Karen Q's Patriot Tours NYC

Karen Q's Patriot Tours NYC History like you never learned it in school! The true story of the Founding of America. Forget those See us on the Travel Channels' Mysteries at the Museum!

Since 2005, we've been leading our customers through the most historic parts of the city, along streets laid in the 1700’s and into national historic landmarks and are a daily presence in Lower Manhattan! We know the story of every nook and cranny of the Southern tip of the Island and we can’t wait to share it with you. Our Research
To prepare for our tours we comb through hundreds of archival doc

Since 2005, we've been leading our customers through the most historic parts of the city, along streets laid in the 1700’s and into national historic landmarks and are a daily presence in Lower Manhattan! We know the story of every nook and cranny of the Southern tip of the Island and we can’t wait to share it with you. Our Research
To prepare for our tours we comb through hundreds of archival doc

Operating as usual

Are you a fan of the John Wick series of movies? Mr. Q is! Featured in the movies is one of my personal favorite buildin...
07/06/2021

Are you a fan of the John Wick series of movies? Mr. Q is! Featured in the movies is one of my personal favorite buildings that we pass on the Revolutionary War/Colonial NYC Tour - The Beaver Building. But John Wick fans know it as the Continental Hotel.

You can find the building at the intersection of Pearl, Beaver, and Wall Streets. Over the entrance is a sign "Cocoa Exchange".

The Beaver Building (you'll find out why it's called that in a moment) was built in 1903-04 as an office building. You might think it looks a bit like the much more famous Flatiron Building, and it does due to its triangular footprint. It's a beautiful example of the city's early skyscrapers with three distinct vertical sections: a base, shaft, and capital. The top section has beautiful, glazed terra cotta ornamentation in green, cream, and red in geometric shapes.

The base section is stone with a series of oval crests marking the top of each section. And at the bottom of each crest is a beaver head peeking down at you! Thus, it's name: Beaver Building.

The building was initially occupied by the Munson Steamship Company, which later built a gorgeous building on the other side of Beaver Street and moved. The next tenant was the New York Cocoa Exchange, for which the entrance is still named.

One of the many fascinating buildings we find in lower Manhattan!

For those who asked: Some more tickets are available for the July 9 tour with Mrs. Q and friends and Fraunces Tavern Mus...
07/05/2021

For those who asked: Some more tickets are available for the July 9 tour with Mrs. Q and friends and Fraunces Tavern Museum .

The tour is called "Declaring Independence".
https://www.frauncestavernmuseum.org/

For those who asked: Some more tickets are available for the July 9 tour with Mrs. Q and friends and Fraunces Tavern Museum .

The tour is called "Declaring Independence".
https://www.frauncestavernmuseum.org/

The BIG flag is out at Fraunces Tavern!
07/05/2021

The BIG flag is out at Fraunces Tavern!

The BIG flag is out at Fraunces Tavern!

Thank you to everyone who bought tickets! We look forward to seeing you Friday.
07/05/2021

Thank you to everyone who bought tickets! We look forward to seeing you Friday.

Thank you to everyone who bought tickets! We look forward to seeing you Friday.

07/04/2021
Declaration of Independence LIVE in NYC July 4, 2020

Last year's reading of the Declaration of Independence. This year it will occur on the NYC reading date, July 9, and will be spectacular!!! I hope you'll be joining us. Tickets available Fraunces Tavern® Museum

Timeless words from Thomas Paine on Independence Day!
07/04/2021

Timeless words from Thomas Paine on Independence Day!

Timeless words from Thomas Paine on Independence Day!

Last night Mrs. Q talked about the old city directories printed in the early years of the nation. Each had a section tha...
07/03/2021

Last night Mrs. Q talked about the old city directories printed in the early years of the nation. Each had a section that listed the salaries of government employees and the cost of maintaining every government department. These pages list the cost of the Federal Government for the year 1794. The directories also listed state and local government salaries.

Imagine getting an itemized list of how your tax dollars are being spent!

I'm finished fussing with this. Added lace cuffs and will wear a plain, white fichu (scarf). Time to move on to the pett...
07/02/2021

I'm finished fussing with this. Added lace cuffs and will wear a plain, white fichu (scarf). Time to move on to the petticoat.

Time to start setting up for Mrs. Q! See you at 7pm ET.

Progress on Mrs. Q's new dress! Gown is finished. Petticoat fabric pinned to see how it will look. I think I will make a...
07/01/2021

Progress on Mrs. Q's new dress! Gown is finished. Petticoat fabric pinned to see how it will look. I think I will make a bonnet like the black one out of the petticoat fabric. Will add colorful ribbon bows to the top and front of the bonnet.

Progress on Mrs. Q's new dress! Gown is finished. Petticoat fabric pinned to see how it will look. I think I will make a bonnet like the black one out of the petticoat fabric. Will add colorful ribbon bows to the top and front of the bonnet.

In July 1776 John Jay writes to his wife Sarah (Sally). Jay is in Poughkeepsie and heading to White Plains to attend the...
07/01/2021

In July 1776 John Jay writes to his wife Sarah (Sally). Jay is in Poughkeepsie and heading to White Plains to attend the New York Provincial Congress. Sarah is in Elizabeth (Elizabethtown), NJ. He is worried about her and their young son's safety in the event of a British attack on the area.

He tells her he hopes to be able to stop in Elizabethtown, a long diversion from the regular route from Poughkeepsie to White Plains, to see her.

The Jays are one of my favorite Revolutionary War Era New York couples, so obviously in love with each other!

"I propose returning to the White Plains by the way of elizabethtown. The journey will be long and fatiguing, but as all the inconveniences of it will be amply compensated by the pleasure of spending a day or two with you, I consider it with satisfaction, and shall pursue it with cheerfulness. Don’t, however, depend on it, lest you be disappointed.

In these days of uncertainty we can be certain only for the present; the future must be the object rather of hope than expectation. My dear Sally, are you yet provided with a secure retreat in case Elizabethtown should cease to be a place of safety. I shall not be at ease till this be done. You know my happiness depends on your welfare; and therefore I flatter myself your affection for me has, before this will reach you, induced you to attend to that necessary object. I daily please myself with an expectation of finding our boy in health and much grown, and my good wife in good spirits."

In July 1776 John Jay writes to his wife Sarah (Sally). Jay is in Poughkeepsie and heading to White Plains to attend the New York Provincial Congress. Sarah is in Elizabeth (Elizabethtown), NJ. He is worried about her and their young son's safety in the event of a British attack on the area.

He tells her he hopes to be able to stop in Elizabethtown, a long diversion from the regular route from Poughkeepsie to White Plains, to see her.

The Jays are one of my favorite Revolutionary War Era New York couples, so obviously in love with each other!

"I propose returning to the White Plains by the way of elizabethtown. The journey will be long and fatiguing, but as all the inconveniences of it will be amply compensated by the pleasure of spending a day or two with you, I consider it with satisfaction, and shall pursue it with cheerfulness. Don’t, however, depend on it, lest you be disappointed.

In these days of uncertainty we can be certain only for the present; the future must be the object rather of hope than expectation. My dear Sally, are you yet provided with a secure retreat in case Elizabethtown should cease to be a place of safety. I shall not be at ease till this be done. You know my happiness depends on your welfare; and therefore I flatter myself your affection for me has, before this will reach you, induced you to attend to that necessary object. I daily please myself with an expectation of finding our boy in health and much grown, and my good wife in good spirits."

Enjoying the greenery and cool harbor breeze this afternoon at Battery Park. I will be meeting you Friday, July 9, as Mr...
06/30/2021

Enjoying the greenery and cool harbor breeze this afternoon at Battery Park.

I will be meeting you Friday, July 9, as Mrs. Q, at the eagle!

June 30, 1776Martha Washington leaves New York for her safety! General Washington remains with his army, preparing for a...
06/30/2021

June 30, 1776

Martha Washington leaves New York for her safety! General Washington remains with his army, preparing for a British invasion to occur at any time.

The provincial New York congress has received information that "divers disaffected and dangerous persons in this Colony" have "lately left their usual places of residence and secreted themselves in woods and swamps, and other places, in all probability with a design to join the enemy, when an opportunity shall offer, which, if not prevented, will greatly endanger the peace, quiet and safety of the inhabitants." Journal of Provincial Congress, Vol 1

The New York congress then resolves to remove all of their records from the city, North to White Plains.

Captain Stephen Brown is sent to Newark, NJ to "apply for assistance in procuring and fixing boats near the ferries for facilitating the passage of troops from the Jerseys to New York." - Correspondence of Capt. John Glover

portrait of M. Washington by Rembrandt Peale

June 30, 1776

Martha Washington leaves New York for her safety! General Washington remains with his army, preparing for a British invasion to occur at any time.

The provincial New York congress has received information that "divers disaffected and dangerous persons in this Colony" have "lately left their usual places of residence and secreted themselves in woods and swamps, and other places, in all probability with a design to join the enemy, when an opportunity shall offer, which, if not prevented, will greatly endanger the peace, quiet and safety of the inhabitants." Journal of Provincial Congress, Vol 1

The New York congress then resolves to remove all of their records from the city, North to White Plains.

Captain Stephen Brown is sent to Newark, NJ to "apply for assistance in procuring and fixing boats near the ferries for facilitating the passage of troops from the Jerseys to New York." - Correspondence of Capt. John Glover

portrait of M. Washington by Rembrandt Peale

Making progress...
06/29/2021

Making progress...

Making progress...

Q Cat in Mrs. Q's sewing room!
06/29/2021

Q Cat in Mrs. Q's sewing room!

Q Cat in Mrs. Q's sewing room!

06/29/2021
Mrs. Q Live in the Afternoon!

Mrs. Q is making a new dress and would like to show you how things are proceeding. Live from her sewing room in Hanover, Square, 1776 New-York.

Plus, some more info on the July 9 NYC reenactment!
Huzzah!!!!

06/28/2021

June 28, 1776 - New York

Captain Thomas Hickey is the first Continental Army soldier to be executed for "mutiny, sedition, and treachery"!

Hickey was a member of the Commander-in-Chief's Guard, a unit formed to protect General Washington. The official charge against him was passing counterfeit money, but rumors saturated New York and surrounding areas that he was actually involved in a plot to assassinate the General.

The plot was described in letters from Dr. Solomon Drowne to his sister, Sally, and brother, William.

June 24, 1776.
"A most infernal plot has lately been discovered here, which, had it been put into ex*****on, would have made America tremble, and been as fatal a stroke to us, this Country, as Gun Powder Treason would to England, had it succeeded. The hellish conspirators were a number of Tories (the Mayor of ye City among them) and three of General Washington's Life Guards. The plan was to kill Generals Washington and Putnam, and as many other Commanding Officers as possible.

July 13, 1776
"I suppose you have heard of ye ex*****on of one of the General's Guards, concerned in ye hellish plot, discovered here some time past. There was a vast concourse of people to see ye poor fellow hanged."

After Hickey's hanging, General Washington issued this General Announcement:

"The unhappy fate of Thomas Hickey, executed this day for mutiny, sedition, and treachery, the General hopes will be a warning to every soldier in the Army to avoid those crimes, and all others, so disgraceful to the character of a soldier, and pernicious to his country, whose pay he receives and bread he eats. And in order to avoid those crimes, the most certain method is to keep out of the temptation of them, and particularly to avoid lewd women, who, by the dying confession of this poor criminal, first led him into practices which ended in an untimely and ignominious death."

June 27, 1804William Peter Van Ness carries the request for an "interview" from Aaron Burr to Alexander Hamilton!The two...
06/27/2021

June 27, 1804

William Peter Van Ness carries the request for an "interview" from Aaron Burr to Alexander Hamilton!

The two men, and their representatives, Van Ness and Nathaniel Pendleton, have been going back and forth since June 16th. They have been attempting to settle a dispute between Hamilton and Burr over insulting remarks made by Hamilton at a meeting of Federalists near Albany, NY.

The day started with a letter from Van Ness to Pendleton, summarizing his and Burr's frustrations with Hamilton. A simple request from Burr for Hamilton to address specific remarks made at the meeting grew into an insurmountable issues, due to Hamilton's evasions, according to Van Ness.

"Col. Burr's request was in that first instance proposed in a form the most simple, in order that Gen. Hamilton might give to the affair that course to which he might be induced by his temper and his knowledge of the facts. Col. Burr trusted with confidence, that from the frankness of a solder and the candor of a gentleman he night expect and ingenuous declaration.

Col. Burr was greatly surprised at receiving a letter which he considered as evasive, and which in manner he deemed not altogether decorous.

In one expectation, however, he was not wholly deceived, for the close of Gen. Hamilton's letter contained an intimation that if Col. Burr should dislike his refusal to acknowledge or deny, he was ready to meet the consequences."

In other words, Van Ness is telling Pendleton that from the very start, Hamilton has been goading Burr into a duel! All subsequent communications from Hamilton have served to cloud the issue even more, pushing Burr closer and closer to the necessity of a challenge.

Van Ness met with Pendleton later that day and issued the verbal request for an "interview", a polite expression for a duel. It was agreed that any time after Sunday, July 8, the "meeting" would take place.

Excerpts from Letter #8, June 27, 1804
William Peter Van Ness to Nathaniel Pendleton

06/25/2021

Where is Mrs. Q?
Fraunces Tavern® Museum

Views of the West Village.#1 - 1700s, when it was the estate called "Richmond Hill" - Washington's headquarters for part...
06/24/2021

Views of the West Village.

#1 - 1700s, when it was the estate called "Richmond Hill" - Washington's headquarters for part of 1776, the Vice Presidential home of John and Abigail Adams in 1789/90, and later home of Aaron Burr.

#2 - The site in 1907, looking a little more like what we think of as the W. Village

#3 - Today, the Restaurant One of By Land, Two if By Sea, picture taken by me

June 23, 1804The letters between Hamilton and Burr continue. But did you know that it wasn't only those two men who were...
06/23/2021

June 23, 1804

The letters between Hamilton and Burr continue. But did you know that it wasn't only those two men who were a part of the correspondence, but two others as well? For Burr, Peter Van Ness, and for Hamilton, Nathaniel Pendleton. They acted as go-betweens, delivering the letters and verbal messages. They also communicated with each other.

Van Ness and Pendleton were also well-known NY lawyers active in politics.

This is letter #4 in the correspondence. It is from Van Ness to Hamilton, informing him that he would like to speak to him in person and would Hamilton kindly tell him when and where would be convenient.

The day before, Van Ness received the following letter from Pendleton, which lead him to request a personal interview with Hamilton. Van Ness was hopeful he might be able to persuade Hamilton to issue an apology of some kind to end the ongoing exchange.

"General Hamilton says he cannot imagine to what Dr. Cooper may have alluded unless it were to a conversation at Mr. Taylor's in Albany last winter (at which Mr. Taylor, he and General Hamilton were present.) General Hamilton cannot recollect distinctly the particulars of that conversation so as to undertake to repeat them, without running the risk of varying, or omitting what might be deemed important circumstances. The expressions are entirely forgotten, and the specific ideas imperfectly remembered; but to the best of his recollection it consisted of comments on the political principles and views of Col. Burr and the results that might be expected from them in the event of his election as Governor, without reference to any particular instance of past conduct, or to private character."

June 23, 1804

The letters between Hamilton and Burr continue. But did you know that it wasn't only those two men who were a part of the correspondence, but two others as well? For Burr, Peter Van Ness, and for Hamilton, Nathaniel Pendleton. They acted as go-betweens, delivering the letters and verbal messages. They also communicated with each other.

Van Ness and Pendleton were also well-known NY lawyers active in politics.

This is letter #4 in the correspondence. It is from Van Ness to Hamilton, informing him that he would like to speak to him in person and would Hamilton kindly tell him when and where would be convenient.

The day before, Van Ness received the following letter from Pendleton, which lead him to request a personal interview with Hamilton. Van Ness was hopeful he might be able to persuade Hamilton to issue an apology of some kind to end the ongoing exchange.

"General Hamilton says he cannot imagine to what Dr. Cooper may have alluded unless it were to a conversation at Mr. Taylor's in Albany last winter (at which Mr. Taylor, he and General Hamilton were present.) General Hamilton cannot recollect distinctly the particulars of that conversation so as to undertake to repeat them, without running the risk of varying, or omitting what might be deemed important circumstances. The expressions are entirely forgotten, and the specific ideas imperfectly remembered; but to the best of his recollection it consisted of comments on the political principles and views of Col. Burr and the results that might be expected from them in the event of his election as Governor, without reference to any particular instance of past conduct, or to private character."

Address

City Hall Park
New York, NY
11104

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

+19177164908

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Karen Q's Patriot Tours NYC posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Karen Q's Patriot Tours NYC:

Videos

Nearby museums