National Archives at New York

National Archives at New York Welcome to the official page for the National Archives at New York City! If you're looking for the official source of information about the US National Archives, please visit our homepage at http://www.archives.gov.
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For a complete directory of all the National Archives Facebook accounts, please visit http://www.archives.gov/social-media/facebook.html. View our Facebook comment policy on the National Archives website at http://www.archives.gov/social-media/facebook-comment-policy.html. Follow us on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/ArchivesNYC The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) manages this Facebook fan page as a portal for information from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. However, information posted here is not official policy of NARA and will in no way grant anyone any rights, privileges, or standing on any matter. All information should be verified through official channels at NARA. For contact information at NARA, please check http://www.archives.gov/. Facebook Comment Policy: You are encouraged to share your comments, ideas, and concerns. Please be aware of the following policies for the National Archives' Facebook fan page: • NARA will only post comments from users over 13 years of age that relate to topics on the specific fan page subject matter. • NARA will delete comments that contain abusive, vulgar, offensive, threatening or harassing language, personal attacks of any kind, or offensive terms that target specific individuals or groups. • NARA will delete comments that are clearly off-topic, that promote services or products, or that promote or oppose any political party, person campaigning for elected office, or any ballot proposition. • Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in the comment being removed. • Communications made via the Facebook fan page will in no way constitute a legal or official notice or comment to the NARA or any official or employee of NARA for any purpose. • The content of all comments is immediately released into the public domain, so do not submit anything you do not wish to be broadcast to the general public. • Do not post personally identifiable information such as social security numbers, addresses and telephone numbers. Comments containing this information will be removed from the Facebook fan page wall. • NARA does not discriminate against any views, but reserves the right to remove posted comments that do not adhere to these standards. Members of the media are asked to pose your questions to the NARA Public Affairs Office through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Media questions or comments will not be posted. NARA Public Affairs can be reached at 202-357-5300 Facebook Privacy Policy: This site is not hosted by the National Archives and Records Administration and thus the privacy policies of NARA do NOT apply. The privacy policy for this web site may be found at http://www.facebook.com/about/privacy/. NARA retains records of the content on the NARA portion of this site, as is provided for in our records retention schedules and mandated by the Federal Records Act. These records include user comments and any personally identifiable information a commenter shares with NARA. Because these records are collected from a public web site, it may be disclosed to others and used by NARA in the conduct of agency business. Please do not share information such as social security numbers, birth dates, or other private information that you do not want to make available to others. NARA disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from any comments posted on this page. This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy. Information about NARA activities and other methods to communicate with NARA are also available on NARA's official web page at http://www.archives.gov/, along with archival photos, videos and other documents. The privacy policy for http://www.archives.gov/ may be found there.

Mission: The National Archives and Records Administration serves American democracy by safeguarding and preserving the records of our Government, ensuring that the people can discover, use, and learn from this documentary heritage. We ensure continuing access to the essential documentation of the rights of American citizens and the actions of their government. We support democracy, promote civic education, and facilitate historical understanding of our national experience.

Here is another collection in our court records.  This collection was seized and submitted as part of a court exhibit . ...
02/22/2020

Here is another collection in our court records. This collection was seized and submitted as part of a court exhibit . It includes a number of psychedelic poster art for rock concerts in the San Francisco, California area during the 1960s and early 1970s. These cards aren't signed and may be part of a collection of various artists however, at least one, the Electric Flag of Fillmore West, 1967 appears to be the work of famed artist of Bonnie MacLean. These cards portray the Doors, The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Country Joe and the Fish, The Miller Blues Band, The Young Bloods, Moby Grape, the Steve Miller Band and more. All of these are in the holdings of the National Archives at New York City.

Today, the most recent remake of the movie "Call of the Wild" was released and it reminds us that Jack London' wasn't ju...
02/22/2020

Today, the most recent remake of the movie "Call of the Wild" was released and it reminds us that Jack London' wasn't just a prolific writer but also a very successful storyteller. In 1914, he filed a lawsuit against the Biography Company for copyright infringement. The company used samples of his story "Just Meat" without his consent. London won the case which is now part of the holdings of the National Archives at New York City.

US National Archives
02/19/2020

US National Archives

This week on our virtual Archives Road Trip, we're staying in Texas to virtually visit the library of 41st President George H. W. Bush.

Help us tag and transcribe records found in the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum in College Station, Texas!

US National Archives
02/19/2020
US National Archives

US National Archives

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 authorizing the forced evacuation and relocation of all people in “military areas” who might pose a threat to national security.

Since the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor had occurred just months earlier, many believed that people of Japanese ancestry posed that threat, and the entire West Coast was deemed a military area.

Over the next six months, 120,000 men, women, and children of Japanese descent were taken from their homes and put into internment camps—nearly 70,000 were American citizens.

Happy Presidents Day!  Here is one of our favorite documents from the NYC office featuring John Adam's appointment in 17...
02/17/2020

Happy Presidents Day! Here is one of our favorite documents from the NYC office featuring John Adam's appointment in 1798 for John Sloss Hobart as the first federal judge in New York.

US National Archives
02/14/2020

US National Archives

Actor Kirk Douglas, who died on February 5, 2020, at age 103, became famous in Hollywood, but he was also a regular in Washington, DC.

The National Archives also holds his military records and images of his visits with Presidents and First Ladies during several administrations. See more images here: http://go.usa.gov/xd9GH

Image: Kirk Douglas's Naval Reserve service record from his Official Military Personnel File. (Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, National Archives at St. Louis; National Archives Identifier 299693)

We hope you can join us on this #ArchivesRoadTrip
02/07/2020

We hope you can join us on this #ArchivesRoadTrip

In honor of Presidents Day, we are taking a virtual road trip to our 14 Presidential Libraries.

We’ll make a new stop each day, unlocking a different Presidential Library tagging or transcription mission. Every contribution will help make these records easier to find in our Catalog.

The #ArchivesRoadTrip starts on February 6!

https://www.archives.gov/citizen-archivist/missions/roadtrip

US National Archives
02/07/2020
US National Archives

US National Archives

“Again and again I stand and knock at the closed door of justice,” wrote Ethel Ross, registered nurse, in her letter to Secretary Frank Knox in 1943. “Why should I--an American Citizen--have to knock so hard and so long for a birthright…especially when my country needs me?”

African American women were not alone in their pursuit of acceptance to the Navy Nursing Corps; other civilians wrote to the Navy arguing against this discrimination.

Petitions from organizations such as the Sweethearts of Servicemen, W.I.V.E.S, and the Women’s Auxiliary of the National Maritime Union, as well as letters from religious groups and private citizens, were sent on behalf of these nurses, demanding that women of any color who are able and qualified should be considered for service.

US National Archives
02/05/2020
US National Archives

US National Archives

In 1810, Senator Philip Reed of Maryland introduced a constitutional amendment modifying the Titles of Nobility Clause.

Our Historian takes a closer look at this unratified amendment, proposed right before the War of 1812, that sought to bar U.S. citizens from accepting titles of nobility.

US National Archives
02/05/2020

US National Archives

On September 13, 1952, Pvt. Cecile Brothers of Hocombe, Missouri, flipped the coin to determine the kickoff for the South Western Command and Japan Logistical Command football season.

Coin tosses have been used since the start of professional football in the late 1800s. Other iconic coin flipping moments can be found in the holdings of the National Archives. President Harry S. Truman did the honors at the Army vs. Navy football game on November 26, 1949, in Philadelphia. (Watch it here: https://catalog.archives.gov/id/23964)

See this image in our online catalog: https://catalog.archives.gov/id/45697720

US National Archives
02/05/2020
US National Archives

US National Archives

Were you inspired by seeing 100-year-old Tuskegee Airman Col. Charles E. McGee at the Super Bowl last night?

Learn more about the history of African American aviators and aviatrices!

US National Archives
02/05/2020

US National Archives

We are celebrating the life of suffragist Mary Church Terrell for the month of February in our Centennial Commemorative Calendar.

Download the calendar page, the mobile phone lockscreen, or the Facebook banner: https://www.archives.gov/campaigns/19th-amendment-calendar

“Seeking no favors because of our color nor patronage because of our needs, we knock at the bar of justice and ask for a...
02/04/2020
19th Amendment at 100: Mary Church Terrell

“Seeking no favors because of our color nor patronage because of our needs, we knock at the bar of justice and ask for an equal chance.” —Mary Church Terrell

Read more about her at: prologue.blogs.archives.gov/2020/02/03/19th-amendment-at-100-mary-church-terrell/

The 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, but this landmark event was neither the beginning nor the end of the story for women and their struggle for the right to vote. Join us in 2020 as we commemo…

National Archives at New York's cover photo
02/04/2020

National Archives at New York's cover photo

Our February Document of the Month is from Record Group 29: Records of the Bureau of the Census. Sarah Tompkins, an acti...
02/03/2020

Our February Document of the Month is from Record Group 29: Records of the Bureau of the Census. Sarah Tompkins, an activist for woman suffrage and racial equality, was the first female African American principal in New York City public schools, listed on line 3 of this 1860 census record with the occupation “public school teacher.”

The struggle for woman suffrage was not always united in its tactics or inclusivity. As a result organizations developed to support suffrage for minority women and communities. Tompkins was a founder of the Brooklyn-based Equal Suffrage League, an organization of African American women who worked for political and voting rights. She also served as the superintendent of suffrage for the National Association of Colored Women.

This facsimile document is displayed as part of the Welcome Center Gallery exhibit, “New York on the Record: Rightfully Hers.”

US National Archives
01/29/2020
US National Archives

US National Archives

Our Cartographic Branch staff has some helpful tips on getting started with research on with aerial imagery covering the United States.

US National Archives
01/28/2020

US National Archives

Today marks the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

By the end of World War II, the Holocaust had claimed the lives of over 6 million Jewish people—nearly two out of every three in Europe.

On January 27, 1945, Soviet forces liberated the Auschwitz concentration camp complex in German-occupied Poland. Russian soldiers discovered thousands of sick, dying, and dead prisoners when they entered the complex of concentration camps, forced labor camps, and a killing center abandoned by the Nazis.

The full scope of Nazi atrocities grew clearer with every concentration camp liberated and mass grave discovered by Allied forces as they advanced across Europe in the final months of World War II.

Army medic Harold Porter penned this graphic description of the horrific scene at the newly liberated Dachau concentration camp on the former camp commandant’s stationery. Grappling with a grisly reality that he knew defied belief, Porter’s letter home acknowledged that “it is easy to read about atrocities, but they must be seen before they can be believed.”

This letter is currently on display at the National Archives Museum in Washington, DC, through February 5, 2020.

📸 First page of letter from Harold Porter, 1945, National Archives, Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum. See the full letter online: https://catalog.archives.gov/id/1055429

US National Archives
01/28/2020
US National Archives

US National Archives

Our Historian takes a closer look at the earliest unratified amendment--the very first amendment ever proposed.

The original first (proposed) amendment outlined how many representatives would be in the U.S. House of Representatives. Had that passed, we could have more than 6,000 representatives today compared to the 435 we currently have.

National Archives Education
01/27/2020

National Archives Education

To date, the U.S. Constitution has 27 amendments. Congress, however, has actually proposed 33 constitutional amendments to the states. But for an amendment to pass, it must be ratified by three-fourths of states.

The earliest unratified amendment was, in fact, the very first amendment ever proposed. Back in 1789, the first Congress drafted 12 amendments and sent them to the states for ratification. By December 15, 1791, enough states had ratified 3 through 12, which eventually became known as the Bill of Rights. Over 200 years later, the original second proposed amendment became the 27th Amendment in 1992.

Learn more on our Pieces of History blog: https://prologue.blogs.archives.gov/2020/01/23/unratified-amendments/

Over the next couple of months we’ll be looking at the amendments that Congress proposed but were not ratified. They deal with representation in Congress, titles of nobility, slavery, child labor, equal rights, and DC voting rights.

Image: Senate Revisions to House Proposed Amendments to the U.S. Constitution showing the original first and second proposed amendments, September 2-9, 1789. (https://catalog.archives.gov/id/3535588)

US National Archives
01/24/2020
US National Archives

US National Archives

Our latest catalog newsletter is online. This edition looks at records relating to Cook First Class Doris (“Dorie”) Miller, whose heroic actions on the USS West Virginia during the attack on Pearl Harbor earned him the Navy Cross.

The US Navy recently announced that they will be naming an aircraft carrier USS Miller, the first time an aircraft carrier has honored an enlisted sailor or an African American.

https://mailchi.mp/nara/0rjknzxchj-763585?e=acb39ce539

Space: The Final Frontier (this is not a Star Trek story)
01/23/2020
Space: The Final Frontier (this is not a Star Trek story)

Space: The Final Frontier (this is not a Star Trek story)

Today’s post is written by David Langbart, an Archivist in the Textual Records Division at the National Archives at College Park. In any large organization, the location and size of office space is…

US National Archives
01/22/2020

US National Archives

We made a mistake.

As the National Archives of the United States, we are and have always been completely committed to preserving our archival holdings, without alteration.

In an elevator lobby promotional display for our current exhibit on the 19th Amendment, we obscured some words on protest signs in a photo of the 2017 Women’s March. This photo is not an archival record held by the National Archives, but one we licensed to use as a promotional graphic. Nonetheless, we were wrong to alter the image.

We have removed the current display and will replace it as soon as possible with one that uses the unaltered image.

We apologize, and will immediately start a thorough review of our exhibit policies and procedures so that this does not happen again.

Image: This photo shows how images from the 1913 and 2017 Women's Marches were displayed as a promotional graphic in the elevator lobby outside the entrance to the Rightfully Hers exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, DC. The image was removed January 18, 2020, and will be replaced with one that uses the unaltered image. National Archives Photo by John Valceanu.

US National Archives
01/17/2020
US National Archives

US National Archives

In January 1941, the National Archives accepted a a complete, multireel 35mm technicolor print of the film "Gone with the Wind." The copy was 19,795 feet contained in four large cases initialed “GWTW.”

Unfortunately, it was lost in the 1978 Suitland film vault fire.

https://go.usa.gov/xdcJz

Check out the many resources related to the civil rights movement and the work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
01/16/2020
US National Archives

Check out the many resources related to the civil rights movement and the work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Today marks the 91st birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The National Archives holds many resources relating to his role in the civil rights movement, from photographs of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom to his correspondence with Presidents.

US National Archives
01/16/2020
US National Archives

US National Archives

Sergeant Reckless was a decorated warhorse who served during the Korean War as a pack horse for the Recoilless Rifle Platoon in the 5th Marine Regiment’s Anti-Tank Company.

She played an important part in the Battle of Outpost Vegas in 1953, braving the chaos of battle to make repeated supply trips, mostly alone, under enemy fire.

If you are researching her service history, Sgt. Reckless is listed in the Marine Corps Personality Index by name, alongside her fellow human Marines.

https://go.usa.gov/xdcC6

What's happening at the National Archives at New York City?  Our e- newsletter lists events, researcher notices and more...
01/13/2020

What's happening at the National Archives at New York City? Our e- newsletter lists events, researcher notices and more. Sign up at: [email protected] for the latest news.

Need a New Years Resolution? Learn more at the US National Archival Recovery Program, the important work they and how yo...
01/13/2020

Need a New Years Resolution?
Learn more at the US National Archival Recovery Program, the important work they and how you can help....

Today we are featuring a Leavenworth Penitentiary mugshot of Frank Ivanhoe Inmate #6078. It was stolen from the National Archives in Kansas City.

Please make note that the National Archives at New York will be closed on Monday, January 20th for the Birthday of Marti...
01/13/2020

Please make note that the National Archives at New York will be closed on Monday, January 20th for the Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr.

RESEARCHER NOTICE

National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) research rooms will be closed Monday, January 20, 2020,
for the Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Regular public services will resume on Tuesday, January 21. Please check your local archival location for normal hours at www.archives.gov/locations#research-facilities.

Online access to NARA holdings will still be available 24 hours a day via www.archives.gov/research.

If you have questions or concerns about the closures, please contact a research room supervisor.

National Archives at New York's cover photo
01/10/2020

National Archives at New York's cover photo

Gifts to the Hoovers
01/10/2020
Gifts to the Hoovers

Gifts to the Hoovers

As the Hoovers toured Latin America, they were feted with lavish dinners and receptions by heads of state and other dignitaries. At these events the Hoovers were usually given a memento to mark th…

Address

1 Bowling Grn
New York, NY
10004

Subway 4 & 5 trains to Bowling Green 1 train to Rector Street R train to Whitehall Street J & Z trains to Broad Street 2 & 3 trains to Wall Street Bus M5, M15, and M20. See the NY MTA for maps and service updates for subways and buses. Drop-Off & Parking Buses may drop off groups at State Street or Whitehall Street. There is no parking at the museum. There are several parking garages located nearby

General information

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the nation's record keeper. Of all documents and materials created in the course of business conducted by the United States Federal government, only 1%-3% are so important for legal or historical reasons that they are kept by us forever. Those valuable records are preserved and are available to you, whether you want to see if they contain clues about your family’s history, need to prove a veteran’s military service, or are researching an historical topic that interests you. The National Archives at New York city maintains Federal records for New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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Friday 10:00 - 17:00

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Our Story

We hold permanent records created by Federal agencies and courts for New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We are free and open to the public.

Visit our website at www.archives.gov/nyc .

For a complete directory of all the National Archives Facebook accounts, please visit http://www.archives.gov/social-media/facebook.html. View our Facebook comment policy on the National Archives website at http://www.archives.gov/social-media/facebook-comment-policy.html. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) manages this Facebook fan page as a portal for information from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. However, information posted here is not official policy of NARA and will in no way grant anyone any rights, privileges, or standing on any matter. All information should be verified through official channels at NARA. For contact information at NARA, please check http://www.archives.gov/. Facebook Comment Policy: You are encouraged to share your comments, ideas, and concerns. Please be aware of the following policies for the National Archives' Facebook fan page: • NARA will only post comments from users over 13 years of age that relate to topics on the specific fan page subject matter. • NARA will delete comments that contain abusive, vulgar, offensive, threatening or harassing language, personal attacks of any kind, or offensive terms that target specific individuals or groups. • NARA will delete comments that are clearly off-topic, that promote services or products, or that promote or oppose any political party, person campaigning for elected office, or any ballot proposition. • Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in the comment being removed. • Communications made via the Facebook fan page will in no way constitute a legal or official notice or comment to the NARA or any official or employee of NARA for any purpose. • The content of all comments is immediately released into the public domain, so do not submit anything you do not wish to be broadcast to the general public. • Do not post personally identifiable information such as social security numbers, addresses and telephone numbers. Comments containing this information will be removed from the Facebook fan page wall. • NARA does not discriminate against any views, but reserves the right to remove posted comments that do not adhere to these standards. Members of the media are asked to pose your questions to the NARA Public Affairs Office through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Media questions or comments will not be posted. NARA Public Affairs can be reached at 202-357-5300 Facebook Privacy Policy: This site is not hosted by the National Archives and Records Administration and thus the privacy policies of NARA do NOT apply. The privacy policy for this web site may be found at http://www.facebook.com/about/privacy/. NARA retains records of the content on the NARA portion of this site, as is provided for in our records retention schedules and mandated by the Federal Records Act. These records include user comments and any personally identifiable information a commenter shares with NARA. Because these records are collected from a public web site, it may be disclosed to others and used by NARA in the conduct of agency business. Please do not share information such as social security numbers, birth dates, or other private information that you do not want to make available to others. NARA disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from any comments posted on this page. This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy. Information about NARA activities and other methods to communicate with NARA are also available on NARA's official web page at http://www.archives.gov/, along with archival photos, videos and other documents. The privacy policy for http://www.archives.gov/ may be found there.


Comments

Shame, shame, shame history will judge you for destroying EPA, Dept of Interior, ICE and other documents...What no back up? No backbone? The Park Service has more courage and respect for the rule of law and history then you do?
Have a great week NARA.
**Help Support the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery Mariners Memorial Campaign** @SSHMarinersGenealogy https://www.facebook.com/SSHMarinersGenealogy/ The Descendants of Sailors’ Snug Harbor Mariners have been reaching out to Historical and Genealogical Societies, Museums, Military Veterans Groups, and Concerned Citizens, to invite them to join a Letters of Support Campaign to support their efforts to gain access to the old Sailors’ Snug Harbor Cemetery on Staten Island, in New York City, to honor their Ancestors and all of the Forgotten 6,500 Merchant, Coast Guard, and Naval Mariners interred there (1834-1976), by installing a Memorial Monument (Obelisk) and holding an annual Memorial Service. Some of the Mariners were famous Sea Captains and some sailed on famous Merchant, Coast Guard, and Naval ships dating back to the American Revolution. Many were just average seamen whom sailed and endured for many years on the sea under arduous conditions. The Mariners were from many areas of the United States, Canada, and other countries. https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/2244490/sailors-snug-harbor-cemetery Sadly, the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery is devoid of gravestones or markers, except for 15 remaining gravestones. The Cemetery is closed and not open to the public. The Board of Trustees of Sailors' Snug Harbor have rejected the Descendants' requests to access the SSH Cemetery to honor their Ancestors. https://nypost.com/2018/12/29/caretakers-shoot-down-plans-for-monument-for-fallen-sailors/ The Descendants are collecting Letters of Support to persuade the Trustees of Sailors’ Snug Harbor to change their decision. You can help support the Descendants by writing a Letter of Support using the Support Letter Writing Instructions at the following link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sZv5VFLNWw0HA-pW2i33RhbgVFQ6oExx Sailors’ Snug Harbor has a very interesting history. It was one of the first large scale retirement facilities in the United States and the first established for Merchant Mariners. It was founded by the Randall family whom were New York City Merchant Sea Captains and Privateers during the French Indian War and Patriots during the Revolutionary War. Alexander Hamilton was a friend of the Randall family and their Attorney. He helped draft the Robert Richard Randall Will in 1801 to create the SSH Trust which funded the SSH Retirement Home. During its 140+ years of operation (1833-1976) approximately 16,000 Mariners resided there. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sailors%27_Snug_Harbor
I have & always will continue to be Supportive of your PURPOSE. Thank You, Sincerely. Everyone has a RIGHT of Knowledge regarding their Biological SELF!!👍👍
The National Archives at New York are fabulous!🙂
I have a Question. My grandfather goes from austria to New York at 1934. His aunt in USA has to pay for him eine Kaution about 40.000 dollars. And as my Grandfather was ill and goes back to Austria his aunt gets the Kaution back. Is this really true?
Why do the bush admins allow the people of our elite forces and our officers of the highest levels as well as themselves to discredit harm and terrorize harras and alter, acceptable capable members of society as well as out them in positions that are hazardous not only to the citizens of the USA, but to the more perfect union that my great great great great grandfather set out to promote and create before the USA became a country long ago. I see the Bush admins to be the creators of the world on terror through greed hate ignorance and disrespect for our great land. If you look at the timeline of the mass shootings that have become so abundant, you would be able to identify that these occured at the time of Bushes rise. Our bases and our citizens as well as the fuctionability of our government the intelligence of our people and the societal norms have all become less then desirable. Bush is tossing people into oppression constantly and consistently and the checks and balances of of government which are necessary for the government to function properly are not being effective, because Bush abounds freely and unjustifiably killing, incriminating, harrasing, terrorizing, discrediting, lying and leading out country down the wrong path. Bush is the biggest two faced lying politician this country will ever know and because our government lacks the foresight to keep our society progressing. Bushes ideology and outright ignorance and lack of respect for anyone but himself is the problem. Bush has total disregard for the law. He uses the law to harass others not only disrupting the cooperation within the force but our society. He perceives himself as unaproachable and immune to prosecution. The 9/11 attack was clearly a set up by W. so that the profits from oil would be abundant and line his pockets. His arrogance and deceit will not go unnoticed. If the Islamists of the middle east wanted to attack the US. why would they not do it their way? How is the 9/11 attack different from every other attack islam has brought about. Its because Bush was greedy and ignorant and thought he could uss the US and it's people to make money. Why was Iraq attacked? The bodies of the pilots where unidentifiable. And I guarantee they did not come from Iraq. Why was Saddam Bushes target? Because Bush is infatuated with killing, you can see by the goings on of the past 30 years. Why would he take a hiatus in the midst of a war he created? How is that not treason? Why do his German blood lines go back to that of Nazi Germany? Why hasn't anyone seen that he has not changed his desire to kill for reasons no one of an honorable position would deam acceptable? Why is Bush attached to the rape of young people and the influence of groups of people that are underintellectually competent and he does nothing more then use them as his own personal tool to influence others. If he did so appropriately and bettered the lives of those involved it might be acceptable, but he does not. Why do we now have a president in our past that was not even elligible for the position because he was not a natural born citizen of the United States. Obama was born in Indonesia and there isn't any doubt about it. Why does the US government lie to not only the citizens it was meant to protect and better but those who have desired to do the same? Carbon tax is a hoax carbon emmisions do not cause global warming. The heat of over a billion automobiles producing 200 F of heat for 40 minutes each day is a major contributor as well as each machine or electronic device that functions all the life of our planet and natural occurrences such as volcanos Hot springs and solar panels. More lies.
Literally thee only picture of me as a child that exists. Can everyone on my Facebook please share this! I need to find my biological father and family. I was born November 18th 1986 in Sayre PA my mother Candace Henricksen was living in Waverly at time. My biological father's name is possible Vincent and i am trying to locate him and his family. I am doing Ancestry DNA test next week I am also actively searching archives as well and requesting medical records too. Please share and help me!!!! Thank you ❤
will I be able to get my grandmother naturalization file from 1973
Federal Minority Enterprise Program, Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Small Business of ..., 91-1, December 9, 10, 11, and 12, 1969 I need a COPY of Clifford Witham's Testimony Please