Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center

Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center Amud Aish Memorial Museum presents the victim experience of the Holocaust with special emphasis on faith-driven Jewish communities.
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Operating as usual

Are you keeping a record or a diary of these times? Keeping a written account of extraordinary times is a way to stay mi...
03/25/2020
Memoir - L2014.005.001

Are you keeping a record or a diary of these times? Keeping a written account of extraordinary times is a way to stay mindful. Berish Erlich kept a diary in the Displaced Persons Camp after WWII in three languages. Now at the Auschwitz exhibit at the Museum of Jewish Heritage, he also used the diary to teach himself English.

Object Name Memoir Catalog Number L2014.005.001 Creator Berish Erlich Scope & Content Single, bound memoir or diary. Cover has typewritten sticker on black hardcover binding, "My Dairy [sic] by Bernard Erlich 9/11/39 to 4/11/45/Warsaw Getto [sic] and various Nazi Concentration Camps." Diary is handw...

Today marks the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. While we work to relive the stories of Jews that went t...
01/27/2020

Today marks the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. While we work to relive the stories of Jews that went through the Holocaust, days like today are always especially meaningful.

We were honored with a visit from students from Politz Day School of Cherry Hill, who visited us after hearing from Holocaust survivors in Brooklyn. It is always powerful when visitors have personal connections to what we are discussing, but it was especially poignant when we learned that a grandson of Rabbi Nissan Mangel was in the group.

Rabbi Nissan Mangel was one of the youngest inmates to miraculously survive Auschwitz. Only 10 years old when he came to Auschwitz, Rabbi Mangel cheated death countless times. Beyond the daily miracle of staying alive Rabbi Mangel evaded the notorious “selection” and survived three extraordinary encounters with the infamous Dr. Mengele, five concentration camps and the death march.

Despite the odds, Rabbi Mangel not only survived, he also continued to see the hand of Hashem in his life and is a well-known speaker and scholar.

May we learn from Rabbi Mangel and his experiences and continue to see Hashem, no matter the circumstances.

Several years ago, Amud Aish had the opportunity to speak to Rabbi Mangel and record his story, which you can view here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUraQrRkCkg

01/27/2020
JLI - The Rohr Jewish Learning Institute

JLI - The Rohr Jewish Learning Institute

Holocaust survivor Mimi Weingarten talks about faith after Auschwitz.

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This excerpt is part of a more extensive oral history conducted by Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center in partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

01/27/2020
JLI - The Rohr Jewish Learning Institute

Today is Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Holocaust survivor Mimi Weingarten talks about faith after Auschwitz.

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This excerpt is part of a more extensive oral history conducted by Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center in partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Today is Asarah B'teves which has been established as a memorial day for Holocaust martyrs for whom we do not know their...
01/07/2020

Today is Asarah B'teves which has been established as a memorial day for Holocaust martyrs for whom we do not know their yartzheit...

Today is Asarah B'teves which has been established as a memorial day for Holocaust martyrs for whom we do not know their yartzheit.

During the Holocaust, the Nazis tried to take away any sense of individuality and humanity from Jews other other victims. For the most part, little care was taken to remember who these victims were and when they had died.

A small group of men and women survivors led by Chanina Walzer, established the Chevra Kadisha (religious burial society) in Bergen-Belsen immediately after liberation and worked to record various details of their lives and deaths so that would be remembered in the future.

The Chevra Kadisha book in Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education...'s collection has has been used to identify the yartzheit for thousands of those that died post-liberation in Bergen-Belsen.

In this fascinating book, we see a powerful example of Chesed shel emes - recording and giving respect to those that were still dying in Bergen Belsen after the Holocaust had already ended.

By having this book in Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center's collection and in our exhibit, we have helped families figure out the yartzheit of loved ones for the first time, despite them dying over seventy years.

Today, and every day, we work to remember the martyred six million Jews killed during the Holocaust. May Gd avenge their blood and their neshamos have an aliyah.

Today is Asarah B'teves which has been established as a memorial day for Holocaust martyrs for whom we do not know their...
01/07/2020

Today is Asarah B'teves which has been established as a memorial day for Holocaust martyrs for whom we do not know their yartzheit.

During the Holocaust, the Nazis tried to take away any sense of individuality and humanity from Jews other other victims. For the most part, little care was taken to remember who these victims were and when they had died.

A small group of men and women survivors led by Chanina Walzer, established the Chevra Kadisha (religious burial society) in Bergen-Belsen immediately after liberation and worked to record various details of their lives and deaths so that would be remembered in the future.

The Chevra Kadisha book in Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education...'s collection has has been used to identify the yartzheit for thousands of those that died post-liberation in Bergen-Belsen.

In this fascinating book, we see a powerful example of Chesed shel emes - recording and giving respect to those that were still dying in Bergen Belsen after the Holocaust had already ended.

By having this book in Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center's collection and in our exhibit, we have helped families figure out the yartzheit of loved ones for the first time, despite them dying over seventy years.

Today, and every day, we work to remember the martyred six million Jews killed during the Holocaust. May Gd avenge their blood and their neshamos have an aliyah.

Today is Asarah B'teves which has been established as a memorial day for Holocaust martyrs for whom we do not know their yartzheit.

During the Holocaust, the Nazis tried to take away any sense of individuality and humanity from Jews other other victims. For the most part, little care was taken to remember who these victims were and when they had died.

A small group of men and women survivors led by Chanina Walzer, established the Chevra Kadisha (religious burial society) in Bergen-Belsen immediately after liberation and worked to record various details of their lives and deaths so that would be remembered in the future.

The Chevra Kadisha book in Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education...'s collection has has been used to identify the yartzheit for thousands of those that died post-liberation in Bergen-Belsen.

In this fascinating book, we see a powerful example of Chesed shel emes - recording and giving respect to those that were still dying in Bergen Belsen after the Holocaust had already ended.

By having this book in Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center's collection and in our exhibit, we have helped families figure out the yartzheit of loved ones for the first time, despite them dying over seventy years.

Today, and every day, we work to remember the martyred six million Jews killed during the Holocaust. May Gd avenge their blood and their neshamos have an aliyah.

11/21/2019
Holocaust Survivor Testimony: Dr. Avrum Bichler

This week we share the Oral History of Dr. Avrum Bichler who was born in Poland in 1933. He escaped with his family to Russia, where they were forced to work as slave laborers near the Arctic Circle, in Siberia, and in Kazakhstan.

After the war ended the Bichler family attempted to return to their home in Poland, only to learn of the horrors they had left behind. Avrum eventually made his way to America where he attended Yeshiva University and received assistance from the JDC.

Avrum ends by telling us to never give up hope and to draw strength from one’s past.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYqfLa8I-qU&t=3793s

Dr. Avrum (Abraham) Bichler was born on February 23, 1933 to a well-to-do Jewish family in Krylow, Poland. Avrum grew up going to Hebrew school, as well as s...

On this Veteran's Day we want to take the time to remember the sacrifice and courage of Seymour Kaplan, an American Jewi...
11/11/2019

On this Veteran's Day we want to take the time to remember the sacrifice and courage of Seymour Kaplan, an American Jewish teenager from Brooklyn who risked his life to join the American army during WWII. He was one of the first American soldiers to enter Dachau upon liberation and served as a much needed translator to many of the survivors that were in desperate need of his help.

We had the honor of displaying some of his photos and items from his time in the army and hearing him speak earlier this year. See below for some of the pictures and see this link to the video of him speaking.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjAiWenUdWk

Today, and every day, we are grateful to Seymour and the many veterans like him for their service.

At the age of 17, Seymour Kaplan left Brooklyn to fight in Nazi Occupied Europe as a machine gunner with the 692 Tank Destroyer Battalion, attached to the 42nd Infantry Division.

Mr. Kaplan was one of the first American soldiers to enter the Dachau Concentration Camp on April 29th, 1945. As a Yiddish speaker, he served as a much-needed translator. He witnessed more than 30 railroad cars filled with bodies. Inside the camp were more bodies and 30,000 survivors, most severely emaciated.

Mr. Kaplan explains: “There were thousands and thousands of victims in the camp. Those alive were so emaciated that it defies description. They were crawling in the mud; some were praying. I yelled out to them that I was Jewish.”

American troops who liberated Dachau were so appalled by conditions at the camp, that they machine-gunned at least two groups of captured German guards.

Mr. Kaplan returned home to Brooklyn and established a garment manufacturing company. After retirement, he began a second career as a teacher in the New York City Public School system. Seymour Kaplan is a mental health advocate and has been honored by the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center is honored to have the chance to tell his story with an important temporary exhibit at the N.Y. State Supreme Court sponsored by the Jewish Lawyers Guild. See attached flyer for more information.

"The shofar was an emblem of her father’s “spiritual resistance. He always looked forward, never backward"https://forwar...
09/26/2019
‘Tell Them We Blew The Shofar At Auschwitz,’ He Said. 75 Years Later, She Did.

"The shofar was an emblem of her father’s “spiritual resistance. He always looked forward, never backward"

https://forward.com/culture/432164/shofar-auschwitz-museum-of-jewish-heritage-rosh-hashana-new-york/

Don't miss this shofar blown in Auschwitz, currently on display
Auschwitz Exhibition at Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust during this Yamim Noraim season.

May the countless stories of resilience and faith even in the darkest of times continue to strengthen us all as we head into the new year.

K'siva v'chasima tova from all of us at Amud Aish!

“I’m going to die on this march. If you live, take this shofar. Tell them we blew the shofar at Auschwitz.”

Did you know that Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center has partnered with United States Hol...
09/12/2019
Amud Aish Holocaust Survivor Oral History Collection - YouTube

Did you know that Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center has partnered with United States Holocaust Memorial Museum to record almost 50 Orthodox Jewish Holocaust Survivors oral history testimonies?

We're in the process of uploading them onto our YouTube channel, check it out!

Which one did you find most meaningful? Do you know a Holocaust survivor that has not yet recorded their experiences during the Holocaust? Please reach out to us to set up an opportunity to do so.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6KZJTny6NKj4lotVAgdxdSSloL9173ne

08/02/2019
Interpreting Artifacts at Amud Aish: Tallis Bag

As we are currently in the midst of the Three Weeks and the Nine Days in the lead up to Tisha B'av it is an appropriate time to look back at how our people have been affected by this long diaspora and what they have taken with them on their journeys. Throughout Jewish history, no matter what was happening around them, Jews tried to cling to their faith, their traditons, and their ritual objects.

In January 1939, at 14 years of age, Moshe Shulevitz traveled on a Kindertransport from Furth, Germany to England. He carried this navy blue tallis bag that his father Gedalia had made for him in honor of his bar mitzvah in 1938. The tallis bag became a precious link to the loved ones he left behind as well as to his traditions.

Moshe lived in youth hostels in England until 1944. At the age of 19, Moshe enlisted in the Jewish Brigade, a military formation of the British Army that was commanded by British-Jewish Officers and served Europe during World War II.

For more information, check out amudaish.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/EEABBCEA-935A-4EC5-AC6C-160893347528

07/26/2019

Earlier this month, Amud Aish's Through the Lens of Faith, opened at the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum.

Through the Lens of Faith focuses on 21 Holocaust survivors and how their relationship with faith and G-d evolved during and after their internment at the concentration camp.

The Opening Ceremony includes Elly Kleinmann, Daniel Libeskind, Caryl Englander, Dr. Henri Lustiger-Thaler, Avshalom Weinstein, and others. The exhibit will be on display through 2020.

For more information, check out http://tlofauschwitz.org/.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtyYfVdx28Y

Descendants of David-Horodok
07/25/2019

Descendants of David-Horodok

In 2016 we posted on the new Brooklyn, New York Holocaust museum, Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center. Since then, the museum has emerged as an invaluable resource for educational programming, traveling exhibits, Orthodox specific wartime archives and new scholarship.

The museum’s mission is to present the victim experience, with special emphasis on the perspectives of observant Jewish communities. It is the only Holocaust museum to focus on the role of faith and identity within the broader context of the annihilation of European Jewry.

Through the Lens of Faith is an outdoor installation installed at the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Oswiecim, Poland. The content of this exhibit was developed by the curatorial department of Amud Aish Memorial Museum under the direction of Dr. Henri Lustiger Thaler.

The exhibition presents photographs of camp survivors by Caryl Englander in a space designed by Daniel Libeskind and is mounted at the entrance to Auschwitz. It is composed of 21 color portraits -18 Jewish, two Catholic-Poles and one Romani, representing three of the ethnic groups that were present in Auschwitz.

The exhibit does not necessarily focus on the brutality of the time, but how faith and spiritual resistance served as a means of coping and transcending the horrific circumstances.

Photographer Caryl Englander selected her subjects from survivor networks associated with the Amud Aish Memorial Museum. She captures her subjects intimately, in their homes, many look directly into the lens—often with their sleeve rolled up to reveal the infamous serial number that was tattooed on prisoners at Auschwitz and the sub-camps—and smiling into the camera.

Three-meter-tall, vertical steel panels line up on both sides of a path that veers off the route that leads to the Auschwitz Memorial and Museum. The repetitive pattern of the panels is reminiscent of the stripes from a prisoner’s uniform, suggesting internment, while the exterior mirrored surfaces reflect the surrounding landscape and evoke a physical and spiritual freedom.

As visitors enter the installation, they encounter the portraits; each one is framed in a recessed vertical panel, and overlaid with black glass etched with the words of the subject’s first-person experiential account of Auschwitz and the perseverance of their faith. Below each didactic is data on the families that were created by survivors after the Holocaust. Each captures the longing for family renewal amongst this population after the genocide. The installation is replete with visual and personal self-narrations, filling in the blank spaces of the visitor experience of Auschwitz.

The installation marks the 75th Anniversary of the liberation in 1945 and will be on view from July 1, 2019 through October 31, 2020.

Text and photos sourced from The Jerusalem Post, Studio Libeskind, amudaish.org. and New York Times.

Through the Lens of Faith is also a book. Learn more here: https://steidl.de/Books/Through-the-Lens-of-Faith-0316173756.html.

Address

5923 Strickland Avenue
New York, NY
11234

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 15:30
Tuesday 10:00 - 15:30
Wednesday 10:00 - 15:30
Thursday 10:00 - 15:30

Telephone

(718) 759-6200

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Hi there, I am reaching out on behalf of the documentary Prosecuting Evil: The Extraordinary World of Ben Ferencz. Prosecuting Evil tells the incredible story of Ben Ferencz, the last surviving Nuremberg Trial prosecutor, who continues to wage his lifelong crusade in the fight for law and peace. Few people today have heard of Ben Ferencz. But this portrait of a 98-year-old lawyer, couldn't be more relevant. Racism, antisemitism, and the return of extremist political views is a danger in 2019. Prosecuting Evil is now available on Netflix in the US and I encourage you all to watch it! If you have any questions about the film, please do not hesitate to reach out ([email protected]) All the best,