Nicholas Roerich Museum

Nicholas Roerich Museum The mission of the Nicholas Roerich Museum is to make available to the public the full range of Roerich’s accomplishments.
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Roerich’s “The Range” (1924) is one of 84 paintings in his Himalayan series, all of which he completed in 1924 during hi...
08/29/2021

Roerich’s “The Range” (1924) is one of 84 paintings in his Himalayan series, all of which he completed in 1924 during his stay in Darjeeling.

While many of Roerich’s landscapes focus more on depth of perspective and added elements like figures or buildings, the paintings in this series take an up-close look at the play between rock, snow, light, and shadow.

If you’d like to take a closer look at these paintings, please go to roerich.org, where you can view our whole collection in our online catalogue.

Roerich’s “The Range” (1924) is one of 84 paintings in his Himalayan series, all of which he completed in 1924 during his stay in Darjeeling.

While many of Roerich’s landscapes focus more on depth of perspective and added elements like figures or buildings, the paintings in this series take an up-close look at the play between rock, snow, light, and shadow.

If you’d like to take a closer look at these paintings, please go to roerich.org, where you can view our whole collection in our online catalogue.

Excerpt from the book “Beautiful Unity” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full te...
08/28/2021

Excerpt from the book “Beautiful Unity” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted is “Himalayas. Evening,” painted by Roerich in 1933.

Excerpt from the book “Beautiful Unity” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted is “Himalayas. Evening,” painted by Roerich in 1933.

Roerich’s “Palden Lhamo” (1931) depicts the wrathful deity Palden Lhamo, considered to be the principal protector of Tib...
08/27/2021

Roerich’s “Palden Lhamo” (1931) depicts the wrathful deity Palden Lhamo, considered to be the principal protector of Tibet, on a rock face in front of a waterfall.

In his book “Fiery Stronghold,” Roerich describes this scene during his travels: “Not far from here is the waterfall, Palden Lhamo. Upon the rocks, nature itself has designed the figure of the austere goddess riding on her favorite mule.”

In Roerich’s painting, the deity appears beside her eponymous waterfall.
Here, as in many of his paintings, Roerich drew inspiration from the places he traveled, where the stories and legends of his subjects had originated.

To read more of “Fiery Stronghold,” please go to roerich.org, where you can access the full text or buy a copy of the book.

Roerich’s “Palden Lhamo” (1931) depicts the wrathful deity Palden Lhamo, considered to be the principal protector of Tibet, on a rock face in front of a waterfall.

In his book “Fiery Stronghold,” Roerich describes this scene during his travels: “Not far from here is the waterfall, Palden Lhamo. Upon the rocks, nature itself has designed the figure of the austere goddess riding on her favorite mule.”

In Roerich’s painting, the deity appears beside her eponymous waterfall.
Here, as in many of his paintings, Roerich drew inspiration from the places he traveled, where the stories and legends of his subjects had originated.

To read more of “Fiery Stronghold,” please go to roerich.org, where you can access the full text or buy a copy of the book.

Excerpt from the book “Diary Leaves” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text ...
08/26/2021

Excerpt from the book “Diary Leaves” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted “St. Panteleimon the Healer,” painted by Roerich in 1931.

Excerpt from the book “Diary Leaves” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted “St. Panteleimon the Healer,” painted by Roerich in 1931.

Roerich’s “Path to Tibet” (1925) depicts Leh, the capital of Ladakh, a region in Northern India. Leh literally means "la...
08/25/2021

Roerich’s “Path to Tibet” (1925) depicts Leh, the capital of Ladakh, a region in Northern India. Leh literally means "land of high passes.”

In this painting, Roerich blurs the boundaries between man-made and natural structures. In the distance, the blue and purple toned rocks transition almost imperceptibly into a fortress. In the foreground, the buildings that are touched by the sun seem to disappear at their edges, fading into blue rocks.

If you’d like to see this and other paintings from our collection, please go to roerich.org, where you can browse our online catalogue.

Roerich’s “Path to Tibet” (1925) depicts Leh, the capital of Ladakh, a region in Northern India. Leh literally means "land of high passes.”

In this painting, Roerich blurs the boundaries between man-made and natural structures. In the distance, the blue and purple toned rocks transition almost imperceptibly into a fortress. In the foreground, the buildings that are touched by the sun seem to disappear at their edges, fading into blue rocks.

If you’d like to see this and other paintings from our collection, please go to roerich.org, where you can browse our online catalogue.

Roerich’s “Rocks of Ladakh” (1932) depicts images of ibexes and archers carved into rocks that he encountered during his...
08/24/2021

Roerich’s “Rocks of Ladakh” (1932) depicts images of ibexes and archers carved into rocks that he encountered during his travels in the Ladakh region. He wrote that “in these ancient images one may distinguish ibexes with huge, powerfully curved horns, yaks, hunters, archers, round dancers and rituals.” (“Heart of Asia”)

Roerich’s focus on these carvings reflects how he was constantly making comparisons between the imagery he saw in order to better understand visual language across different cultures.

To read more from “Heart of Asia,” please go to roerich.org, where you can read the full text and buy the book.

Roerich’s “Rocks of Ladakh” (1932) depicts images of ibexes and archers carved into rocks that he encountered during his travels in the Ladakh region. He wrote that “in these ancient images one may distinguish ibexes with huge, powerfully curved horns, yaks, hunters, archers, round dancers and rituals.” (“Heart of Asia”)

Roerich’s focus on these carvings reflects how he was constantly making comparisons between the imagery he saw in order to better understand visual language across different cultures.

To read more from “Heart of Asia,” please go to roerich.org, where you can read the full text and buy the book.

Roerich’s “Tibet. Gelukpa Monastery” (1936) is one of many paintings he did of the monasteries he encountered during his...
08/08/2021

Roerich’s “Tibet. Gelukpa Monastery” (1936) is one of many paintings he did of the monasteries he encountered during his travels. In his travel diaries, he wrote that “one must have a sense of beauty and of fearless self denial to build strongholds on such heights.” (“Heart of Asia”)

Roerich also write that in many of the monasteries, “long subterranean passages, leading to a river, were hewn in the rocks,” and that, not surprisingly, “this fairy-tale of subterranean passages, as we shall see, has created many of the best sagas.”

If you’d like to read more from “Heart of Asia,” please go to roerich.org, where you can find the full text and buy the book.

Roerich’s “Tibet. Gelukpa Monastery” (1936) is one of many paintings he did of the monasteries he encountered during his travels. In his travel diaries, he wrote that “one must have a sense of beauty and of fearless self denial to build strongholds on such heights.” (“Heart of Asia”)

Roerich also write that in many of the monasteries, “long subterranean passages, leading to a river, were hewn in the rocks,” and that, not surprisingly, “this fairy-tale of subterranean passages, as we shall see, has created many of the best sagas.”

If you’d like to read more from “Heart of Asia,” please go to roerich.org, where you can find the full text and buy the book.

Excerpt from the book “The Invincible” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full tex...
08/07/2021

Excerpt from the book “The Invincible” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted is “Tibetan Lakes,” painted by Roerich in 1933.

Excerpt from the book “The Invincible” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted is “Tibetan Lakes,” painted by Roerich in 1933.

Roerich’s “Oirot, the Messenger of the White Burkhan” (1925) depicts the Blessed Oirot riding a white horse while one of...
08/06/2021

Roerich’s “Oirot, the Messenger of the White Burkhan” (1925) depicts the Blessed Oirot riding a white horse while one of the nomad Oirots waits for him. The two figures seem close and yet far away with the mist separating them.

The Oirots were a Finno-Turki tribe that lived in Oirotiya, now known as the Altai region. Roerich recounts an incident where "about fifteen years ago, a young Oirot girl had a vision: the Blessed Oirot as a mighty rider, on a white steed, appeared and told her that he was the Messenger of the White Burkhan, whose advent was near." ("Heart of Asia")
⠀⁠
To buy a print of this painting, please go to roerich.org, where you can also purchase “Heart of Asia” or read the full text online for free.

Roerich’s “Oirot, the Messenger of the White Burkhan” (1925) depicts the Blessed Oirot riding a white horse while one of the nomad Oirots waits for him. The two figures seem close and yet far away with the mist separating them.

The Oirots were a Finno-Turki tribe that lived in Oirotiya, now known as the Altai region. Roerich recounts an incident where "about fifteen years ago, a young Oirot girl had a vision: the Blessed Oirot as a mighty rider, on a white steed, appeared and told her that he was the Messenger of the White Burkhan, whose advent was near." ("Heart of Asia")
⠀⁠
To buy a print of this painting, please go to roerich.org, where you can also purchase “Heart of Asia” or read the full text online for free.

Excerpt from the book “Beautiful Unity” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full te...
08/05/2021

Excerpt from the book “Beautiful Unity” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted “The Tablets of the Commandments,” painted by Roerich in 1931.

Excerpt from the book “Beautiful Unity” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted “The Tablets of the Commandments,” painted by Roerich in 1931.

Roerich’s “Chenrezi,” painted in 1932, depicts the bodhisattva of compassion carved into a mountain. In his writings, Ro...
08/04/2021

Roerich’s “Chenrezi,” painted in 1932, depicts the bodhisattva of compassion carved into a mountain.

In his writings, Roerich points to where he came across an image of Cherenzi: “The twilight fell and the whole room seemed enveloped in new significance. The image of Chenrezi, superbly embroidered upon the lustrous silk, which hung above the head of the Lama, seemed to glance down at us in a significant way.” (“Shambhala”)

In this painting, Roerich chooses to depict the image of Chenrezi carved into rock instead of on silk. The idea of twilight enveloping the scene in significance seems to still hold true though, as the figure appears half in shadow.⠀
⠀⠀
If you’d like the read more from “Shambhala,” please go to roerich.org, where you can read the full text and buy the book.

Roerich’s “Chenrezi,” painted in 1932, depicts the bodhisattva of compassion carved into a mountain.

In his writings, Roerich points to where he came across an image of Cherenzi: “The twilight fell and the whole room seemed enveloped in new significance. The image of Chenrezi, superbly embroidered upon the lustrous silk, which hung above the head of the Lama, seemed to glance down at us in a significant way.” (“Shambhala”)

In this painting, Roerich chooses to depict the image of Chenrezi carved into rock instead of on silk. The idea of twilight enveloping the scene in significance seems to still hold true though, as the figure appears half in shadow.⠀
⠀⠀
If you’d like the read more from “Shambhala,” please go to roerich.org, where you can read the full text and buy the book.

Roerich completed “The Last Angel” in 1912, shortly before the outbreak of World War I. The angel stands in a landscape ...
08/03/2021

Roerich completed “The Last Angel” in 1912, shortly before the outbreak of World War I. The angel stands in a landscape almost completely covered in fire and smoke, foreshadowing the destruction caused by the coming war.

Roerich modeled the style of this work after traditional icon painting. He used reverse perspective, also known as inverse or Byzantine perspective, which was also used in traditional Russian Orthodox icons. Unlike linear perspective, which makes closer objects appear larger, reverse perspective makes farther objects appear larger. This gives that “flat” effect, as though everything is up front instead of receding back.

If you’d like a print of this painting, please go to roerich.org.

Roerich completed “The Last Angel” in 1912, shortly before the outbreak of World War I. The angel stands in a landscape almost completely covered in fire and smoke, foreshadowing the destruction caused by the coming war.

Roerich modeled the style of this work after traditional icon painting. He used reverse perspective, also known as inverse or Byzantine perspective, which was also used in traditional Russian Orthodox icons. Unlike linear perspective, which makes closer objects appear larger, reverse perspective makes farther objects appear larger. This gives that “flat” effect, as though everything is up front instead of receding back.

If you’d like a print of this painting, please go to roerich.org.

Roerich’s “Nubra Valley” (1926) depicts one of the more pleasant parts of his travels. He and his party came to Nubra Va...
08/01/2021

Roerich’s “Nubra Valley” (1926) depicts one of the more pleasant parts of his travels. He and his party came to Nubra Valley after crossing the Khardong La pass in Ladakh, India. In his travel diaries, Roerich wrote that it was almost impossible to paint on the Khardong La pass because his fingers were so numb from the cold.

After the traveling party emerged into Nubra valley, Roerich noted the “heat and a vivid sun” and “after the difficulties of the pass and glacier, the road seems easy.” (“Altai-Himalaya”)

If you’d like to read more from “Altai-Himalaya,” please go to roerich.org, where you can read the full text and buy the book.

Roerich’s “Nubra Valley” (1926) depicts one of the more pleasant parts of his travels. He and his party came to Nubra Valley after crossing the Khardong La pass in Ladakh, India. In his travel diaries, Roerich wrote that it was almost impossible to paint on the Khardong La pass because his fingers were so numb from the cold.

After the traveling party emerged into Nubra valley, Roerich noted the “heat and a vivid sun” and “after the difficulties of the pass and glacier, the road seems easy.” (“Altai-Himalaya”)

If you’d like to read more from “Altai-Himalaya,” please go to roerich.org, where you can read the full text and buy the book.

Excerpt from the book “Beautiful Unity” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full te...
07/31/2021

Excerpt from the book “Beautiful Unity” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted is “Gompa,” painted by Roerich in 1932.

Excerpt from the book “Beautiful Unity” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted is “Gompa,” painted by Roerich in 1932.

Roerich’s “Arjuna” (1929) depicts one of the central characters of the ancient Indian epic Mahabharata. Here, Arjuna has...
07/30/2021

Roerich’s “Arjuna” (1929) depicts one of the central characters of the ancient Indian epic Mahabharata. Here, Arjuna has his arms outstretched, pointing to where a bolt of light is entering the mountain.

We can find a potential source for this moment in Roerich’s travel diary, “Heart of Asia,” where he writes: “It is said that Arjuna laid a subterranean passage from Kullu to Manikaran.” In this painting, Arjuna may be directing the bolt of lightning to create that passage.

If you’d like to buy a print of this painting, or a copy of “Heart of Asia,” please go to roerich.org.

Roerich’s “Arjuna” (1929) depicts one of the central characters of the ancient Indian epic Mahabharata. Here, Arjuna has his arms outstretched, pointing to where a bolt of light is entering the mountain.

We can find a potential source for this moment in Roerich’s travel diary, “Heart of Asia,” where he writes: “It is said that Arjuna laid a subterranean passage from Kullu to Manikaran.” In this painting, Arjuna may be directing the bolt of lightning to create that passage.

If you’d like to buy a print of this painting, or a copy of “Heart of Asia,” please go to roerich.org.

Excerpt from the book “Diary Leaves” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text ...
07/29/2021

Excerpt from the book “Diary Leaves” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted “Elijah the Prophet,” painted by Roerich in 1931.

Excerpt from the book “Diary Leaves” by Nicholas Roerich. ⠀

Please go to roerich.org if you’d like to read the full text and buy the book.

The image depicted “Elijah the Prophet,” painted by Roerich in 1931.

“Guru Guri Dhar” (1931) depicts a Himalayan mountain range near Kullu Valley, the area where Roerich settled in 1928 and...
07/28/2021

“Guru Guri Dhar” (1931) depicts a Himalayan mountain range near Kullu Valley, the area where Roerich settled in 1928 and lived for the rest of his life.

At an elevation of 6,500 feet, Kullu has magnificent views of the surrounding mountain ranges. It also has a rich cultural history. Roerich writes that Kullu has a hero protector called Narasimha, who “protects the rich harvests” and “fills the valley with fragrant flowers.”

Roerich mentions “Guru Guri Dhar” when he writes about the ruins of the castle of Narasimha in Naggar, a town in Kulu. Here, “above the image of Narasimha rises the white summit of Guru Guri Dhar.” (“Shambhala”)

To read more of “Shambhala,” please go to roerich.org, where you can access the full text and buy the book. You can also buy a print of this painting in our online gift shop.

“Guru Guri Dhar” (1931) depicts a Himalayan mountain range near Kullu Valley, the area where Roerich settled in 1928 and lived for the rest of his life.

At an elevation of 6,500 feet, Kullu has magnificent views of the surrounding mountain ranges. It also has a rich cultural history. Roerich writes that Kullu has a hero protector called Narasimha, who “protects the rich harvests” and “fills the valley with fragrant flowers.”

Roerich mentions “Guru Guri Dhar” when he writes about the ruins of the castle of Narasimha in Naggar, a town in Kulu. Here, “above the image of Narasimha rises the white summit of Guru Guri Dhar.” (“Shambhala”)

To read more of “Shambhala,” please go to roerich.org, where you can access the full text and buy the book. You can also buy a print of this painting in our online gift shop.

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