Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center

Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center Our mission is to educate Delaware Valley students and adults, personalizing the Holocaust so that they learn the consequences of racism, ethnic cleansing,
(11)

The Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center, America's first Holocaust museum, was founded in 1961 by survivor Yaakov Riz, who lost 83 members of his family in Hitler's death camps. Riz vowed that if he survived he would dedicate his life to establishing a museum that would memorialize the millions of Jews and Non-Jews who perished at the hands of Nazi barbarism. Initially, the museum was housed in the basement of Riz's home. The museum's genesis, its growth and its struggle against intolerance are the realization of his dream, his courage and his commitment. In the five-county area that we serve, the museum's educational and community outreach is ecumenical and comprises a population that ranges from elementary school school (grade 5) to senior citizens. Many of the students we work with come from disadvantaged homes. Some of our students are newcomers who have fled countries such as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Serbia. During the last 50 years, tens of thousands of students have visited the museum. We, in turn, have presented thousands of Holocaust programs in schools and to community groups and organizations. Our efforts are designed to emphasize the message that racial, ethnic, and religious hatred are the social poisons that weaken the American democracy.

Mission: Using the resources of the museum, our mission is to educate students and adults, personalizing the Holocaust so that they learn the consequences of racism, ethnic cleansing, and intolerance. The Holocaust was a watershed event, not only in the 20th century, but in the entire history of humanity. The study of the Holocaust provides us with one of the most effective ways to work with students to examine basic moral issues and value systems. What are the lessons of the Holocaust for us today?

Operating as usual

A blessed New Year from HAMEC to you. As we enter into the Jewish New Year, we would like to honor the memory of Joe Kah...
09/19/2020

A blessed New Year from HAMEC to you. As we enter into the Jewish New Year, we would like to honor the memory of Joe Kahn, Annaliese Nossbaum, Manya Perel, Gunter Hauer, and Ilse Lindemeyer and the work they did to educate children around the world about the Holocaust. HAMEC will continue to share their message and continue to preserve history to learn from the past.

09/04/2020
Dr. Leon Bass

For this week's Legacy Library Friday, we remember the life of Dr. Leon Bass who spoke about his experience as a Black liberator during World War II.

Dr. Leon Bass is a former high school principal and veteran of World War II who has dedicated much of his life as a teacher, a school administrator, and a speaker, to fighting racism wherever it exists.

As a nineteen-year-old soldier serving in a segregated unit of the U.S. Army, Leon Bass participated in the liberation of Buchenwald concentration camp in 1945. That moment changed his life. "I was an angry soldier," said Bass. "I was being asked to fight for freedom while at the same time, as a black man, I was constantly being told in many ways that I wasn't good enough to have that freedom."

Following his service in the U.S. Army 183rd Engineer Combat Battalion in World War II, Bass graduated from West Chester University of Pennsylvania and later received a doctorate from Temple University. He taught at several schools in the School District of Philadelphia and was a principal at the Benjamin Franklin High School in Philadelphia for 14 years.

He has presented his story to audiences throughout the United States and across the world. He was a participant in the International Liberators Conference, held in Washington, D.C. in 1981. In 1994, he was the keynote speaker at the Georgia Commission on the Holocaust, and in 1996, he was awarded the Pearlman Award for Humanitarian Advancement from Jewish Women International. He appeared in the Academy Award-nominated documentary, "Liberators: Fighting on Two Fronts in World War II." In 2011, he published his book, "Good Enough: One Man's Memoirs of the Price of a Dream."

This is "Dr. Leon Bass" by Flim Films on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

08/28/2020
Klara Vinokur

This week's #LegacyLibaryFriday features Klara Vinokur, whose heroic story of bravery, reminds us of why we continue to teach Holocaust education in schools today.

Klara was born in Shpola, a small town in the Ukraine, in 1927. Her mother was a dressmaker, her father was a laborer and she had a younger brother, Gregory, and an older sister, who lived near Kiev. She attended the local school with her non-Jewish Ukrainian friends.

On June 22, 1941, the Germans invaded the Soviet Union and her small town became occupied on July 30. She was then forced to wear an armband with the Star of David and forced to clean the streets and houses. In late September, the Shpola ghetto was established and the entire local Jewish population was forced to live in cramped quarters with little food. Her father was murdered on August 21.

In the beginning of May 1942, the Nazis and local police announced that those who were capable would be sent to labor camps. Within a few weeks, Klara fell sick with typhoid fever and was confined to a room with 20 other sick people. Later, in 1942, her mother gave Klara fake identification, renaming her Olga Pushenko who came from a children's home in Donesk. The family then hid with other Ukrainian friends and that was the last time she saw her mother. Gregory was hid in another family and then was taken. Klara then went to hide in another Ukrainian home, but the family called the police and she was taken to the police station where she saw partisans hanged and others shot. She was suspected of collaborating with the partisans and on April 7, 1943, was sent to a state farm. On January 26, 1944, on her birthday, the Russian army liberated her.

The next day she was shot in the left shoulder and after recovering for one month in a hospital, returned to Shpola. Her sister survived so Klara moved near Kiev, Ukraine. She married an officer and graduated from the Institute of Foreign Languages. She then immigrated to the U.S. and worked as the chairwoman of a trade union from 1970 to 1985. She has one son and two grandchildren.

This is "Klara Vinokur" by Flim Films on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Today, we are celebrating one of our Graduate History Practicum students, Fabulous Flores.  Fabulous is from Southern Ca...
08/25/2020

Today, we are celebrating one of our Graduate History Practicum students, Fabulous Flores. Fabulous is from Southern California, and is currently a graduate student studying Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Stockton University. She chose this internship because it is her goal to work in this field at a college level.

She believes that continuing to work alongside people and organizations within this field is an invaluable experience and networking opportunity. So far, her favorite part about this program has been getting to work hands on with the artifacts. Fabulous mentioned, "The feeling of holding history in your hands is indescribable."

08/21/2020
Dave Tuck

For this week's Legacy Library Friday, we are featuring ghetto and concentration camp survivor, David Tuck. To learn more about HAMEC's programs and how you can book a virtual speaker on our website hamec.org.

David Tuck was born in Poland. His mother passed away
six months after his birth, so his Orthodox Jewish grandparents took him in and insisted that he receive both a public and Hebrew education.

Life drastically changed on September 1, 1939 when Germany invaded Poland. He was 10 years old. Radio broadcasts changed from Polish music to “Deutschland Über Alles,” “Germany Overall.” By December he was forced to wear an armband and then a yellow Star of David and he had to step off the sidewalk and into the street when German soldiers approached him.

Within a few weeks David’s family was deported to the Lodz ghetto where he spoke German well enough that he was able to work in the food ration office providing families with ration cards. Then in the spring of 1941, David was deported to Posen, a labor camp in Poland.

In 1943 the Nazis liquidated the Posen labor camp and sent David to another labor camp to construct an autobahn. Then David was deported, with other skilled workers to Auschwitz where he arrived on August 25, 1943. He worked in a sub-camp of Auschwitz called Eintrachthütte in a factory building anti-aircraft guns. In January 1945, David was deported on a train to Mauthausen in Austria, a brutal 370-mile trip over four days. To survive, he scooped snow from the ground using a tin cup tied to his belt. He was subsequently sent to Güsen II, an underground factory to build German aircraft.

On May 5, 1945 the Americans liberated Güsen II; he weighed 78 pounds. David then spent the next several months recuperating in refugee camps and then immigrated to the United States in 1950.

To find out more, listen to Dave Tuck's testimony below. #LegacyLibraryFriday

This is "Dave Tuck" by Flim Films on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

This summer, HAMEC has been fortunate to work with several post-graduate students and interns. Over the next few days, w...
08/20/2020

This summer, HAMEC has been fortunate to work with several post-graduate students and interns. Over the next few days, we will be featuring our interns and the work they have done this summer. Adam Babetski is from Sterling, Virginia. For the past year, he has been a member of Penn State's Bellisario College of Communications where he majors in Broadcast Journalism. He previously worked for CommRadio and runs a podcast.

Part of why Adam was so excited about this position is due to his personal ties with having a Holocaust survivor as a family friend and believed that this internship would be a valuable experience dedicated to raising awareness and education about the Holocaust.

As a Communications intern at HAMEC, his primary job function works with the social media accounts and website. Adam mentioned that he is particularly glad that he's gotten the chance to interview several Holocaust survivors who are on HAMEC's Board of Trustees in the hope that he can pass their stories and experiences to others in the future.

Looking for something to do this Sunday, August 23? The Sousa Mendes Foundation will be hosting a free program entitled,...
08/18/2020
Upcoming Events Virtual program: Hidden Children and their Rescuers - Sousa Mendes Foundation

Looking for something to do this Sunday, August 23? The Sousa Mendes Foundation will be hosting a free program entitled, "Hidden Children and their Rescuers" at 4:00PM, which will feature multiple panelists, including Ruth Kapp Hartz. Click the link for more details and how to sign up!

This program will explore the history and psychology of hidden children and their rescuers during the Holocaust. Meet three formerly hidden children: renowned Jewish advocate Abraham H. Foxman (hidden in Poland), psychologist Dr. Noémi Perelman Mattis (hidden in Belgium) and Holocaust educator Ruth...

The Jewish Exponent also covered Manya Perel's amazing story. To many, Manya was an inspiration, making her life's missi...
08/18/2020
Holocaust Survivor Manya Perel Dies at 97 - Jewish Exponent

The Jewish Exponent also covered Manya Perel's amazing story. To many, Manya was an inspiration, making her life's mission to tell as many students as possible about the hardships she endured. May her memory be blessed.

They wrote a book about Manya Perel, a Holocaust survivor turned educator and activist who died on July 29 at the age of 97. Plays, too, and movies, written and shot by students at Temple University, Stockton University and Rowan University. Not that Perel needed any help telling her story: Over the...

The documentary film, "Holy Silence" is being broadcast for free now through August 22 which documents the role the Vati...
08/17/2020
“Holy Silence’ documents the Vatican’s role in the Holocaust

The documentary film, "Holy Silence" is being broadcast for free now through August 22 which documents the role the Vatican played during the Holocaust. Steven Pressman, the documentation, is also credited with his work in the 50 Children documentary, which featured Kurt Herman.

For more information about the film, as well as how to register and watch, click the link below.

Pope Pius XII Photo courtesy of PerlePress Productions . By GERRI MILLER, Jewish Journal, August 14, 2020. Click for full report. . Could the Catholic Church have done more to save Jews during the…

The Jewish Exponent recently told Gunter Hauer's incredible life story on their website, covering his escape from Europe...
08/17/2020
Holocaust Survivor Gunter Hauer Dies at 101 - Jewish Exponent

The Jewish Exponent recently told Gunter Hauer's incredible life story on their website, covering his escape from Europe until his time as a HAMEC speaker. May his memory be blessed.

Holocaust survivor Gunter Hauer — who watched Adolf Hitler leave the 1936 Olympics to avoid presenting Black U.S. track star Jesse Owens with a gold medal for the long jump — died Aug. 2. He was 101. “He saw things and did things that were quite different than the other survivors,” said Chuc...

08/14/2020
Kurt Herman

Our next #LegacyLibraryFriday focuses on Kurt Herman, one of 49 children who boarded the U.S.S. Harding and sailed to America to escape Nazi Germany.

Kurt was born in October 1929 in Vienna, Austria. He went to school across the street from his house with Jews and non-Jews and frequently played with his friends after school. After Germany’s annexation of Austria in March 1938, Kurt’s non-Jewish school friends began calling him names and wearing swastikas.

The Nazis seized his family’s fabric business and his father was in constant danger of being arrested during random house raids by Stormtroopers. After Kristallnacht, the Night of the Broken Glass, on November 9-10, 1938, Kurt’s family tried to flee Austria.

When Kurt was ten, his mother answered a newspaper ad looking for children to immigrate to America. A nurse and pediatrician interviewed and tested Kurt for his health, intelligence, and his ability to be separated from his parents. In May 1939, Kurt was selected, along with 49 other children, aged 5-14, to immigrate to Philadelphia on the USS President Harding, arriving in New York Harbor on June 3, 1939.

He was first assigned to a children’s summer camp and then placed with a foster family in Allentown, PA. Within two years, Kurt was reunited with his parents. His grandparents, however, were murdered in Auschwitz. Kurt felt a great responsibility to act in ways that pay respect to the memory of his family.

Herman had three daughters and eight grandchildren. He was a retired financial officer and was a frequent speaker to school groups and others about his experiences during the
Holocaust.

It is through this week's Legacy Library Friday that we honor the memory and life of Kurt Herman. Check back next Friday for another featured speaker.

This is "Kurt Herman" by Flim Films on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Join us on September 10th at 11:00am by signing up for our Annual Educator of the Year Program as we honor Rabbi Lance J...
08/13/2020

Join us on September 10th at 11:00am by signing up for our Annual Educator of the Year Program as we honor Rabbi Lance J. Sussman, Ph.D. with the Excellence in Education Award.

RSVP via our website today or by visiting this link: https://forms.gle/r7snaEhPkk6jLG8D6

We hope to see you there!

Join us on September 10th by signing up for our Annual Educator of the Year Program as we honor Rabbi Lance J. Sussman, ...
08/10/2020

Join us on September 10th by signing up for our Annual Educator of the Year Program as we honor Rabbi Lance J. Sussman, Ph.D. with the Excellence in Education Award.

Rabbi Sussman will be presenting the keynote address, entitled, "From Bamberg to America, 1938-1939: The Sacki Family Story".

RSVP via our website today or by visiting this link: https://forms.gle/r7snaEhPkk6jLG8D6

We hope to see you there!

The stories of Jewish resistance fighters and partisans is told in a New London Holocaust exhibition. This exhibition te...
08/10/2020
Untold stories of Jewish resistance revealed in London Holocaust exhibition

The stories of Jewish resistance fighters and partisans is told in a New London Holocaust exhibition. This exhibition tells the personal stories of heroes, resistance movements, and rescue networks. For more information, read the article below.

Diaries and manuscripts turn spotlight on little-known acts of endurance and bravery

08/07/2020
Gunter Hauer

For this week's #LegacyLibraryFriday, we are honoring the memory and life of Gunter Hauer. Gunter escaped Nazi Germany during the 1930s as a refugee before eventually ending up in Philadelphia.

Gunter Hauer was born in Berlin, Germany in 1919. His father worked at a department store and his mother was a homemaker. In 1929, when Gunter was a teenager, he heard Adolf Hitler speak on the radio from a Nazi Rally and he could not believe what he was hearing. Then in January 1933, Hitler came to power and Gunter’s life began to change. Within a few short years, he was no longer allowed to sit on a public park bench or go to the movies.

During Kristallnacht, November 9-10, 1938, Gunter’s schoolteacher sent Gunter home for the sole purpose of being Jewish. Gunter, then 18 years old, tried to convince his parents that they had to leave Germany. His Aunt worked in the travel business and was able to obtain passports to leave through Russia. However it turned out to be a scam and they remained stuck in Nazi Germany.

By sheer luck, his Aunt was able to get eight spaces aboard the Terukuni Maru, a Japanese ship that sailed from London, England. On September 1, 1939, the start of WWII, they were sailing through the Suez Canal and away from the impending tragedy that soon befell Europe.

Gunter survived the war, got married, and made his way to California and eventually to Philadelphia in 1947 where he worked in the music industry working his way to becoming an executive at Atlantic Records promoting concerts and events.

Every Friday for the next few weeks, we will be showcasing different Survivor's testimony via our Legacy Library as a way to remember and commemorate their sacrifices, hardships, and hope during the Holocaust.

Produced by Flim Films LLC and The Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center Gunter Hauer's Legacy documentary is one of a 13-part series of Holocaust…

The American Jewish University is hosting a film discussion with director Steven Karras. The event will take place at 3P...
08/04/2020
About Face: Film Discussion with the Director

The American Jewish University is hosting a film discussion with director Steven Karras. The event will take place at 3PM EST/12 PM PST. The event is free and you can register by clicking the link below!

About Face: Film Discussion with the Director 12pm PDT They were German citizens who bravely joined the allied forces, rebelling against the existential threat posed by the Nazi regime. They fought for the US, in advanced intelligence units, as interrogators at Nuremberg and elsewhere--even as mayor...

We are sad to share with you that local Holocaust survivor, and HAMEC speaker, Manya Perel passed away on July 29th, 202...
08/04/2020
In Memory of Manya Perel - Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center

We are sad to share with you that local Holocaust survivor, and HAMEC speaker, Manya Perel passed away on July 29th, 2020. May her memory be a blessing. Please visit our website to view her lasting impact on Holocaust awareness and education to the local community.

In Memory of Manya Perel We are sad to share with you that local Holocaust survivor and HAMEC speaker Manya Perel passed away on July 29th, 2020. May her memory be a blessing. Manya was one of the most dedicated speakers and educators we have had the pleasure to work with and …

Address

8339 Old York Road, Suite 203/205,
Philadelphia, PA
19116

SEPTA # 58 or 67

General information

During the last 50+ years, thousands of students and adults have participated in museum programs. Many students and their teachers have visited the museum, and the museum has hosted many adult community groups as well. The museum staff takes its outreach programs into public, parochial, private, and Jewish schools. Home-schooled students and their parents have also visited the museum. Students and teachers have listened to the life experiences of Holocaust survivors, liberators -- American GIs -- who liberated the concentration camps, and Kindertransport (children whom the Nazis ransomed allowing them to leave for England -- most never saw their parents again). Because many of our speakers are into their 70's and 80's, we are currently videotaping their stories. Over the last 52 years, the museum staff presented programs to elementary, middle, high school, and college students. Our outreach program has taken us to federal installations, senior citizen retirement communities, nursing homes, and universities in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. The museum sponsors live performances by professional actors of an abridged version of "The Diary of Anne Frank" and "Lida Stein and the Righteous Gentile". For some students, the plays, a vehicle for teaching the lessons of the Holocaust, was their first exposure to live theater. The play is an excellent venue for discussing the dangers of prejudice, bigotry, and racism. The museum is excited to continue to offer this program as the Anne Frank Theater Project. After viewing the production, students have an opportunity to ask questions and discuss its relevance and the issues it raises for us today. One student commented, "The play made me think about things I had never thought about before. Anyone of us can become a victim no matter what your background is." During the 2017/2018 school year, our Educational Programs reached more than 40,000 people during more than 300 programs to schools, organizations, and businesses.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(215) 464-4701

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center:

Videos

Category

Our Story

The Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center, America's first Holocaust museum, was founded in 1961 by survivor Yaakov Riz, who lost 83 members of his family during the Holocaust. Riz vowed that if he survived he would dedicate his life to establishing a museum that would memorialize the millions of Jews and Non-Jews who perished at the hands of Nazi barbarism. Initially, the museum was housed in the basement of Riz's home. The museum's genesis, its growth and its struggle against intolerance are the realization of his dream, his courage and his commitment. In the five-county area that we serve, the museum's educational and community outreach is ecumenical and comprises a population that ranges from elementary school (grade 5) to senior citizens. Many of the students we work with come from disadvantaged homes. Some of our students are newcomers who have fled countries such as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Serbia. During the last 50+ years, tens of thousands of students have visited the museum. We, in turn, have presented thousands of Holocaust programs in schools and to community groups and organizations. Our efforts are designed to emphasize the message that racial, ethnic, and religious hatred are the social poisons that weaken the American democracy.

Nearby museums


Comments

Help your community get the funding it needs for Programs and services like: supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, Medicaid, Health clinics, education, and much more. Complete 2020 Census online: Http:// my2020census.gov/, by phone: 844-330-2020, or by mail. it's easy, safe, and important
Forget the high-school diploma. Miriam Schreiber is so thoroughly self-educated, she'd qualify for a few college degrees. What a life she has made.
Hi there, I am reaching out on behalf of the documentary Prosecuting Evil: The Extraordinary World of Ben Ferencz. Prosecuting Evil tells the incredible story of Ben Ferencz, the last surviving Nuremberg Trial prosecutor, who continues to wage his lifelong crusade in the fight for law and peace. Few people today have heard of Ben Ferencz. But this portrait of a 98-year-old lawyer, couldn't be more relevant. Racism, antisemitism, and the return of extremist political views is a danger in 2019. Prosecuting Evil is now available on Netflix in the US and I encourage you all to watch it! If you have any questions about the film, please do not hesitate to reach out ([email protected]) All the best,
In case you have not seen or heard about this event yet, the Keystone State Boychoir (KSB) will be sharing the stage with Holocaust survivor, Sidney Taussig, at NMAJH on June 1st, when they share a most remarkable - and unknown - story. This journey for KSB began when the 2017 Tour Choir to Prague wanted to learn more about boys their own age before traveling to Terezin (our artistic director made it a mission to address the Holocaust with the boys after overhearing a boy say that the Holocaust had never happened). This led the boys to Mr. Sidney Taussig and the Boys of Vedem. A group of 40 or so 12-15 year old boys, crammed into a tiny 15x15 dorm room, who preserved their humanity and their boyhood with the most beautiful poetry and prose, as well as writings about everyday things like sports, food and girls. They created Vedem - a literary magazine that they read aloud every Friday night. Only 1 in 7 boys survived. And now Mr. Taussig is the last surviving Vedem Boy. He will be joining us for this June 1 event where we will honor him and tell his story. The boys will also travel to Poland and Lithuania this summer, taking this story with them... you can also get more info at cychoirs.org/vedem or contacting me directly. The event starts at 5 pm and concludes at 6:30 pm. There is a brief reception following as well. I hope you will share this with friends and colleagues and join us at the museum theatre for an amazing event: https://cychoirs.ticketleap.com/the-boys-of-vedem/dates/Jun-01-2019_at_0500PM#/
I always read the posts from the Holocaust Awareness Museum as it used to be a big part of my life. I used to be active with the organization, back in the '80's when it was known as the Jewish Identity Center at Englewood and Frontenac Sts. My mother was executive director and I designed the logo ( butterfly with barbed wire) and I'm very flattered that after 30 some years, you're still using it. Let us never forget!
This film was published on the BBC on 19 April 1968 on the 25th anniversary of the revolt in the Warsaw Ghetto. It takes a bit to get going, as though the makers were trying to film the time slot. Furthermore parts of the film are not from Warsaw, some video is from Bydgogosz, other from Kraków. The film ends abruptly - clearly it must have gone on longer but I do not possess the extra part. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgB8EgiBcLw
https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/High-Tech-Holocaust-Survivor_Philadelphia-486813881.html Thank you HAMEC for letting us tell these survivors' stories and how they're touching lives all over the country and world via Skype.
So proud of our mom Deanne Scherlis Comer!
These survivors from the Holocaust are a brave group of people. Some were in concentration camps, labor camps, hidden children, kindertransports out of Germany, etc. They went to nearly 400 schools last year to share their experiences of the most hateful behavior done to human beings. They teach children about tolerance, kindness, being up standers against hateful behavior and being better human beings.
Bully for HAMEC! Thanks to all of our survivors. God Bless all of them!
Im surprise you guys never thought of creating (engraved or minted medal or a button). They are very inexpensive and it would help tremendously in your donation effort.