Independence NHP, Edgar Allan Poe NHS & Thaddeus Kosciuszko NM

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Our comment policy is enforced on all platforms:

While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines. If you don't comply, your message will be removed. We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racist comments or submissions, nor do we allow c

Operating as usual

One final salute, for the month of November, to America’s veterans: Senator Edward Baker's Death and Independence Hall.I...
11/30/2021

One final salute, for the month of November, to America’s veterans: Senator Edward Baker's Death and Independence Hall.

Independence Hall witnessed the somber funeral of one of Philadelphia's adopted sons, Senator Edward Dickinson Baker. Baker's family moved to Philadelphia in 1816 from London, and later to the Illinois territory, where Baker befriended Abraham Lincoln after defeating him in the 1844 congressional election. Lincoln later named his second son after Baker. When the Civil War erupted in April 1861, Edward Baker (then Senator from California) raised a regiment in Philadelphia that was christened the 1st California in honor of his adopted state. Baker was given command of a brigade in Charles Stone's division along the upper Potomac River. On Oct 20th, 1861, Baker met one last time with the Lincoln family and offered a premonition to his own death in battle. He was killed the following day leading his men during the Battle of Ball's Bluff near Leesburg, Virginia. After a public funeral in Washington D.C., Baker's body was taken to Philadelphia for a public viewing. His funeral bier was displayed in the Assembly Room of Independence Hall, November 7th and 8th, before leaving by train for New York and eventually burial in San Francisco. Edward Baker remains the only sitting US Senator to be killed in battle.

#VeteransDay #Veterans #FindYourPark

(Images: Col. Edward D. Baker, -1861 / E. & H.T. Anthony Firm, 501 Broadway, N.Y. United States, ca. 1861. Photograph. courtesy of The Library of Congress https://www.loc.gov/item/2005681414/.

Benkert, Geo. Felix. Funeral march to the memory of Colonel Baker. Lee & Walker, Philadelphia, 1861. Notated Music. https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200000050/.)

During the American Revolutionary War, the Oneida were steadfast American allies. As in other Native American societies,...
11/28/2021

During the American Revolutionary War, the Oneida were steadfast American allies. As in other Native American societies, Oneida women had a great deal of autonomy and influence, playing important roles on and off the battlefield.

In August of 1777, Tyonajanegen, or “Two Kettles Together,” the wife of Oneida War Chief, Han Yerry Tewahangarahken, fought alongside her husband at the Battle of Oriskanny. When Hay Yerry’s wrist was injured by a musket ball, Two Kettles Together took over the job of reloading his weapon. She later rode out from the battlefield to alert neighboring Indians and patriots of the battle’s outcome.

The following Spring, an Oneida woman named Polly Cooper accompanied fifty Oneida and Tuscarora warriors to aid General Washington’s army at Valley Forge. Cooper brought gifts of white corn and showed the army proper way to prepare hulled corn soup. She stayed on to serve as a cook for Washington.

Philadelphia’s Museum of the American Revolution highlights Oneida men and women’s contributions to the American cause in their Oneida Nation Gallery. The aid given by Cooper and the Oneida are commemorated with a statue at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian depicting Cooper, Washington, and the Oneida Chief Skenandoah.

#NativeAmericanHeritageMonth #FindYourPark

(Images: Detail from the Battle of Oriskany, August 6, 1777, by Don Troiani Historical Artist, and, "Allies in War, Partners in Peace" features, from left, George Washington Chief Skenandoah and Polly Cooper. Image courtesy of Oneida Nation, accessed via the New Haven Herald at: https://www.nhregister.com/news/article/Smithsonian-gets-another-1M-from-Oneidas-adds-11445894.php#taboola-1)

In 1775, the Continental Congress wrote an address to the Haudenosaunee, or Iroquois, Confederacy: “Brothers! We live up...
11/26/2021
Tree of Peace (U.S. National Park Service)

In 1775, the Continental Congress wrote an address to the Haudenosaunee, or Iroquois, Confederacy: “Brothers! We live upon the same ground with you. The same island is our common birth- place. We desire to sit down under the same tree of peace with you: let us water its roots and cherish its growth, till the large leaves and flourishing branches shall extend to the setting sun, and reach the skies.”

The tree of peace that the founding fathers alluded to was the White Pine, a symbol for the Haudenosaunee system of government. Just as Americans see the Liberty Bell as a symbol of America’s revolutionary ideal to “proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof,” the Haudenosaunee use the White Pine to represent the peaceful union between the tribes which comprise their Confederacy: the Mohawk, Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, and Tuscarora, who live throughout America and Canada today. According to tradition, when their union was established a White Pine was planted in the capital. Peace was not just the absence of war, but the foundation of Haudenosaunee law and society.
In the 1980’s, Jake Swamp, a Mohawk Chief, revived this symbol by planting White Pines across the world, including next to the First Bank of the United States, on the corner of Third and Chestnut Street. By then, he wanted the White Pine to represent a peaceful and respectful union between indigenous and non- indigenous peoples.

Native American history is American history and Independence National Historical Park is proud to tell this part of our nation’s story. You can visit the Tree of Peace today!

Read more at: https://www.nps.gov/articles/tree-of-peace.htm

Indigenous Values Initiative Fort Stanwix National Monument Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

Happy Thanksgiving! The Liberty Bell Center, Independence Hall and the Independence Visitor Center are open 11 a.m. to 4...
11/25/2021

Happy Thanksgiving! The Liberty Bell Center, Independence Hall and the Independence Visitor Center are open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; all other park buildings are closed.

Happy Thanksgiving! The Liberty Bell Center, Independence Hall and the Independence Visitor Center are open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; all other park buildings are closed.

Last month, the park had unusual access to the 12,446-pound Bicentennial Bell when it was uncrated to begin design of th...
11/24/2021

Last month, the park had unusual access to the 12,446-pound Bicentennial Bell when it was uncrated to begin design of the frame that will display it in the new garden planned at 3rd and Walnut Streets. From June 1976 to January 2013, the bell hung atop the original park Visitor Center’s 108-foot tower; recently, the bell resided in storage. When visible at eye level, the bell’s inscription celebrates America’s strong historical and ideological ties to Great Britain. On the bell’s exterior also appears the 447-year-old Whitechapel Foundry’s manufacturer’s mark: three bells topped by a crown (signifying royal favor) and next to the letters “WA & D” (for master founders William, Alan, and Douglas Hughes). Around the bell’s inside surface are etched many concentric rings used during the tuning process. And, written in ink and pencil inside the bell near its top are the names of those who installed the bell in 1976 and those who subsequently repaired the bell’s original ringing mechanism. Although not meant to be readily seen, these aspects represent the Bicentennial Bell’s role as both an historical symbol and the product of a long craft tradition.

#bicentennial #bicentennialbell #phillyhistory #findyourpark

Public Affairs Officer Andrew McDougall recently highlighted Philadelphia for the "Honor Your Hometown" campaign - a non...
11/24/2021
Independence National Historical Park — Honor Your Hometown

Public Affairs Officer Andrew McDougall recently highlighted Philadelphia for the "Honor Your Hometown" campaign - a non-partisan, all-volunteer campaign to honor hometowns across America. Watch his touching tribute to Philadelphia and its many neighborhoods.

#FindYourPark National Park Service

Independence National Historical Park spokesperson Andrew McDougall pays tribute to Independence Hall, where American history began, and the many neighborhoods of Philadelphia as part of the Honor Your Hometown series.

Joseph Brant (Thayendanegea) was a Mohawk leader who spent his life advocating for “the Interests of the Indians [which ...
11/24/2021

Joseph Brant (Thayendanegea) was a Mohawk leader who spent his life advocating for “the Interests of the Indians [which have] ever and I hope Ever shall be my greatest aim, in accomplishing of which I have never Spared time or trouble.”

Brant’s name became well-known throughout the United States during the Revolutionary War, when he and his people sided with the British in hopes of protecting their traditional homeland. That fame is why years later, President George Washington sought out Brant’s aid, even though the two men had previously fought on opposing sides.

In 1792, the American army had just suffered crushing defeats at the hands of western Native American tribes. Washington hoped to recruit the “celebrated Captain Brant” as a neutral party to advocate for peace. Brant accepted the administration’s invitation to visit Philadelphia, explaining, “My taking this jaunt to the American seat of Government will enable me to form an Idea of [the Americans’] intentions.”

A skilled negotiator, Brant told Washington and his cabinet what he believed was required for peace, but found the administration unwilling to alter their conditions. Brant conveyed their proposals to a council of the western tribes, but as he predicted, the council rejected them. War continued for two more years. However, Brant never stopped advocating for the rights of Indigenous people.

#NativeAmericanHeritage #IndigenousHeritage

(Images: Portrait of Captain Joseph Brant (Thayendanega) by Charles Willson Peale, 1797. Collection of Independence National Historical Park (INDE 11880) and, Brant’s visit is memorialized in an exhibit at President’s House Site, where President Washington lived and received visitors during his presidency in Philadelphia. NPS Photo.)

Sources
• “Joseph Brant (Thayendanegea),” National Park Service, https://www.nps.gov/people/joseph-brant-thayendanegea.htm.
• Marion Nelson Winship. “‘Indians Now in this City’ – Philadelphia, 1792: The Negotiation of Diplomatic Visits by Indian Guests and Their Official White Hosts.” History 700 Seminar, University of Pennsylvania, June 1990. (Repository: Independence National Historical Park, I&E OCH Library, Indians in Pennsylvania resource binder)
• Isabel Thompson Kelsay, Joseph Brant, 1743-1807: Man of Two Worlds (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1984), 458-482.
• Clifford E. Trafzer, ed., American Indians/American Presidents: A History (New York: Harper Collins, 2009).

A Church Founding Father and the Trail of Tears Bishop William White (1748-1836), whose house Independence National Hist...
11/21/2021

A Church Founding Father and the Trail of Tears

Bishop William White (1748-1836), whose house Independence National Historical Park preserves and interprets, was a founder of the American Episcopal Church. He was known for his compassion for his congregants. Occasionally, his compassion extended to total strangers and led him to break his personal rule of non-interference in politics. In January 1830, he chaired a protest meeting. He began his speech: “If it should seem a departure from this principle that I am now to take my seat in the chair behind me, my defence (sic) is in the nature of the subject which has brought us together on this occasion.”

His reason for this departure was “the most imperious claims of justice.” The United States Congress was debating a bill that would remove Five Tribes (Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole) from their lands in the southeast United States and relocate them west of the Mississippi River. Bishop White referred to the Cherokee as “a helpless and unoffending people, in rightful possession of the territory from which they are threatened to be withdrawn.”

Bishop White along with Congressman Davy Crockett, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and many others lent their support to these five tribes in their quest to retain their lands.

However, in May 1830, the United States Congress passed the Indian Removal Act which led to the infamous Trail of Tears. Bishop White warned: “a national sin shall be the beginning of a series of national sufferings, ending in the prostration of legitimate and free government.”

#IndigenousHeritage #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

(Images: No. 1 Residence of Rt. Rev. Dr. Wm. White, Bishop of Pennsylvania, No. 2 Residence of Chas. Chauncey, Esq., No. 3 his law office [graphic]: these houses of Walnut Street No. 3 being one to the n.w. corner of that and Third Street/ Photograph by Richards. Date: June 1859. courtesy of The Library Company of Philadelphia and image of Bishop White by deaf and mute lithographer Albert Newsam, 20 May 1809-20 Nov 1864. Copy after William Henry Brown, 1808-1883. Date of Image: 1838. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Milton and Ingrid Rose)

11/19/2021

Red Shawl Day is a day to remember and honor.

The color red is worn to draw attention to the horrible acts of violence that have disproportionately affected Indigenous communities, particularly women and children, and have been ignored for far too long.

Led by Secretary Deb Haaland, we are leading a multi-agency effort to ensure that the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous people is finally addressed. We are assisting Tribal communities with investigations and providing resources to prioritize these cases. #RedShawlDay

Photo by Marian Bitsui, BIE

Grapeshot and Cannonballs don't care if you are wearing a skirt!  Margaret Corbin, heroine of the Battle of Fort Washing...
11/16/2021

Grapeshot and Cannonballs don't care if you are wearing a skirt! Margaret Corbin, heroine of the Battle of Fort Washington, will lose the use of her left arm, be facially disfigured and taken prisoner after being hit by grapeshot. On Nov 15, 1776, the last position held by the Americans was Fort Washington on the island of Manhattan. John Corbin, who was a matross, and his 25-year-old wife, Margaret were among the group. On Nov 16th they were located on top of the northwest hillside with Virginia riflemen, about 250 strong, when 3,000 Hessians attacked from the north while the British troops attacked from the south and east. After her husband was killed, Margaret took up his post, sponging and loading the cannon. When the gunner is killed, she took over his post too. Her accuracy will become legendary on both sides. It is believed she inflicted the most causalities and was the last one firing. By 1779 both Pennsylvania and the Continental Congress had awarded her a disability pension. Making her the first woman to receive veteran’s benefits.

#VeteransDay #FindYourPark

(Image: Don Troiani’s Battle of Fort Washington, features Margaret Corbin. Currently on display at the Museum of the American Revolution.
Used with permission of Don Troiani. Don Troiani Historical Artist)

Grapeshot and Cannonballs don't care if you are wearing a skirt! Margaret Corbin, heroine of the Battle of Fort Washington, will lose the use of her left arm, be facially disfigured and taken prisoner after being hit by grapeshot. On Nov 15, 1776, the last position held by the Americans was Fort Washington on the island of Manhattan. John Corbin, who was a matross, and his 25-year-old wife, Margaret were among the group. On Nov 16th they were located on top of the northwest hillside with Virginia riflemen, about 250 strong, when 3,000 Hessians attacked from the north while the British troops attacked from the south and east. After her husband was killed, Margaret took up his post, sponging and loading the cannon. When the gunner is killed, she took over his post too. Her accuracy will become legendary on both sides. It is believed she inflicted the most causalities and was the last one firing. By 1779 both Pennsylvania and the Continental Congress had awarded her a disability pension. Making her the first woman to receive veteran’s benefits.

#VeteransDay #FindYourPark

(Image: Don Troiani’s Battle of Fort Washington, features Margaret Corbin. Currently on display at the Museum of the American Revolution.
Used with permission of Don Troiani. Don Troiani Historical Artist)

To close out this past week of military events by Team Fastrax, the Veterans Parade, the Marine Corps Birthday and the C...
11/15/2021

To close out this past week of military events by Team Fastrax, the Veterans Parade, the Marine Corps Birthday and the City of Philadelphia’s official Veterans Day ceremony, the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) from the Military District of Washington DC closed out the park’s salute to service with two outstanding public performances on Saturday. The event was coordinated by Park Ranger and Army Veteran Dave Powers.

To close out this past week of military events by Team Fastrax, the Veterans Parade, the Marine Corps Birthday and the City of Philadelphia’s official Veterans Day ceremony, the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) from the Military District of Washington DC closed out the park’s salute to service with two outstanding public performances on Saturday. The event was coordinated by Park Ranger and Army Veteran Dave Powers.

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GPS: 525 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA
19106

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm
Saturday 9am - 5pm
Sunday 9am - 5pm

Telephone

+12159652305

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Can someone please explain why the National Park Service would allow an oversized Indego bike station with solar panel to be placed at the entrance to Washington Square (and which includes motorized bikes)?
This coming April 1st marks the 25th anniversary of one of the funniest April Fool’s jokes ever. What a marketing stunt Taco Bell pulled off! #TacoBell #LibertyBell #AprilFools
History repeat's it self in 2020 under Donald Trump. All he had to was read the history books & the Constitution??? so simple, 200,000 dead since the COVID came. No action by our President accept lawsuits to retain his office ??? Our tax money this must stop.
A few of my writing friends and I put together this anthology commemorating the 171st anniversary of Poe’s Death. Check it out! mybook.to/Forevermore
Memorial Web page For immediate release: August 25, 2020 Death on duty or in the line of duty should be honored. So determined Jeff Ohlfs, a retired Chief Ranger, in compiling an honor roll of National Park Service dead. On the 104th anniversary of the National Park Service, NPSHistory.com is pleased to release the NPS Employee Memorial. Truly a labor of love, Ohlfs has spent over thirty years researching and honoring these individuals. The memorial can be viewed at: http://npshistory.com/employee-memorial/ Ohlfs was at Hot Springs National Park when he heard about the 1927 murder of park policeman James Cary. Ohlfs became concerned about remembering all NPS employees who gave their lives to the preservation of our nation's parks. In finalizing this Memorial, Ohlfs reached out to NPSHistory.com, which agreed to be its permanent host. This Memorial honors and remembers the 260 employees of the National Park Service who have paid the ultimate sacrifice — having died on duty or in the line of duty. Notes Dr. Harry Butowsky: "Jeff Ohlfs had hoped to complete the memorial before his retirement. Never one to give up, he contacted me and I agreed to host it on the spot. Obviously, the preservation of our nation’s natural and cultural heritage has also carried great personal risk." Dr. Butowsky continued: “Our thanks to Jeff for his devotion in assembling this Memorial — we pray no one else will be added. The National Park Service now manages 419 separate sites nationwide with more than 20,000 permanent and seasonal employees — all are on the front lines when it comes to tragedy." Please take a moment to reflect and remember these fallen members of the NPS family. Omissions and additions may be sent to [email protected]. NPSHistory.com is a private, non-commercial electronic library (not affiliated with the National Park Service). Harry Butowsky [email protected]
Will you open the buildings soon?
I see that the inside portions of the park are closed. What is available to do?
For posterity, I visited the park on the afternoon of July 4, 2020. Who among us has ever seen it like this? The bicycle barricades were protection in the even of civil unrest. The intersection of 6th and Chestnut was full of about 200 loud, somewhat profane, but otherwise peaceful demonstrators. Police had the streets shut down for them. They were using a pick up truck as a stage and had a PA system. Otherwise the areas that would be packed with visitors were vacant.
I've always enjoyed the fleeting shot of that NPS Ranger at Martin Luther King's side in our Liberty Bell film but had never seen any other images of him. I came across him in a Frank Sinatra documentary and was kind of excited to see a wider shot of him. Al Cavalari