The Fabric Workshop and Museum Shop

The Fabric Workshop and Museum Shop Artist-made gifts found nowhere else. Discover home goods, hand bags, and wearables with artsy flair.

09/09/2023
07/08/2023
Henry Taylor’s sculptural practice involves a voracious sourcing of materials, making him a natural fit to collaborate n...
06/13/2023

Henry Taylor’s sculptural practice involves a voracious sourcing of materials, making him a natural fit to collaborate not only with FWM but with  (Recycled Artists In Residency)—a non-profit organization focusing on the intersection of art, industry, and waste.

During his site visit at RAIR, Henry found inspiration in the way materials were discarded, collected, and bound together. In his FWM exhibition, “Nothing Change, Nothing Strange,” you’ll encounter three totemic sculptures created from compressed bales of post-industrial refuse that the artist sourced from Revolution Recovery, the construction and demolition waste recycling facility RAIR works from. For Henry, these bales of paint buckets, vinyl home siding, and black plastic planters carry distinct material identities and narratives. In this work, Taylor breaks apart and reasserts them with a more complicated and nuanced narrative.

Explore with Taylor how people and materials are held together, separated, and categorized both socially and systematically. Admission to FWM is free (suggested donation of $5). 



 
Images: © Henry Taylor, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. “Nothing Change, Nothing Strange,” 2023. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo credit:

Members, time is running out to save 30% store-wide. Use your member coupon code at checkout by midnight!Shop FWM>> http...
05/14/2023

Members, time is running out to save 30% store-wide. Use your member coupon code at checkout by midnight!

Shop FWM>> https://bit.ly/3Yu9y8U

05/01/2023

This tote’s design was made from a sketch in which FWM Artist-in-Residence Henry Taylor breaks apart the word “tartan” into “Tar/Tan”—evidence of how Taylor’s thinking process, artistic process, and use of materials is connected to his sharp and subversive dismantling of language.

After visiting the artist’s solo exhibition, “Nothing Change, Nothing Strange,” stop by the FWM Shop to purchase this commemorative tote bag or shop online>> https://bit.ly/41AMdDz

Image: © Henry Taylor, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. “Nothing Change, Nothing Strange,” 2023. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo credit: Carlos Avendaño.

🏵 See you all soon! 🌸
03/04/2023

🏵 See you all soon! 🌸

Heading to the PHS : Pennsylvania Horticultural Society The Philadelphia Flower Show ? Get a complimentary paper flower when you spend $25 or more at the The Fabric Workshop and Museum Shop . We're conveniently located right across from the Convention Center at 1214 Arch St.

*Must present your flower show ticket.

  | Beatrice Wood (1893–1998) was an American ceramicist credited for her involvement in introducing the avant-garde mov...
02/13/2023

| Beatrice Wood (1893–1998) was an American ceramicist credited for her involvement in introducing the avant-garde movement to the US in the early 20th century. Often referred to as the “Mama of Dada,” she had a close relationship with Marcel Duchamp and Henri-Pierre Roche, and together in 1917 they founded early Dadaist art publications “The Blind Man” and “Rongwrong” magazines. ⁠

Much later in her career, Wood produced this silk scarf with our Studio during her residency at FWM. Entitled “Perfect Lovers,” it depicts abstracted figures comingled in various erotic combinations and explores the tension where the two figures become indivisible. For the scarf’s border, Wood employed linework that may at first appear decorative and non-representational but a closer inspection reveals hundreds more of these intertwined lovers wrapping all four sides. ⁠

Get 20% off all scarves, including “Perfect Lovers” through Valentine’s Day, February 14 (link in bio). FWM members save an additional 10%. ⁠



Image: Beatrice Wood, in collaboration with FWM. “Perfect Lovers” scarf, printed on silk.

VALENTINE'S DAY SALESave up to 30% now through Feb 14.Enjoy 20% off our best-loved pillows, scarves, and Will Stokes, Jr...
02/12/2023

VALENTINE'S DAY SALE
Save up to 30% now through Feb 14.

Enjoy 20% off our best-loved pillows, scarves, and Will Stokes, Jr. plushies both in-store and online. FWM members get an extra 10% off! ⁠
⁠💕
Stop by in-person for another sweet deal—save $5 when you get two pillowcases.

Shop FWM: https://bit.ly/FWM-Valentine

Check it out! Get 30% off all FWM-made items, produced in collaboration with artists from around the world. Today only! ...
11/27/2022

Check it out! Get 30% off all FWM-made items, produced in collaboration with artists from around the world. Today only!
www.store.fabricworkshopandmuseum.org

Find unique holiday gifts while supporting your favorite museums.

In our future, the history of art could be taught as a story—or, rather, stories that embrace the possibility of multipl...
10/05/2022

In our future, the history of art could be taught as a story—or, rather, stories that embrace the possibility of multiple voices, many frameworks for seeing, and a philosophy of both/and instead of either/or. These are some of the ideas put forth in “Storytellers of Art Histories,” edited by Alpesh Kantilal Patel () and Yasmeen Siddiqui ().

In conjunction with “Jayson Musson: His History of Art,” join us Tuesday, October 18 at 6:00 pm for a night of non-visual storytelling, where PhD art history candidates from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art and Architecture () introduce recorded excerpts from some of the anthology’s contributors narrating their stories in their own voices.

Following the presentations, share your own stories of art via a hands-on workshop to screen-print your own conversational tote bag, sparking the exchange of future stories of art!
Register through the link in bio.

Image: Visitors enjoy Episode 1: “Hey Young World.” Jayson Musson, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. “His History of Art,” 2022. Photo credit: Carlos Avendaño; “Storytellers of Art Histories,” courtesy of Intellect Books

06/17/2022

“The power of the domestic is so important because it’s the foundation for so much of what we do in our everyday lives. It is a safe space to allow one’s self to just “be” without performing or thinking about the dangers of the outside world.”—artist Jonathan Lyndon Chase ()

This , we’re reflecting on the complexity and sensuality of Jonathan Lyndon Chase’s “Big Wash” through the exhibition catalogue. Last year, Chase transformed our gallery into a laundromat with drawings, paintings, sculpture, video, and sound that explored Black, q***r domestic intimacy and blurred public and private boundaries. Included in Chase’s paintings are personal objects—bedsheets, clothing, and grooming products—to reveal an undercurrent of tenderness in daily life.

In addition to installation views and illustrations of Chase’s works, the catalogue features photographs, sketches, poetry, and short fiction exploring kinship, nostalgia and intimacy—themes of the exhibition and Chase’s larger artistic practice—by contributing writers Yolanda Wisher, Tiona Nekkia McClodden, Meg Onli and Meg Pendoley, noor ibn najam, and jamal rashad.

The exhibition may have come and gone, but the salient themes in “Big Wash” continue to resonate through the catalogue, available through the link in bio.


Music: Solitude
Musician: Rook1e ()

05/15/2022

Today we’re celebrating Betty Woodman, who was born in 1930 in Norwalk, CT 🥳

The ceramic artist challenged the meaning of an object’s functionality through deconstruction and reconstruction—pairing familiar hints of household items and architectural details with a distinctive gestural quality. What makes her sculptures so captivating? Upon closer inspection, one can easily get lost in the details of her exuberant brush strokes and textures. Whether the designs riff on Greek, Etruscan, Asian or Modernist forms, her works find pleasure in a vibrant language that is recognizable as her own.
In the spirit of Betty Woodman, let us take a moment today to look closely and find joy and beauty in the details of everyday life. Learn more about the artist through the link in bio.


Film excerpt from “Think Out Loud,” produced by Charles Woodman, New York, NY, 1990. Courtesy of the Woodman Family Foundation. Video editing by Watch Me Rise Films. Images: Betty Woodman (right) and construction technician Betty Leacraft-Cameron work on Turnadot Doorway, 1980.

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