Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia

Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia Germantown Historical Society is an educational & research center dedicated to preserving & interpreting the history of the original German Township in NW Philadelphia.

Encompassing the contemporary neighborhoods of Germantown, Mt. Airy, and Chestnut Hill Founded in 1900 as the Site & Relic Society of Germantown, the Germantown Historical Society is dedicated to collecting, preserving, and interpreting the rich and diverse history of the historic German Township (Germantown, Mt. Airy, and Chestnut Hill) in northwest Philadelphia. The Society currently serves as t

Encompassing the contemporary neighborhoods of Germantown, Mt. Airy, and Chestnut Hill Founded in 1900 as the Site & Relic Society of Germantown, the Germantown Historical Society is dedicated to collecting, preserving, and interpreting the rich and diverse history of the historic German Township (Germantown, Mt. Airy, and Chestnut Hill) in northwest Philadelphia. The Society currently serves as t

Operating as usual

Though many of the mills in our area were located along the Wissahickon and Wingohocking creeks, others existed in areas...
11/23/2021

Though many of the mills in our area were located along the Wissahickon and Wingohocking creeks, others existed in areas located further way from sources available for natural water power. With the development of the steam engine, mills no longer needed to be constructed immediately adjacent to natural sources of water to obtain power. As a result, many were constructed on higher ground. George Bronson’s Eagle Mill was one such example. Built in the mid-19th century at 406-416 Mechanic Street, the mill is shown as it appeared around 1880. On maps and in Philadelphia city directories, the mill was listed variously as a textile mill, and as a saw mill later on.

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

Though many of the mills in our area were located along the Wissahickon and Wingohocking creeks, others existed in areas located further way from sources available for natural water power. With the development of the steam engine, mills no longer needed to be constructed immediately adjacent to natural sources of water to obtain power. As a result, many were constructed on higher ground. George Bronson’s Eagle Mill was one such example. Built in the mid-19th century at 406-416 Mechanic Street, the mill is shown as it appeared around 1880. On maps and in Philadelphia city directories, the mill was listed variously as a textile mill, and as a saw mill later on.

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

Have you thought about Google “street views” as a research tool to have a better understanding of our local history? Goo...
11/08/2021

Have you thought about Google “street views” as a research tool to have a better understanding of our local history? Google has been making its “street views” available for our area for almost 15 years, and it is an invaluable resource for those researching the history of area buildings and businesses, and for those in the preservation field wanting to know how buildings have been altered. This series of images were taken as “screen grabs” of Google “street views” of 5141 Germantown Avenue, the building on the northeast corner of Collum Street. In just 10 years, the market occupying the first floor has had four names. In 2011, the market was the Nayali Market. By 2012, it had been renamed as the Progressive Food Market. By 2014, it had been renamed again, as the Germantown Deli and Grocery. Finally, by 2018, it had been renamed as the Zapata Deli. Presumably, most of these name changes reflect changes in ownership and may also be connected to alterations to the interior of the building to suit the needs of the different owners of the market. Whatever the case, this series of photos illustrate how invaluable Google “street views” has become as a research and preservation tool.

This Monday Mashup post features an undated photograph taken of an unknown street, presumably in our area. One possibili...
11/01/2021

This Monday Mashup post features an undated photograph taken of an unknown street, presumably in our area. One possibility is that the main (and rather muddy-looking!) street visible in the photograph is Chew Avenue, and that the photo was taken facing down from around Hortter Street, with the rowhouses visible on the right being those on the 200 block of East Montana Street. If so, this would explain the well-kept row of trees visible along the street at the left, as Thomas Meehan’s nurseries would have existed on the adjacent property. Do you know of any other locations which this photograph might show? Please let us know about them, as we would love to positively identify this photo!

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

This Monday Mashup post features an undated photograph taken of an unknown street, presumably in our area. One possibility is that the main (and rather muddy-looking!) street visible in the photograph is Chew Avenue, and that the photo was taken facing down from around Hortter Street, with the rowhouses visible on the right being those on the 200 block of East Montana Street. If so, this would explain the well-kept row of trees visible along the street at the left, as Thomas Meehan’s nurseries would have existed on the adjacent property. Do you know of any other locations which this photograph might show? Please let us know about them, as we would love to positively identify this photo!

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

Today’s Throwback Thursday post takes us to the corner of Germantown Avenue and School House Lane, facing up towards the...
10/28/2021

Today’s Throwback Thursday post takes us to the corner of Germantown Avenue and School House Lane, facing up towards the 5500 and 5600 blocks of Germantown Avenue as they appeared circa 1935. The sign of Cherry’s Shoe Store is visible on the side of the store’s building; look carefully, and one can see traces of it in the “screen grab” taken from a 2012 Google street view. The sign still survives today. In the left foreground is a street lamp once found throughout the City of Philadelphia. These were installed in the mid-1920s and remained in many areas well into the 1950s. Along Germantown Avenue in Germantown and Mount Airy, they were replaced in 1958. In Chestnut Hill, they were replaced slightly earlier, in 1952.

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

Today’s Throwback Thursday post takes us to the corner of Germantown Avenue and School House Lane, facing up towards the 5500 and 5600 blocks of Germantown Avenue as they appeared circa 1935. The sign of Cherry’s Shoe Store is visible on the side of the store’s building; look carefully, and one can see traces of it in the “screen grab” taken from a 2012 Google street view. The sign still survives today. In the left foreground is a street lamp once found throughout the City of Philadelphia. These were installed in the mid-1920s and remained in many areas well into the 1950s. Along Germantown Avenue in Germantown and Mount Airy, they were replaced in 1958. In Chestnut Hill, they were replaced slightly earlier, in 1952.

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

Although the situation has perhaps changed in the last ten years or so, our apartment buildings have tended to have been...
10/25/2021

Although the situation has perhaps changed in the last ten years or so, our apartment buildings have tended to have been much ignored in terms of their historical and architectural relevance to our area. Many apartment houses, such as the Lennox Apartments (formerly the Walnut Lane Apartments) on the south side of the 200 block of West Walnut Lane were built during a boom of construction of apartment buildings in the 1920s, with another occurring in the 1950s. Our area was particularly attractive to such construction given its proximity to Center City, access to public transportation, and lots formerly occupied by often sprawling estates, which could accommodate the construction of large apartment buildings. Such was the case with the Lennox Apartments- shown as they appeared around 1930- which were built on the site of the Walnut Lane School, which in turn had opened in a large, Victorian-era house.

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

Although the situation has perhaps changed in the last ten years or so, our apartment buildings have tended to have been much ignored in terms of their historical and architectural relevance to our area. Many apartment houses, such as the Lennox Apartments (formerly the Walnut Lane Apartments) on the south side of the 200 block of West Walnut Lane were built during a boom of construction of apartment buildings in the 1920s, with another occurring in the 1950s. Our area was particularly attractive to such construction given its proximity to Center City, access to public transportation, and lots formerly occupied by often sprawling estates, which could accommodate the construction of large apartment buildings. Such was the case with the Lennox Apartments- shown as they appeared around 1930- which were built on the site of the Walnut Lane School, which in turn had opened in a large, Victorian-era house.

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

Today’s Throwback Thursday post is one of those perhaps falling under the theme of “the more things change, the more the...
10/21/2021

Today’s Throwback Thursday post is one of those perhaps falling under the theme of “the more things change, the more they stay the same.” The black and white view was taken of the Second Presbyterian Church on the southeast corner of the intersection of Greene and Tulpehocken streets around 1900. The Google “street view” shows a similar view as it appeared around 120 years later. Although the church is now home to the Germantown Community Presbyterian Church and part of the church’s tower has long since been removed, the overall “feel” of these “now and then” photographs is remarkably unchanged. The stone pedestrian walkways crossing the streets visible in the circa 1900 photograph have been replaced with the painted variety we are familiar with today. And the fire hydrant is still located in exactly the same spot, 120 years later. Perhaps the biggest and most immediately apparent change is that the street has long since been paved. Otherwise, the view is quite similar to that of 120 years ago.

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

Today’s Monday Mashup brings us to a scene totally unrecognizable today: the parade grounds of Mower General Hospital in...
10/18/2021

Today’s Monday Mashup brings us to a scene totally unrecognizable today: the parade grounds of Mower General Hospital in Chestnut Hill, as shown by a photograph taken by John Moran. Designed as a series of buildings radiating from a central point in an arrangement similar to that at Eastern State Penitentiary and opened in 1863, the Hospital was in the approximate location bounded by present-day Stenton Avenue and the railroad tracks of SEPTA’s Chestnut Hill East line, and by Willow Grove Avenue and northwest of Mermaid Lane. During the over two years it was open, over 20,000 wounded during the course of the Civil War were treated there, arriving by train to what is now Wyndmoor station. At the close of the war, the Hospital was closed. Its grounds became part of the estate of Randal Morgan, which in turn, was developed with Chestnut Hill Village, Market Square, and the United States Post Office in the 1960s and 70s. As for the Hospital, no traces of it are known to exist.

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

Today’s Monday Mashup brings us to a scene totally unrecognizable today: the parade grounds of Mower General Hospital in Chestnut Hill, as shown by a photograph taken by John Moran. Designed as a series of buildings radiating from a central point in an arrangement similar to that at Eastern State Penitentiary and opened in 1863, the Hospital was in the approximate location bounded by present-day Stenton Avenue and the railroad tracks of SEPTA’s Chestnut Hill East line, and by Willow Grove Avenue and northwest of Mermaid Lane. During the over two years it was open, over 20,000 wounded during the course of the Civil War were treated there, arriving by train to what is now Wyndmoor station. At the close of the war, the Hospital was closed. Its grounds became part of the estate of Randal Morgan, which in turn, was developed with Chestnut Hill Village, Market Square, and the United States Post Office in the 1960s and 70s. As for the Hospital, no traces of it are known to exist.

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

These two photographs show the old Philadelphia, Germantown and Norristown Railroad’s Depot at Germantown Avenue and Pri...
10/14/2021

These two photographs show the old Philadelphia, Germantown and Norristown Railroad’s Depot at Germantown Avenue and Price Streets, as it appeared in perhaps around 1895, and the site as it appeared in 2017. The black and white view was taken from Vernon Park- the grass of which is visible in the foreground- with the depot at the center of the photograph. Note the sign below the roof line, which notes “Main Street Station.” What we know as Germantown Avenue today was referred to as Main Street for much of the 19th century and into the early 20th. The Depot burned down in November 1981. Also, in the 2017 Google “street view” photo, note the location of the Crab Story crab house. This approximates the location of the small wood structure visible to the right of the depot. In both photographs, a narrow lot may have limited the size of the associated building’s construction.

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home!

The 6200 block of Germantown Avenue looks completely different today than it did in November 1950, when the black and wh...
10/11/2021

The 6200 block of Germantown Avenue looks completely different today than it did in November 1950, when the black and white photograph was taken. At the time, the Keyser House at 6205 Germantown Avenue- the house in the foreground- was being demolished to make way for the construction of a Penn Fruit Company supermarket. The lot would be cleared again in the late 1990s to make way for the construction of the Rite Aid Pharmacy, which still stands at the location and as shown in this recent Google “street view.” If not for the presence of the old Kirk and Nice Funeral Home building still standing at the northeast corner of Germantown Avenue and Washington Lane and the few remaining buildings on the upper end of the east side of the 6200 block of the Avenue, the 1950 view would be completely unrecognizable today. When compared side by side, these photographs make an excellent argument for the protection of our historic resources!

The photograph shown here and thousands of others are available online at https://germantown.pastperfectonline.com/ It’s a great way to spend some time reliving Germantown memories at home.

After the end of World War II, our nation's attention become more insular and inward looking, characterized in part by a...
09/27/2021

After the end of World War II, our nation's attention become more insular and inward looking, characterized in part by a focus on our Colonial history and the comforts of home. As a result, many of our early buildings along Germantown Avenue were "restored" to a "Colonial" appearance, and in areas adjacent to Market Square, plans were afoot in the early 1950s to create a "Little Williamsburg" centered around the Deshler-Morris House, George Washington's "summer white house" to which he retreated during the Yellow Fever epidemics of 1793-1795. The Ashmead House at 5434 Germantown Avenue was one of the renovated houses. Shown undergoing renovations in August 1949, the house was to become the home of the Northern Liberties Federal Loan Association upon its completion. It is now a part of campus of Germantown Friends School.

After the end of World War II, our nation's attention become more insular and inward looking, characterized in part by a focus on our Colonial history and the comforts of home. As a result, many of our early buildings along Germantown Avenue were "restored" to a "Colonial" appearance, and in areas adjacent to Market Square, plans were afoot in the early 1950s to create a "Little Williamsburg" centered around the Deshler-Morris House, George Washington's "summer white house" to which he retreated during the Yellow Fever epidemics of 1793-1795. The Ashmead House at 5434 Germantown Avenue was one of the renovated houses. Shown undergoing renovations in August 1949, the house was to become the home of the Northern Liberties Federal Loan Association upon its completion. It is now a part of campus of Germantown Friends School.

Family-owned grocery stores like that of Charles Y. Scully at 5352-5354 Germantown Avenue, shown as it appeared around 1...
09/23/2021

Family-owned grocery stores like that of Charles Y. Scully at 5352-5354 Germantown Avenue, shown as it appeared around 1900, were once commonplace up and down the Avenue, until regional chain grocery stores like American Stores Co. (ASCO) (now ACME) proliferated in the 1920s. The arrival of the Great Depression at the end of 1929 made their survival even more difficult. Notice that a cloud has been drawn over number 5352 at left, and that the features of the second and third floors of number 5354 have been strengthened/ highlighted. This suggests that this photograph may have been taken and edited for publication in one of the local weekly newspapers, perhaps the Germantown Independent-Gazette. The buildings have long since been demolished and the site is now the property of Germantown Friends School.

Family-owned grocery stores like that of Charles Y. Scully at 5352-5354 Germantown Avenue, shown as it appeared around 1900, were once commonplace up and down the Avenue, until regional chain grocery stores like American Stores Co. (ASCO) (now ACME) proliferated in the 1920s. The arrival of the Great Depression at the end of 1929 made their survival even more difficult. Notice that a cloud has been drawn over number 5352 at left, and that the features of the second and third floors of number 5354 have been strengthened/ highlighted. This suggests that this photograph may have been taken and edited for publication in one of the local weekly newspapers, perhaps the Germantown Independent-Gazette. The buildings have long since been demolished and the site is now the property of Germantown Friends School.

Address

5501 Germantown Ave
Philadelphia, PA
19144

General information

Pat Henning Library and Archives Discover your neighborhood, community, house or family in our Library & Archives! Named in honor of Mt. Airy historian Pat Henning, the research collections include a wealth of material from 1683 to the present day on the history of Greater Germantown (Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill) including individuals, buildings, businesses, community organizations, activities and more. Our holdings include personal papers, manuscripts, business records and institutional archives as well as books, newspapers, church and cemetery records, maps, deeds and other land records, scrapbooks and oral history interviews. The image collection is especially rich and includes thousands of glass plate negatives, daguerreotypes and lantern slides, and well over 5,000 photographs depicting residents, streets and structures from the mid-19th century to the present. Collections of particular note include the archives of the African-American Genealogy Group, the Germantown Theatre Guild, Germantown Hospital and the Philadelphia, Germantown & Norristown Rail Road. Research by Mail In addition to on-site research visits, the Society offers a research service by mail for genealogical and historical inquiries related to the history of Greater Germantown. This service is offered for a fee of $50 for up to two hours of research and $30/hr for each additional hour up to four hours. Inquiries may be sent by fax, mail or email or by using the library’s order form. Please allow 8 to 10 weeks for a reply. If you have questions about the service, please contact the library staff for additional information. Alexander Bartlett, Librarian & Archivist [email protected] Library Hours Tuesdays 9 AM - 1 PM Thursdays 1 PM - 5 PM Please email [email protected] to inquire about Sunday hours Please email or call the library/archives to schedule your research visit. Admission Fees Non-members $10.00; students $5.00 GHS members receive free admission to the Library and Archives.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 9am - 1pm
Thursday 1pm - 5pm

Telephone

(215) 844-1683

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Do you have any info or photos of the old James S Jones store(s) on Germantown ave?
This Sunday! Join some of Germantown's own National Historic Landmarks for Philadelphia history. Johnson House Historic Site Cliveden Stenton Historic Rittenhouse Town Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia (for the Germantown Colonial Historic District)
Some of our National Historic Landmark sites in Historic Germantown will be "Reopen!" Johnson House Historic Site Stenton Cliveden Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia
From the Archives! #InternationalFunatWorkDay with Mt. Airy Learning Tree and the Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia
Sometimes a vintage photo has an interesting look, layout or design...today's photo from Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia seemed like a good candidate for a treatment on a photo app. Which is your favorite?
Many years ago, Dr Philip Potter a wise Methodist Pastor and then head of the World Council of Churches spoke to a gathering I was in about “the blessed budget” and shared how we could easily discern the priorities of any group by a line-by-line review of their annual budgets to see what their priorities where! I have followed his approach these last 40 years and repeatedly I run across the same thing. Namely that the needs of the poor in every situation is always the smallest budget priority! Despite having made billions off the free labor of their slaves from 1640-1840 first in Bermuda then in NJ and PA and later throughout the USA, Quakers have in fact given at best a few crumbs of their tables to help the poor living around their meetinghouses and schools! Friends Schools were set up to be Select Schools and by Select they meant for rich white Quaker kids originally as this evolved to include elite colleges like Swarthmore, Haverford, Bryn Mawr etc.…. While Quaker merchants like Strawbridge and Clothier made millions in profits from selling slave and Jim Crow grown southern cotton, they gave only a few documented crumbs to the poor. Most Quaker estates went to benefit fellow friends’ activities and are still doing that today. In the last 11 years I have again lived in Germantown (lived here from 1979-82 prior) and attended local Quaker meetings, even being briefly a member. My son went to Greene Street and Germantown Friends School and I live in what locals call the “Quaker Kremlin” here inside the historic Awbury Arboretum in a house built by the family who paid for GFS and Haverford etc.… I have monitored local Quaker budgets and developments all the last decade and here is what I see: 1. Cost to construct the new Chestnut Hill Meeting 10.0 million 2. Cost to buy land and buildings to expand Greene Street Friends holdings maybe 5.0 3. Cost to build a new Germantown bathroom as reported above $90,000 4. Annual budgets for GFS, Penn Charter, the Greene street-Germantown, and Chestnut Hill meetings for the last 10 years let us estimate at maybe at 70.0 million a year 5. Benefit to the local community say 19144 being the zip code with the highest number of low-income persons maybe at best 10% or 7.0 million estimated in terms of local jobs created. Note no scholarships given to very low-income kids 0 and local groups might be given $5,000 a year or over 10 years $50,000 or so…. I for one think this is unjust, and a disgrace and Quakers should be called out and told to do much better…. If we estimate their actual benefits to their former slaves since let us say the civil war it is small compared to the massive amount of profit they gained from enslaving people! Now these are ballpark estimates at best, but the deeper point is despite thousands of books being written by and about Quakers 0 have documented the economic gains from their owning of slaves and profit from the cotton trade etc.…. It is time to take seriously the issue of reparations and it should be a topic I think of conversation right here in Germantown and grow from there…. What do you think?
Another man stealing a woman's idea and being the one who get's the credit and the money. Not a reason to celebrate the connection. Do better Germantown Historical Society "While Darrow made millions and struck an agreement that ensured he would receive royalties, Magie’s income for her creation was reported to be a mere $500."
Another familiar face at this year’s festival is first-person interpreter, Noah Lewis! Noah portrays African American teamster and Revolutionary war veteran, Edward ‘Ned’ Hector, and this year, he will be at Cliveden discussing African American soldiers’ experiences during the Revolutionary War at 2 pm. On October 17th at 3 pm, Noah will discuss his 20-plus years’ experience as a first-person interpreter as part of Cliveden’s project, Considering Re-enactments: The Battle of Germantown in the Light of 21st Century Gun Violence. The conversation will be held at Cliveden and is free; registration is open now. All attendees must wear masks and maintain safe physical distance. Visit https://fb.me/e/cHPJnryzI for more information. The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage National Trust for Historic Preservation ACES Veterans Museum Honoring All Veterans Awbury Arboretum Black Writers Museum Concord School House and Upper Burying Ground Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia Germantown Mennonite Historic Trust Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance Grumblethorpe PhilaLandmarks Historic Fair Hill Historic Germantown Historic Rittenhouse Town The Hood Cemetery Johnson House Historic Site Germantown Lest We Forget Slavery Museum Stenton Wyck Historic House, Garden, and Farm
Cliveden was the summer home of the Chew family and the focal point of the Battle of Germantown in 1777. George Washington and the Continental troops staged a surprise attack on British troops on October 4th but suffered a severe defeat after several hours of fighting. On October 3rd, Cliveden will be open from 12 pm to 4 pm; there will be a musket firing demonstration to open and close the festival. At 1 pm and 3 pm, listen to author Tom McGuire discuss The Surprise of Germantown and its effect on Germantown and the American Revolution. If you’ve attended the festival in years past, you’ll recognize Tom as the narrator during past re-enactments. See you Saturday! ACES Veterans Museum Honoring All Veterans Awbury Arboretum Black Writers Museum Concord School House and Upper Burying Ground Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia Germantown Mennonite Historic Trust Grumblethorpe PhilaLandmarks Historic Fair Hill Historic Germantown Historic Rittenhouse Town The Hood Cemetery Johnson House Historic Site Germantown Lest We Forget Slavery Museum Stenton Wyck Historic House, Garden, and Farm
SNEAK PEEK: An image from Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia and Historic Germantown's slideshow, Germantown Avenue from Wayne Junction to Cresheim Valley, to be featured in this year’s Night of Lights! This photograph showing John Trower’s catering business at 5706 Germantown Avenue was published in J. Gordon Baugh’s 1913 A Souvenir of Germantown in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, as a directory of African American businesses in Germantown. An African American entrepreneur, investor, and philanthropist, Trower was a major employer of local African American residents, dying a millionaire in 1911. This year's slideshow from GHS will feature historical photographs of some of the buildings and places on Germantown Avenue in Germantown and Mount Airy, and with this year's other slideshows, will explore the history of the former German Township - now Germantown, Mount Airy, and Chestnut Hill. Excerpts from recordings of the Germantown Historical Society’s African Americans in Germantown Between the World Wars oral history project will be broadcast during the slideshow, helping to bring the histories of some of the buildings alive by stories shared by local residents. Special thanks to Elfant Wissahickon Realtors for sponsoring this slideshow! We can't wait to learn and share with you at this year's Night of Lights, every evening from October 9-25. Don't forget to RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/627737948127194
As we count down to our Virtual Hall of Fame on August 25th, we will be sharing info about our event here. Today we profile one of our three honorees - Leon Bates. Leon Bates, a legendary concert pianist who enjoyed international success, was born in Germantown and has recently retired to Mount Airy. From Eugene Ormandy’s Philadelphia Orchestra, to New York, to Paris, to Vienna, to Rome, to LaScala in Milan, to Johannesburg and beyond, he is a star in the firmament of classical music. For tickets to the FREE Hall of Fame event: https://bit.ly/2DI7VzJ Photo from the Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia Archives Collection
What I do not get is why are we giving the systemic racism at Germantown Friends School a free pass? My son a recent GFS grad a few weeks ago said "Dad I wish they had burned down the school!" He was there 10 years and a top student but saw clearly the DEEP RACISM of the place which I have noted for over 40 years..And why are we not calling for the removal of the Godfather of Racism in PA, William Penn? Why not re naming streets like CHEW ave honoring the largest slave owner in this area? And why not call on all of the historical homes to add at least 50-60% African american board members and staff?