Docenting at Heritage House Museum

Docenting at Heritage House Museum A page for (and by) the volunteer docents of Heritage House Museum in Riverside, CA. This page is dedicated to sharing exactly what I do with all the time I spend volunteering at Heritage House Museum, as well as anything I find about the history of the house, the city and the time period in general, and the history of the house's docents.

I'm thrilled to see other docents liking the page, and I'd encourage them to share their experiences as well - photos, stories, anecdotes, anything they think is relevant to their time at the house. For further information about the museum, visit:
http://www.riversideca.gov/museum/heritagehouse/

Operating as usual

Instagram Photos
06/10/2021

Instagram Photos

Women’s athletic clothing of 1896… apparently perfect for tennis, croquet or riding your bike :) #antiques #sports #curiosityincyeg

06/04/2021

Today marks the U.S. Postal Service’s release of the “Go For Broke” Forever stamp. The stamp commemorates the contributions of Japanese American soldiers to the U.S. Army in World War II. The stamp is named in honor of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, one of the most decorated units in U.S. history. Composed almost entirely of Japanese Americans, the 442nd’s motto was “Go for Broke,” meaning they would do anything to prevail. Both Yoshizo and Harold Harada served in the U.S. Army's 442nd Regimental Combat Team and returned home safely to the U.S. after the war.
Image courtesy of the U.S. Postal Service.

06/01/2021

Mine Harada and Saburo Kido wedding portrait, 1928.
Mine Harada and Saburo Kido were married in Riverside on May 20, 1928. The newlyweds lived in San Francisco, where Kido operated his own legal practice and Mine worked in an Asian souvenir store, where she made more than double the salary of her husband.

Image courtesy of the Harada Family Archival Collection, Museum of Riverside. We need to keep the story alive and save the Harada House.

05/24/2021

Yesterday, May 23, 2021, was the 79th anniversary of the Harada family’s forced removal and incarceration by the U.S. government during World War II. The incarceration of some 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry is one of the most infamous violations of civil rights in our country’s history.

Amid the current rise of hate crimes against Asians and the continuing systemic racism against communities of color in our country, the Harada House Foundation solemnly commemorates the anniversary and shares this remembrance from Naomi Harada, a granddaughter of Jukichi and Ken Harada. It was Naomi’s father, Harold, who inscribed the date on the wall of their family home in Riverside, California with the date and time of their forced removal.

When asked to write my thoughts of the forced removal of my father - Harold Harada, my mother, grandparents, aunts, and uncles from their homes on the West Coast, I became solemnly pensive. I think of tremendous loss on a grand scale: The loss of civil rights and the absence of protection of those rights, doled out by a nation that promises “liberty and justice for all.”

On a smaller scale, there is the personal loss. While it is unknown if the incarceration hastened my grandparents’ demise, the fact remains they died in the Topaz incarceration camp. My siblings and I never got to know our father’s parents. I think about how my family left pets, friends, neighbors, teachers, and personal treasures behind, not knowing if they would ever see them again. My Auntie Sumi lost her means for a livelihood after the war because the family business, the Washington Restaurant, was gone. In letters I have only recently seen, Jess Stebler, a family friend who cared for the Harada House during the war, warned Auntie Sumi not to return to Riverside alone, that she should wait until my father or another brother could accompany her. He was genuinely concerned for her safety. As a child, I knew that Auntie Sumi worked cleaning houses, which causes me to pause on what opportunities were available to her, as her brothers went on to advanced degrees.

My parents met in Topaz. My mother’s family lost everything because of the incarceration.

How different might life have been if it were not for the forced removal?

Naomi Harada, granddaughter of Jukichi and Ken Harada and daughter of Harold Harada, May 23, 2021

#StopAsianHate

The Eliza Tibbets ("The Sower's Dream") statue was "flower-bombed" by a local florist with blossoms, eucalyptus and oran...
05/24/2021

The Eliza Tibbets ("The Sower's Dream") statue was "flower-bombed" by a local florist with blossoms, eucalyptus and oranges this week. What a lovely tribute to a fascinating woman and early Riverside pioneer!

"The 1,100 pound bronze statue depicts Eliza with outstretched arms and billowing dress. It is meant to portray a young Eliza as opposed to the older "Queen Victoria" Eliza most associate with Mrs. Tibbets' time living in Riverside.

Included on the statue are etchings of navel oranges and a replica of a "Woman's Relief Corps" medal, no doubt a nod to Eliza's women's suffrage activism.

Several tiles surrounding the statue include the names of those who helped make it a reality. Planted nearby are two navel orange trees. The statue honors not only Eliza the navel orange matriarch, but also Eliza the spiritualist, abolitionist and activist." ~ Raincross Square

Dyer mounting block on display in front of the porch at Heritage House. The Dyer family had a mansion on Main Street bet...
05/21/2021

Dyer mounting block on display in front of the porch at Heritage House.

The Dyer family had a mansion on Main Street between Eleventh and Twelfth streets that was torn down in the late 1920s. The first Dyer bank (pictured) later became Riverside Banking Company.

"A mounting block, horse block, carriage stone, or in Scots a loupin'-on stane is an assistance for mounting and dismounting a horse or cart, especially for women, the young, the elderly or the infirm.

Mounting blocks were especially useful for women riding sidesaddle or pillion, that is 'riding double', allowing a horse to be mounted without a loss of modesty. They were also used to assist ladies and men into and out of carts.

They were frequently located outside churches or kirks for the use of parishioners attending services, funerals, etc. Often they were located in the main streets and outside public houses." ~ Wikipedia

Harada House in Riverside Marks Asian Immigrant Civil Rights
05/20/2021
Harada House in Riverside Marks Asian Immigrant Civil Rights

Harada House in Riverside Marks Asian Immigrant Civil Rights

The Harada House in downtown Riverside is a marker of the fight for civil rights that Asian immigrants underwent in California. Tony Shin reports for NBC4 at 6 p.m. on May 18, 2021.

Wonderful memories of our Ice Cream Social, 4 years ago on this day.
05/19/2021

Wonderful memories of our Ice Cream Social, 4 years ago on this day.

05/02/2021

Happy First Day of May, dearies! 🌸

#May1st #VictorianEra
Image: "May," poster from the 1890's. Source: NYPL The New York Public Library

Victorian May Day celebrations."May Day is often synonymous with the Victorian era as it was at this time that the celeb...
05/01/2021

Victorian May Day celebrations.

"May Day is often synonymous with the Victorian era as it was at this time that the celebration really saw its revival. The Victorians however, were formal people and many of the pagan traditions and links to fertility were believed to be too risqué, so the maypole became a seasonal game for children instead. In addition to the maypole, Victorian’s would mark the beginning of the summer season with family games, dancing and music – much like Sudeley Castle’s May Day event on Monday 7 May." ~ Sudeley Castle

Spring has sprung in the Heritage House gardens.
05/01/2021

Spring has sprung in the Heritage House gardens.

04/25/2021

Excitement is in air. We are actively preparing to open Heritage House on Sept.10th, barring any new restrictions. If things continue as they are, Moon Festival will be held on Sept.21st, although it will be very different than in years past. Please check back as we will share updates when we get them. We cannot wait to share our beautiful "Jewel of Riverside" and Catherine Bettners inspiring story with our guests again!

Happy Easter to all of our Guests, Docents and Staff.
04/04/2021

Happy Easter to all of our Guests, Docents and Staff.

Happy Easter Sunday, dearies!

#Victorian #Easter2021 💐 🐇
Image Source: The Graphics Fairy

04/02/2021

Ever wonder why the @museumofriverside collects insects? Join them during the Virtual #RiversideInsectFair as they present “Small Things Can Tell a Big Story” a behind the scenes look of their Entomology collection. 🦋🍃🌸 #ILoveRiverside

04/01/2021

Happy First Day of April, dearies!

#April1st #VictorianEra
Image: "April," poster from the 1890's. Source: NYPL The New York Public Library

Victorian Poissons d’Avril (April Fool's Day) cards. In France and others areas of Europe, such as Italy, Belgium and Sw...
04/01/2021

Victorian Poissons d’Avril (April Fool's Day) cards.

In France and others areas of Europe, such as Italy, Belgium and Switzerland, the April 1 tradition is often known as Poissons d’Avril, literally ‘April Fish’, traced back to 1508 when French poet Eloy d’Amerval mentioned a holiday called ‘Poisson d’Avril’.

Another theory is that fish in April are generally young and easily caught, making them susceptible to gullibility. A common custom in France on 1 April is to attempt to attach a paper fish to someone’s back without them noticing." ~ HistoryPress

03/29/2021

Jukichi and Ken Harada, circa 1905-1909.
In 1905, the Harada family was reunited. Jukichi had left Japan in 1903. Ken and their son, Masa Atsu, journeyed to California in 1904. While Masa Atsu was permitted entry into the US, Ken was turned away at Angel Island Immigration Station and required to return to Japan. In 1905, she successfully entered the United States via Canada. Shortly after her arrival, the family moved from Redlands to Riverside.

Image courtesy of the Harada Family Archival Collection, Museum of Riverside. We need to keep the story alive and save the Harada House. https://www.haradahousefoundation.org/donate

03/28/2021
Once again, it's orange blossom season in Riverside. Did you know that there's a connection between Queen Victoria and t...
03/22/2021

Once again, it's orange blossom season in Riverside. Did you know that there's a connection between Queen Victoria and the fragrant blooms? Here's the story:

The connection between orange blossoms and Queen Victoria explained:

"As a present for their sixth wedding anniversary in February 1846, Albert gave Victoria a wreath of white porcelain orange blossoms with gold leaves on a braided black velvet band with a silk ribbon tie at the back. The wreath includes four oranges made from green enamel to represent the four children they had at that time, but that wasn't the only meaningful touch.

The selection of orange blossom was filled with significance for the couple. The flower represented chastity in the language of flowers; it was also associated with betrothal, as emphasized when Albert sent Victoria a brooch designed as a white porcelain and gold sprig of orange blossom after their engagement.

Victoria wore fresh orange blossoms on their wedding day, and just as her gown created a trend for white wedding dresses, she started a trend for orange blossom jewelry. Albert turned his engagement gift into a parure (matched set) by giving her another brooch and a pair of matching earrings in December 1845." ~ OrderOfSplendor

03/19/2021

Our thoughts on the violence in Atlanta last night. Read for the full statement. https://bit.ly/3lszUoC
#stopaapihate #wekeepussafe
Repost from Stop AAPI Hate

"The Riverside–Arlington Line is a former Pacific Electric interurban railway line in the Inland Empire. The route provi...
03/18/2021

"The Riverside–Arlington Line is a former Pacific Electric interurban railway line in the Inland Empire. The route provided suburban service between San Bernardino and Arlington with a later extension to Corona. It operated between 1893 and 1943." ~ Wikipedia

03/16/2021

Women's History Month continues! The citrus industry employed immigrants from many regions of the world and attracted people from all walks of life during picking season. The impractical clothing worn by this woman and little girl didn't stop them from taking part.

03/14/2021

On March 27 at 1:00 p.m., the Ontario Museum of History and Art presents a virtual lecture, "The Harada House – A Story of Endurance and Preservation." Join this presentation by Lisa Masengale, the Museum of Riverside’s Curator of Historic Structures, to learn about the Harada family, their house, and the ongoing effort to share this story of endurance and preservation. Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86509823468#success

03/14/2021

She was approached by a young girl who kept repeating "mommy ... baby ... blood." The young nurse at first wasn't sure what to do, but she followed the child to a sick woman in a dirty, unheated tenement on the Lower East Side of New York, where immigrants were forced to live in horrible conditions.

The young girl's "mother was bleeding to death in childbirth, and . . . the doctor had abandoned the family because they couldn’t afford to pay him," according to the New York Times.

The young nurse saved the woman's life.

The nurse had been training to become a doctor [and was enrolled in medical school], which was "a rarity at that time for a woman," according to writer Sara Ivry.

But after seeing the horrid conditions immigrants had to endure, she decided to quit medical school to help and care for those in need. “She calls that her ‘baptism of fire’ moment,” Katie Vogel, a public historian, said, “because it was the first time that she witnessed those conditions up close in a way that she understood how all the factors of poverty all come together.”

The name of the young nurse was Lillian D. Wald. She was born on March 10, 1867. She championed the causes of public health nursing, housing reform, suffrage, world peace, and the rights of women, children, immigrants and working people.

"In 1893, after witnessing first-hand the poverty and hardship endured by immigrants on the Lower East Side, she founded Henry Street Settlement. She moved into the neighborhood and, living and working among the industrial poor, she and her colleagues offered health care to area residents in their homes . . . In addition to health care, Henry Street provided social services and instruction in everything from the English language to music," according to the web page of the Henry Street Settlement.

“Scorn of the immigrant is not peculiar to our generation,” she wrote in “The House on Henry Street,” the memoir she wrote in 1915.

"Lillian Wald originated the public health nursing service and the Henry Street Settlement to meet the needs of the poor . . . During the early twentieth century, this outstanding nurse and social activist was a dynamic force for social reform, creating widely-adopted models of public health and social service programs," according to the National Women's Hall of Fame.

This is part of a continuing series on the Peace Page celebrating Women's History Month.

She also "founded, and pioneered an array of social programs and initiatives that so many now take for granted," according to Ivry.

"A fierce advocate for children, she created the first playground in New York City; pioneered special education; introduced the concept of free lunches and nurses in schools; and fought against child labor," according to the New York Times.

“We extrapolated that one in six Americans has been impacted or touched by a program that was pioneered at Henry Street,” said David Garza, the organization’s executive director. “You see something like a playground — how many of us have been in a playground? How many have had a lunch at school that was free? How many have had a nurse visit someone who needed homecare?”

Wald "rejected the dominant idea of her time: that poverty is a personal moral failing . . . and she took great responsibility for those less fortunate than she was," according to Ivry.

She "went on to help organize other public health nursing programs in universities and for organizations, including the American Red Cross . . . [she also] led the charge to abolish child labor, and helped secure the creation of the federal Children’s Bureau in 1912," according to the National Women's Hall of Fame.

An early civil rights activist, Wald was an outspoken proponent of equal rights and justice for women and people of color. She insisted that all Henry Street classes be racially integrated, and she established settlement house branches in neighborhoods that had larger African-American populations so that they, too, would have access to her organization’s services.

In response to the continuing horrific practice of lynching and the 1908 race riot in Springfield, she and Mary Talbert, Jane Addams, and Mary McLeod Bethune became founding members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), whose first meetings were held at the Henry Street Settlement.

And, when it came to helping immigrants, Wald “thought immigrants’ culture should be valued . . . she didn't think people [should give] up their culture . . . and thought the contributions of immigrants should be celebrated,” according to Ivry.

“As a nation, we must rise or fall as we serve or fail these future citizens,” Wald wrote in a revelant observation, noting, “only through knowledge is one fortified to resist the onslaught of arguments of the superficial observer who, dismayed by the sight, is conscious only of ‘hordes’ and ‘danger to America’ in these little children.”

"A tireless and accomplished humanitarian", she became "one of the most influential and respected social reformers of the 20th century," according to the Henry Street Settlement.

"A recently discovered artifact shows the power and influence of Lillian Wald," according to the New York Times, a book which had the signatures of Eleanor Roosevelt and Amelia Earhart. "Throughout the 20th century, the settlement house served as a destination for civil rights leaders like W.E.B. DuBois, who visited Henry Street’s stately dining room for the reception celebrating the N.A.A.C.P.’s founding conference. Decades later, Rosa Parks stayed there while attending a rally at Madison Square Garden, just five months after her arrest."

"Wald established a close community of women—with whom she had both romantic and platonic relationships—at the Settlement," according to the Henry Street Settlement.

"Wald did not marry and maintained her closest relationships with women. Although she did not self-identify as a lesbian, her letters reveal the intimate affection she felt for at least two of her companions, Mabel Hyde Kittredge and Helen Arthur," according to lgbt history month.

Today, the Henry Street Settlement continues to serve low-income individuals and families, survivors of domestic violence, youngsters ages 2 through 21, individuals with mental and physical health challenges, and senior citizens.

Wald was named by the New York Times as one of the 12 greatest living American women in 1922, devoting her life ensuring that women and children, immigrants and the poor, and members of all ethnic and religious groups would realize America's promise of "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness."

Lillian Wald, according to Michael Bronski, "imagined an America in which helping the poor was not charity but a work of democracy and a demonstration of equality."

~ jsr

[Photo courtesy of National Women's Hall of Fame]

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8193 Magnolia Ave.
Riverside, CA
92504

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Saturday 12pm - 3:30pm
Sunday 12pm - 3:30pm

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This is a space for sharing what the dedicated docents of Heritage House Museum in Riverside, CA do, as well as anything related to the history of Heritage House, the Bettner family, early Riverside and the Victorian period in general, and the history of the museum’s docents. Docents are encouraged to share their experiences - photos, stories, anecdotes and anything else to do with the time they spend volunteering at the house. For further information about the museum, visit: http://www.riversideca.gov/museum/heritagehouse/


Comments

"Although rare today, the hair receiver was a common fixture on the dressing tables of women from Victorian times to the early decades of the 20th century. Its purpose was to save hair culled from the hairbrush and comb, which were used vigorously on a daily basis. The hair could then be stuffed into pincushions or pillows. Since hair was not washed as often as it is today, oils were frequently used to add scent and shine to hair. The residual oil made the hair an ideal stuffing for pincushions because it lubricated the pins, making it easier for them to pierce material. Small pillows could be stuffed with hair, which was less prickly than pinfeathers. But possibly most important, hair receivers made the creation of ratts possible. A ratt (sometimes spelled rat) is a small ball of hair that was inserted into a hairstyle to add volume and fullness. The ratt was made by stuffing a sheer hairnet until it was about the size of a potato and then sewing it shut." ~ Michael McLeod
"Although rare today, the hair receiver was a common fixture on the dressing tables of women from Victorian times to the early decades of the 20th century. Its purpose was to save hair culled from the hairbrush and comb, which were used vigorously on a daily basis. The hair could then be stuffed into pincushions or pillows. Since hair was not washed as often as it is today, oils were frequently used to add scent and shine to hair. The residual oil made the hair an ideal stuffing for pincushions because it lubricated the pins, making it easier for them to pierce material. Small pillows could be stuffed with hair, which was less prickly than pinfeathers. But possibly most important, hair receivers made the creation of ratts possible. A ratt (sometimes spelled rat) is a small ball of hair that was inserted into a hairstyle to add volume and fullness. The ratt was made by stuffing a sheer hairnet until it was about the size of a potato and then sewing it shut." ~ Michael McLeod http://go-star.com/antiquing/hairreceivers.htm
Heritage House Victorian House Museum closure until further notice.No events will be held in April 2020 https://www.riversideca.gov/press/information-regarding-covid-19-coronavirus
I am so I haven't been there to help I been so sick I anixity. I been loosing weight I have no apptie. I.try eat than I feel sick. tired of just sitting home I haven't been working Have no strengh I been drinking water I hope I can come back Hertige House. I get the shales
I am interested in being a volunteer. How should I start that process?
Happy Holidays