Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

Robert Rauschenberg Foundation The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation fosters the artistic and philanthropic legacy of one of the most important artists of the 20th century.
The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation was formed by Robert Rauschenberg in 1990 to promote awareness of the causes and groups close to the heart of its founder. Activities of the Foundation have included grant making, educational programs and prints and campaigns to benefit environmental and humanitarian initiatives. Today the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation extends this scope with programs including a new grant for artistic innovation and collaboration and direct assistance for the advancement of art. The Rauschenberg Residency, one of the Foundation's key programs, also has a page at http://facebook.com/RauschenbergResidency
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The Rauschenberg Foundation team is working remotely in accordance with social distancing sanctions—and we miss being ar...
03/30/2020

The Rauschenberg Foundation team is working remotely in accordance with social distancing sanctions—and we miss being around #Rauschenberg artworks! Follow along as each staff member shares a favorite work for all to enjoy.

Up first is Senior Curator David White, who has been Rauschenberg's curator since the 80s. White selects "Turqoise Blazer Spring Glut," 1989, saying: "Here is an example of Rauschenberg using some discarded pieces from a scrap metal yard and making an artwork that I find both elegant and joyful.”

Apparently today is #nationalpuppyday 🐶 ! Here is Robert #Rauschenberg as a boy with his mother Dora and a litter of #pu...
03/23/2020

Apparently today is #nationalpuppyday 🐶 ! Here is Robert #Rauschenberg as a boy with his mother Dora and a litter of #puppies by "Queenie,” his father's hunting dog at their home in Port Arthur, Texas in 1935. We hope these photographs bring a smile to your face. We wish you good health and high spirits.

Today is 03.14 otherwise known as Pi Day! To brighten up your newsfeed, here is our ode to the mathematical Pi constant:...
03/14/2020

Today is 03.14 otherwise known as Pi Day! To brighten up your newsfeed, here is our ode to the mathematical Pi constant: Rauschenberg's famous Key Lime Pie recipe.

Rauschenberg had so many requests for a slice of this homemade #pie, that he kept recipe cards at his studio and home in Captiva, Florida. Laurie Anderson recalls that for many winters #Rauschenberg sent her and other friends in #NYC #limes grown in Captiva. Tag us in your post if you make this pie! 🥧 #piday

On view at the Menil Collection in Texas are two collaborations between #Rauschenberg and artist Susan Weil. Part of the...
03/13/2020

On view at the Menil Collection in Texas are two collaborations between #Rauschenberg and artist Susan Weil. Part of the exhibition “Photography and The Surreal Imagination,” these works are cyanotypes, made by exposing chemically-treated paper to light and using objects and human subjects to make impressions.

Weil originally learned this method from her grandmother who experimented with glass negatives and #blueprint equipment at her father’s architecture office. Weil introduced Rauschenberg to the technique at her family home in Outer Island, Connecticut in 1949. The following year, Rauschenberg and Weil married and produced a series of blueprint works together.

Visit the @menilcollection today to see these blueprints in person until June 14th. Follow @susanweilk to see more of her work!

Credits: Robert Rauschenberg and Susan Weil,
“Laid Out Body,” ca.1950, cyanotype.
“Light Borne in Darkness,” ca.1950, cyanotype.
@ The Menil Collection

Announcing our partnership with The New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) to administer a new medical emergency grant ...
03/11/2020

Announcing our partnership with The New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) to administer a new medical emergency grant program called Rauschenberg Emergency Grants. This marks the first phase of a program that will be in the tradition of Change, Inc., a non-profit foundation established in 1970 by Robert #Rauschenberg to assist professional artists of all disciplines in need. Beginning in May 2020, the program will provide visual and media artists and choreographers with one-time #grants of up to $5,000 for medical emergencies.⁣

“We are delighted to be partnering with NYFA to launch this program which directly reflects Bob’s own concern for the well-being of fellow creative practitioners. Bob was both responsive and generous in his own giving, and we aim to follow those values in developing the Foundation’s philanthropic initiatives.” said Kathy Halbreich, Executive Director of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.⁣

Detailed information can be found on NYFA’s Rauschenberg Emergency Grants website.

In March of 1958, Rauschenberg moved to 128 Front Street after the Pearl Street building he was living and working in wa...
03/05/2020

In March of 1958, Rauschenberg moved to 128 Front Street after the Pearl Street building he was living and working in was condemned by New York City authorities. Jasper Johns also moved into the same building. Rauschenberg’s and Johns’s new studios were on the second and third floors respectively, above Marotta’s Real Italian Hero Sandwiches.

Here is what must be one of the last photos taken of #Rauschenberg in his Pearl Street studio, and one of the few color photographs we have from this period, New York, March, 1958.

Rauschenberg works shown are Charlene (1954), Untitled (ca. 1954), and partial rear view of the second state of Monogram (1955–59; second state 1956–58). Photo: Dan Budnik

To better dive into #Rauschenberg's artworks in the Foundation's holdings, RRF collaborated with the MA Program in the H...
03/03/2020

To better dive into #Rauschenberg's artworks in the Foundation's holdings, RRF collaborated with the MA Program in the History of Art at @HunterCollege (CUNY), in conducting a Research Methods course taught by Emily Braun, Distinguished Professor. Each student produced comprehensive documentation and a detailed essay on an individual work. In this picture, a student meets with Foundation staff and conservators to examine Untitled (Japanese Recreational Claywork), 1983.
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Essays from Evan Bellantone, Re'al Christian, Kristen Clevenson, Margaret Colbert, Vitoria Hadba, Kristin Howell, and Beatrice Johnson are available to read on our website. Just click Menu ➡️ Programs ➡️ Collaborations ➡️ Hunter College, CUNY, Fall 2018. #arthistory #research #huntercollegearthistory

Today we announce our 2020 Archives Research Residents! Seven scholars - blending various combinations of art history, v...
03/02/2020

Today we announce our 2020 Archives Research Residents! Seven scholars - blending various combinations of art history, visual and performing arts, education, engineering, curatorial, and conservation interests - will be spending one to two weeks in the Rauschenberg Foundation archives investigating aspects of Rauschenberg and his collaborators. Meet the residents and learn more about their projects: https://www.rauschenbergfoundation.org/programs/grants/archives-research-residency

Robert Rauschenberg with Jasper Johns, John Cage, Bob Cato, and others, New York, ca. 1955. Photo: Jerry Schatzberg

On this day in 1964, @thenewyorker published an extensive profile on #Rauschenberg titled “Moving Out” by Calvin Tomkins...
02/29/2020

On this day in 1964, @thenewyorker published an extensive profile on #Rauschenberg titled “Moving Out” by Calvin Tomkins.

In the 1960s, before the magazine allowed photographs, the custom was to have a staff artist draw an informal #portrait of the person being profiled. Instead, Rauschenberg submitted his own image for this purpose. The accompanying illustration is a self portrait–small enough to fit into an envelope–an ink thumbprint with a typewritten monogram RR.

February is Black History Month—in observance, we are sharing one of Rauschenberg’s solvent transfer drawings from 1968,...
02/28/2020

February is Black History Month—in observance, we are sharing one of Rauschenberg’s solvent transfer drawings from 1968, a critical year in the history of the #civilrights movement, which saw the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and civil unrest across U.S. cities.

Not unlike today, the #1968 U.S. presidential election spurred widespread activism and protests against racial injustice. Rauschenberg captured independent Presidential candidate, comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory (1932–2017), along with Malcolm X (1925–65) in this drawings, transferring newspaper headlines, copy, and press media images onto paper.

The source material headline reads "The Shift from Moderates to Militants: a Separate Path to Equality, Search for a Black Past, Part IV,” from Life Magazine, 65, no. 24, 13 December 1968, pp. 86–87. #blackhistorymonth

Will the real Robert Rauschenberg please stand up?We love this photo collage of #Rauschenberg, from multiple angles, in ...
02/20/2020

Will the real Robert Rauschenberg please stand up?

We love this photo collage of #Rauschenberg, from multiple angles, in his studio, made by photographer Duane Michals in 1962. This image ran in the Mademoiselle February 1965 issue alongside Leo Lerman’s article, “The New Old Masters,” which featured Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, with portraits by Duane Michals.

Credit: Duane Michals, Collage Portrait of Rauschenberg in His Studio, 1962.

Wishing the best of luck to all the talents who have been nominated for an #Oscar tonight. 🎞 A movie that changed the ci...
02/09/2020

Wishing the best of luck to all the talents who have been nominated for an #Oscar tonight. 🎞 A movie that changed the cinemascape was "Bonnie and Clyde” (1967) – stills from which appear in a lithograph series made by #Rauschenberg in 1968, titled “Reels B+C” (in reference to the names of the American outlaws). During the 40th Academy Awards in 1968, the #film was nominated in several categories including Best Picture; ultimately Estelle Parsons won Best Supporting Actress award for her portrayal of Blanche Barrow, and Burnett Guffey won for Best Cinematography.

Which film do you think will be a standout at this year’s Oscars? 🍿 🎥

02/07/2020

In February 1989, Trisha Brown Dance Company’s ‘Astral Convertible,’ premiered at the Cultural Palace in Moscow, with metallic costumes and a technologically turbocharged set designed by Robert #Rauschenberg in collaboration with engineers Per Biorn and Billy Klüver.

The set is portable and consists of eight freestanding aluminum towers powered by #car batteries and equipped with sensors, which detect dancers’ movements to trigger light (a system of industrial headlights designed by Ken Tabachnick) and sound (a soundtrack of music and #traffic noises composed by Dickie Landry).

Brown explains that Rauschenberg titled the performance in reference to the car parts 🚙 he used as well as to “passage through the sky. And ‘convertible,’ [Rauschenberg] said, was to permit whatever changes [he] wanted to make.”

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🎥 Video: Excerpt of Trisha Brown Dance Company performing ‘Astral Convertible’ (1989). Set and costumes by Rauschenberg, music by Richard Landry. Color video, 1 min., 10 sec., from the film Aeros (1990), directed by Burt Barr.

Now on view at the @whitneymuseum is Robert Rauschenberg’s painting “Yoicks” (1954) as part of the exhibition, “Making K...
11/22/2019

Now on view at the @whitneymuseum is Robert Rauschenberg’s painting “Yoicks” (1954) as part of the exhibition, “Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019.” The exhibition explores how artists subvert tradition and ideas of fine art through the incorporation of materials such as textiles, ceramics, glass, and more.

“Yoicks” is hung next to a looped wire sculpture by Ruth Asawa. Both artists attended #BlackMountainCollege, an experimental arts school in North Carolina. #Rauschenberg took on the challenge raised by his Black Mountain teacher, painter #JosefAlbers, who claimed that red was a difficult color, by combining red paint with backgrounds of newsprint and fabrics. “Yoicks” is one of the first works in which Rauschenberg incorporated fabric, beginning a lifelong exploration of the material.

Head over to the #WhitneyMuseum and explore how the notion of craft is forever evolving!

First image: On left, Robert Rauschenberg, “Yoicks,” 1954. On right, #RuthAsawa, “Untitled (S.270, Hanging Six-Lobed, Complex Interlocking Continuous Form within a Form with Two Interior Spheres),” 1955 (refabricated 1957–1958.

Second image: Installation view of “Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 22, 2019¬–January 2021. #MakingKnowing @ Whitney Museum of American Art

#Reposting @rauschenbergresidency -- Today we welcome the artists of Residency 42! #rauschenbergresidency #residency42 #...
11/19/2019

#Reposting @rauschenbergresidency -- Today we welcome the artists of Residency 42! #rauschenbergresidency #residency42 #artistcommunity #artistresidency #art #artist #researchanddevelopment

This is the last week to apply for the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Archives Research Residency! The program provides ...
11/12/2019

This is the last week to apply for the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Archives Research Residency! The program provides partial support for travel expenses for researchers to come to the Foundation located at Bob’s old New York studio. Researchers will have the opportunity to explore the most comprehensive body of information relating to Rauschenberg's life and work. Applications are due this Friday, November 15th, so check out the link in our bio to apply now!

Rauschenberg at the Miami Herald, looking through photography archives for source material for Cover for Tropic, The Miami Herald (1979), published in an edition of 600,000 in Miami, December 1979. Photo: Attributed to John Doman

We are currently accepting applications for the 2020 Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Archives Research Residency! This pr...
10/03/2019

We are currently accepting applications for the 2020 Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Archives Research Residency! This program is an opportunity for researchers and scholars to spend one to two weeks researching at the Rauschenberg Foundation and its archives in New York City. The archives, the most comprehensive body of information relating to Rauschenberg's life and career, consist of Rauschenberg’s personal papers and records from his studios. The program provides partial support for accommodations and other travel expenses related to the visit. Applications are due November 15. Learn more at this link:
https://www.rauschenbergfoundation.org/programs/grants/archives-research-residency

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Robert Rauschenberg with Jasper Johns, John Cage, Bob Cato, and others, New York, circa 1955. Photo: Jerry Schatzberg

09/26/2019

"Cunningham," a new 3D documentary directed by Alla Kovgan, premiers at the New York Film Festival @filmlinc this weekend.
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Having met the choreographer #MerceCunningham at Black Mountain College in 1952, Rauschenberg began working with the #MerceCunninghamDanceCompany two years later. Over the course of the next decade he designed lighting, sets, and costumes for over twenty performances. The two men remained friends for more than sixty years. In a statement from October 1974 #Rauschenberg wrote, "All of us worked totally committed, shared every entense[sic] emotion and I think performed miracles, for love only."
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#CunninghamFilm @magnoliapics @thenyff #NYFF #dance

There's a new, exciting group of artists starting their residencies in Captiva today - visit our website to learn more!
06/17/2019
Rauschenberg Residency

There's a new, exciting group of artists starting their residencies in Captiva today - visit our website to learn more!

Today we welcome the artists of Residency 39!

An excellent piece on the new documentary film by Michelle Angela Ortiz/ Artist - a filmmaker and muralist that we've su...
05/29/2019
It’s Mother’s Day, but for detained immigrant women and children, new film shows, that’s no holiday

An excellent piece on the new documentary film by Michelle Angela Ortiz/ Artist - a filmmaker and muralist that we've supported with an Artist-as-Activist grant - that details the challenges faced by detained mothers.

If you'd like to watch, there will be a screening in Philadelphia this Saturday at the Philadelphia Latino Film Festival.

Read on:

https://www.philly.com/news/immigration-detention-trump-berks-families-las-madres-de-berks-20190509.html?__vfz=medium%3Dsharebar

Philadelphia artist and documentary-maker Michelle Angela Ortiz chronicled the struggles of four mothers sent to the family detention center in Berks County.

An exciting announcement from the Residency in Captiva!
05/01/2019

An exciting announcement from the Residency in Captiva!

We are excited to announce the 2019-2020 Chef in Residence, Jackie Vitale! Jackie is ever excited by the magic of food: as a source of joy, a community builder, a teaching tool, and a happy home for our microbial friends. She comes to Captiva from her hometown of Stuart, Florida, where she has spent the last five years growing an urban farm, restaurant, and community space called Ground Floor Farm. As the Chef in Residence, Jackie will oversee the Foundation’s ongoing commitment to providing fresh, regionally sourced food for the resident artists. She also will work to build relationships in the southwest Florida community.

Learn more about Jackie and the Chef in Residence program here: https://www.rauschenbergfoundation.org/newsfeed/robert-rauschenberg-foundation-names-jackie-vitale-2019-2020-chef-residence

In 1982 and 1983, Robert Rauschenberg travelled to Japan and worked at Otsuka Ohmi Ceramics Company on his "Japanese Rec...
03/14/2019

In 1982 and 1983, Robert Rauschenberg travelled to Japan and worked at Otsuka Ohmi Ceramics Company on his "Japanese Recreational Clayworks" series, in which he manipulated prefabricated Japanese art ceramics. In this batch of 35mm slides, dated March 1983, #Rauschenberg is seen applying glazes on a ceramic panel that appears to be an early state of "Drawing Room 4 (Japanese Recreational Claywork)" (1983). Photos: Unattributed

Monday motivation from Robert Rauschenberg, written in 1993.
03/11/2019

Monday motivation from Robert Rauschenberg, written in 1993.

The absolutely visionary artist Carolee Schneemann has passed away at the age of 79. Schneemann and Rauschenberg saw eye...
03/08/2019

The absolutely visionary artist Carolee Schneemann has passed away at the age of 79. Schneemann and Rauschenberg saw eye-to-eye – not just in the 1964 photograph from the 32nd Venice Biennale above – but also in their provocative, discourse-challenging, and ever-evolving approach to art-making. Both were heavily textural in their painting, as can be seen in the two works featured here: the first, Untitled (1956) by Rauschenberg, and the second, “Sir Henry Francis Taylor” (1961) by Schneemann. The artists were also deeply involved in Judson Dance Theater.⁣

Schneemann’s influential photography series, “Eye Body: 36 Transformative Actions for Camera” (1963), posed a question that the artist would continue to explore throughout her career: “Could a nude woman artist be both image and image-maker?”⁣

Schneemann comments, “Everyone said my work was not really worth thinking about, that it looked like a bad version of Rauschenberg.”⁣

Photo credit: Ugo Mulas (1964)⁣
Artwork credit 1: Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008), Untitled (1956)⁣
Artwork credit 2: Carolee Schneemann (1939-2019), “Sir Henry Francis Taylor” (1961)⁣
Artwork credit 3: Carolee Schneemann (1939-2019), “Eye Body 11” (1963)

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Comments

I love so much his works
Impressive
I couldn't find this one on your website. Can you tell me the title of this piece of work?
Ruffa Geniale Montale P T [email protected]