North St. Paul Historical Society

North St. Paul Historical Society Promoting awareness of North St. Paul's history for residents and visitors through education, interpretation, presentation, and preservation.
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Memorial Day Parade, 1926.  Margaret and 7th, looking west.
05/25/2020

Memorial Day Parade, 1926. Margaret and 7th, looking west.

North St. Paul Historical Society
05/25/2020

North St. Paul Historical Society

Joseph Muller article from 1936.  See yesterday's post for more information on his mortuary business.Thanks to Mary Ann ...
05/15/2020

Joseph Muller article from 1936. See yesterday's post for more information on his mortuary business.

Thanks to Mary Ann Schokmiller for sharing this clip. Do you have pictures or clippings we should see? Please message us.

Muller-Stahlmann Mortuary, 1937Joseph Muller started various mortuary and furniture businesses in North St. Paul as earl...
05/14/2020

Muller-Stahlmann Mortuary, 1937

Joseph Muller started various mortuary and furniture businesses in North St. Paul as early as 1888. In September of 1935, George Stahlmann and Joseph Muller became partners in the new Muller-Stahlmann Mortuary. By the end of 1937, George Stahlmann had taken over sole ownership. Stahlmann passed away in 1943 in a train-auto collision at the Margaret Street crossing. At first Stahlmann’s daughter, Betty, announced that she would run the mortuary business, but in February of 1943 the business was sold to Gustaf Sandberg. The Sandberg family continues to operate the business to this day in the same location on the Northwest corner of 7th and Charles.

(See yesterday's post for an earlier view of these buildings)

Main Street, 1912
05/13/2020

Main Street, 1912

1940 Census Map
05/11/2020

1940 Census Map

NSP Fishermen.  Date unknown
05/09/2020

NSP Fishermen. Date unknown

One of North St. Paul’s finest and a dear friend of ours!  Heroes walk amongst us.
05/09/2020
Portraits of Valor: Bob Holmstrom, 94, Army

One of North St. Paul’s finest and a dear friend of ours! Heroes walk amongst us.

Bob Holmstrom was sworn to secrecy for 40 years after World War II, where he flew secret nighttime mission over Europe dropping spies, supplies and propaganda to resistance fighters.

North St. Paul Historical Society
05/04/2020

North St. Paul Historical Society

#OTD 1920Our local paper, 100 years ago today.
04/28/2020

#OTD 1920

Our local paper, 100 years ago today.

04/24/2020

#OTD 1888

Fire struck again at 9 p.m. on April 24, 1888. This time the Cramer and Coney factory was ablaze. Alerted by the conductor of the Wisconsin Central train, Luger’s factory blew its whistle which “startled our people and caused them to rush into the streets to learn the whereabouts of the devouring monster.'” Cries of “Fire, Fire” passed among the crowd who rushed into the streets to view a sky “lighted by a lurid flame, great columns of fire and smoke.” The town with no fire department watched helplessly as the factory burned to the ground. Although Cramer and Coney was insured for $5,500, the total loss in buildings and machinery was $12,000.

04/22/2020

#DidYouKnow that there was a stay-home order in North St. Paul during the Flu Epidemic of 1918?

The following excerpt is taken directly from our North St. Paul Centennial book "A Century od Good Living"...

"The influenza epidemic, which some people thought originated in Spain, swept the entire country during the latter part of 1918. North St. Paul actually lost more people from death due to influenza than from fighting in the European war. As thousands across the state died, entire communities shut down, suspending all activities. Residents were ordered to stay home. North St. Paul Mayor Emil Karnuth issued a resolution on October 28 “To Prevent the Further Spread of Influenza.” The resolution which was issued after a joint meeting of the Village Council and the Board of Education, ordered “That the Board of Health of North St. Paul be ordered to close all schools, churches, theaters, lodges, and stop other public gatherings until Saturday, November 9th (inclusive) or longer if necessary.

”Even so, by November 8, over 25 cases of influenza had been confirmed in town. One of the families hardest hit was the Neumann family whose children lost their parents, Gus and his wife, within a few days of each other. Others who died included nineteen-year-old MartinKohler and Rose Hilpisch who died of influenza complicated by pneumonia. The Sentinelurged people to comply with the Mayor’s order. “Few people as yet realize the great seriousness of the scourge that has caused the death of our fellow citizens. When people realize the fact that by not taking the proper preventatives from catching the disease and from spreading it after they once have it, they may cause the death of a neighbor or friend, or perhaps their own death, then the epidemic will be lessened to as great an extent as possible.”

Although many people in town struggled to survive the incapacitating effects of the influenza epidemic, they nevertheless rallied to aid others who suffered even greater misfortunes. Upon learning about the plight of northern Minnesotans whose lives were devastated by raging forest fires, Mrs. Huseby and Mrs. Way organized a fund drive. By mid-October, 1918, the Sentinel reported that “The village of North St. Paul has again come to the front in assistance rendered to the Northern Minnesota fire sufferers. The great disaster which left so many of our fellow citizens to want and destitution did not go unheeded.” Employees at the Standard ConveyorCompany alone collected $342.50 which was added to the $941.90 collected by other factories, organizations and among private citizens. Besides cash donations, the townspeople also collected spare clothing that the Red Cross sent to the Cloquet and Duluth areas for distribution. The response of North St.Paulites to the homeless was just one more example of the community spirit which inspired townspeople to lend aid whether it be to their next-door neighbors or to strangers across the state."

Looking good!
04/21/2020

Looking good!

Take a look at the floors, stage, and paint! we can’t wait for you all to see it in person🍻😊

People of North St. Paul
04/20/2020

People of North St. Paul

Who remembers where this place once stood?
04/19/2020

Who remembers where this place once stood?

Photos from North St. Paul Historical Society's post
04/17/2020

Photos from North St. Paul Historical Society's post

04/13/2020

#OTD 1913

Granville Trace in his article on April 13, 1913 suggested that North St. Paul also hire a city manager: “One of the best things North St. Paul could do would be to hire a manager to run the entire public business of the town, subject to the control of the council, in just the same way that the school superintendent manages the schools under the control of the board of education. At present the men who manage the town are paid ten dollars a year, except the clerk, and he received $100. A half-million dollar corporation spending $140 a year for management salaries! Then we ‘kick’ about the results we get. Nobody can afford to do much work for ten dollars a year. At present we are trying to get government for nothing.”

#OTD 1919"Hal" Harold Norgard was born on April 10, 1919 in Hixon, Wisconsin.What's your favorite "Hal" story?
04/10/2020

#OTD 1919

"Hal" Harold Norgard was born on April 10, 1919 in Hixon, Wisconsin.

What's your favorite "Hal" story?

04/01/2020

#OTD 1948

Clarence Weber, who assumed ownership of his father’s cafe in 1943, gave many North St. Paulites their first glimpse of television. An article in the April 1, 1948 issue of the Review proudly announced that Weber’s Cafe had installed the first commercial television. Shortly after, Neumann’s Bar installed the second commercial TV. Many stores also began displaying and selling televisions in April. In North St. Paul Schleck Hardware carried televisions first, followed by Kaufman’s and Springborn Hardware.

As COVID-19, or the "Corona Virus", challenges the world, businesses and institutions in North St. Paul brace themselves...
03/28/2020

As COVID-19, or the "Corona Virus", challenges the world, businesses and institutions in North St. Paul brace themselves for the Governor's "Stay-At-Home" order. These pictures were taken on March 27, 2020, just hours before the two-week order went into effect.

As COVID-19, or the "Corona Virus", challenges the world, businesses and institutions in North St. Paul brace themselves for the Governor's "Stay-At-Home" order. These pictures were taken on March 27, 2020, just hours before the two-week order went into effect.

North St. Paul Historical Society
03/23/2020

North St. Paul Historical Society

03/23/2020

Many people are isolated at home and finally getting to those projects that involve reorganizing and going through storage boxes. Maybe some of you will come across old photos of North St. Paul, and we want them! Pictures of your loved ones may contain a wealth of information in the background.

We would love it if you Scan and Message them to us. Please include people/place names and dates if possible. No scanner? There are free apps for smartphones that do the trick like "Scannable".

Thank you for your help in building our collection and happy hunting!

03/21/2020

#OTD 1949

Perhaps the incident that best-symbolized community problems and sentiment at this time occurred on Monday, March 21, 1949, when an estimated 400 residents jammed the high school auditorium to protest a tax increase. For three hours North St. Paul’s taxpayers, armed with “sheets of paper, figures and tax statements,” confronted government officials from state, county and local offices. Many objected to the new county valuations on the grounds that property was taxed unequally. Mayor Larry Ball explained that the village council had no jurisdiction over county valuations. Gus Rassmussen, Chief Deputy County Assessor, informed protestors that their only recourse involved assembling proof of their allegations and presenting the figures to county officials. State Representative Fred Memmer suggested that residents form a committee to examine the county assessor’s records

03/17/2020

In response to the Minnesota Department of Health’s newest COVID-19 recommendations, the North St. Paul Historical Society has decided to close our museum to the public until further notice. NSPHS will regularly reassess this temporary closure.

The health and safety of our guests, volunteers, and community is our highest priority. NSPHS is continuing to monitor the news and federal and state health officials’ recommendations and will communicate further changes as they occur.

Until then, please continue to enjoy our page!

North St. Paul Veteran's Park
03/14/2020

North St. Paul Veteran's Park

“U.S. Navy Veteran, Richard J. Thill, passed 3-12-20. A member of VFW 1350 and AL 39, “Dick” Thill was a Pearl Harbor Survivor aboard the USS Ward, DD139. Dick was an honored WWII Veteran and owner of a paver in Veterans Park. Dick’s group “First Shot Naval Vets” was also a major contributor and fund raiser for Veterans Park in North St. Paul. A final salute.”

There is a lot to unravel here in this 1977 Crazy Days shot.  Taken outside present-day Luther Center.  Of particular no...
03/09/2020

There is a lot to unravel here in this 1977 Crazy Days shot. Taken outside present-day Luther Center. Of particular note is the boy about to purchase the Living World Habitrail dragster for his hamster! Find him. We need to know how fast it went.

03/07/2020

#OTD 1911

The Mother’s Club drew heated reactions from some residents when they insisted that children should have a playground on the west side of Central Park (Today's Veteran's Memorial). In a letter written March 7, 1911, a “Taxpayer” responded to the playground issue:

"Do we have to submit to such an outrageous thing as this? Don’t these women know that every piece of property near Central Park will lose in value if the west end is covered with a playground for children? … No one living near Central Park will dare leave the house for fear these young hoodlums will break windows or destroy property… why should they be allowed to be on this lot in the center of town, disfiguring our park. Won’t someone please tell these women to mind their own business and stay at home and knit."

Charles W. Smith, future owner of the Sentinel, and many others rallied in favor of the playground. Smith suggested that the “Taxpayer” visit some of the parks in St. Paul which proved to benefit the neighborhoods that they served. Other letters to the editor were not so kind: “the writer is either a chronic dyspeptic or the milk of human kindness is so thoroughly dried up in his anatomy, that the community would be far better off without such a taxpayer.”

03/05/2020

#OTD 1888

The Ancient Order of United Workmen (A.O.U.W.), a benevolent society, announced its intent to organize North St. Paul’s workers in the same Sentinel issue that carried Dr. Greenlee’s complaint about the town’s healthful environment. On March 5. 1888, the St. Paul A.O.U.W. sent representatives to North St. Paul to explain the benefits of the association and to organize a lodge. According to the A.O.U.W., its membership consisted of industrial workers, lawyers, merchants, und other professional and semiprofessional people who united to protect their families financially in the event of death or disability. The Knights of Pythias, a Roman Catholic benevolent society, also organized a chapter in North St. Paul. These and other societies offered insurance plans that paid benefits to members and their families, whose lives would have been devastated by the loss of income due to the death or disability of the wage-earner. These societies also functioned as social organizations that drew its members together for meetings and entertainment.

#OTD 1871Dr. Ernest Cowern was born in England on March 3, 1871
03/03/2020

#OTD 1871

Dr. Ernest Cowern was born in England on March 3, 1871

03/01/2020

#OTD 1888

At six a.m. on Thursday, March 1, 1888, during a driving sleet storm, a fire devastated the Dargis residence. Dargis managed to save stoves and furniture on the first floor, but the fire completely destroyed the house itself and all his personal belongings. The Cottage Company who owned the house was insured for the structure. But Dargis, uninsured, was “stripped of nearly everything he possessed.” North St. Paul’s citizens rallied to assist Dargis, who found temporary shelter with the J.E. Osborne family. The Sentinel reported this first fire in a long editorial which called for both a water works and a fire department. The Land Company indicated that it already was investigating the possibility of sinking an artesian well in town. Although Silver Lake provided a source of water, the Land Company and residents worried about reducing the level of the lake if it were tapped for fire and other uses.

02/24/2020

#OTD 1918

Sunday, Feb. 24, 1918 will for a long time be remembered in North St. Paul. Fourteen of our best young men left for the front. They had to leave Fathers, Mothers and Sweethearts to go and fight for the liberty of the world. There were many dimmed eyes that day. The young men appeared brave, but in the crowd we noticed an impression of sadness, everyone felt the grievance of the situation.
According to the Sentinel’s March 1 account, North St. Paul ceremoniously bid farewell to John A. Hanson, Albert Montgomery, Robert R. Stevens, Leo Orth, Frank Lorenz, John Renken, Clarence T. Hanson, Rudolph Shockey, Joseph Bell, Roy Folska, Herbert Stevens, Paul Stielow and Francis McCauley. After a formal banquet, the village council presented each of the boys with a small flag. Mr. Zwickey played the “Star Spangled Banner” and then the council members led the procession of new recruits, their families and friends to the waiting train. As the boys boarded the cars at Margaret Street Martin Luger, “the man with the big heart, distributed a roll of ‘green-backs’ to the boys.” The crowd waved as the train rumbled out heading toward White Bear where it would pick up the next group of soldiers. Of those who left North St. Paul that day, Rudolph Shockey would not return.

It is with great sadness that we share the loss of our very own Donna Clevenger.  Donna passed away on February 10, 2020...
02/20/2020

It is with great sadness that we share the loss of our very own Donna Clevenger. Donna passed away on February 10, 2020, at the age of 86. She was a key contributor to our Historical Society and will be missed greatly.

For many years, Donna was the first smiling face we all saw at the North St. Paul Medical Center where she worked as the receptionist. In 1955 she was the Queen of the Snows. In recent years, Donna took the time to call each of our members before every event at our museum with a warm, heartfelt invitation and reminder.

She was a beautiful person inside and out. All of us here at the Society feel privileged to have spent so much time with her.

Preceded in death by parents Alexander Clevenger & Grace Wanke. Funeral Service Friday (2/21) 11:00 AM at NORTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 2675 E. Hwy 36, North St. Paul; visitation one hour prior to Service. Interment Lakeview Cemetery.
Sandberg Family Funeral Home
651-777-2600

Pictured here: Mabel and Clarence SpringbornIn February 1947, Springborn Hardware held a grand opening in its new store,...
02/10/2020

Pictured here: Mabel and Clarence Springborn

In February 1947, Springborn Hardware held a grand opening in its new store, offering more spacious shopping areas, nationally advertised merchandise and customer-oriented services. One year later, during its 15th anniversary celebration, Springborn’s introduced the new “Frostair Duplex Refrigerator,” an unusual appliance that joined two separate compartments, a refrigerator and a frozen food chest.

02/07/2020

#OTD 1933

RAID! Federal agents raided two speakeasies on February 7, 1933. The agents arrested three men in a "club" at Seventh and Charles. They then moved down the street to Neumann's where they broke in and arrested John and James Neumann. The agents padlocked both places and hauled their prisoners off to jail. The following day the men were charged with possession of alcohol and creating a nuisance

#OTD 1926Harry Lyon was born in Saint Paul, Minnesota on February 6, 1926
02/06/2020

#OTD 1926

Harry Lyon was born in Saint Paul, Minnesota on February 6, 1926

Address

2666 7th Ave E
North Saint Paul, MN
55109

Opening Hours

Friday 13:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 13:00

Telephone

(651) 779-6402

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About Us

The North St. Paul Historical Society works to promote an awareness of North St. Paul history for residents and visitors through education, interpretation, presentation, and preservation. The Museum is a nonprofit organization whose goal is collection, preservation, and exhibition of historical artifacts of local North St. Paul significance.

The Historical Society's hosts monthly gathering, featuring guest speakers on the fourth Tuesday of the month starting at 7:00 p.m. Monthly gatherings do not take place in November, December and during the summer months.

Museum Hours

Friday 1 - 4 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Also by appointment for special tours and groups.

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Comments

Going thru Grandma's old stash of newspaper clippings today and found these about the LUGER family reunion and anniversary! Don't know if the N St Paul Hist Soc has these but thought I'd share anyway! (click on photo to see whole image)
"Feds Call Again" read the headline in the North St Paul Courier on Friday Feb 17, 1933. I was at the MN Hist Soc yesterday looking at newspaper microfilm. I'm trying to find evidence/clues to a raid on the family farm. Didn't find any specific to the family but this article said, "Stating they are going to keep calling until they dry the town up, Federal agents made the rounds in North St Paul again Tuesday afternoon. No arrests were made, and nothing found in violation of the national prohibition amendment.... Carl P. McKusick was freed of all suspicion & released after questioning... Other men arrested by the federal agents were freed on bond until their cases are brought up before Federal District court... Does the North St Paul Historical Society have any more info on these local raids?
who remembers 'Kiddy Korner'?
My Grandmother’s Lois Temme Prom dresses from North High. Including dance cards. One is dated 1936.
Does anyone have a picture of the house where John Glenn school is now located on County Road B. This was my grandfathers home. HIs name was Joseph Kopp.. He had 7 children... Thanks. June Kopp Jennings.
My Grandparents Ken Andersen and Lois Temme. Attending North High Prom. Not sure on the year. Guessing 1935/1936ish. I have two of here dresses and dance cards.
This is my Grandma, Lois Temme. She was in the North High band. No idea what year this is. She was born in 1918 so I’m guessing 1934/1935ish.
Do you have any photos of Harmony Elementary with the original building still intact?
North St. Paul Main Street, circa 1912. Note Neumann’s Bar;
Anyone have pictures of Viking DriveIn or King Hi?
My dad and I on our bikes at Silver Lake Beach in No. St. Paul, early 1970's. 😎 *UPDATE* My dad, Chuck Hood, passed away on March 26th at the age of 80 of natural causes. He will be forever missed.