Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center

Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center Our mission is to educate Delaware Valley students and adults, personalizing the Holocaust so that they learn the consequences of racism, ethnic cleansing,
(29)

The Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center, America's first Holocaust museum, was founded in 1961 by survivor Yaakov Riz, who lost 83 members of his family in Hitler's death camps. Riz vowed that if he survived he would dedicate his life to establishing a museum that would memorialize the millions of Jews and Non-Jews who perished at the hands of Nazi barbarism. Initially, the museum was housed in the basement of Riz's home. The museum's genesis, its growth and its struggle against intolerance are the realization of his dream, his courage and his commitment. In the five-county area that we serve, the museum's educational and community outreach is ecumenical and comprises a population that ranges from elementary school school (grade 5) to senior citizens. Many of the students we work with come from disadvantaged homes. Some of our students are newcomers who have fled countries such as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Serbia. During the last 50 years, tens of thousands of students have visited the museum. We, in turn, have presented thousands of Holocaust programs in schools and to community groups and organizations. Our efforts are designed to emphasize the message that racial, ethnic, and religious hatred are the social poisons that weaken the American democracy.

Mission: Using the resources of the museum, our mission is to educate students and adults, personalizing the Holocaust so that they learn the consequences of racism, ethnic cleansing, and intolerance. The Holocaust was a watershed event, not only in the 20th century, but in the entire history of humanity. The study of the Holocaust provides us with one of the most effective ways to work with students to examine basic moral issues and value systems. What are the lessons of the Holocaust for us today?

Operating as usual

This year, we are continuing to offer educational programs to engage your students in a dialogue of the Holocaust. Our p...
01/13/2021

This year, we are continuing to offer educational programs to engage your students in a dialogue of the Holocaust. Our programming this school year will be offered virtually. These programs are suitable for 5th-12th grade students and meet Pennsylvania’s Academic Standards for History and English in our digital format redesign. Please click this link to learn about our programs and contact us to schedule them! https://hamec.org/programs/

A message from Lisa Glass Marlowe following the events of January 6:"Holocaust Survivors are traumatized when hateful at...
01/11/2021

A message from Lisa Glass Marlowe following the events of January 6:
"Holocaust Survivors are traumatized when hateful attacks happen. This flag hung on the Capitol building (11/17/2018), in my honor, for my work in Holocaust education. This reminds me how vital Holocaust and racial inequality education is, We must fight back by demanding every school teach tolerance and racism, so we can say, 'never again.'"
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/08/world/europe/us-capitol-rampage-camp-auschwitz.html

This week, we are celebrating one of our history interns, Leah Dukes! Leah was recently accepted into the Holocaust and ...
01/06/2021

This week, we are celebrating one of our history interns, Leah Dukes! Leah was recently accepted into the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Ph.D. program at Gratz College, and she will begin her studies there later this month.
Leah has been working at HAMEC since July of 2020. She is responsible for cataloguing our artifact collection, as well as helping to prepare exhibits.
One of Leah’s favorite experiences at HAMEC has been working with rare artifacts. “I really like getting to touch the artifacts and working with them as primary resources”, she said. “‘Poisonous Mushroom’ and ‘Never Trust a Fox’, two childrens’ propaganda books that we have, are artifacts that I have never seen [elsewhere] in person. It was pretty interesting to handle those artifacts and do interpretations of them for our media guide.”

Schedule a Virtual Holocaust Presentation for your Classroom today. Over the past ten years we have reached over 250,000...
01/05/2021
Schedule a Virtual Holocaust Presentation for your Classroom

Schedule a Virtual Holocaust Presentation for your Classroom today. Over the past ten years we have reached over 250,000 Greater Delaware Valley Area students and teachers in a discussion of the consequences of racism, ethnic cleansing, and intolerance. Click on the link and schedule a program today!

Programs are Available Now! Dear Colleague,  The Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center (HAMEC) is offering educational programs to engage your students in a dialogue of the Holocaust. Over

Christmas Greetings
12/24/2020
Christmas Greetings

Christmas Greetings

To all of our friends and supporters who are celebrating Christmas, we at the Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center wish you a happy holiday. All times are difficult and this year has bee…

12/21/2020
Cheltenham School District

Check out this tribute to one of our survivors, Itka Zygmuntowics! https://fb.watch/2wHDFBmrkq/

This week, the district is highlighting PBL students and the public service announcements they created as part of the “Empathy-Driven Change” project.

As calls for social and political change reached a fever-pitch in 2020, the Cheltenham High School freshman project-based learning (PBL) cohort took on the mission of fostering its own sense of political agency. Even though none were of voting age, the students created a sense of ownership by channeling their individual interests and concerns into a professional message for change: The Empathy-Driven Change project. Freshman PBL students shared their inspirations and rationales for choosing their PSA topics.

Shay Millis
“When I started my PSA, I wanted it to be relatable to myself. My very good friend Itka Zygmuntowicz had just passed away, and I wanted to honor her in this PSA, so I decided to make it about the Holocaust. Itka survived the Holocaust when she was only 14. She was held in Auschwitz, which was one of the worst concentration camps. Because of my friendship with Itka and my Jewish heritage, this PSA is important to me. I hope people watch it and are affected by it.
#ProjectBasedLearning #ThisIsCheltenham

From our blog: https://hamecblog.wordpress.com/2020/12/13/how-nazis-used-personal-names-to-spawn-the-holocaust-before-th...
12/14/2020
Before the infamous Yellow Star, Nazi authorities forced all Jews to only bear names from a sanctioned list

From our blog: https://hamecblog.wordpress.com/2020/12/13/how-nazis-used-personal-names-to-spawn-the-holocaust-before-the-infamous-yellow-star-nazi-authorities-forced-all-jews-to-only-bear-names-from-a-sanctioned-list/

And from our archives: The Nazis wrote "Israel" on Kurt Herman's passport as his middle name. Check it out at our virtual tour here https://mobile.hamec.yourcultureconnect.com/e/hidden-children-and-child-rescue/kurt-hermans-reisepass

CBC Radio, November 27, 2020. Click for full report and audio. Note: Ideas is a CBC radio program and podcast, available on CBC Listen, Stitcher and wherever you get your podcasts. Click for audio.…

Join us for our celebration of International Holocaust Remembrance Day next month! We will be holding a virtual event on...
12/13/2020

Join us for our celebration of International Holocaust Remembrance Day next month! We will be holding a virtual event on January 27 at 9:00 a.m. in partnership with the We Are Here! Foundation and World ORT. More details are coming soon!

To all of our friends and supporters who are celebrating the Festival of Lights, we wish you a happy holiday. As we comm...
12/09/2020

To all of our friends and supporters who are celebrating the Festival of Lights, we wish you a happy holiday. As we commemorate the sweet victory of the Maccabees over our oppressors, we are reminded that all times are difficult. Certainly our heroic Survivors can attest to that. 5780 and 5781 have presented us with new and different challenges. But just like the Maccabees, we will prevail. So please enjoy this holiday season as best as you can – with or without family members by your side physically. And here is our hope that 2021 and certainly 5782 will be far more normal.

Chuck Feldman
President

Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center's cover photo
12/03/2020

Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center's cover photo

There is just one day left to register for our Virtual Museum opening, featuring a new exhibit! Our Giving Tuesday fundr...
12/01/2020

There is just one day left to register for our Virtual Museum opening, featuring a new exhibit! Our Giving Tuesday fundraiser for the event has also gone live on Facebook, with a goal of raising $3600. Facebook will be matching donations after 8:00 a.m. tomorrow for a limited time, and we would appreciate your support! You can donate by copying and pasting this link:
https://www.facebook.com/donate/199045885013626/?fundraiser_source=pages_tab
Copy and paste this link to register for tomorrow’s event: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_rzBTd4PwQ8itRidR5xK3oQ?fbclid=IwAR3EHUJjt-B7MSOv-R4jUSa-P_1nkdXCZ1_2FToCCz2R4LuEhkoN6jflBp0

#Holocaust #Education #Learning #School #Educationmatters #History #Auschwitz #Shoah #Israel #AnneFrank #WeRemember #Holocausto #Nazi #WWII #NeverAgain #HolocaustEducation #HolocaustAwareness #holocaustsurvivor #holocaustmemorial

Please join HAMEC Staff next month as we guide our supporters through our new virtual and remote artifact tour guide, wi...
11/19/2020

Please join HAMEC Staff next month as we guide our supporters through our new virtual and remote artifact tour guide, with online resources and a virtual exhibit that educators and supporters can access from home! The project is partially funded by Claims Conference (Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany). You can register for the event by clicking this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_rzBTd4PwQ8itRidR5xK3oQ

11/14/2020
Kristallnacht Commemorative Lecture | Gratz College

Please join our friends at Gratz College and the Tuzman family virtually on November 15 from 7-8 p.m. for a presentation by Rabbi Lance J. Sussman, Ph.D and Chair of the Gratz College Board of Governors! The event commemorates Kristallnacht, the night in November 1938 when Nazi leaders unleashed a series of pogroms against the Jewish population of Germany and recently incorporated territories. No registration is required. You can stream the event by clicking this link: https://www.gratz.edu/event/kristallnacht-commemorative-lecture

From Bamberg to Baltimore: The Sacki Family Escapes Nazi Germany, 1935-1945Join Gratz College, the Tuzman family, and the Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center (HAMEC) for an online presentation by Rabbi Lance J. Sussman, Ph.D., Chair of the Gratz College Board of Governors, in commemorati...

A blessed New Year from HAMEC to you. As we enter into the Jewish New Year, we would like to honor the memory of Joe Kah...
09/19/2020

A blessed New Year from HAMEC to you. As we enter into the Jewish New Year, we would like to honor the memory of Joe Kahn, Annaliese Nossbaum, Manya Perel, Gunter Hauer, and Ilse Lindemeyer and the work they did to educate children around the world about the Holocaust. HAMEC will continue to share their message and continue to preserve history to learn from the past.

09/04/2020
Dr. Leon Bass

For this week's Legacy Library Friday, we remember the life of Dr. Leon Bass who spoke about his experience as a Black liberator during World War II.

Dr. Leon Bass is a former high school principal and veteran of World War II who has dedicated much of his life as a teacher, a school administrator, and a speaker, to fighting racism wherever it exists.

As a nineteen-year-old soldier serving in a segregated unit of the U.S. Army, Leon Bass participated in the liberation of Buchenwald concentration camp in 1945. That moment changed his life. "I was an angry soldier," said Bass. "I was being asked to fight for freedom while at the same time, as a black man, I was constantly being told in many ways that I wasn't good enough to have that freedom."

Following his service in the U.S. Army 183rd Engineer Combat Battalion in World War II, Bass graduated from West Chester University of Pennsylvania and later received a doctorate from Temple University. He taught at several schools in the School District of Philadelphia and was a principal at the Benjamin Franklin High School in Philadelphia for 14 years.

He has presented his story to audiences throughout the United States and across the world. He was a participant in the International Liberators Conference, held in Washington, D.C. in 1981. In 1994, he was the keynote speaker at the Georgia Commission on the Holocaust, and in 1996, he was awarded the Pearlman Award for Humanitarian Advancement from Jewish Women International. He appeared in the Academy Award-nominated documentary, "Liberators: Fighting on Two Fronts in World War II." In 2011, he published his book, "Good Enough: One Man's Memoirs of the Price of a Dream."

This is "Dr. Leon Bass" by Flim Films on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

08/28/2020
Klara Vinokur

This week's #LegacyLibaryFriday features Klara Vinokur, whose heroic story of bravery, reminds us of why we continue to teach Holocaust education in schools today.

Klara was born in Shpola, a small town in the Ukraine, in 1927. Her mother was a dressmaker, her father was a laborer and she had a younger brother, Gregory, and an older sister, who lived near Kiev. She attended the local school with her non-Jewish Ukrainian friends.

On June 22, 1941, the Germans invaded the Soviet Union and her small town became occupied on July 30. She was then forced to wear an armband with the Star of David and forced to clean the streets and houses. In late September, the Shpola ghetto was established and the entire local Jewish population was forced to live in cramped quarters with little food. Her father was murdered on August 21.

In the beginning of May 1942, the Nazis and local police announced that those who were capable would be sent to labor camps. Within a few weeks, Klara fell sick with typhoid fever and was confined to a room with 20 other sick people. Later, in 1942, her mother gave Klara fake identification, renaming her Olga Pushenko who came from a children's home in Donesk. The family then hid with other Ukrainian friends and that was the last time she saw her mother. Gregory was hid in another family and then was taken. Klara then went to hide in another Ukrainian home, but the family called the police and she was taken to the police station where she saw partisans hanged and others shot. She was suspected of collaborating with the partisans and on April 7, 1943, was sent to a state farm. On January 26, 1944, on her birthday, the Russian army liberated her.

The next day she was shot in the left shoulder and after recovering for one month in a hospital, returned to Shpola. Her sister survived so Klara moved near Kiev, Ukraine. She married an officer and graduated from the Institute of Foreign Languages. She then immigrated to the U.S. and worked as the chairwoman of a trade union from 1970 to 1985. She has one son and two grandchildren.

This is "Klara Vinokur" by Flim Films on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Today, we are celebrating one of our Graduate History Practicum students, Fabulous Flores.  Fabulous is from Southern Ca...
08/25/2020

Today, we are celebrating one of our Graduate History Practicum students, Fabulous Flores. Fabulous is from Southern California, and is currently a graduate student studying Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Stockton University. She chose this internship because it is her goal to work in this field at a college level.

She believes that continuing to work alongside people and organizations within this field is an invaluable experience and networking opportunity. So far, her favorite part about this program has been getting to work hands on with the artifacts. Fabulous mentioned, "The feeling of holding history in your hands is indescribable."

08/21/2020
Dave Tuck

For this week's Legacy Library Friday, we are featuring ghetto and concentration camp survivor, David Tuck. To learn more about HAMEC's programs and how you can book a virtual speaker on our website hamec.org.

David Tuck was born in Poland. His mother passed away
six months after his birth, so his Orthodox Jewish grandparents took him in and insisted that he receive both a public and Hebrew education.

Life drastically changed on September 1, 1939 when Germany invaded Poland. He was 10 years old. Radio broadcasts changed from Polish music to “Deutschland Über Alles,” “Germany Overall.” By December he was forced to wear an armband and then a yellow Star of David and he had to step off the sidewalk and into the street when German soldiers approached him.

Within a few weeks David’s family was deported to the Lodz ghetto where he spoke German well enough that he was able to work in the food ration office providing families with ration cards. Then in the spring of 1941, David was deported to Posen, a labor camp in Poland.

In 1943 the Nazis liquidated the Posen labor camp and sent David to another labor camp to construct an autobahn. Then David was deported, with other skilled workers to Auschwitz where he arrived on August 25, 1943. He worked in a sub-camp of Auschwitz called Eintrachthütte in a factory building anti-aircraft guns. In January 1945, David was deported on a train to Mauthausen in Austria, a brutal 370-mile trip over four days. To survive, he scooped snow from the ground using a tin cup tied to his belt. He was subsequently sent to Güsen II, an underground factory to build German aircraft.

On May 5, 1945 the Americans liberated Güsen II; he weighed 78 pounds. David then spent the next several months recuperating in refugee camps and then immigrated to the United States in 1950.

To find out more, listen to Dave Tuck's testimony below. #LegacyLibraryFriday

This is "Dave Tuck" by Flim Films on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

This summer, HAMEC has been fortunate to work with several post-graduate students and interns. Over the next few days, w...
08/20/2020

This summer, HAMEC has been fortunate to work with several post-graduate students and interns. Over the next few days, we will be featuring our interns and the work they have done this summer. Adam Babetski is from Sterling, Virginia. For the past year, he has been a member of Penn State's Bellisario College of Communications where he majors in Broadcast Journalism. He previously worked for CommRadio and runs a podcast.

Part of why Adam was so excited about this position is due to his personal ties with having a Holocaust survivor as a family friend and believed that this internship would be a valuable experience dedicated to raising awareness and education about the Holocaust.

As a Communications intern at HAMEC, his primary job function works with the social media accounts and website. Adam mentioned that he is particularly glad that he's gotten the chance to interview several Holocaust survivors who are on HAMEC's Board of Trustees in the hope that he can pass their stories and experiences to others in the future.

Address

8339 Old York Road, Suite 203/205,
Philadelphia, PA
19116

SEPTA # 58 or 67

General information

During the last 50+ years, thousands of students and adults have participated in museum programs. Many students and their teachers have visited the museum, and the museum has hosted many adult community groups as well. The museum staff takes its outreach programs into public, parochial, private, and Jewish schools. Home-schooled students and their parents have also visited the museum. Students and teachers have listened to the life experiences of Holocaust survivors, liberators -- American GIs -- who liberated the concentration camps, and Kindertransport (children whom the Nazis ransomed allowing them to leave for England -- most never saw their parents again). Because many of our speakers are into their 70's and 80's, we are currently videotaping their stories. Over the last 52 years, the museum staff presented programs to elementary, middle, high school, and college students. Our outreach program has taken us to federal installations, senior citizen retirement communities, nursing homes, and universities in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. The museum sponsors live performances by professional actors of an abridged version of "The Diary of Anne Frank" and "Lida Stein and the Righteous Gentile". For some students, the plays, a vehicle for teaching the lessons of the Holocaust, was their first exposure to live theater. The play is an excellent venue for discussing the dangers of prejudice, bigotry, and racism. The museum is excited to continue to offer this program as the Anne Frank Theater Project. After viewing the production, students have an opportunity to ask questions and discuss its relevance and the issues it raises for us today. One student commented, "The play made me think about things I had never thought about before. Anyone of us can become a victim no matter what your background is." During the 2017/2018 school year, our Educational Programs reached more than 40,000 people during more than 300 programs to schools, organizations, and businesses.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(215) 464-4701

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center:

Videos

Category

Our Story

The Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center, America's first Holocaust museum, was founded in 1961 by survivor Yaakov Riz, who lost 83 members of his family during the Holocaust. Riz vowed that if he survived he would dedicate his life to establishing a museum that would memorialize the millions of Jews and Non-Jews who perished at the hands of Nazi barbarism. Initially, the museum was housed in the basement of Riz's home. The museum's genesis, its growth and its struggle against intolerance are the realization of his dream, his courage and his commitment. In the five-county area that we serve, the museum's educational and community outreach is ecumenical and comprises a population that ranges from elementary school (grade 5) to senior citizens. Many of the students we work with come from disadvantaged homes. Some of our students are newcomers who have fled countries such as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Serbia. During the last 50+ years, tens of thousands of students have visited the museum. We, in turn, have presented thousands of Holocaust programs in schools and to community groups and organizations. Our efforts are designed to emphasize the message that racial, ethnic, and religious hatred are the social poisons that weaken the American democracy.

Nearby museums


Other History Museums in Philadelphia

Show All

Comments

Brzeszcze 19.01.2021 - remembrance The 76th Anniversary of Death March of KL Auschwitz-Birkenau Foundation of memory sites near Auschwitz-Birkenau
Help your community get the funding it needs for Programs and services like: supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, Medicaid, Health clinics, education, and much more. Complete 2020 Census online: Http:// my2020census.gov/, by phone: 844-330-2020, or by mail. it's easy, safe, and important
Forget the high-school diploma. Miriam Schreiber is so thoroughly self-educated, she'd qualify for a few college degrees. What a life she has made.
Hi there, I am reaching out on behalf of the documentary Prosecuting Evil: The Extraordinary World of Ben Ferencz. Prosecuting Evil tells the incredible story of Ben Ferencz, the last surviving Nuremberg Trial prosecutor, who continues to wage his lifelong crusade in the fight for law and peace. Few people today have heard of Ben Ferencz. But this portrait of a 98-year-old lawyer, couldn't be more relevant. Racism, antisemitism, and the return of extremist political views is a danger in 2019. Prosecuting Evil is now available on Netflix in the US and I encourage you all to watch it! If you have any questions about the film, please do not hesitate to reach out ([email protected]) All the best,
In case you have not seen or heard about this event yet, the Keystone State Boychoir (KSB) will be sharing the stage with Holocaust survivor, Sidney Taussig, at NMAJH on June 1st, when they share a most remarkable - and unknown - story. This journey for KSB began when the 2017 Tour Choir to Prague wanted to learn more about boys their own age before traveling to Terezin (our artistic director made it a mission to address the Holocaust with the boys after overhearing a boy say that the Holocaust had never happened). This led the boys to Mr. Sidney Taussig and the Boys of Vedem. A group of 40 or so 12-15 year old boys, crammed into a tiny 15x15 dorm room, who preserved their humanity and their boyhood with the most beautiful poetry and prose, as well as writings about everyday things like sports, food and girls. They created Vedem - a literary magazine that they read aloud every Friday night. Only 1 in 7 boys survived. And now Mr. Taussig is the last surviving Vedem Boy. He will be joining us for this June 1 event where we will honor him and tell his story. The boys will also travel to Poland and Lithuania this summer, taking this story with them... you can also get more info at cychoirs.org/vedem or contacting me directly. The event starts at 5 pm and concludes at 6:30 pm. There is a brief reception following as well. I hope you will share this with friends and colleagues and join us at the museum theatre for an amazing event: https://cychoirs.ticketleap.com/the-boys-of-vedem/dates/Jun-01-2019_at_0500PM#/
I always read the posts from the Holocaust Awareness Museum as it used to be a big part of my life. I used to be active with the organization, back in the '80's when it was known as the Jewish Identity Center at Englewood and Frontenac Sts. My mother was executive director and I designed the logo ( butterfly with barbed wire) and I'm very flattered that after 30 some years, you're still using it. Let us never forget!
This film was published on the BBC on 19 April 1968 on the 25th anniversary of the revolt in the Warsaw Ghetto. It takes a bit to get going, as though the makers were trying to film the time slot. Furthermore parts of the film are not from Warsaw, some video is from Bydgogosz, other from Kraków. The film ends abruptly - clearly it must have gone on longer but I do not possess the extra part. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgB8EgiBcLw
https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/High-Tech-Holocaust-Survivor_Philadelphia-486813881.html Thank you HAMEC for letting us tell these survivors' stories and how they're touching lives all over the country and world via Skype.
So proud of our mom Deanne Scherlis Comer!
These survivors from the Holocaust are a brave group of people. Some were in concentration camps, labor camps, hidden children, kindertransports out of Germany, etc. They went to nearly 400 schools last year to share their experiences of the most hateful behavior done to human beings. They teach children about tolerance, kindness, being up standers against hateful behavior and being better human beings.
Bully for HAMEC! Thanks to all of our survivors. God Bless all of them!