Sean Kelly Gallery

Sean Kelly Gallery A Contemporary Art Gallery in New York City The Gallery, founded by British-born Sean Kelly in 1991, operated privately in SoHo until 1995. During these formative years, it established a reputation for diverse, intellectually driven, unconventional exhibitions.
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The original list of artists represented included Marina Abramović, Joseph Kosuth and Julião Sarmento, who exemplify the Gallery's commitment to exhibiting important, challenging contemporary art. In 1995, the Gallery relocated to 43 Mercer Street, where it continued to enhance its reputation by taking on representation of such significant international artists as James Casebere and Callum Innes. In 2001, Sean Kelly Gallery moved into a converted 7,000 square-foot industrial space on 29th Street in the Chelsea gallery district. The move to the new, spacious Chelsea location enabled the Gallery to mount increasingly ambitious, museum-quality exhibitions to great critical acclaim. The Gallery's roster of artists also expanded to include such notable figures as Los Carpinteros, Iran do Espírito Santo, Leandro Erlich, Antony Gormley, Laurent Grasso, Johan Grimonprez, Rebecca Horn, Tehching Hsieh, Idris Khan, the estate of Robert Mapplethorpe, Anthony McCall, Alec Soth, Frank Thiel, and Kehinde Wiley. The Gallery also began representing the estate of the renowned Danish furniture designer Poul Kjærholm. In October 2012, Sean Kelly opened a new 22,000 square foot space at 475 Tenth Avenue in a historic 1914 building. Award-winning architect Toshiko Mori designed the two-story gallery, which opened with a series of events culminating in its inaugural exhibition with Antony Gormley. Toshiko Mori was awarded the AIA Design Award in Interiors for her unique architectural approach to the Hudson Yards location. Since moving to the new space, Sean Kelly has continued to add internationally renowned artists to its roster, such as David Claerbout, José Dávila, Candida Höfer, Mariko Mori, and Sun Xun. As the Gallery continues to grow, its commitment to excellence and quality remains unchanged. The Gallery's artists have consistently been included in major international exhibitions and recognized with esteemed awards across the globe. Several of the gallery's artists have represented their countries at the Venice Biennale, including Ann Hamilton (American Pavilion, 1999), Joseph Kosuth (Hungarian Pavilion, 1993), Julião Sarmento (Portuguese Pavilion, 1997), and Marina Abramović, who won the prestigious Golden Lyon Award for Sculpture in 1997. In 2008, Abramović was the recipient of the Austrian Decoration of Honour for Science and Art and in 2009, during the 8th Florence Biennale, she was presented with the Lorenzo il Magnifico award for Lifetime Achievement. Japan’s prestigious Praemium Imperiale Prize for Sculpture was awarded to both Antony Gormley (2013) and Rebecca Horn (2010), who, in 2011, was the recipient of the Grande Médaille des Arts Plastiques, Académie d’Architecture de Paris. Most recently, José Dávila was selected as the winner of the 2014 EFG ArtNexus Latin America Art Award and Kehinde Wiley was presented with a 2015 U.S. Department of State Medal of Arts for his outstanding commitment and contributions to the Art in Embassies program and international cultural exchange.

Operating as usual

In disquieting video installations David Claerbout comes to grips with the passage of time. He lengthens time, allows th...
05/15/2021

In disquieting video installations David Claerbout comes to grips with the passage of time. He lengthens time, allows the present and past to fuse, and sometimes even seems to bring time to a halt. His newest video, Aircraft (FAL), premières at De Pont in his solo exhibition opening today. A fine moment to show video works, drawings and storyboards of his that the museum has been collecting since 2005. In the intimate environment of the wool-storage spaces, these works from the collection provide a unique view spanning nearly two decades of his artistic career.

Claerbout asks himself, over and again, what direction time takes. Does it move from left to right, as events in history are recorded? Or are there alternative ways of experiencing time? Those who watch Claerbout’s works will definitely say yes.

With Aircraft (FAL) Claerbout adds an idea that touches on one of the core responsibilities of museums: to preserve the past. We see an impressive aircraft under construction, supported by immense scaffolding. Everything is palpable and feels brand new: the polished aluminum, the labels on the boxes, the glass. Even the guards’ footsteps on the concrete floor sound crisply fresh. But the setting is outdated and the model of the aircraft old-fashioned, as if its construction has, for some reason, been delayed for more than seventy years. Such ambiguous and incompatible experiences of time clash in one’s mind. By once again interweaving past and present with the utmost subtlety Claerbout creates a kind of interim time. In this way he also creates space for contemplating the future and progress, the aircraft being the perfect metaphor for this. After having reversed, halted and lengthened time, Claerbout now seems to be asking himself, too, whether time as such can be preserved.

@studiodavidclaerbout @de_pont_museum

05/12/2021

In conversation: Jose Dávila and Sean Kelly, tune in tomorrow, Thursday, May 13 at 3pm EST to hear Jose in discussion about his current solo exhibition, The Circularity of Desire.

Click below to register:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/7316207704148/WN_xFoeMuBIRQ-Wd-9FAX-OIg

‘It came to me through a simple reflection’, says #JoseDávila in this video, filmed in his expansive studio complex in Guadalajara, Mexico, ‘that gravity is one of the main forces for making matter circular.’ One sculpture, included in his new exhibition at Sean Kelly, New York, comprised of poured sand, which falls naturally into a circular mound, demonstrates this inherent tendency to forming circles: a motif developed through silkscreen and vinyl paintings (also incorporating fragments of text), which quote from circles found in major figures from 20th century art. Silkscreen prints on found cardboard also utilize the circular motif, referencing the cycles of repurposing and reuse. - @friezeofficial

@JoseDavila Additional cinematography by Santiago Melazzini #SeanKellyNY #Friezevideo #Friezestudio #circle

Visit #SeanKellyNY at #FriezeNY open through the weekend! Stand B17.
05/08/2021

Visit #SeanKellyNY at #FriezeNY open through the weekend! Stand B17.

Today is the first day of Jose Dávila's solo exhibition The Circularity of Desire, on view through June 19, 2021.⁠⁠⁠⁠The...
05/07/2021

Today is the first day of Jose Dávila's solo exhibition The Circularity of Desire, on view through June 19, 2021.⁠⁠
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The exhibition is based upon research the artist conducted during the pandemic into the iconography of the circle and its presence throughout art history in the 20th and 21st centuries. Comprised of new paintings, sculptures, and silkscreens on cardboard, themes of circularity and the recurrent influence of circular forms throughout art history unite these interrelated bodies of work.⁠⁠
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@JoseDavila #TheCircularityOfDesire #SeanKellyNY

05/05/2021

Frieze NY Now open, visit us at Stand B17!

Sean Kelly Gallery is delighted to welcome Frieze New York to Hudson Yards, where the gallery has been located since 2012. For the first in-person art fair in the US in over a year, the gallery will present a dynamic selection of painting, sculpture, photography, and works on paper. Our booth will feature work by the gallery’s international roster of artists including Dawoud Bey, Julian Charrière, Jose Dávila, Antony Gormley, Candida Höfer, Ilse D’Hollander, Callum Innes, Idris Khan, Hugo McCloud, Landon Metz, Sam Moyer, Shahzia Sikander, Alec Soth, Janaina Tschäpe, and Wu Chi-Tsung.

Image 1: @julian.charriere, Towards No Earthly Pole - Sovetskaya, 2019; Image 2: Ilse D'Hollander, Untitled, 1990/1991; Image 3: @candidahoefer_official, Palazzo Medici-Riccardi Firenze I 2008; Image 4: @innes_callum, Exposed Painting Blue Violet, 2019; Image 5: @wuchitsung, Cyano-Collage 101, 2021; Image 6: @littlebrownmushroom, Leyla and Sabine. New Orleans, 2018; Image 7: @shahzia.sikander, Mirrored, 2019; Image 8: @landonmetz, Untitled, 2021

@friezeofficial #FriezeNY2021 #SeanKellyNY

05/05/2021

Frieze NY Now open, visit us at Stand B17!

Sean Kelly Gallery is delighted to welcome Frieze New York to Hudson Yards, where the gallery has been located since 2012. For the first in-person art fair in the US in over a year, the gallery will present a dynamic selection of painting, sculpture, photography, and works on paper. Our booth will feature work by the gallery’s international roster of artists including Dawoud Bey, Julian Charrière, Jose Dávila, Antony Gormley, Candida Höfer, Ilse D’Hollander, Callum Innes, Idris Khan, Hugo McCloud, Landon Metz, Sam Moyer, Shahzia Sikander, Alec Soth, Janaina Tschäpe, and Wu Chi-Tsung.

Image 1: @julian.charriere, Towards No Earthly Pole - Sovetskaya, 2019; Image 2: Ilse D'Hollander, Untitled, 1990/1991; Image 3: @candidahoefer_official, Palazzo Medici-Riccardi Firenze I 2008; Image 4: @innes_callum, Exposed Painting Blue Violet, 2019; Image 5: @wuchitsung, Cyano-Collage 101, 2021; Image 6: @littlebrownmushroom, Leyla and Sabine. New Orleans, 2018; Image 7: @shahzia.sikander, Mirrored, 2019; Image 8: @landonmetz, Untitled, 2021

@friezeofficial #FriezeNY2021 #SeanKellyNY

It is with immense sadness that we mourn the passing of our great friend the artist Julião Sarmento 1948-2021, we had th...
05/04/2021

It is with immense sadness that we mourn the passing of our great friend the artist Julião Sarmento 1948-2021, we had the great pleasure and privilege of working with him and representing him since 1989. Julião was with the gallery since its inception, he was inspirational, loyal and much loved by all who knew him. Over the decades we shared many wonderful memories, exhibitions, and achievements together, he was part of our family, both artistic and personal. We extend our heartfelt condolences to his wife Isabel, his children Duarte and Laura and all those whose lives he touched and enriched throughout his life and long, distinguished career. Julião will be greatly missed by all who knew him.

Julião Sarmento was born in 1948 in Lisbon, Portugal. From 1967-1970 he studied painting and architecture at the Escola Superior de Belas Artes, Lisbon. Sarmento developed a multi-media visual language, combining film, video, sound, painting, sculpture, and installations. His work addresses issues of complex interpersonal relationships and has utilized themes such as psychological interaction, sensuality, and transgression.

Julião Sarmento was included in two Documentas, and represented Portugal at two Venice Biennales. His work is featured in prominent public and private collections worldwide.

"He changed Portugal. Very few artists change a country." – Hans Ulrich Obrist

It is with immense sadness that we mourn the passing of our great friend the artist Julião Sarmento 1948-2021, we had the great pleasure and privilege of working with him and representing him since 1989. Julião was with the gallery since its inception, he was inspirational, loyal and much loved by all who knew him. Over the decades we shared many wonderful memories, exhibitions, and achievements together, he was part of our family, both artistic and personal. We extend our heartfelt condolences to his wife Isabel, his children Duarte and Laura and all those whose lives he touched and enriched throughout his life and long, distinguished career. Julião will be greatly missed by all who knew him.

Julião Sarmento was born in 1948 in Lisbon, Portugal. From 1967-1970 he studied painting and architecture at the Escola Superior de Belas Artes, Lisbon. Sarmento developed a multi-media visual language, combining film, video, sound, painting, sculpture, and installations. His work addresses issues of complex interpersonal relationships and has utilized themes such as psychological interaction, sensuality, and transgression.

Julião Sarmento was included in two Documentas, and represented Portugal at two Venice Biennales. His work is featured in prominent public and private collections worldwide.

"He changed Portugal. Very few artists change a country." – Hans Ulrich Obrist

Happy birthday to Janaina Tschäpe! This is the LAST week to visit ‘Janaina Tschäpe: Between the Sky and the Water’ @sara...
04/25/2021

Happy birthday to Janaina Tschäpe!

This is the LAST week to visit ‘Janaina Tschäpe: Between the Sky and the Water’ @sarasotaartmuseum, closing Sunday May 2!

Between the Sky and the Water is a mid-career retrospective of Janaina Tschäpe (b. Munich, Germany 1973). Tschäpe’s wide-ranging oeuvre is visually connected by a lexicon of forms that array across a variety of media—painting, drawing, installation, sculpture, photography, video, and performance. These varied articulations of her core concepts comprise a holistic cosmology, a gesamtkunstwerk (a total work of art), a grand evolutionary opera where each piece plays a supporting role, subsumed by the totality of the body. Recurring themes persist—Kafkaesque metamorphosis and transformation, a feminist resistance to the perpetual policing of the female body, a collapsing of scale undifferentiating the grand cosmos from the infinitesimal cellular, an excavation of the nature of landscape—but always, most importantly, is an exploration of painting as a way of understanding the world.
Travelling from deep sea to land to space, the terrain is constantly shifting and yet the same, like a creature tropically and symbiotically adapting to whatever environment they find themselves inhabiting. Atmospherically sliding between the figurative and the abstract, the work invites your eye to travel, free of regard for chronology, or need of narrative.
image: installation view. 📷: Ryan Gamma

It’s the last day to visit Sam Moyer’s exhibition Tone. The sculptures serve as both complement and counterpoint to the ...
04/24/2021

It’s the last day to visit Sam Moyer’s exhibition Tone.

The sculptures serve as both complement and counterpoint to the paintings. Each is composed of joined panels held together by tension, visually mirroring the act of codependency. Juxtaposing forms that alternate between the biomorphic and geometric, they are composed of soapstone remnants from the artist's home and aggregate concrete (similar to terrazzo), partnered with hand-poured concrete segments. The exposed concrete joints reveal an assemblage of stones gathered from beaches along the Long Island Sound. Sandblasted to echo found fragments of sea wall near the artist's home, the markings emphasize the passage of time represented through erosion.

“If a piece balances the physical density of sculpture while echoing the speed or lightness of a drawing, it is an experiential success for me.” - #SamMoyer

@sammemoyer, Dependents 8, 2021, soapstone and terrazzo, 39 1/16 x 29 3/4 x 13 1/4 inches (99.3 x 75.5 x 33.7 cm)

It’s the last day to visit Sam Moyer’s exhibition Tone.

The sculptures serve as both complement and counterpoint to the paintings. Each is composed of joined panels held together by tension, visually mirroring the act of codependency. Juxtaposing forms that alternate between the biomorphic and geometric, they are composed of soapstone remnants from the artist's home and aggregate concrete (similar to terrazzo), partnered with hand-poured concrete segments. The exposed concrete joints reveal an assemblage of stones gathered from beaches along the Long Island Sound. Sandblasted to echo found fragments of sea wall near the artist's home, the markings emphasize the passage of time represented through erosion.

“If a piece balances the physical density of sculpture while echoing the speed or lightness of a drawing, it is an experiential success for me.” - #SamMoyer

@sammemoyer, Dependents 8, 2021, soapstone and terrazzo, 39 1/16 x 29 3/4 x 13 1/4 inches (99.3 x 75.5 x 33.7 cm)

The Copenhagen International Documentary Film Festival is virtually screening Marina Abramović's landmark exhibition '51...
04/22/2021

The Copenhagen International Documentary Film Festival is virtually screening Marina Abramović's landmark exhibition '512 Hours' through May 5, 2021. Link in bio to view.⁠

In the summer of 2014, tens of thousands of guests flocked to the Serpentine Gallery in London to experience #MarinaAbramović’s exhibition ‘512 Hours’. But when it opened, it dawned on everyone that the audience itself was the actual work in the performance artist’s landmark exhibition. The audience members were also active participants and co-creators of the social experiment, which – set against the minimalist background of the gallery’s empty space – developed continuously into new, unpredictable directions during the three weeks (or 512 hours) in which the exhibition took place, while Abramović herself took part in the performative ritual. ⁠

Adina Istrate and Giannina La Salvia documented not just the show itself but also the creative process and not least what it meant to some of its many participants. Everyone had highly different and often deeply personal experiences, which for many became the beginning of a healing process. After one year of social distancing, ‘512 Hours’ feels even more generous in its radical vision for new and free communities. We experience a unique artistic talent in action in a film that ranks among the finest takes on creative thinking and practice.⁠

@abramovicinstitute @cphdox #CPHDOX2021

The Copenhagen International Documentary Film Festival is virtually screening Marina Abramović's landmark exhibition '512 Hours' through May 5, 2021. Link in bio to view.⁠

In the summer of 2014, tens of thousands of guests flocked to the Serpentine Gallery in London to experience #MarinaAbramović’s exhibition ‘512 Hours’. But when it opened, it dawned on everyone that the audience itself was the actual work in the performance artist’s landmark exhibition. The audience members were also active participants and co-creators of the social experiment, which – set against the minimalist background of the gallery’s empty space – developed continuously into new, unpredictable directions during the three weeks (or 512 hours) in which the exhibition took place, while Abramović herself took part in the performative ritual. ⁠

Adina Istrate and Giannina La Salvia documented not just the show itself but also the creative process and not least what it meant to some of its many participants. Everyone had highly different and often deeply personal experiences, which for many became the beginning of a healing process. After one year of social distancing, ‘512 Hours’ feels even more generous in its radical vision for new and free communities. We experience a unique artistic talent in action in a film that ranks among the finest takes on creative thinking and practice.⁠

@abramovicinstitute @cphdox #CPHDOX2021

Mariko Mori's work Transcircle is featured in '2021 A Space Odyssey Monolith: Memory as Virus – Beyond the New Dark Age'...
04/16/2021

Mariko Mori's work Transcircle is featured in '2021 A Space Odyssey Monolith: Memory as Virus – Beyond the New Dark Age' a group exhibition at GYRE Gallery, Tokyo, Japan closing April 25, 2021.⁠⁠
⁠⁠
Transcircle brings together Japan’s prehistoric Jomon culture and the movements of the planets in our solar system. “In 2003, I set out on a two-year journey of fieldwork at Jomon archaeological sites from Hokkaido to Okinawa. The rich and diverse Jomon universe that I encountered revealed the mystery and the reality of generation and flow in a continuous, unbroken progression from the remote past to the present.” - #MarikoMori⁠⁠
⁠⁠
Stone circles, similar to Möbius bands, symbolize life and death as two sides of the same coin, Mori compares this parallel to the ancestral beliefs in ancient Japan, and the close connection between people and the spiritual world that still continue today. In this work, the movements of the nine planets of the solar system, acting as a metaphor for life, are rendered digitally and expressed through LEDs in nine colors. The colors and speeds of the LEDs represent the diversity of movement among the planets. The LEF lights are embedded in nine artificial stones in the form of a circle, which stand as a metaphor for death. Together, they give the impression of being integrated into a single, coherent work—there is no contradiction between life and death. The stone circle, with a multi-dimensional structure like a Buddhist mandala, brings the order of the universe to a chaotic and apparently irrational arrangement. ⁠⁠
⁠⁠
According to the artist: “the pillars in the stone circle, pointing to the heavens above, can free us from the endless repetition of the natural cycle of life and death, with the internal and external become one. I envisaged the stones as antennas that connect us to this new spatial dimension. In Transcircle, I attempted to make a work that would bring out the sort of themes that the contemporary world finds most difficult to define; themes such as eternity and rebirth.”⁠⁠
⁠⁠
@marikomori #GYREomotesando #gyregallery

Mariko Mori's work Transcircle is featured in '2021 A Space Odyssey Monolith: Memory as Virus – Beyond the New Dark Age' a group exhibition at GYRE Gallery, Tokyo, Japan closing April 25, 2021.⁠⁠
⁠⁠
Transcircle brings together Japan’s prehistoric Jomon culture and the movements of the planets in our solar system. “In 2003, I set out on a two-year journey of fieldwork at Jomon archaeological sites from Hokkaido to Okinawa. The rich and diverse Jomon universe that I encountered revealed the mystery and the reality of generation and flow in a continuous, unbroken progression from the remote past to the present.” - #MarikoMori⁠⁠
⁠⁠
Stone circles, similar to Möbius bands, symbolize life and death as two sides of the same coin, Mori compares this parallel to the ancestral beliefs in ancient Japan, and the close connection between people and the spiritual world that still continue today. In this work, the movements of the nine planets of the solar system, acting as a metaphor for life, are rendered digitally and expressed through LEDs in nine colors. The colors and speeds of the LEDs represent the diversity of movement among the planets. The LEF lights are embedded in nine artificial stones in the form of a circle, which stand as a metaphor for death. Together, they give the impression of being integrated into a single, coherent work—there is no contradiction between life and death. The stone circle, with a multi-dimensional structure like a Buddhist mandala, brings the order of the universe to a chaotic and apparently irrational arrangement. ⁠⁠
⁠⁠
According to the artist: “the pillars in the stone circle, pointing to the heavens above, can free us from the endless repetition of the natural cycle of life and death, with the internal and external become one. I envisaged the stones as antennas that connect us to this new spatial dimension. In Transcircle, I attempted to make a work that would bring out the sort of themes that the contemporary world finds most difficult to define; themes such as eternity and rebirth.”⁠⁠
⁠⁠
@marikomori #GYREomotesando #gyregallery

Address

475 10th Ave
New York, NY
10018

Opening Hours

Tuesday 11:00 - 18:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 18:00
Thursday 11:00 - 18:00
Friday 11:00 - 18:00
Saturday 10:00 - 18:00

Telephone

(212) 239-1181

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Since its inception in 1991, Sean Kelly Gallery has been internationally regarded for its diverse, intellectually driven program and highly regarded roster of artists. The gallery has garnered international attention for its high caliber exhibition program and collaboration with many of the most significant cultural institutions around the world.

The gallery operated privately in SoHo until 1995, when its first public space opened at 43 Mercer Street. During these formative years, it established a reputation for diverse, intellectually driven, unconventional exhibitions. The original list of artists represented; Marina Abramović, James Casebere, Callum Innes, Joseph Kosuth and Julião Sarmento, all of whom are still with the gallery today, exemplified the Gallery’s commitment to presenting important and challenging contemporary art.

In 2001, Sean Kelly moved to a converted 7,000 square-foot industrial space on 29th Street in the Chelsea gallery district. The new spacious location enabled the Gallery to mount increasingly ambitious, museum-quality exhibitions to great critical acclaim. During its early period in Chelsea, the Gallery's roster of artists expanded to include such notable figures as Iran do Espírito Santo, Antony Gormley, Rebecca Horn and Frank Thiel. In the ensuing years, the Gallery undertook representation of Los Carpinteros, Leandro Erlich, Laurent Grasso, Johan Grimonprez, Tehching Hsieh, Peter Liversidge, Anthony McCall, Alec Soth and Kehinde Wiley.

In October 2012, Sean Kelly opened a new 22,000 square foot space at 475 Tenth Avenue in a historic 1914 building. Award-winning architect Toshiko Mori designed the two-story gallery, which opened with an exhibition of work by Antony Gormley. Toshiko Mori was awarded the AIA Design Award in Interiors for her unique architectural approach to the Hudson Yards location. With the gallery’s expansion into the new space, Sean Kelly added internationally acclaimed artists to its roster; David Claerbout, José Dávila, Candida Höfer, Ilse D’Hollander, Hugo McCloud, Mariko Mori, Liu Wei, James White and Sun Xun.