Islamic Design Art

Islamic Design Art Islamic art is not art of a specific religion, time, place, or of a single medium Instead it spans some 1400 years, and includes a range of artistic fields including architecture, calligraphy , painting, glass, ceramic and textiles, among others.
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it's all about Islamic Design and Art

Islamic Design Art
08/27/2020

Islamic Design Art

Ablutions Basin of Yemeni Sultan al-Mujahid Sayf al-Din 'Ali,ca.
Egypt, 1321–63

Although commissioned for a Rasulid sultan of Yemen, this basin reflects prevailing tastes of early fourteenth century Cairo and was clearly produced there or in Damascus, where comparable pieces were created. Bold inscriptions on the wall and rim constitute the central decorative theme, punctuated by medallions featuring lotus blossoms and the Rasulid emblem, a five‑petaled rosette.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Islamic Design Art
08/27/2020

Islamic Design Art

Kashkul (Beggar's Bowl),
Iran,19th century

The kashkul, or beggar’s bowl, is perhaps the most emblematic accoutrement of the wandering dervish. These typically boat-shaped vessela were made in a variety of media, including coco-de-mer shell, wood, metal, and ceramic. Dervishes used them primarily to collect and store alms (their main source of sustenance) and occasionally as drinking vessels. In later centuries, many were marketed as decorative objects since a devoted dervish would be unlikely to carry an elaborately carved kashkul as it would contradict his belief in the renunciation of worldly goods in favor of unconditional devotion to the Divine. The kashkul has a number of metaphorical associations. For example, it represents the cleansing of a sufi’s soul of all extraneous earthly desires in preparation for the acceptance of Divine love; it was also with a dervish's life of poverty. The inscription, an excerpt from sura 67 verse 51 from the Qur'an, has been skillfully pierced into the steel body of the vessel and then damascened in gold.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Islamic Design Art
05/02/2020

Islamic Design Art

Silver Gilt Tray,
India, 18th century

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Islamic Design Art
02/05/2020

Islamic Design Art

Finial in the Form of a Parrot,
India,17th–18th century

Metropolitan Museum of Art

01/27/2020
British Museum's screens made by Saudi artisan

British Museum's screens made by Saudi artisan
Five screens serve to let light into the Albukhary Foundation Gallery of the Islamic World in the British Museum.
They were made by Saudi designer Ahmad Angawi who has given traditional Islamic geometric patterns a contemporary twist.
STORYLINE
One of the more unusual houses in Jeddah belongs to Dr. Sami Angawi, a respected architect.
Like father like son - the young Angawi, Ahmed, is a designer - with a difference.
Growing up, he watched bees meticulously build their hive between the glass pane and the Mangour screen in his living room in Jeddah.
Observing the activity of the bees over a period of time and noticing the regularity of the shape the bees produced, Ahmed - who is a long time admirer of Islamic geometry - started to build ornate wooden panels.
In 2018, his work went on display at the Art Paris Art Fair, shown in the Saudi Arabian section of the international fair.
Saudi artisan Ahmed Agawi says he brought together in his mind the two elements close to his childhood window - the beehive and the window shutter.
"I had two thoughts," he explains.
"One was about the cells - the hexagonal shape shown and how it came about; the other was the Mangour which hasn't been worked on for some time and there is no mathematical explanation of this."
What is unusual about the Mangour window shutters is that no nails are used in their construction.
They are entirely handmade and based on a traditional technique.
In 2017, they were shown at 21,39, Jeddah's annual art event as hanging abstract shapes.
Ahmad Angawi, who studied at the Prince's Foundation School of Traditional Arts in London and now runs the Jameel House of Traditional Arts in the old town of Jeddah, says the shape of the cells within the hive and the subtlety of the geometric shutters led him to use contemporary technology.
"I used laser because in every age artists use the best tools available," he says.
Five screens were specially commissioned for use in the Albukhary Foundation Gallery of the Islamic World in the British Museum in London which opened in October 2018.
The screens add atmosphere and resonate with many of the objects on display that also have similar geometric designs.
While not placed in a display cabinet, the Mangour act as a filter to the outside world.
The clever interplay of light and shade filtering through turns them into an integral part of the galleries.
Venetia Porter, curator at the British Museum, says that the charm of the Mangour is that they are based on traditional techniques seen in Jeddah Old Town but have a contemporary feel.
"He hasn't just copied the woodworking techniques of the Hijaz - this Mangour technique that you find in the old houses of Jeddah still - but he's reinterpreted them in a very contemporary way," says Porter.
The Mangour are an outstanding part of the gallery.
The mathematical precision which suggests infinity is a part of Islamic traditional design.
Venetia Porter explains that there are more screens in the first gallery than in the second.
"Here we had to reduce the light levels because we're showing light sensitive works, works on paper and textiles, and there's only one screen in here," she says.
The Mangour screens play a part in defining the mood of the Albukhary Foundation Gallery of the Islamic World - a treasure trove of objects showing the art of symmetry and precision.
The subtle lights that spreads around the gallery repeat the language of geometry and the enduring techniques of master craftsmen.

AP Archive (12 Apr 2019) LEADIN

12/30/2019
Islamic Design Art

Islamic Design Art

Making a Mangour screen part I

Artist Ahmad Angawi takes us through some of the geometry and craft processes behind the making of the beautiful mangour window screens that are such a feature of the the Albukhary foundation galleries of the Islamic world at the British museum.

By: the British museum

12/18/2019
Islamic Design Art

Islamic Design Art

In 1232, Shuja' ibn Man'a al-Mawsili completed a magnificent brass ewer inlaid with copper and silver, very likely for the local ruler of Mosul, Iraq. With its vignettes of sports, battles, and courtly entertainments, this ceremonial vessel is a celebration of aristocratic life under the Seljuq Turks.

© 2016 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Islamic Design Art
12/06/2019

Islamic Design Art

Glass water-flask in the shape of a pilgrim's flask; gilded and enamelled decoration.
Syria, 1250-1260

British Museum

Islamic Design Art
12/01/2019

Islamic Design Art

Bezoar Stone with Case and Stand,
India,17th century

Sought by European nobility, Goa stones are compounds of natural elements once thought to have curative properties. The ornate containers were believed to enrich the medicinal effects.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

11/19/2019
Islamic Design Art

Islamic Design Art

HRH The Prince of Wales explains why he created his School of Traditional Arts in Shoreditch, London, and what it strives to achieve. A film made by Ian Skelly and David Martin as part of a series on the Prince of Wales's vision and the work done by his Charities and Charitable Foundation.

By: Ian Skelly

Islamic Design Art
11/11/2019

Islamic Design Art

Finial in the Form of a Parrot,
India,17th–18th century

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Islamic Design Art
11/08/2019

Islamic Design Art

Earthenware bowl, painted in luster over an opaque, white glaze
Iraq; 10th century
The David Collection

11/07/2019
Islamic Design Art

Islamic Design Art

Making Marbled Paper
a video demonstrating the process of making marbled paper.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Islamic Design Art
11/06/2019

Islamic Design Art

Water Filter,
Earthenware
Egypt, 14th–15th century

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Islamic Design Art
11/02/2019

Islamic Design Art

Ewer with Lid,
Afghanistan, 15th century

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Islamic Design Art
10/29/2019

Islamic Design Art

Ablutions Basin of Yemeni Sultan al-Mujahid Sayf al-Din 'Ali,ca.
Egypt, 1321–63

Although commissioned for a Rasulid sultan of Yemen, this basin reflects prevailing tastes of early fourteenth century Cairo and was clearly produced there or in Damascus, where comparable pieces were created. Bold inscriptions on the wall and rim constitute the central decorative theme, punctuated by medallions featuring lotus blossoms and the Rasulid emblem, a five‑petaled rosette.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Islamic Design Art
10/28/2019

Islamic Design Art

Wall Panel with Geometric Interlace,
Egypt, Cairo, 15th century

Metropolitan Museum of Art

10/27/2019
Islamic Design Art

Islamic Design Art

Object Name: Tughra

Date: ca. 1555–60

Geography: From Turkey, Istanbul

Medium: Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper

Dimensions: H. 20 1/2 in. (52.1 cm)
W. 25 3/8 in. (64.5 cm)
Mat: 25 x 30 in. (63.5 x 76.2 cm)

Classification: Codices

Credit Line: Rogers Fund, 1938

10/26/2019
An Introduction to Islam through Art

An Introduction to Islam through Art

Professor Tamara Albertini shares some of the treasures of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art's Shangri La residence and reflects on what the art of the past tells us about today.

By: University of Hawai‘i News 2010

Star-Shaped Tile Collection The Metropolitan Museum
10/25/2019

Star-Shaped Tile Collection

The Metropolitan Museum

Panel of 4 cuenca tiles16th centurySpanishThis panel of four tiles illustrates the persistence of Islamic design princip...
10/24/2019

Panel of 4 cuenca tiles
16th century
Spanish

This panel of four tiles illustrates the persistence of Islamic design principles; however, the cuenca, or arista, technique, in which the colors are prevented from mingling in the firing process by raised borders molded in the clay, has replaced the earlier Islamic cuerda seca method, examples of which may be seen in the case to the left. The geometric pattern would have been repeated to cover a large area of wall or ceiling.

Panel with Horse Heads11th centuryThis panel, probably from a wooden door, is deeply carved with two symmetrical horse h...
10/23/2019

Panel with Horse Heads
11th century
This panel, probably from a wooden door, is deeply carved with two symmetrical horse heads in relief. Attention to detail is evident in the beaded bands and bridles amid arabesques. The piece was carved to different depths in order to produce a pleasing chiaroscuro effect, a technique mastered by Fatimid woodworkers. A companion piece, almost certainly from the same door, is in the Museum of Islamic Art, Cairo.

Section from a Qur'an Manuscriptca. 1300As the second volume of a seven-part Qur'an manuscript, this codex contains no c...
10/22/2019

Section from a Qur'an Manuscript
ca. 1300
As the second volume of a seven-part Qur'an manuscript, this codex contains no colophon, but it opens with an elaborately illuminated double page bearing intricate geometric strapwork closely comparable to designs of Andalusian and North African tiles. Marginalia indicate that this Qur'an once belonged to the library of a ribat (hostel) in the holy city of Medina accommodating Moroccan residents.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Pierced Globelate 13th–early 14th centuryDesigned as an incense burner, this globe once hung from a chain. Inside the hi...
10/19/2019

Pierced Globe
late 13th–early 14th century
Designed as an incense burner, this globe once hung from a chain. Inside the hinged body is a small cup, slung on three rings (gimbals) to stabilize the burning coal or incense in the suspended container. The inscription bands do not name the object’s owner, but repeat a string of epithets lauding him.

Pair of Minbar Doors1325, Egypt, CairoMetropolitan Museum of Art
10/18/2019

Pair of Minbar Doors
1325, Egypt, Cairo

Metropolitan Museum of Art

10/15/2019
Making a Mangour screen part II

Making a Mangour screen part II

In 2018 the British Museum commissoned artist Ahmad Angawi to create some traditional Mangour screens to cover the windows of the new Albukhary foundation galleries of the Islamic world. These traditional screens are beautiful but also practical, in that they reduce light and heat in the rooms they adorn.

In this film Ahmad talks about the craftsmanship that went into making the screens and some of the thought processes associated with the geometric designs, that make them such a key architectural feature of the galleries.

By: The British museum

10/12/2019
Making a Mangour screen part I

Making a Mangour screen part I

Artist Ahmad Angawi takes us through some of the geometry and craft processes behind the making of the beautiful mangour window screens that are such a feature of the the Albukhary foundation galleries of the Islamic world at the British museum.

By: the British museum

DishMade of polychrome, black painted potteryTurkey, 1650
09/30/2019

Dish
Made of polychrome, black painted pottery

Turkey, 1650

Pen-boxRectangular brass pen-box with rounded ends, inlaid with silver, gold and a black material. Inside are two compar...
09/29/2019

Pen-box

Rectangular brass pen-box with rounded ends, inlaid with silver, gold and a black material. Inside are two compartments, the larger one for reed pens and a knife to sharpen them, the smaller for containers of ink. The lid and interior are decorated on all sides with a series of seated figures contained within roundels and either holding goblets or playing musical instruments with geometric designs between. The sides are decorated with a lattice design filled with birds and geometric or leafy patterns.

Syria,1300-1350

Figure of a dove. Inscribed.Steel; inlaid with garnet and gold.Iran, 18thCBritish Museum
09/24/2019

Figure of a dove. Inscribed.
Steel; inlaid with garnet and gold.

Iran, 18thC
British Museum

casketMade of silver inlaid brass.Iran, 14thCBritish Museum
09/23/2019

casket
Made of silver inlaid brass.
Iran, 14thC

British Museum

Bowl with bulging body. Body engraved with border of knotted pseudo Kufic and plaited hastaes separated by four roundels...
09/22/2019

Bowl with bulging body. Body engraved with border of knotted pseudo Kufic and plaited hastaes separated by four roundels of palmette and arabesques. Base has lozenges containing floral motif around roundel of palmettes. Made of brass engraved and inlaid with silver, gold? and a black substance.

Palestine, 15thC
British Museum

Magic bowl. Engraved with Arabic inscriptions (Qur'anic verses and prayers) and with engraved brass tags (charms or 'key...
09/21/2019

Magic bowl. Engraved with Arabic inscriptions (Qur'anic verses and prayers) and with engraved brass tags (charms or 'keys') attached.Brass, engraved.

lucknow, India
British Museum

Glass water-flask in the shape of a pilgrim's flask; gilded and enamelled decoration.Syria, 1250-1260British Museum
09/20/2019

Glass water-flask in the shape of a pilgrim's flask; gilded and enamelled decoration.
Syria, 1250-1260

British Museum

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