UCR Public History

UCR Public History Public History program at the University of California, Riverside

Operating as usual

05/22/2021

The death of legendary silent film star Rudolph Valentino at age 31 in 1926 caused mass hysteria among his fans. An estimated 100,000 people lined the streets of Manhattan to pay their respects at his funeral. A second funeral was held in Beverly Hills, setting off another wave of mourning among his fans.

Valentino's final movie "The Son of the Sheik" also featured a beautiful Arabian horse named Jadaan (the co-stars are seen in this postcard). Many fans made their way to the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse ranch in Pomona, California to get a glimpse of "the Valentino horse." According to one account, "Women crowded around his box stall, wore the stable door smooth pressing for a better look at the sleek stallion. And they stood to silent near-reverence when Jadaan was led riderless into the arena carrying his former master's colorful desert regalia."

The Kellogg ranch belonged to cereal magnate W.K. Kellogg’s Arabian horse ranch. Kellogg built the ranch in 1925 in Pomona to fulfill his life-long dream of breeding outstanding Arabian horses. As part of his interest in the breed, Kellogg began to collect books and research materials on the Arabian horse. Kellogg donated the horses, ranch, and other property to the state of California in 1932. Eventually the collection became part of the the Cal Poly Pomona University Library's Special Collections and Archives

Through a grant from the NHPRC, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona undertook a project to create and enhance online descriptions for 53 collections, comprising 600 linear feet from their backlog, including portions from the university archives, the records of architect John T. Lyle, and records from the local winemaking industry, Arabian horse ranching, and the Pomona Valley Historical Collection. You can visit their Special Collections at https://libguides.library.cpp.edu/prf.php?account_id=63651.

And you can find the finding aid to the Kellogg Arabian Horse Collection at https://oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/c8pz5gc0/entire_text/

With funding provided by ACLS-Mellon Foundation, UCR’s Public History Program, in partnership with Los Angeles Poverty D...
04/29/2021

With funding provided by ACLS-Mellon Foundation, UCR’s Public History Program, in partnership with Los Angeles Poverty Department’s Skid Row History Museum & Archive, invites applications for two paid fellowships for UCR graduate students in the humanities.

1. Graduate Internship with Skid Row History Museum & Archive
This fellowship will take place over Summer 2021 (12 weeks), estimated at 200 hours total. A stipend of $5,000 is available, to be paid in two parts—at the start of the 12 weeks and upon submission of the deliverables to the partner organization.

Fellows may work remotely, at the Downtown LA Museum (250 S. Broadway), or in a combination of on-site and remote work.
The goal of the fellowship is to introduce community-based archives to graduate students in the humanities; lend your expertise to a grassroots social justice-based arts and culture organization; and explore professional practice in public humanities outside of the academy.

Fellows will work with Skid Row Museum Archivists to create finding aids; edit oral history transcripts; and research and create short films covering issues in the history of Skid Row, drawn from the LA Poverty Department media archives. The topics for research are open and if fellows have interest in particular areas intersecting with the practices of LA Poverty Department and the Skid Row History Museum & Archive, then they may propose alternatives to the three deliverables (finding aids, edited oral histories, and one or two short films for Instagram, Facebook, and websites).

Ideal applicants will be interested in intersections between memory/archival work, arts programming, and social justice. Desired skills include: ability to work independently; attention
to detail; strong research and writing skills; aptitude for digital media (though prior experience is not necessary); personable.

2. Graduate Fellowship in Community-based Archives
This fellow will work approximately 70 hours during Summer 2021 to develop course materials and help arrange guest lecturers for a Community-based Archives graduate seminar offered by Cathy Gudis at UCR in Fall 2021 (HIST 263, Thursdays, 3-5:50 pm). A stipend of $1500 will be
provided for work completed. The purpose is to jointly develop materials for the course—as an open syllabus, also sourced through social media or through other modes of creative inquiry
that can serve graduate students as well as interested faculty and community-based archives.

About Los Angeles Poverty Department (lapovertydept.org)
Founded in Skid Row in 1985 as the nation’s first theater group comprised of unhoused individuals, Los Angeles Poverty Department’s mission is to connect the experiences of people
living in poverty to the sociopolitical forces that affect their lives and communities. We do so through community-based programs, performances, multidisciplinary artworks, and, since 2015, exhibitions and publicly accessible historical materials at our Skid Row History Museum & Archive (250 S. Broadway, Downtown LA).

LA Poverty Department (LAPD) has developed countless projects that highlight the grassroots activist initiatives in the neighborhood, map Skid Row’s changing borders, and educate the broader public about the most strident challenges facing the community today. The Skid Row History Museum & Archive foregrounds the distinctive artistic and historical consciousness of Skid Row and functions as a means to explore the mechanics of displacement in an age of immense income inequality, by mining the neighborhood’s activist history and amplifying
effective community strategies. The space operates as an archive and exhibition, performance, and meeting space.

Exhibitions focus on grassroots strategies that have preserved the neighborhood from successive threats of gentrification and displacement, to be studied for current adaptation and use. During pandemic-related closure of the museum, LAPD launched a publicly accessible digital archive of interviews and performances related to the group's biennial "Walk the Talk" performance/parade (https://app.reduct.video/lapd/walk-the-talk/#), which invites community engagement and response.

These fellowships are organized by Catherine Gudis, UCR Associate Professor of History, who is an ACLS-Mellon Society & Scholars Fellow at the Skid Row History Museum & Archive.

Please do not hesitate to write with questions or for more information: [email protected]

Applications due Monday, May 17, 2021 at:
https://forms.gle/4YBnkLmWBq9StQDy

With funding provided by ACLS-Mellon Foundation, UCR’s Public History Program, in partnership with Los Angeles Poverty Department’s Skid Row History Museum & Archive, invites applications for two paid fellowships for UCR graduate students in the humanities.

1. Graduate Internship with Skid Row History Museum & Archive
This fellowship will take place over Summer 2021 (12 weeks), estimated at 200 hours total. A stipend of $5,000 is available, to be paid in two parts—at the start of the 12 weeks and upon submission of the deliverables to the partner organization.

Fellows may work remotely, at the Downtown LA Museum (250 S. Broadway), or in a combination of on-site and remote work.
The goal of the fellowship is to introduce community-based archives to graduate students in the humanities; lend your expertise to a grassroots social justice-based arts and culture organization; and explore professional practice in public humanities outside of the academy.

Fellows will work with Skid Row Museum Archivists to create finding aids; edit oral history transcripts; and research and create short films covering issues in the history of Skid Row, drawn from the LA Poverty Department media archives. The topics for research are open and if fellows have interest in particular areas intersecting with the practices of LA Poverty Department and the Skid Row History Museum & Archive, then they may propose alternatives to the three deliverables (finding aids, edited oral histories, and one or two short films for Instagram, Facebook, and websites).

Ideal applicants will be interested in intersections between memory/archival work, arts programming, and social justice. Desired skills include: ability to work independently; attention
to detail; strong research and writing skills; aptitude for digital media (though prior experience is not necessary); personable.

2. Graduate Fellowship in Community-based Archives
This fellow will work approximately 70 hours during Summer 2021 to develop course materials and help arrange guest lecturers for a Community-based Archives graduate seminar offered by Cathy Gudis at UCR in Fall 2021 (HIST 263, Thursdays, 3-5:50 pm). A stipend of $1500 will be
provided for work completed. The purpose is to jointly develop materials for the course—as an open syllabus, also sourced through social media or through other modes of creative inquiry
that can serve graduate students as well as interested faculty and community-based archives.

About Los Angeles Poverty Department (lapovertydept.org)
Founded in Skid Row in 1985 as the nation’s first theater group comprised of unhoused individuals, Los Angeles Poverty Department’s mission is to connect the experiences of people
living in poverty to the sociopolitical forces that affect their lives and communities. We do so through community-based programs, performances, multidisciplinary artworks, and, since 2015, exhibitions and publicly accessible historical materials at our Skid Row History Museum & Archive (250 S. Broadway, Downtown LA).

LA Poverty Department (LAPD) has developed countless projects that highlight the grassroots activist initiatives in the neighborhood, map Skid Row’s changing borders, and educate the broader public about the most strident challenges facing the community today. The Skid Row History Museum & Archive foregrounds the distinctive artistic and historical consciousness of Skid Row and functions as a means to explore the mechanics of displacement in an age of immense income inequality, by mining the neighborhood’s activist history and amplifying
effective community strategies. The space operates as an archive and exhibition, performance, and meeting space.

Exhibitions focus on grassroots strategies that have preserved the neighborhood from successive threats of gentrification and displacement, to be studied for current adaptation and use. During pandemic-related closure of the museum, LAPD launched a publicly accessible digital archive of interviews and performances related to the group's biennial "Walk the Talk" performance/parade (https://app.reduct.video/lapd/walk-the-talk/#), which invites community engagement and response.

These fellowships are organized by Catherine Gudis, UCR Associate Professor of History, who is an ACLS-Mellon Society & Scholars Fellow at the Skid Row History Museum & Archive.

Please do not hesitate to write with questions or for more information: [email protected]

Applications due Monday, May 17, 2021 at:
https://forms.gle/4YBnkLmWBq9StQDy

Postdoctoral opportunity as an ACLS Leading Edge Fellowship with Chicago’s Full Spectrum Features, the Midwest’s leading...
04/29/2021
Full Spectrum Features

Postdoctoral opportunity as an ACLS Leading Edge Fellowship with Chicago’s Full Spectrum Features, the Midwest’s leading film and media nonprofit organization working to increase diversity, equity and inclusion in the independent film industry. The Leading Edge Fellow will assume a key leadership role in designing and executing Hidden Histories, a teacher training program centered around Japanese American WWII incarceration that will enable K-12 teachers to utilize FSF’s award-winning digital humanities programs to teach history in the classroom.

Application deadline: 9pm EDT, Thursday May 6, 2021

To apply:
Information on the Leading Edge Fellowship Program: https://www.acls.org/Competitions-and-Deadlines/Leading-Edge-Fellowships
Information about Full Spectrum's specific project:https://documents.acls.org/Programs/Fellowships-and-Grants/Leading-Edge/Spring%202021/Leading-Edge-Full-Spectrum-Features.pdf
All applications must be submitted through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application System (ofa.acls.org)
For more information about Full Spectrum Features: https://www.fullspectrumfeatures.com

A Chicago-based nonprofit committed to increasing diversity in independent film by producing, exhibiting, and supporting the work of marginalized filmmakers.

Photos from Museum of Riverside's post
04/22/2021

Photos from Museum of Riverside's post

Public historians at work! Have you worked on a podcast? Or have a favorite history podcast?
03/17/2021
Episode 89: Horses in Antiquity, with Carolyn Willekes — The Endless Knot

Public historians at work! Have you worked on a podcast? Or have a favorite history podcast?

We speak to Dr. Carolyn Willekes about horses in antiquity: their development and domestication, their use in warfare, their training and breeding, and her many adventures riding horses across Greece, Turkey, Mongolia, and Canada.

03/04/2021

Have you registered for Virtual NCPH 2021 yet? If not, there's still time! Registration will remain open for the duration of the meeting, but if you register by noon EST tomorrow, March 4, you'll receive access to the platform sooner! If you wait, there will likely be a delay before you receive platform access. To register, visit https://ncph.org/conference/2021-annual-meeting/registration-information/.

And peep that virtual event portal in the comments!

01/11/2021

‼️ Smithsonian's Race Initiative is Hiring ‼️

Dear AAAM Members & Supporters:

The Smithsonian's Race, Community and Our Shared Future Initiative is hiring two research assistants (contract positions) to work with the Smithsonian Team. The enclosed dropbox link contains all necessary documents including the statement of work (SOW) and instructions for submitting a bid in the request for quotes (RFQ).

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/dlcx12fvt7yrgi0/AABKqTM7pC9nPHYPO82wF0hIa?dl=0

The team is excited to open the RFQ process and allow applications for this necessary and timely work.

Deadline to submit a bid: Friday, January 22, 2021

For more about the initiative visit https://race.si.edu

or read more here: https://www.si.edu/support/impact/healing-nation

Please send all questions to Joanne Flores [email protected]

W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library
01/05/2021

W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library

The University Library is proud to host the 3rd annual Equine History Conference virtually on March 25-26, 2021, and will focus on the theme “Equine Ecologies and Economies.” Conference proposals are due on January 15 and should be submitted to [email protected].

Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West
08/27/2020

Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West

Please join us and an all-star panel of curators from The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens for "Collecting the History of the West, The Pacific Rim, & California at The Huntington: A Centennial Reflection."

Wednesday September 2, 2020
4:00pm PDT
Register: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_DWCyT9McQ_eZgjyZ27lT0A

Museum of Riverside
08/21/2020

Museum of Riverside

The Museum has been awarded a "Save America's Treasures" grant to begin the rehabilitation of Harada House! This $500,000 grant will get us started on the foundation and structural stabilization work. More news to come soon!

Little Compton Historical Society
08/10/2020

Little Compton Historical Society

Our next virtual lecture will be on August 12th with Dr. Charlotte Carrington-Farmer. She probes the life of Mary Barnard, wife of Roger Williams, and explores the multiple ways of discovering more about Mary Williams and the lives of 17th-century women.

Register here: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcpfu-urDMvG9eg9DcPm1GCppjEG8QPe4V9

(As a part of our annual meeting, there will be a 15-minute business meeting and the election of officers and directors before Dr. Carrington-Farmer's lecture begins around 7:15pm.)

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Riverside, CA
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Our annual graduate student conference will be on the Saturday, May 19 at downtown Riverside. Welcome to join us for exchanging ideas about this crucial issue in our time! ——“The Art of Being in Exile: Alienation and Liberation" ============ 9:00-9:20 REGISTRATION AND COFFEE ----------- 9:20-9:30 OPENING REMARKS (Camilla Querin, AHGSA Conference Coordinator) (Jason Weems, Associate Professor, History of Art) ----------- 9:30-10:50 PANEL ONE: Exiled From History (Moderated by Dr. Jason Weems) Maxwell Forton, Binghamton University “Exiles in the Painted Desert: Colonial Legacies in Petrified Forest National Park” Laura R. Colkitt, University of Florida, Gainesville “Exiled from Africa: Sokari Douglas Camp's Re-contextualization of Past Injustice” Ana Leticia Adami, Columbia University / Universidade de São Paulo “Religious Life and Self-Exile: Learned Women in the Italian Renaissance” ------------ 10:50-11:10 BREAK ------------ 11:10-12:30 PANEL TWO: Assimilation and Retention (Moderated by Dr. Patricia Morton) Najah Pena, University of California, Riverside “Al-Tahtawi, Exile, Paris, and the Arabic Renaissance” Amelia Miholca, Arizona State University “Exil, Dor, Désir: The Romanian Exiles in Post-World War I Paris” Richard Nedjat-Haiem, University of Chicago “Ana ‘Albi Dalili W ‘Ali ’An ’Arabiyyati: The Jews are Arab Cultural Icons, Too!” ------------ 12:30-2:00 LUNCH BREAK ------------ 2:00-2:05 INTRODUCTION OF KEYNOTE SPEAKER (Cynthia Neri Lewis, AHGSA Conference Coordinator) 2:05 -3:00 KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Dr. Tatiana Flores (Associate Professor, Rutgers University) “Perpetual Exile: The Caribbean as Ur-Diaspora” ------------ 3:00 -3:10 BREAK ------------ 3:10- 4:30 PANEL THREE:Networks of Exiles (Moderated by Dr. Susan Laxton) Katja Rivera, University of Illinois at Chicago “The Old World as The Newest Thing: Felipe Ehrenberg’s Maps, 1970–74” Paula Kupfer, University of Pittsburgh “Photographs on the Move: Gertrudes Altschul and São Paulo’s Foto Cine Clube Bandeirante” Adri Kácsor, Northwestern University “The Communist Aesthetics of Exile: Constructivism Moves to Europe” ----------- 4:30- 4:40 CLOSING REMARKS (Rebecca Maness, AHGSA President) ========== Special Thanks to: UCR Department of the History of Art UCR Department of English UCR Department of Art UCR Department of Anthropology UCR Department of Comparative Literature UCR Department of Ethnic Studies UCR Department of History Center for Ideas and Society CHASS Dean’s Office Graduate Student Association Culver Center of the Arts/UCR ARTSblock Kourtney Brumfield Susan Komura Dr. Jeanette Kohl Dr. Susan Laxton Dr. Patricia Morton Dr. Jason Weems ----------------------- Front image: Anh-Thuy Nguyen, Boat Journey series, Brighton Beach # 1, 2013. Aluminum print, 8x8 in. Courtesy of the artist.
Hello, fellow Highlanders! ESA, the company I work for, is looking for one and possibly two paid, half-time historic preservation interns for current students or recent grads in Santa Monica. See this link for more info and an application:
Hello! We still have spots for the course MUS007 - " MUSIC in MOVIES and TV" . June 26 - July 29 (Summer Session 1). The classes take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 1:10 pm to 4:00pm. Feel free to enroll online (Call number 71396/7), and do not hesitate to contact us for further information! #mus007 #musicinmoviesandtv #ucrsummersession #ucr
Hi! We invite UCR Public History to celebrate our new Julia Morgan Tribute Wall! Julia Donoho + Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony Tuesday, May 30, 2017, 5:30 p.m. - 7 p.m., Free RAM is proud to debut our new Julia Morgan Tribute Wall designed and funded by HMC Architects and their Designing Futures Foundation. This permanent exhibition features new information and imagery to educate visitors about the building’s architecture and history, and Morgan’s story as the first professional female architect in California and winner of the American Institute of Architect’s Gold Medal, the AIA’s highest honor. Please join us for the ribbon-cutting ceremony! In addition, Julia Donoho, a well-regarded Morgan expert, will give a presentation on Morgan’s early work and life. She will also discuss the process of posthumously awarding Morgan the AIA Gold Medal and its significance globally.