Dix reported that he had confiscated and destroyed the larger negative and the sole print from it. He sent Stanton a print from the four-lens plate, with a request that the negative be spared. Stanton at once issued orders to destroy the remaining plate and all prints. The sole print sent to him by General Dix was preserved by Stanton and was given by his son to John G. Nicolay. It remained forgotten until 1952 when Ronald Rietveld, a fourteen-year-old student, discovered it among the Nicolay[-Hay Collection] papers in the Illinois State Historical Library." -- Charles Hamilton & Lloyd Ostendorf, "Lincoln in Photographs: an Album of Every Known Pose" (1963).

Ronald Rietveld had come across an envelope in which there was a letter with a folded sheet of paper. Recounted now retired Professor Rietveld:

"I opened up the folded sheet of plain stationary and there lay a faded brown photograph ... and then I saw what it was immediately. I knew Lincoln photography fairly well at 14 and knew that this picture, if it was indeed a photograph, [was not then known to] exist.... So I knew where it was taken, it was New York City, and when it was taken -- April 24, 1865, and I picked it up and ran and said [to his host Illinois State Historian Harry Pratt], 'Harry, look at I what I just found!' This is a picture of Lincoln in his coffin taken in New York City at the time of his funeral!" -- quoted in Bob Zeller's "The Blue and Gray in Black and White," (Praeger Publishers, Westport, CT: 2005), p. 196.

The first image is detail from the preserved Gurney negative print discovered in the Nicolay papers and designated as Ostendorf-119; the second is retouched detail from that print, courtesy of the Lincoln Financial Foundation, showing an artist's conception of Lincoln lying in his casket based upon the J. Gurney Jr. photograph; and the third image is a sketch appearing in the May 6, 1865 Harper's Weekly depicting Lincoln's remains being viewed by the public at New York's City Hall. "So vast was the throng that even during the night and early morning viewers were allowed only a few moments to glance into the coffin before they were hurried on by the guards."

By Craig Heberton IV

04/23/2020
April 21, 1865...Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train leaves Washington, D.C.
04/21/2020

April 21, 1865...Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train leaves Washington, D.C.

American Battlefield Trust
04/18/2020

American Battlefield Trust

Ordered by Grant as part of his Vicksburg Campaign, Union Cavalry Colonel Benjamin H. Grierson departed from La Grange, TN #OnThisDay, April 17, 1863, in command of 1,700 men of the 6th and 7th Illinois and the 2nd Iowa Cavalry in the beginnings of 'Grierson's Raid.'

Over 17 days Grierson's Raid would march 800 miles, repeatedly engage the Confederates, disable two railroads, capture many prisoners and horses, and destroy vast amounts of property, before finally ending in Baton Rouge on May 2.

Address

211 N Main St
Rockford, IL
61101

General information

Our camp meets the first Wednesday of each month at 7:00p.m. Our meetings are held at Veterans Memorial Hall, 211 N Main St, Rockford, IL 61103

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Comments

Merry Christmas to our brothers in Camp #26 from your brothers in the Israel Richardson Camp #2 north of Detroit, MI. Brother Tom Spencer Patriotic Instructor
Huzzah!