Sean Kelly Gallery

Sean Kelly Gallery A Contemporary Art Gallery in New York City
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The Gallery, founded by British-born Sean Kelly in 1991, operated privately in SoHo until 1995. During these formative years, it established a reputation for diverse, intellectually driven, unconventional exhibitions. The original list of artists represented included Marina Abramović, Joseph Kosuth and Julião Sarmento, who exemplify the Gallery's commitment to exhibiting important, challenging contemporary art. In 1995, the Gallery relocated to 43 Mercer Street, where it continued to enhance its reputation by taking on representation of such significant international artists as James Casebere and Callum Innes. In 2001, Sean Kelly Gallery moved into a converted 7,000 square-foot industrial space on 29th Street in the Chelsea gallery district. The move to the new, spacious Chelsea location enabled the Gallery to mount increasingly ambitious, museum-quality exhibitions to great critical acclaim. The Gallery's roster of artists also expanded to include such notable figures as Los Carpinteros, Iran do Espírito Santo, Leandro Erlich, Antony Gormley, Laurent Grasso, Johan Grimonprez, Rebecca Horn, Tehching Hsieh, Idris Khan, the estate of Robert Mapplethorpe, Anthony McCall, Alec Soth, Frank Thiel, and Kehinde Wiley. The Gallery also began representing the estate of the renowned Danish furniture designer Poul Kjærholm. In October 2012, Sean Kelly opened a new 22,000 square foot space at 475 Tenth Avenue in a historic 1914 building. Award-winning architect Toshiko Mori designed the two-story gallery, which opened with a series of events culminating in its inaugural exhibition with Antony Gormley. Toshiko Mori was awarded the AIA Design Award in Interiors for her unique architectural approach to the Hudson Yards location. Since moving to the new space, Sean Kelly has continued to add internationally renowned artists to its roster, such as David Claerbout, José Dávila, Candida Höfer, Mariko Mori, and Sun Xun. As the Gallery continues to grow, its commitment to excellence and quality remains unchanged. The Gallery's artists have consistently been included in major international exhibitions and recognized with esteemed awards across the globe. Several of the gallery's artists have represented their countries at the Venice Biennale, including Ann Hamilton (American Pavilion, 1999), Joseph Kosuth (Hungarian Pavilion, 1993), Julião Sarmento (Portuguese Pavilion, 1997), and Marina Abramović, who won the prestigious Golden Lyon Award for Sculpture in 1997. In 2008, Abramović was the recipient of the Austrian Decoration of Honour for Science and Art and in 2009, during the 8th Florence Biennale, she was presented with the Lorenzo il Magnifico award for Lifetime Achievement. Japan’s prestigious Praemium Imperiale Prize for Sculpture was awarded to both Antony Gormley (2013) and Rebecca Horn (2010), who, in 2011, was the recipient of the Grande Médaille des Arts Plastiques, Académie d’Architecture de Paris. Most recently, José Dávila was selected as the winner of the 2014 EFG ArtNexus Latin America Art Award and Kehinde Wiley was presented with a 2015 U.S. Department of State Medal of Arts for his outstanding commitment and contributions to the Art in Embassies program and international cultural exchange.

A Statement of Action | Black Lives MatterWe look forward to working together to make society at large an equitable and ...
06/19/2020

A Statement of Action | Black Lives Matter

We look forward to working together to make society at large an equitable and accountable place for everybody. We stand in solidarity with Black Lives Matter, and pledge to stay committed to fight racial injustice. Without intentional and deliberate action, the fight against systemic racism will not succeed.

Please join us in support of organizations working towards sustainable solutions that affirm the sanctity, security, and prosperity of Black lives.


Black Lives Matter https://blacklivesmatter.com/

Know Your Rights Camp https://www.knowyourrightscamp.com/legal

Obama Foundation https://www.obama.org/anguish-and-action/

Black Art Futures Fund https://www.blackartfutures.org/

Arts Administrators of Color https://aacnetwork.org/

PEN America https://pen.org/

In celebration of Juneteenth, the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United Stat...
06/19/2020

In celebration of Juneteenth, the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States, we are highlighting Dawoud Bey’s work Untitled #14 (Site of John Brown's Tannery), 2017. The work is from his Night Coming Tenderly, Black, a series of 25 large-scale black-and-white photographs that re-imagine the movements of freedom seekers along the Underground Railroad.
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This network of secret routes and safe houses, established in the United States during the early to mid-19th century was used by enslaved people to escape into free states in the North and Canada. In this body of work, #DawoudBey focused on the architecture and landscape around Northern Ohio and Lake Erie, one of the final passages of the route into Canada. Using both real and imagined sites, these richly toned photographs seek to recreate the spatial and sensory experiences of those figures moving furtively through the darkness of night towards freedom. Bey continues his visualization of collective experience and history, using photography as a vehicle to make history resonant in the contemporary moment. This work can be seen in our virtual Art Basel Online Viewing Room.
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@dawoudbey, Untitled #14 (Site of John Brown's Tannery), 2017 gelatin silver print image: 44 x 55 inches (111.8 x 139.7 cm) paper: 48 x 59 inches (121.9 x 149.9 cm) edition of 6 with 2 APs

Today we go #IntheArchive to revisit Antony Gormley's exhibition STAND, 2019, a public artwork, which was on view at the...
06/18/2020

Today we go #IntheArchive to revisit Antony Gormley's exhibition STAND, 2019, a public artwork, which was on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art January 24 - June 16, 2019.
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STAND comprised an installation of ten monumental cast iron ‘Blockwork’ sculptures placed at regular intervals across the East Terrace of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, overlooking historic Benjamin Franklin Parkway and the city below. Continuing his critical engagement of the human body, Gormley described the ten-foot-high individual sculptures with titles including Hope, Assuage, Lull, Powder, Rate and Assay, amongst others, as standing stones that act as markers in space.
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Speaking about the installation at the time Gormley stated, “This exhibition is incomplete without the subjective witness of the citizen: each work in its different way calls on him or her to simultaneously project and recognize internal affinities in the attitude carried by the block piles... This is an exciting opportunity to see what sculpture can make us think and feel. What can it do to and for us? Can it have a revelatory or diagnostic function? Can it work on us to recognize our true selves and allow collective space to again be a space in which personal truth can arise?”
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Images: Antony Gormley, STAND, 2019, Installation view, Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA, USA, Courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art #AntonyGormley

06/17/2020

For today’s #InDetail we are previewing a selection of the works featured in the gallery’s Art Basel Viewing Room that reveal the rich spectrum of aesthetic tendencies expressed by artists with whom we work, including #MarinaAbramović
#DawoudBey #JoseDávila #Julian Charrière #CandidaHöfer #IlseDHollander
#RebeccaHorn #CallumInnes #IdrisKhan #JosephKosuth #HugoMcCloud #MarikoMori
#SamMoyer, #ShahziaSikander and #KehindeWiley.
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pass the salt, 2020 is from McCloud’s newest body of work, Burdened Man, which touches on notions of class through his use of single-use plastic bags. Abramović’s Self Portrait with Skeleton, 2003, is linked to her performance Nude with Skeleton, and is one of her most iconic images. Horn’s Der Sonnenseufzer, 2006, which translates as “The Sun Sigh,” is a classic example of the artist’s mechanical sculpture. Kosuth’s ‘Titled (A.A.I.A.I.)' [begin], [middle], [end], Webster's N.D., 1968, is an exceptionally rare example from his “Definitions,” series, a work whose apparent graphic simplicity belies its unmistakable philosophical and psychological complexity. Moyer’s Breaking the Line, 2020 is a new painting of variegated and multi-hued sections of repurposed black marble combined with hand-painted fabric in a unique composition. Dávila’s Untitled (Les Ménines), 2020, engages a deconstructed graphic which riffs on iconic moments from art history. D’Hollander’s unique works on cardboard reveal a newly found freedom of expression, previously unseen in her work. Wiley’s monumental sculpture Rumors of War, 2019, unveiled in Times Square in September 2019, before moving to its final home at the entrance to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond in December, has become an iconic emblem of the Black Lives Matter movement. Today this sculpture stands as an untarnished beacon to the future, as the very works that it was created in response to—the numerous memorials to the Confederacy lining Richmond’s Monument Avenue—are being permanently removed.

06/16/2020

Laurent Grasso takes us inside his Paris studio. Grasso describes the studio’s function as “a research machine,” a place where he is able to live with his artworks to better understand them. Grasso’s creative process includes extensive periods of research and the creation of conceptual statements for each project, realized through various experimentations.
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Incorporating imagery culled from the cinema and art history, #LaurentGrasso works in video, sculpture, painting, and drawing, to recreate phenomena – both human and natural – that set up surreal and ambiguous juxtapositions of time and space. Grasso often intentionally manipulates imagery by imposing unique and unusual perspectives onto his subject matter, thereby subverting the viewer's instinct to accept what they see at face value. A continually shifting viewpoint is at the heart of Grasso's aesthetic sensibility – in Grasso's words, "the idea is to construct a floating viewpoint, thereby creating a discrepancy in relation to reality. We move from one viewpoint to another, and that's also how we manufacture states of consciousness."
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@laurentgrasso #SeanKellyNY #DigitalProgramming

Chelsea Guerdat, Special Projects Manager chose Untitled, 2020, by Jose Dávila for #StaffPicksSaturday.Jose’s sculptures...
06/13/2020

Chelsea Guerdat, Special Projects Manager chose Untitled, 2020, by Jose Dávila for #StaffPicksSaturday.

Jose’s sculptures are physical manifestations of pure dualism. Whenever I am fortunate to encounter his work, I have two contradictory experiences at the exact same time. It is as if I am witnessing Henri Cartier-Bresson’s “decisive moment” in sculptural form, and I dare not look away for fear of missing the best part.

Experience 1: The antagonistic elements -- two organically shaped boulders, painted for the first time in an unmistakable Yves Klein-inspired blue, and two geometric polished concrete volumes -- are forced together by pressure, resistance and tension. The sculpture appears fragile, unstable, under constant threat of rupture, precariously existing on the verge of collapse. Everything is unsettled and uncertain; the struggle between the opposing forces is palpable. Ominous, impending chaos.

Experience 2: Calmness ensues. The complementary elements are at rest, suspended in perfect equilibrium. The boulders and concrete volumes coexist in a harmonious state of stillness, providing balanced, reciprocal support to each other. The individual elements are synthesized into a cohesive whole, stronger together than the sum of their parts.

It is then up to me as the viewer to reconcile my conflicting experiences. This is why I find Jose's works to be so lastingly impactful. Whether it is a singular sculpture, such as Untitled, or a body of sculptures, such as the Los Límites de lo Posible or the Joint Effort series, Jose’s aptly named sculptures make me an active participant with WORK to do. I become like the sculptures myself - seeking out that fleeting moment where all of the dynamic experiences align to a perfect point of making sense. - @chelseaguerdat

#JoseDávila, Untitled, 2020, concrete, boulders and epoxy paint, 37 5/8 x 21 5/8 x 30 1/2 inches (95.5 x 55 x 77.5 cm)
#SeanKellyNY

06/12/2020

This #FilmFriday’s feature is Janaina Tschäpe’s film The Ocean Within, 2013. Watch on Vimeo for 24 hours from Friday, June 12 until Saturday, June 13.

https://vimeo.com/424026359
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Join us on social media and tag @SeanKellyNY to share a pic of your at-home screening. The person who submits the winning picture of them watching the film will receive a signed copy of #JanainaTschäpe publication.
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Janaina Tschäpe’s wide-ranging practice of painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, and video investigates observed and imagined views of the landscape, filtered through perception and memory. She often incorporates themes of aquatic, plant and human life to suggest dreamlike scenarios, referencing interests in myth, morphology and the mysteries of aquatic states. Her 2013 video, The Ocean Within, exemplifies Tschäpe’s fascination with the ocean and her characteristic interpretation of it as mysterious, dreamlike, and fantastical. She has explained: “Landscape is almost like measuring time; you look at something and try to find out where it ends. So the contemplation of a landscape is always a search, the search for something new, the search for time.” - @janaina_tschape_studio
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#SeanKellyNY #DigitalProgramming #

On view through the gallery's website, and part of our virtual archives, The Exhibition—Collect Wisely is our inaugural ...
06/11/2020

On view through the gallery's website, and part of our virtual archives, The Exhibition—Collect Wisely is our inaugural online exhibition. Like the Collect Wisely podcast, this exhibition exists outside the aegis of the gallery and the artists it represents. Instead, it is centered around artworks from the collections of our podcast participants, among them Marieluise Hessel Artzt, Ron Pizzuti, Rodney Miller, Howard Rachofsky, Gary Yeh, and Tiffany Zabludowicz. We asked these collectors how recent conditions had affected their current thinking about art. In particular, if there was one work of art in their own collection that they had been contemplating deeply in this moment of self-isolation and quarantine? Or if there was certain work in their collection through which they have discovered new meaning, or rediscovered passion, given the challenging and unfamiliar circumstances in which we find ourselves.
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Their responses were heartfelt, touching, urgent and insightful. Remarking on Titus Kaphar’s painting, Time Travel, 2013, which depicts the whitewashed figure of a black civil war soldier, Ron Pizzuti wrote that, “The racism that existed during the civil war still exists to a large degree today.” In the work she chose, Anj Smith’s, The Combatant, 2010, Tiffany Zabludowicz saw how this “beautiful, universal, melancholic work, set against a dystopian backdrop, encourages us all to bravely combat darkness from external and internal forces.” And Howard Rachofsky, reconsidering Felix Gonzalez-Torres’, Perfect Lovers, 1987-1990, wrote how the work reminds he and his wife Cindy “of the lessons we learned from the HIV/AIDS pandemic and how those lessons can usefully be applied to the fight against COVID-19. That is, at all times, and to the best of our ability, act with kindness and display compassion and humanity.” We have found inspiration and comfort in their words and hope you will as well.
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Image 1. Titus Kaphar, Time Travel, 2013 2. Anj Smith, The Combatant, 2010 3. Felix Gonzalez-Torres "Untitled" (Perfect Lovers), 1987-1990
#IntheArchive #CollectWisely #SeanKellyNY

Today we go #InDetail with a work on cardboard by Ilse D’Hollander (1968 – 1997)..This work was made in 1991 shortly aft...
06/10/2020

Today we go #InDetail with a work on cardboard by Ilse D’Hollander (1968 – 1997).
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This work was made in 1991 shortly after D’Hollander finished her art studies at the Hoger Instituut voor Beeldende Kunsten St. Lucas in Ghent. Upon finishing school, she had no money for art supplies. Her decision to paint on cardboard came about purely for economic reasons. On her way home, she discovered that a local paper factory was planning to discard a sizeable number of large sheets of cardboard. D’Hollander enlisted the help of a fellow student to assist in transporting the materials to her small apartment. Perhaps, feeling less encumbered by this modest material, rather than the more costly high art canvas she had previously used, D’Hollander seemed to find a freedom of expression that had not been evident in her work before. Her paintings on canvas are typified by a more subdued palette for which she would become recognized. By contrast, in this unique series on cardboard, D’Hollander produced 28 vibrantly colored works incorporating collaged elements along with mixed media, including pencil, oil, acrylic, and ballpoint pen, amongst other materials.
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#IlseDHollander’s oeuvre exhibits a highly developed sense of color, composition, scale and surface, through the use of subtle tones and pared down compositions. An artist’s artist, her canvases and works on paper favor abstraction, yet subtly allude to the everyday, hinting at nature and the landscape of the Flemish countryside where she spent the last and most productive years of her life.
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Ilse D'Hollander, Untitled, 1991, mixed media on cardboard, artwork: 27 15/16 x 39 3/8 inches, framed: 31 7/8 x 43 11/16 x 2 3/8 inches

06/09/2020

Sun Xun #IntheStudio

Sun Xun shares a video montage of work he’s been creating in his studio in Bejing. In response to the lockdown Sun Xun stated, “I think there is no change for me. Normally, I don’t plan my work for more than one week. It is just a waste of time for me. The world or the situation is always changing, and the key is to feel the direction, and that’s enough for me. I am always ready for changes, and just like water flows through a river, changing its shape all the time on the riverbed. The world is like a drunken man. You must be drunk too.” - @sun_xun

Considered one of China’s most talented artists, #SunXun’s artistic practice combines meticulous craftsmanship with stylistic experimentation not limited to any one medium. Blurring the lines between drawing, painting, animation and installation, his work incorporates a wide array of materials. Painting, woodcuts, traditional Chinese ink and charcoal drawings are often combined to create the foundation of expressionistic, stop-motion animated films. These films are then presented in immersive settings, creating a theatre of memory for the visitor, filled with realistic and fantastical iconography.

Sun Xun was born in Fuxin, an industrial mining town in northeast China, and grew up in the period immediately following the Chinese Cultural Revolution. The lingering aftereffects of this movement continue to have a profound impact on his work, which often explores themes of global history, culture, memory and politics. He is especially interested in the way historical events are perceived and remembered by ordinary citizens versus how they are officially presented by public agencies and the media. Sun Xun’s work explores concepts of past versus present and personal versus political in symbolic and surrealist ways, often choosing to use animals and insects, rather than human characters, as the main protagonists in his stories.

Video published in @harpersbazaarus

artnet
06/08/2020
artnet

artnet

Gallerist Sean Kelly of Sean Kelly Gallery on why it's not too late to create the art world we want:

Kehinde Wiley’s monumental sculpture Rumors of War stands unblemished at the entrance to the Virginia Museum of Fine Art...
06/04/2020

Kehinde Wiley’s monumental sculpture Rumors of War stands unblemished at the entrance to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Virginia. Installed in December 2019, #RumorsofWar demands that we consider broader perspectives on traditional narratives of heroism and representation in American history and culture, standing as a shining example of how to imagine and develop a more complete and inclusive American story for the future. Today marks a pivotal step in the right direction with the announcement of the removal of Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s statue from Richmond’s Monument Avenue, along with four others.
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As a direct response to the Confederate statues that line Monument Avenue, #KehindeWiley conceived the idea for Rumors of War when he visited the city in 2016 for the opening of Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic at VMFA. In Wiley’s sculpture, the figure is a young African American dressed in urban streetwear. Proudly mounted on its large stone pedestal, the bronze sculpture commemorates African American youth lost to the social and political battles being waged throughout our nation.
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“I’m a black man walking those streets…. What does that feel like to walk a public space, and to have your state, your country, your nation, say this is what we stand by? No. We want more. We demand more. We creative people create more…And today we say yes to something that looks like us. We say yes to inclusivity. We say yes to broader notions of what it means to be an American.” - @kehindewiley
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Image 1: @kismetj
Image 2 and 3: @troysimmonsstudio
Image 4: @richmondfreepressusa @ Richmond, Virginia

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475 10th Ave
New York, NY
10018

Opening Hours

Tuesday 11:00 - 18:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 18:00
Thursday 11:00 - 18:00
Friday 11:00 - 18:00
Saturday 10:00 - 18:00

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(212) 239-1181

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Since its inception in 1991, Sean Kelly Gallery has been internationally regarded for its diverse, intellectually driven program and highly regarded roster of artists. The gallery has garnered international attention for its high caliber exhibition program and collaboration with many of the most significant cultural institutions around the world.

The gallery operated privately in SoHo until 1995, when its first public space opened at 43 Mercer Street. During these formative years, it established a reputation for diverse, intellectually driven, unconventional exhibitions. The original list of artists represented; Marina Abramović, James Casebere, Callum Innes, Joseph Kosuth and Julião Sarmento, all of whom are still with the gallery today, exemplified the Gallery’s commitment to presenting important and challenging contemporary art.

In 2001, Sean Kelly moved to a converted 7,000 square-foot industrial space on 29th Street in the Chelsea gallery district. The new spacious location enabled the Gallery to mount increasingly ambitious, museum-quality exhibitions to great critical acclaim. During its early period in Chelsea, the Gallery's roster of artists expanded to include such notable figures as Iran do Espírito Santo, Antony Gormley, Rebecca Horn and Frank Thiel. In the ensuing years, the Gallery undertook representation of Los Carpinteros, Leandro Erlich, Laurent Grasso, Johan Grimonprez, Tehching Hsieh, Peter Liversidge, Anthony McCall, Alec Soth and Kehinde Wiley.

In October 2012, Sean Kelly opened a new 22,000 square foot space at 475 Tenth Avenue in a historic 1914 building. Award-winning architect Toshiko Mori designed the two-story gallery, which opened with an exhibition of work by Antony Gormley. Toshiko Mori was awarded the AIA Design Award in Interiors for her unique architectural approach to the Hudson Yards location. With the gallery’s expansion into the new space, Sean Kelly added internationally acclaimed artists to its roster; David Claerbout, José Dávila, Candida Höfer, Ilse D’Hollander, Hugo McCloud, Mariko Mori, Liu Wei, James White and Sun Xun.

Throughout its twenty five plus years, Sean Kelly has garnered extensive attention for its work with renowned cultural institutions, coordinating hundreds of exhibitions on behalf of its artists at an array of prestigious museums including the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France; the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, Ireland; the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel; Kunstwerke Berlin, Germany; the Musée d'Art Contemporain de Montréal, Canada; the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sapporo, Japan; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Tate Gallery, London, England; the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia; the Stedelijk van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Holland; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, to name but a few.

Sean Kelly has continued to expand its program to include a new generation of exceptional contemporary artists adding Julian Charrière, Landon Metz, Sam Moyer, Shahzia Sikander and Janaina Tschäpe in the past year. As the Gallery continues to grow, its commitment to excellence and quality remains unwavering.

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