Dickinson

Dickinson Contact information, map and directions, contact form, opening hours, services, ratings, photos, videos and announcements from Dickinson, Art Gallery, 980 Madison Avenue, New York, NY.

01/03/2023
Happy New Year!
01/01/2023

Happy New Year!

Happy Christmas from the Dickinson team!
12/25/2022

Happy Christmas from the Dickinson team!

As we are fast approaching Christmas, Dickinson will be closing our doors for the festive period from 6pm today and will...
12/21/2022

As we are fast approaching Christmas, Dickinson will be closing our doors for the festive period from 6pm today and will re-open Tuesday, 3 January 2023.

We send you wishes for a Happy Christmas and thank you for your patronage and support in 2022.

We look forward to sharing exciting gallery announcements in the New Year and seeing you in our galleries and art fair stands (next up : TEFAF Maastricht, 9-19 March) in 2023!

In the meantime, enjoy a visual survey of our Top 10 posts of the past year :
1. Only one week left until Masterpiece London opens …
2. CURRENTLY ON VIEW: Dickinson New York presents ‘Visible and Tangible Form’ a selection of works by artists with ties to the International Concrete Art Movement
3. Quote of the Day: Juan Gris - ‘Cubism is not a manner but an aesthetic, and even a state of mind’
4. FINAL WEEK – It’s your last chance to see our New York exhibition ‘Picabia and the Surrealists’
5. Dickinson Recommends: ‘Francis Bacon: Man and Beast’ at Royal Academy of Arts
6. After two years of virtual fairs, we are thrilled to be returning in person to TEFAF New York at the Park Avenue Armory, opening Thursday, 5 May
7. Due to popular demand, we are thrilled to announce the extension of our New York exhibition ‘Fanny Sanin: Progression, 1966 to Now’ until 15 April
8. Video highlight: Dan Colen’s ‘In the Ketchup’ (2014) Dickinson New York
9. In today’s Masterpiece fair highlights, a Continental diversion, featuring Jean-Etienne Liotard’s ‘Portrait of Sir Everard Fawkener (1694 – 1758)’ (c. 1753-55), a recent redisovery reognised only 2019 by the late Liotard scholar, Marcel Rothlisberger
10. We are in full fair mode with TEFAF Maastricht opening tomororw 24 June, followed quickly by Masterpiece London on 28 June

FINAL TWO DAYS: ‘Treasures of Dutch and Flemish Art from Private Collections’ at Dickinson London.-From children and ado...
12/20/2022

FINAL TWO DAYS: ‘Treasures of Dutch and Flemish Art from Private Collections’ at Dickinson London.
-
From children and adolescents to churchgoers and travellers, governors to gentry, ‘Treasures of Dutch and Flemish Art’ features a variety of portraits and figural scenes for your enjoyment.
-
Walter Pompe’s (1703-1777) emotionally-charged boxwood sculpture ‘Cristo vivo’ conveys the artists extraordinary understanding of human flesh. ‘Portrait of a man, bust-length, in a fur coat’ by Ambrosius Benson (c.1495-1550) presents a range of textures, from the soft fur of the anonymous sitter’s wrap to the shadow of stubble on his chin. Gerbrand Ban’s (c.1613-1652) charming portrait of a young boy holding a tulip and a teething toy represents early childhood and Frederick Kerseboom’s (1632-1693) portrait of Sir John Langham, age 12, playing the viola da gamba, is a record of later adolescence. The show also includes portraits of the 1st Viscount Falkland, Governor General of Ireland, and Sir Richard Lee, who counted among the favourites of Queen Elizabeth I.
-
Come see these and other Old Masters at 58 Jermyn Street through this Wednesday, 21 December. Gallery Hours: Mon – Fri, 9am-6pm.
-
Dickinson will be closing our doors for the festive period from 6pm, Wednesday, 21 December and will re-open Tuesday, 3 January 2023.

This jewel-like floral still life attributed to the Dutch artist Balthasar Van der Ast (1593 – 1657) is based on an earl...
12/05/2022

This jewel-like floral still life attributed to the Dutch artist Balthasar Van der Ast (1593 – 1657) is based on an early flower piece by Jan Brueghel the Elder, now in Frankfurt Städel Museum, (‘Still Life with Bouquet of Flowers’, c. 1610-25). Born in Middelburg, Van der Ast was among the Dutch Golden Age painters celebrated for cabinet still lifes depicting flowers and fruit. Following the death of his father in 1609, the young artist lived with his sister Maria and her husband, the successful still-life painter Ambrosius Bosschaert (1573 – 1621), whose precise manner exerted a formative influence on Van der Ast’s own style.

Over the course of his career, Van der Ast’s compositions grew in complexity, and the artist began incorporating shells, insects and exotic fruits as well as floral arrangements. He has since become known as a pioneer of ‘shell life’ painting for works such as ‘Flowers in a vase with Shells and Insects,’ c.1630 in the collection of National Gallery.

Come see this and other Old Master works in ‘Treasures of Dutch and Flemish art from private collections’ on view at Dickinson London until 21 December. Gallery Hours: Mon – Fri, 9am-6pm.

Images: Attr. Balthasar Van der Ast, ‘Flowers in a glass beaker with brambles, shell and eglantine, on a stone plinth’, c. 1618, oil on panel, 28 x 18.5 cm. (11 x 7 ¼ in.), available at Dickinson London; Jan Brueghel the Elder, ‘Still Life with Bouquet of Flowers’, c. 1610-25, Staedel Museum, Frankfurt; Balthasar Van der Ast, ‘Flowers in a vase with Shells and Insects,’ c.1630, The National Gallery, London.

You don’t know what’s up and you don’t know what’s down and neither do we.’ - A MOMA security guard to Mrs. Genevieve Ha...
12/04/2022

You don’t know what’s up and you don’t know what’s down and neither do we.’ - A MOMA security guard to Mrs. Genevieve Habert, December 1961.
-
Which way is up? The revelation that Piet Mondrian’s ‘New York City 1’ (1941) was recently hung upside down in the ‘Mondrian. Evolution’ exhibition at Germany’s K20 K21 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen museum reminds us of an uncanny repeat of the same circumstance, with the same picture, at MoMA The Museum of Modern Art in 1945.

Today marked a similar anniversary when, on 4 December 1961, MoMA mistakenly hung Henri Matisse’s gouache ‘Le Bateau’ upside down for 47 days in the exhibition ‘The Last Works of Henri Matisse’! Neither the museum staff, nor the 116,000 visitors, nor even Pierre Matisse himself had noticed.

It took the keen eye and inquisitive nature of a stockbroker, Mrs. Genevieve Habert, to notice the discrepancy after consulting a catalog in which the work was properly oriented. The above beguiling response by a security guard didn’t deter Habert, who reported it to the , which then brought the error to light. The museum remedied the mistake immediately and Pierre Matisse declared to the Times: “Mrs. Habert should be given a medal.”

Keep your eyes open on your next museum visit!

Today in ‘Dickinson Recommends’, we are visiting ‘The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England’ at The Metropolita...
11/29/2022

Today in ‘Dickinson Recommends’, we are visiting ‘The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England’ at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

This incredible exhibition brings together objects from across the globe to create a narrative that explains the importance of the Tudor reign, not just in England, but also across Western Europe and the Americas.

Viewers are encouraged to learn about the sumptuous and diverse court that surrounded the Tudor monarchs through objects in the exhibition, ranging from small-scale, private portraits to colossal Flemish tapestries. The objects are cleverly arranged so as to create conversations between one another. This can be appreciated, for instance, with the portraits of ‘Ellen Maurice’ and ‘Elizabeth I (‘The Ditchley Portrait’)’, where the viewer can see how courtiers emulated their queen’s attire and vice versa.

On view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York until 8 Jan 2023.

Image credits: Designed by Unknown, ‘The Division of the Booty’ (c.1526-28), tapestry, 458 x 594 cm., Musée national de la Renaissance - Château d'Ecouen (site officiel); Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, ‘Ellen Maurice’ (1597), oil on oak, 90.6 x 74.2 cm., The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, ‘Elizabeth I (‘The Ditchley Portrait’)’ (c.1592), oil on canvas, 241.3 x 152.4 cm., National Portrait Gallery; designed and executed by Dirk Vellert, ‘Martyrdom of the seven Maccabee Brothers and their Mother’ (c.1530), glass-stained, 70.5 x 47cm., The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

This compelling bust-length portrait of an anonymous sitter is characteristic of the work of Ambrosius Benson, who ranke...
11/28/2022

This compelling bust-length portrait of an anonymous sitter is characteristic of the work of Ambrosius Benson, who ranked among the finest painters active in 16th Century Bruges.
Born in Lombardy, Benson settled in Bruges in the Southern Netherlands after travelling and working in Spain; he was granted citizenship in 1518 and registered in the painters’ guild the following year. A period of training in the studio of Gerard David was cut short by a dispute over the ownership of preparatory drawings, at which point Benson established himself as an independent master.

Although Benson’s sensitive and detailed devotional images continued to be influenced by the work of David and his predecessors Van Eyck and Memling, it is his distinctive and detailed portraiture that is considered by many scholars to be his most impressive work. The fact that the sitter in this portrait, wrapped in a sumptuous fur coat, remains to be identified does not detract from its appeal; from the fineness of his white collar, to the steadiness of his gaze, it communicates a quiet dignity. The portrait was first attributed to Benson by Max Jakob Friedländer in 1948, an attribution that has recently been endorsed by current scholarship.

Come see this and other Old Master works in ‘Treasures of Dutch and Flemish art from private collections’ on view at Dickinson London until 21 December. Gallery Hours: Mon – Fri, 9am-6pm. Please see our ‘About’ page for ways to be in touch for further information.

Ambrosius Benson (c. 1495 – 1550), Portrait of a man, bust-length, in a fur coat, oil on panel, 24 x 18.5 cm. (9 ½ x 7 ¼ in.)

Dickinson is delighted to announce its autumn exhibition ‘Treasures of Dutch and Flemish art from private collections’, ...
11/25/2022

Dickinson is delighted to announce its autumn exhibition ‘Treasures of Dutch and Flemish art from private collections’, opening this Monday, 28 November at our London gallery. The show will feature highlights by Ambrosius Benson, Jan van der Ast, and Frans Snyders, among many others.

Most of the works in the show come from British collections, and many have belonged to the same family for generations. Among the featured paintings is Ambrosius Benson’s vibrant ‘Portrait of a man, bust-length, in a fur coat’, a work first given to Benson in 1948 and more recently endorsed by scholars. On a similar, jewel-like scale is a floral still life attributed to Balthasar van der Ast, based on an early flower piece by Jan Brueghel the Elder. Sculpture is represented by a boxwood ‘Cristo Vivo’ by 18th Century Flemish master Walter Pompe, whose extremely high level of finish includes an elaborate signature and precise date.

Keep your eyes open here for further information throughout the run of the show, on view at 58 Jermyn Street until 21 December. Gallery hours: Mon – Fri, 9am – 6pm.

Images: Attr. Balthasar VAN DER AST, ‘Flowers in a glass beaker with brambles, shell and eglantine, on a stone plinth’, c.1618 (oil on panel, 28 x 18.5 cm./11 x 7 ¼ in.); Ambrosius BENSON (c.1495 – 1550), ‘Portrait of a man, bust-length, in a fur coat’ (oil on panel, 24 x 18.5 cm./9 ½ x 7 ¼ in.); Walter POMPE, ‘Cristo Vivo’, 1729 (boxwood sculpture, height: 33.3 cm./13 in.)

Today we take a 5-minute trip down Piccadilly to the Royal Academy of Arts to see ‘Making Modernism,’ an exhibition dedi...
11/22/2022

Today we take a 5-minute trip down Piccadilly to the Royal Academy of Arts to see ‘Making Modernism,’ an exhibition dedicated to pioneering women artists working in Germany in the early 1900s. It showcases works by Paula Modersohn-Becker (1876 – 1907), Käthe Kollwitz (1867 – 1945), Gabriele Munter (1877 – 1962), and Marianne Werefkin (1860 – 1938), among others.

The exhibition consists of a variety of still lifes, genre paintings and self-portraits focused on working-class life, infant mortality, and the burdens of motherhood in early 20th Century Germany. Werefkin’s ‘Twins’ (1909) depicts two mothers, each cradling a baby, and all four figures are tinged with green, highlighting the lack of food available and poor living conditions.

The influence of the newly emerging abstract style is apparent. This is especially evident in the work of Münter, who formed a relationship with her tutor Wassily Kandinsky (1866 – 1944) after studying at the Phalanx art school in 1901. Kandinsky’s style was also adapted by Jacoba van Heemskerck in pieces such as ‘Composition No. 84 (Portrait of a Child)’ (1918).

‘Times’ critic Chloe Ashby has described the various works as displaying ‘the familiar subjects of modernist art filtered through a distinctly female lens – a lens that takes in the small as well as the monumental.’ This exhibition is on now until 12 February 2023.
-
Image credits: Marianne Werefkin. ‘Twins’, 1909 Museo Comunale d'Arte Moderna Ascona / Museo Castello San Materno / AAMA; Jacoba van Heemskerck, ‘Composition No. 84 (Portrait of a Child)’, 1918 Kunstmuseum Den Haag; Installation View at The Royal Academy of Arts, 2022.

This remarkable landscape, showing the extensive view from Fitzhead, near Taunton in Somerset, was painted for one of Ja...
11/17/2022

This remarkable landscape, showing the extensive view from Fitzhead, near Taunton in Somerset, was painted for one of James Ward’s most important patrons, the agricultural reformer John Southey, 15th Lord Somerville (1765 – 1819). Executed in 1805, it was an homage to Sir Peter Paul Rubens’s celebrated ‘View of Het Steen in the Early Morning’ (1636), now in the collection National Gallery, and was chosen by Ward along with its companion to feature in the first exhibition of the newly founded British Institution in 1806.

Ward had originally been commissioned by Somerville to produce 200 portraits of significant breeds of livestock. Although the project was abandoned, Somerville was impressed by Ward and went on to commission a large equestrian portrait of George III on His Majesty’s horse Adonis. Ward visited Somerville in Somerset to paint two large views of the Fitzhead estate and later travelled with him to Roxburghshire where he executed two further landscapes: ‘Melrose Abbey’ and ‘The Eildon Hills’.

James Ward, R.A (1769 – 1859), ‘A View in Somersetshire from Fitzhead, the Seat of Lord Somerville’, 1805, signed with monogram and dated lower left ‘JWARD -1805-‘, oil on panel, 101.3 x 170 cm. (39 ¾ x 66 7/8 in.)

For further information on this and other pictures for sale, please contact our London gallery.

‘Franceschini was the painter of Arcadia.’ - Philip Pouncey, Renaissance Academic (1910 – 1990)Marcantonio Franceschini ...
11/10/2022

‘Franceschini was the painter of Arcadia.’ - Philip Pouncey, Renaissance Academic (1910 – 1990)

Marcantonio Franceschini (1648 – 1729) was among the most celebrated artists in 18th century Bologna. He was admired for his graceful, classical manner, which built on the tradition of the Carracci and the Accademia degli Incamminati, and celebrated above all for his pastoral scenes.

‘Aurora and Cephalus’ (1700), a tale from Ovid’s ‘Metamorphoses’, was commissioned for the Principe di Cannitz. In Franceschini’s dynamic composition, the protagonists’ positions create a strong diagonal emphasis that underscores the dramatic consequences of the ill-fated affair.

‘Pastoral Scene with nymphs and a shepherd’ is a fine example of Franceschini’s widely admired pastoral manner, and bears the crest of the Balbi, a Genoese noble family who acquired Castello di Piovera in the mid-17th century and were known to be patrons of Franceschini’s. A red chalk drawing of the same subject matter is in the Royal Collection Trust.
-
Admiration for Franceschini continued after his death, with ‘Pastoral Scene with nymphs and a shepherd’ going on to influence the French rococo painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732 – 1806) in works such as ‘Le Verrou (The Bolt)’ (1759-60). In 1818, Percy Shelley wrote: ‘[Franceschini’s] colouring is less warm than that of Guido [Reni] but nothing can be more clear and delicate; it is as if he could have dipped his pencil in the hues of some serenest and star-shining twilight.’

For further information on these and other pictures for sale, please contact us through the link in bio.

Image credits: Marcantonio Franceschini, ‘Aurora and Cephalus’ (1700), oil on canvas, 146.4 x 103.5 cm., c/o Dickinson; Marcantonio Franceschini, ‘Pastoral Scene with nymphs and a shepherd’, oil on canvas, 110 x 130 cm., c/o Dickinson; Attr. to Marcantonio Franceschini, ‘Pastoral Scene with nymphs and a shepherd’, red chalk on paper, Royal Collection, Windsor; Jean-Honoré Fragonard, ‘Le Verrou (The Bolt)’ (1759-60) oil on canvas, 74 x 94 cm., Musée du Louvre.

Known by his contemporaries as the ‘Wild Swiss’, and an artist who produced scandalous subject matter, Henry Fuseli (174...
11/03/2022

Known by his contemporaries as the ‘Wild Swiss’, and an artist who produced scandalous subject matter, Henry Fuseli (1741 – 1825) is now celebrated in the exhibition ‘Fuseli and the Modern Woman: Fashion, Fantasy, Fetishism’ at the The Courtauld.
-
A passionate enthusiast of theatre, literature and women (in no particular order!), Fuseli dedicated his career to the illustration of Shakespearean subject matter and depictions of the female form.
-
The exhibition transports the viewer back into an 18th century mind, when society was obsessed with gothic and fantastical subject matter. Women in beautiful dress grace the walls, inspired by the theatrical performances Fuseli had attended at the Royal Opera House and Drury Lane (LW Theatres).
-
Many courtesans appear, as in ‘Half-Length figure of a courtesan with feathered head-dress’ (1800-10), but a particular source of inspiration was his wife of 35 years, Sophia Rawlins. Sophia appears repeatedly in intimate depictionsm with her dress and hair both in keeping with the styles of the time, seen particularly in ‘Sophia Fuseli, her hair in large rolls, with pink gloves, in front of a brown curtain’ (1790) reflecting Fuseli’s fascination with fashionable, modern women of the day.
-
Jonathon Jones of the Guardian asked in his review of the show, ‘Are these women models or fantasies?’ Perhaps if you visit this exhibition you could answer this otherwise impossible question. The exhibition is on view now until 8 January 2023.
-
Image credits: Installation View at The Courtauld Gallery (2022); Francis Wheatley, ‘View of the interior of the Shakespeare Gallery’ (1790), watercolour on paper, 45 x 61.7 cm.; Henry Fuseli, ‘Sophia Fuseli, her hair in large rolls, with pink gloves, in front of a brown curtain’ (1790), pencil and brush, with wash, watercolour and white heightening on paper, 31.6 x 19.7 cm., Kunsthaus Zürich; Henry Fuseli, ‘Half-length figure of a courtesan with feathered head-dress’ (c.1800), graphite, pen and brown ink, brush and watercolour on paper, 28.3 x 20 cm., Kunsthaus Zürich.

For our ‘Past Exhibitions’ series today we jump back to October 2015, when Dickinson London hosted the show ‘Martin Kipp...
11/01/2022

For our ‘Past Exhibitions’ series today we jump back to October 2015, when Dickinson London hosted the show ‘Martin Kippenberger: Posters 1977 – 1997’, a collection of 171 posters and 180 invitation cards created by the artist (1953 – 1997).
-
Kippenberger was one of the most complex and prolific German artists of his generation. He drew inspiration from his contemporaries, modern society, and his own experiences. His work offers contradictory impressions of these subjects: they are at once absurd, hopeful, tragic, charming and bleak. Very much an artist’s artist, Kippenberger had many of his posters designed by his close friends, including Jeff Koons, Christopher Wool, Lawrence Weiner, Rosemary Trockel, Franz West and Cosima von Bonin.
-
The collection, one of the largest of its kind and available for sale at Dickinson, offers a unique insight into the mind of the artist: the posters and invitations cards constitute a significant body of work, and act as a visual autobiography that spans his career.
-
Please contact us to discuss your interest in acquiring these or other works by Kippenberger.

Autumn marks the stage when young foxes begin to establish their own territories. As the nights lengthen you may have no...
10/27/2022

Autumn marks the stage when young foxes begin to establish their own territories. As the nights lengthen you may have noticed these shy and solitary animals exhibiting a sense of adventure and self-discovery in country gardens and city streets. Perhaps they remind you of your teenage self, although hopefully you were not digging holes in the garden and rifling through the bins!
-
In this spirit, Dickinson presents Joseph Gott’s (1786 – 1860) ‘A fox with her two cubs’ (c.1848), with a mother standing proud, protecting her offspring. This sculpture, with its careful study of anatomy and playful depiction of the foxes, displays Gott’s remarkable sensitivity to the anatomy of his subjects which earned the admiration of his contemporaries such as Sir Thomas Lawrence and Antonio Canova.
-
The fox subject matter is rare, as Gott often focused on children, dogs and cats, such as the marble ‘A greyhound with her two puppies suckling’ (1823), in the Devonshire Collection at Chatsworth House. He was evidently proud of this work, however, and it was exhibited at the Royal Academy of Arts in the year of its creation and again in 1862 at the ‘The International Exhibition’, considered one of the most important exhibitions of the Victorian Age. The marble has most recently been in the possession of the racehorse owners and breeders Sir Edmund and Lady Loder at Eyrefield Lodge in County Kildare, Ireland.
-
For further information on this and other works for sale, please contact us via the information on our ‘About’ page.

Have you read the most recent issue of ARS MAGAZINE? We were pleased to see the full page colour advert placed by Detroi...
10/25/2022

Have you read the most recent issue of ARS MAGAZINE? We were pleased to see the full page colour advert placed by Detroit Institute of Arts announcing their recent acqusition of María Blanchard’s vibrant, jazz-inspired oil ‘Saxophonist’ (c.1919), acquired from Dickinson’s stand at TEFAF Maastricht 2022.
-
The Spanish painter remains relatively little studied among the Cubists dominating the Parisian ‘avant-garde’ scene in the early decades of the 20th Century. Blanchard discovered Cubism after moving to the Bateau Lavoir artists’ colony in Montmartre in 1909, where remaining there throughout her career. Her work is most often compared to that of fellow Spaniard Juan Gris, who became a close friend, and through whom she was introduced to other members of Cubist circles including Picasso, Braque, and Metzinger.
-
Blanchard prioritised colour in her arrangements of large, layered planes, learned during her early studies under Emilio Sala at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando. Jazz music and musicians remained a popular theme among the Cubists, with Picasso, Braque, Gris, Matisse and many others all turning their attention to this modern form of music.
-
In 2012, Blanchard was the subject of a monographic exhibition organised by the Museo Reina Sofía in partnership with the Fundacion el Botin. We look forward to seeing how the DIA will feature and share this superb work in future exhibitions and scholarly endeavours.

These exquisite, tiny paintings in oil on copper represent an unusual and perhaps unique reworking of church interiors –...
10/19/2022

These exquisite, tiny paintings in oil on copper represent an unusual and perhaps unique reworking of church interiors – originally painted by Pieter Neefs, the Elder (1578 – 1656) – by the Venetian vedutista Giovanni Antonio Canal, Il Canaletto (1697 – 1768).
-
The subjects and composition are entirely typical of Neefs, a Flemish painter known for depictions of similar church interiors. More recently, however, scholars have identified the lively figures of the churchgoers as by the hand of Canaletto. It has been thought that a Venetian collector, or possibly a London-based one, amused himself by commissioning the artist to add figures to paintings executed by Neefs in the previous century.
-
Canaletto’s great patron, the agent and British Consul at Venice Joseph Smith (c. 1674 – 1770), owned a larger pair of panels signed by Neefs. This pair later entered the of King George III in 1762/63.
-
Giovanni Antonio Canal, Il Canalettop (1697 – 1768) and Pieter Neefs, the Elder (1578 – 1656), ‘A church interior with a view of the altar’; and ‘A church interior with a view of the nave’, oil on copper, each: 8.5 x 6.5 cm. (3 1/3 x 2 ½ in.); a pair.
-
For further information on this pair and other pictures for sale, please contact us at [email protected].

Go see ‘Lucian Freud: New Perspectives’ at  … as soon as possible!-Eight rooms are exquisitely curated and laid out, bri...
10/17/2022

Go see ‘Lucian Freud: New Perspectives’ at … as soon as possible!
-
Eight rooms are exquisitely curated and laid out, bringing together more than 60 paintings from over seven decades of work. From Freud’s early through his late periods, each room explores themes of youth, power, intimacy, death, and flesh. Early works focus on intimately scaled portraits and still lifes, moving on to larger scaled works of family, friends, lovers, titans, royalty and, himself, then to his later provocative and monumental pictures.
-
As the exhibition states ‘He (Freud) is known for his intense gaze, his attention to detail and his remarkable skill in manipulating paint on the canvas.’ That he does, from beginning to end, very well. Organized by the National Gallery and the , the exhibition is on view in London until 22 January 2023 (and traveling to Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza 14 Feb - 18 June 2023.)

‘My illustrious lordship, I’ll show you what a woman can do.’Artemisia Gentileschi (1593 – 1653)-📸: ‘Self-Portrait as th...
10/14/2022

‘My illustrious lordship, I’ll show you what a woman can do.’
Artemisia Gentileschi (1593 – 1653)
-
📸: ‘Self-Portrait as the Allegory of Painting (La Pittura)’, c.1638-39, oil on canvas, 98.6 x 75.2 cm., Royal Collection Trust; ‘Judith and Her Maidservant with the Head of Holofernes’, c.1623-25, oil on canvas, 187.2 × 142cm., Detroit Institute of Arts; ‘Self Portrait as Saint Catherine of Alexandria’, c.1615-17, oil on canvas, 71.4 x 69 cm., National Gallery; ‘Judith Beheading Holofernes', c.1620, oil on canvas, 146.5 x 108 cm., Uffizi Gallery

As we await the coronation ceremony of King Charles III (6 May 2023), let’s look back to the time of an earlier Charles,...
10/13/2022

As we await the coronation ceremony of King Charles III (6 May 2023), let’s look back to the time of an earlier Charles, Charles II (1630 – 1685), a great patron of the arts.
-
Among the court artists who found favour during his reign was Henri Gascar (1635 – 1701), who was presumably summoned to England around 1674 by Louise de Kérouaille, Duchess of Portsmouth, one of the King’s mistresses (and, like Gascar, born in France). In addition to painting the Duchess and her family, Gascar was commissioned to paint portraits of Charles II and other favourite mistresses Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland, and the actress Nell Gwynn. This elegant and large-scale ‘Portrait of a Court Beauty, possibly Nell Gwynn, reclining in a landscape, a château in the distance’ - available for sale at Dickinson - may depict Nell herself based on its striking compositional similarities to an engraving, in reverse, of ‘Nell Gwynn and her two sons’. It certainly illustrates Gascar’s talent for depicting sumptuous draperies in vibrant colours, which made him a fashionable choice in court circles.
-
For further information on this and other pictures for sale, please contact us at [email protected].

In honour of Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs from 15 September to 15 October, we’re looking back at a past sale: Giu...
10/10/2022

In honour of Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs from 15 September to 15 October, we’re looking back at a past sale: Giulio Romano’s superb ‘The Holy Family’ (c. 1520-23), acquired through Dickinson by the Getty museum.
-
What’s that you say? It’s true, Giulio Romano, Raphael’s most talented pupil, was indeed Italian – but the painting belonged to Fernando Enríquez Afán de Ribera, 3rd Duke of Alcalá and Viceroy of Naples (then under Spanish control), who likely acquired it during his tenture as Viceroy (1629 – 31); it appears in an inventory of his collection taken between 1632 and 1636. More recently, the painting passed through the collections of William Waldegrave, 1st Baron Radstock, and subsequently George Byng M.P., who housed his collection at Wrotham Park.
-
We hope you have enjoyed looking at art with a connection to Spain or Latin America – whether through the artist or its provenance – this month!

“It makes you go this way, and that way, and then off at the deep end altogether.” (Samuel Courtauld, describing the wor...
10/07/2022

“It makes you go this way, and that way, and then off at the deep end altogether.” (Samuel Courtauld, describing the work of the French master Cézanne.)
-
The Tate Modern exhibition Cézanne records the pivotal stylistic transformation and success of the artist during a time of great economic and social change throughout Europe. The show includes over 20 works never before seen in the UK such as The Basket of Apples, c. 1893 (Art Institute of Chicago), ‘Mont Sainte-Victoire’, 1902-06 (Philadelphia Museum of Art) and ‘Still Life with Milk Pot, Melon, and Sugar Bowl’, 1900-06 (Private collection).
-
With recent investigations into Cezanne’s artistic process, the exhibition reveals how the artist challenged the existing canon in terms of technique, composition and palette.
-
The exhibition has been described as a “must-see” by The Times and is currently on view until 12 March 2023.

Image credits: ‘The Basket of Apples’, c.1893, oil on canvas, 65 x 80 cm., The Art Institute of Chicago; ‘The Bathers’, 1890-92, oil paint on canvas, 54.3 × 66 cm., Saint Louis Art Museum; ‘Scipio’, 1866-68, 86 x 107 cm., MASP - Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand; ‘The François Zola Dam’, 1839-1906, oil on canvas, 54.2 x 74.2 cm., museumwales; Installation Shots of still lifes, Tate Modern, 2022.

Today marks four years since Banksy’s ‘Girl with balloon’ was half shredded during a live auction at Sotheby’s in London...
10/05/2022

Today marks four years since Banksy’s ‘Girl with balloon’ was half shredded during a live auction at Sotheby’s in London.
-
Using a remote control, the painting unexpectedly lowered itself through a shredder that had been inserted into the back of the painting by Banksy himself. The bottom half of the painting was cut into strips, leaving the remainder of the painting within the frame, which has since been referred to by Sotheby’s, as a moment of “instant art world history”.
-
Before the shredding, the artwork was originally sold for $1.4 million, but when the renamed artwork returned to the auction house four years later, ‘Love is in the Bin’ sold for a whopping $25.4 million.

Today in ‘Dickinson Recommends’, we are visiting ‘A New Look at Old Masters’ at The Metropolitan Musuem of Art. In this ...
09/30/2022

Today in ‘Dickinson Recommends’, we are visiting ‘A New Look at Old Masters’ at The Metropolitan Musuem of Art.

In this once in a lifetime exhibition, has rehung artworks from its permanent collection allowing viewers to see the works in a new light (pun not intended). Each gallery contains a theme which acts to inspire subject matter conversations, such as scientific curiousity, views of Venice, and types of portraiture.

This exhibition is part of the ongoing European Paintings Skylights Project. The project aims to update the current lighting system, first added in 1952, so viewers can continue to enjoy its magnificent collection in optimal light conditions.

Highlights from the exhibition include works by masters Canaletto, Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, and Anthony van Dyck.

On view at The Met until Spring 2023.

All pictures in the collection of the MET. Image credits: Canaletto, ‘Campo Santa Maria Zobenigo, Venice’, c. 1730, oil on canvas, 47 × 78.1 cm.; Canaletto, ‘The Grand Canal, Venice’, c. 1730, oil on canvas, 47 × 77.8 cm.; Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, ‘Comtesse de la Châtre (Marie Charlotte Louis Perrette Aglaé Bontemps), 1789, oil on canvas, 114.3 × 87.6 cm.; Anthony van Dyck, ‘James Stuart, Duke of Richmond and Lennox’, c. 1633-35, oil on canvas, 215.9 × 127.6 cm.

Address

980 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
10075

Telephone

(212) 772-8083

Website

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Dickinson posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Share

Category

Nearby museums


Other Art Galleries in New York

Show All

You may also like