Guy B. Woodward Museum

Guy B. Woodward Museum The museum features early Western culture: an 1886 adobe home furnished in period antiques, a jail, blacksmith & other shops, buggies, wagons & much more.
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Operating as usual

PRESS RELEASE
08/05/2020

PRESS RELEASE

03/16/2020

In light of the evolving health recommendations for Coronavirus (COVID-19), and the need for social distancing and precautionary measures, we feel that the most responsible decision for our Docents, guests students, and staff right now is to close the Museum effective today, Monday, March 16th, until the end further notice.

While this isn’t the easiest decision for us to make, we feel that it is the right one for the time being. For now, at least through the end of March.

03/07/2020

Please note our website is down due to a technical issue. We’re working to resolve it.

REMEMBERING KEN WOODWARD                                                                     (By Jeff Funk)Immediately f...
02/17/2020

REMEMBERING KEN WOODWARD (By Jeff Funk)

Immediately following our December potluck dinner I learned of Ken Woodward’s passing. I first became acquainted with Ken in the mid 1970’s when he was the Program Afloat College Education (PACE) Administer for Central Texas College, and I was the Educational Services Officer on the USS Constellation (CV-64). I remember the ship being several hundred miles off the coast of San Diego when the ship’s captain called me to the bridge and informed me that I would be immediately flown off the ship to San Diego, and that I was not to return until I had arranged to have an instructor assigned to teach a “English as a Second Language” course onboard the ship. I had contracts with several colleges and one high school, however none of them could help me. I was then referred to the local office of Central Texas College where I met Ken for the very first time. Ken was extremely sympatric to my problem. With his help I flew back to the ship three days later with an instructor, course curriculum and textbooks. Needless to say, Ken was my hero as he made me look great to the captain and through the next couple of years he assisted me in setting up several other college and vocational classes. The help I received from Ken was very typical of his can-do attitude and how he approached his everyday dealings with all individuals.

Upon moving to Ramona in 1983 I was again reunited with Ken through my wife Alice’s affiliation with the Guy B. Woodward Museum. Ken’s dedication to the Ramona Pioneer Historical Society and the Guy B. Woodward Museum found his life resolving around the museum and carrying on where his parents Geneva and Guy Woodward left off. Thank you so much, Ken.

For those members who don’t receive the Ramona Sentinel I am passing on the following from Ken’s obituary.

“Ramona Kenneth Paul Woodward was born in Oceanside, CA, on May 5, 1933, to Geneva and Guy Woodward. He passed away on December 19, 2019, in Escondido, CA. Ken attended Oceanside High School for three years and graduated from El Centro High School in 1951. At both schools, he was active in the athletic programs of football, basketball, and track. Ken was employed by the FBI while he attended San Diego State College. He was drafted into the U.S. Army and served in Korea during the Korean War. Following his discharge from the army, he graduated from San Diego State and began his teaching career at Oceanside High School. His first teaching assignment was for the mentally challenged. This was a new concept in education at Oceanside High School, and he faced the challenge of developing this new program and was successful. Ken was a popular and well-respected member of the coaching staff. He was a coach for the Varsity Track Team for several years. Ken was an administrator for Central Texas College for 15 years. He enjoyed golfing and hiking, and was active in the Ramona Historical Society, and Director of the Guy B. Woodward Museum. He was preceded in death by his parents and brother Richard D. Woodward.”

12/29/2019

It is with our sadness to announce one of our long term docents, friend of the museum and community, and a name sake to the museum, (Guy B. Woodward’s son), Ken Woodward, has passed away. Many of you may remember him, and he was a warm man with a vast amount of knowledge of Ramona and the backcountry in it’s earlier years.
The funeral will be at Bonham brothers funeral home January 4th. Viewing starts at 10am. Service is at noon with the procession to the graveside service after. From niece - Jessica Woodward.
If you would like to leave a favorite memory of Ken and his family please attend the services.

12/03/2019

As part of our communication development, the RPHS (Ramona Pioneer Historical Society) newsletter will be posted.
The December 2019 issue is posted as a slide show and as an album.

11/28/2019

Happy Thanksgiving!! We have a lot to be thankful for including our new webpage. Check it out at woodwardmuseum.net.

The foundation is in, new pieces and features will be added including a calendar. I hope you like this version and will give me feedback to continue to develop it.

Tom Taylor did such an awesome job with the previous version. We want to thank him for all of the hours he spent and the photos he's given us. Tom will continue to be our photographer and I will be our webmaster. Cheryl

Guy B. Woodward Museum Rack Card
11/23/2019

Guy B. Woodward Museum Rack Card

10/04/2019

Historical Society Welcomes Railroad Aficionado.
Ramona Pioneer Historical Society President Jeff Funk invites history and railroad buffs to the society’s potluck dinner meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 15.

Guest speaker Jim Price will talk about the San Diego and Arizona Railway (SD&AE), and how 100 years ago, John D. Spreckels drove a golden spike at Carrizo Gorge, signifying the completion of what was dubbed "the impossible railroad,” which had taken more than 12 years to build.

Price has a longstanding interest in Western history, especially old mining towns and the railroads that served them. He and his wife, Joan, own a vacation home in Goldfield, Nev., where they are restoring a 130-year-old caboose.

The group will also discuss its gala dinner and centennial celebration planned for November.

The meeting will be held in the Barnett Barn on the grounds of the Guy B. Woodward Museum, 645 Main St. The public is welcome. Those who attend are asked to bring a main dish, salad or dessert to serve eight.

Thank you Ramona Home Journal for the article:

RAMONAJOURNAL.COM
Historical Society Welcomes Railroad Aficionado

Come down and take a free tour! Learn about Ramona and the backcountry of San Diego from the late 1800’s. #Ramona #whatt...
06/29/2019

Come down and take a free tour! Learn about Ramona and the backcountry of San Diego from the late 1800’s. #Ramona #whattodoinSanDiego #Woodward #Museum #Verlaque #Ransom

05/30/2019

Tonight! We are Cruzin' History! Come into the museum FREE and Cruise History with us during the Ramona Cruise night. We will be open 5:30-7pm.

Ramona Pioneer Historical Society had a wonderful treat this afternoon with a visit from the #Clampers #EClampusVitus #S...
04/27/2019

Ramona Pioneer Historical Society had a wonderful treat this afternoon with a visit from the #Clampers #EClampusVitus #Squidbob #whattodoinRamoma #GuyBWoodwardMuseum #SanDiegoMuseum

Come see us!
04/27/2019

Come see us!

We are open and giving free tours! Come see learn about the wonderful history about Ramona and the backcountry! #Ramona ...
04/27/2019

We are open and giving free tours! Come see learn about the wonderful history about Ramona and the backcountry! #Ramona #GuyBWoodward #SanDiegoMuseum

03/01/2019

FREE! Yes, free admission! We love donations but right now, walk ins are free to tour! Come check out the hidden gem in Ramona! #ramonahistory #history #wow we are open Friday 1-3, and Saturday and Sunday from 1-4. Contact us for more information. See you soon!

What a fun night at the Christmas Tree Lighting last night in front of the Guy B. Woodward Museum. Just beautiful! Thank...
12/02/2018

What a fun night at the Christmas Tree Lighting last night in front of the Guy B. Woodward Museum. Just beautiful! Thank you Ramona Chamber of Commerce & to all involved! The tree looks lovely! Many people attended & enjoyed the music & dancing, Car Show, & photos with Santa at the Town Hall.

1925 Hit & Miss Engine used to saw wood on Dobrotin Ranch in Ramona.
06/18/2018

1925 Hit & Miss Engine used to saw wood on Dobrotin Ranch in Ramona.

Thank you Regina Elling for your efforts in the design, planning & planting of the our rock & succulent gardens. Also to...
03/08/2018

Thank you Regina Elling for your efforts in the design, planning & planting of the our rock & succulent gardens. Also to all who made donations to it. It sure has brightened up the grounds. And also to our maintenance man Ed Bates.
Good job all! 👍

Please share!
01/19/2018
Jessica

Please share!

Have you heard that the Guy B. Woodward Museum has been nominated by Hulafrog San Diego North, CA for the Most Loved Place to Go With Kids in San Diego North for 2018? Vote at the link below between now and 2/2/18 to find out who will be the most loved!

Thank you again to the Ramona Chamber of Commerce for putting up the beautiful Community Christmas Tree at the Guy B Woo...
12/12/2017

Thank you again to the Ramona Chamber of Commerce for putting up the beautiful Community Christmas Tree at the Guy B Woodward Museum.

Always a treat to host students from Montessori Children’s Elementary School, who have crafted the decorations for our C...
12/12/2017

Always a treat to host students from Montessori Children’s Elementary School, who have crafted the decorations for our Christmas tree for the past 20 years.

Thank you to the Logan family who visited the Guy B. Woodward Museum following their reunion!
11/25/2017

Thank you to the Logan family who visited the Guy B. Woodward Museum following their reunion!

Jeff Zevely from Ch. 8 Zevely Zone visited the Woodward Museum. Fun time!
11/23/2017

Jeff Zevely from Ch. 8 Zevely Zone visited the Woodward Museum. Fun time!

Ed Bates in charge of our museum maintenance, is repainting the lattice work. Good job Ed! 👍
10/24/2017

Ed Bates in charge of our museum maintenance, is repainting the lattice work. Good job Ed! 👍

For more information about programs, meetings, or becoming a docent check our website woodwardmuseum.net.
08/15/2017
woodwardmuseum.net/

For more information about programs, meetings, or becoming a docent check our website woodwardmuseum.net.

Ramona museum

Check out the Guy B. Woodward Museum...lots to see such as vintage wagons, blacksmith shop, cowboy bunk house, the histo...
08/11/2017

Check out the Guy B. Woodward Museum...lots to see such as vintage wagons, blacksmith shop, cowboy bunk house, the historic 1886 adobe Verlaque House. Located in the heart of "Old Town Ramona."

What an amazing collection of antique wagons, buggies, original jail house, cowboy bunk house & much more!!
06/24/2017

What an amazing collection of antique wagons, buggies, original jail house, cowboy bunk house & much more!!

Thank you to the Ramona Garden Club, Regina & all who contributed to our rock gardens.
06/05/2017

Thank you to the Ramona Garden Club, Regina & all who contributed to our rock gardens.

Ken Woodward by old homemade Lakeside ranch wagon.
03/29/2017

Ken Woodward by old homemade Lakeside ranch wagon.

Photos from Guy B. Woodward Museum's post
12/10/2016

Photos from Guy B. Woodward Museum's post

Thanks Duane & Mischa Dobrotin & Ed Bates for repairing the door to the blacksmith's shop!
12/02/2016

Thanks Duane & Mischa Dobrotin & Ed Bates for repairing the door to the blacksmith's shop!

Come on out & enjoy!!!🌲🎅🏻
11/21/2016

Come on out & enjoy!!!🌲🎅🏻

Thanks to the Ramona Garden Club for the beautiful Charles Faust plaque depicting historical farm & blacksmith's tools &...
06/18/2016

Thanks to the Ramona Garden Club for the beautiful Charles Faust plaque depicting historical farm & blacksmith's tools & the freight wagon that are also on display at the museum.

Address

645 Main St
Ramona, CA
92065

General information

Hours: Thurs & Fri 1-3 Sat & Sun 1-4 Weekdays & Group tours call for appointment. (760) 789-7644

Opening Hours

Thursday 13:00 - 15:00
Friday 13:00 - 16:00
Saturday 13:00 - 16:00
Sunday 13:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(760) 789-7644

Products

Extensive archives of historic local newspapers, photos, documents, and autobiographies. Research and local history books available.

Alerts

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Videos

Guy B. Woodward Museum Of Early Western Culture

Owned and Operated by The Ramona Pioneer Historical Society 645 Main Street, Ramona, CA 92065/Mailing Address: P.O Box 625, Ramona, CA 92065 Phone: (760) 789-7644 ~ www.WoodwardMuseum.net Hours: ~Saturday & Sunday 1-4 PM ~Thursday and Friday 1-3 PM ~Weekdays by Appointments ~Special Group Tours Available ~Archive Research by Appointment Admission is Free during regular open hours ~Donations Accepted ~Established Fees for Special Appointments & Special Group Tours ~Memberships Available. Includes Quarterly Newsletters and Programs

The tour features The Verlaque House, a French Provincial Adobe. Circa 1886


  • Fully Furnished in Period Antiques

  • Original 1800’s 7-ton Steel Jail, in use ‘til 1915
  • Nearby museums


    Comments

    My Grandfathers turkey ranch. Jack Decker also owned Ramona newspaper
    It is to my great sadness to say my Grandpa Ken Woodward passed away December 19th. The funeral will be at Bonham brothers funeral home January 4th. Viewing starts at 10am. Service is at noon with the procession to the graveside service after. Thank you.
    Christmas Potluck
    Come and see our "Honey House" started back in the 1950s.
    "Finally I came across a story about the legendary rodeo cowboy, Casey Tibbs, who I remembered had won something like six world titles (it was 8) and was evermore a world-class athlete. More importantly, as rodeo’s quintessential Beau Geste, Casey’s bright purple Cadillacs, his movie-star looks and his hard-drinking ways endeared him to every other cowboy who ever bought his family tickets, thus he did as much to build the sport into what it is today as any other guy who ever pulled on pointed boots. What I didn’t know was that Tibbs was a premier practical joker. I love people like Casey Tibbs. As I grow increasingly tired of today’s pro athletes who actually shoot themselves with guns and are seemingly arrested more times than they make a travel roster, I long for the merriment that was had back in the days when life was pure and laughter was genuine. For instance, Casey used to travel with another cowboy of note named Delbert (Deb) Copenhaver. One time they had to catch a 5 a.m. flight to the next rodeo town and had stayed at the airport’s bar until it closed. Well, as some other good men have come to learn, the three hours between the time the bar closes and the flight leaves is longer than from one Christmas to the next. One of the guys who helped the two cowboys order doubles at “last call” was sleeping on the floor in the waiting area and Casey convinced Deb it would be so funny to “hot foot” the poor man. This is where you tuck matches between the sole and the upper portion of an unsuspecting chump’s shoe and, when you light them and they burn down, the victim will dance quite a memorable jig. Casey started the caper, but was suddenly all thumbs. Deb looked at his buddy with disgust, shoved Casey out of the way, and proceeded to do the job right, which – of course – is what Casey wanted all along. So the very second Deb was lighting the cluster of carefully-placed matches, Casey slapped the wall as hard as he could with a magazine and the victim jumped awake to see a wide-eyed Copenhaver in the middle of setting his foot on fire. Well, the chump was a mighty big boy and, with murder in his eyes, he then chased Deb all over the airport for about 30 minutes. Casey was laughing so hard he could hardly stand up but, according to Deb, the colorful Tibbs did something like this most nearly every day. Well, I’m wishing the world had more Caseys. I think such high-jinx are hysterical but the best ever is what the lovable Tibbs did to the “King of Cowboys” himself, Roy Rogers. Back in the ‘50s, the biggest rodeo event in the world was in New York’s Madison Square Garden. Oh, it didn’t have the prestige of Dallas or Fort Worth or even the Calgary Stampede but it had a far-greater lure – huge paychecks. A cowboy could make as much at “The Garden” in just a week as he did on the circuit the rest of the year, and that’s “honest injun.” Well, the New York crowd was hooked from the get-go and soon people from all over the East coast would gather in the Big Apple to see the cowboys rope and ride. The rodeo people were eager to glamour it up so they arranged for the most famous cowboy in the whole world, Roy Rogers, to bring Dale Evans (“The Queen of the West”) and, of course, Trigger, his ever-faithful steed, to NYC. Roy and Dale would do a lot of TV and radio spots all week, posing for pictures and signing autographs, and then, on the night of the finals, “The King of the Cowboys” would kick things off by galloping ole Trigger around and around the arena. To further get the crowd all frenzied, Roy would rip out his six-gun and shoot madly into the air. I mean, the band would be playing a jazzed-up ”Happy Trails To You,” the whole thing, and a roaring Madison Square Garden would be about to pop at the seams. So along comes the unforgettable year our hero Casey Tibbs spent part of every day early in the week secretly collecting dead pigeons all over Manhattan (I heard he used a homemade snare and a handful of dried corn and . . . they were not all deceased). Then, just before Roy Rogers himself made his cameo appearance in the spotlight of a darkened and very sold-out Madison Square Garden, Casey somehow climbed high into the rafters over the arena with a burlap bag of the dead birds. So here’s the deal: every time Roy Rogers would fire his pistol, Casey Tibbs would toss a dead pigeon from high in the darkness, just so it would get caught for a second in the spotlight’s glare. The more Roy Rogers would pull the pistol’s trigger, the more very-dead birds would land right behind the horse Trigger. Forget that Roy was shooting blanks. Forget the state bird of New York is Eastern bluebird. I’m telling you that, back then, on the “Pure-as-Ivory-Soap” scale Roy Rogers was just one notch under the Rev. Billy Graham. Now it appeared to the maddening crowd that Roy Rogers himself was killing every pigeon between the Hudson and the East River. A bewildered Roy even changed six-shooters. Bam! Another pigeon tumbles to earth. Bam! Bam! Two dead birds almost hit Trigger. Are you kidding me? When he finally angled his horses towards the exit gate and they brought up the house lights, dead pigeons were all over the place and the boos and catcalls and threats were enough to make you think the ever-hated Boston Celtics had just walked in. The word still stands that Roy Rogers, “The King of the Cowboys,” never spoke to the legendary rodeo star Casey Tibbs again, but, c’mon, let’s rodeo! That’s when you gotta’ laugh the loudest, buckaroo, and then you gotta’ cowboy up and, yessir, go again." Come to the museum and meet our docents because . . . there are a whole lot more very interesting stories.
    Historical Society Welcomes Railroad Aficionado Ramona Pioneer Historical Society President Jeff Funk invites history and railroad buffs to the society’s potluck dinner meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Oct. 16. Guest speaker Jim Price will talk about the San Diego and Arizona Railway (SD&AE), and how 100 years ago, John D. Spreckels drove a golden spike at Carrizo Gorge, signifying the completion of what was dubbed "the impossible railroad,” which had taken more than 12 years to build. Price has a longstanding interest in Western history, especially old mining towns and the railroads that served them. He and his wife, Joan, own a vacation home in Goldfield, Nev., where they are restoring a 130-year-old caboose. The group will also discuss its gala dinner and centennial celebration planned for November. The meeting will be held in the Barnett Barn on the grounds of the Guy B. Woodward Museum, 645 Main St. The public is welcome. Those who attend are asked to bring a main dish, salad or dessert to serve eight. Thank you Ramona Home Journal for the article:
    https://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/1988/sep/29/cover-was-ramona-real/? fbclid=IwAR3QnLoXNxVxIqG09erq2uPDGtG2AGwr2keff7HoUFC4jeHseET-ffvJoyQ A school day friend of mine wrote this to me in response to the article about Ramona: She was based on my GGG Grandmother's sister, Maria Romano Dionisia Valdez, daughter of Jose Manuel Machado and Maria Serafina De La Luz Valdez. Helen Hunt Jackson visited San Diego and was inspired to write the novel. My GGG Grandmother was Juana De Dios Machado. Her daughter, Maria Arcadia De Alipas married Capt. Robert Decauter Israel and they went on to be the long term lighthouse keepers at Point Loma. My mother's grandfather grew up at the light from about 5 years old to adulthood and would row across SD bay to attend Mason Street Scholl and stay with Juana during the week. Jose Manuel's father, Juan Machado arrived in SD in 1769 with Rivera y Moncada Expedition and lived at the presidio before moving on to San Gabriel where he had a son, Jose Manuel (above), who returned to SD and build many of the adobe's in Old Town. AND. Maria Arcadia Alipas y Machado Israel, gave an interview in 1913 discussing her mother's recollection. I quote "Ramona was a servant to the Estudillo family. She ran off first with an Indian going afoot for two to three years but life was too rough and they returned to the Estudillo house" "After a while, Ramona's husband began to drink and abuse Ramona so she left him and went to live with a sailor named Scott" but according to her "he drank too and she soon left to live with members of the Estudillo family in Santa Barbara". -- Jeff Cribben
    "What I didn’t know was that Tibbs was a premier practical joker. I love people like Casey Tibbs. As I grow increasingly tired of today’s pro athletes who actually shoot themselves with guns and are seemingly arrested more times than they make a travel roster, I long for the merriment that was had back in the days when life was pure and laughter was genuine. For instance, Casey used to travel with another cowboy of note named Delbert (Deb) Copenhaver. One time they had to catch a 5 a.m. flight to the next rodeo town and had stayed at the airport’s bar until it closed. Well, as some other good men have come to learn, the three hours between the time the bar closes and the flight leaves is longer than from one Christmas to the next. One of the guys who helped the two cowboys order doubles at “last call” was sleeping on the floor in the waiting area and Casey convinced Deb it would be so funny to “hot foot” the poor man. This is where you tuck matches between the sole and the upper portion of an unsuspecting chump’s shoe and, when you light them and they burn down, the victim will dance quite a memorable jig. Casey started the caper, but was suddenly all thumbs. Deb looked at his buddy with disgust, shoved Casey out of the way, and proceeded to do the job right, which – of course – is what Casey wanted all along. So the very second Deb was lighting the cluster of carefully-placed matches, Casey slapped the wall as hard as he could with a magazine and the victim jumped awake to see a wide-eyed Copenhaver in the middle of setting his foot on fire. Well, the chump was a mighty big boy and, with murder in his eyes, he then chased Deb all over the airport for about 30 minutes. Casey was laughing so hard he could hardly stand up but, according to Deb, the colorful Tibbs did something like this most nearly every day." - Roy Exum