Ukrainian Institute of America

Ukrainian Institute of America For seven decades the Ukrainian Institute promotes through educational, professional and social activities, a greater awareness, knowledge and appreciation of Ukraine’s and Ukrainians' rich culture, history and accomplishments
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The Ukrainian Institute of America is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the arts, music and literature of Ukraine and the Ukrainian diaspora. The Institute hosts art exhibits, concerts, film screenings, poetry readings, literary evenings, children's programs, lectures, symposia and educational programs, all open to the public.

Six years ago, the most tragic episode of the Revolution of Dignity began in Ukraine.Between the 18th to the 20th Februa...
02/20/2020
Ex-investigator gives highlights on re-constructed timeline of Maidan massacre

Six years ago, the most tragic episode of the Revolution of Dignity began in Ukraine.

Between the 18th to the 20th February 2014, peaceful protestors were brutally killed on Institutska Street, Maidan Nezalezhnosti and the surrounding area in Kyiv. Several dozen people went missing, more than a thousand were injured, and hundreds were arrested and tortured by the regime of the then-President Viktor Yanukovych.

Eternal Memory and Glory to the Heavenly Hundred Heroes!
Герої не вмирають! Heroes Never Die!

At the end of 2014, the Special Investigations’ Department was formed within the Prosecutor General’s Office to handle the Maidan cases. As told by Serhyi Horbatiuk, who used to head the Department from the very beginning, the main trouble it faced was the lack of investigators and political wil...

On Sunday, February 16, 2020, the Ukrainian Institute of America presented the world premiere of film Taras. Return (201...
02/17/2020

On Sunday, February 16, 2020, the Ukrainian Institute of America presented the world premiere of film Taras. Return (2019).

Q&A with the film's writer and director Oleksandr Denysenko, cinematographer Oleksandr Kryshtalovych and actress Anna Topchij followed the screening.

The event was co-sponsored by Self Reliance (NY) Federal Credit Union.

Photos by Bogdan Grytsiv.

On Sunday, February 16, 2020, the Ukrainian Institute of America presented the world premiere of film Taras. Return (2019).

Q&A with the film's writer and director Oleksandr Denysenko, cinematographer Oleksandr Kryshtalovych and actress Anna Topchij followed the screening.

The event was co-sponsored by Self Reliance (NY) Federal Credit Union.

Photos by Bogdan Grytsiv.

Read in The Ukrainian Weekly about our upcoming exhibition Peripheral Visions: Recent Art by Irenaeus and Dorian Yurchuk...
02/14/2020
“Peripheral Visions”: A duo-exhibition of spatial transitions by the Yurchuks

Read in The Ukrainian Weekly about our upcoming exhibition Peripheral Visions: Recent Art by Irenaeus and Dorian Yurchuk.

NEW YORK – Art at the Institute is presenting “Peripheral Visions,” an exhibition of mixed-media artworks by familial artists Iranaeus and Dorian Yurchuk, exploring extreme visions of architectonic and topographic ruminations in two and three dimensions. The exhibition opens at the Ukrainian I...

Please join the Ukrainian Studies Program and Razom for Ukraine for an evening with Ukrainian writer Artem Chekh.Wednesd...
02/07/2020
Absolute Zero: An Evening with Ukrainian Writer Artem Chekh | Columbia | Harriman Institute

Please join the Ukrainian Studies Program and Razom for Ukraine for an evening with Ukrainian writer Artem Chekh.
Wednesday, February 12, 2020 at 6:00 pm.
Harriman Institute Atrium, 12th Floor International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St).

Wednesday, February 12, 20206:00pmHarriman Institute Atrium, 12th Floor International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)Please join the Ukrainian Studies Program and Razom for Ukraine for an evening with Ukrainian writer Artem Chekh.The event will feature readings by Mr. Chekh from his landmark 2017....

Solo song traditions of old Ukraine, accompanied on lute, torban and bandura, presented the music of early singer-songwr...
02/03/2020

Solo song traditions of old Ukraine, accompanied on lute, torban and bandura, presented the music of early singer-songwriters like Hryhoriy Skovoroda and the blind singers (kobzari and lirnyky). Julian Kytasty, bandura and Roman Turovsky, lute.

Solo song traditions of old Ukraine, accompanied on lute, torban and bandura, presented the music of early singer-songwriters like Hryhoriy Skovoroda and the blind singers (kobzari and lirnyky). Julian Kytasty, bandura and Roman Turovsky, lute.

Today Ukraine commemorates the heroes of the Battle of Kruty. The battle took place on January 29, 1918, when several hu...
01/29/2020

Today Ukraine commemorates the heroes of the Battle of Kruty. The battle took place on January 29, 1918, when several hundred men of the Ukrainian forces including 300 students briefly halted the advance of 4,000 soldiers of the Red Army towards Kyiv. While the Ukrainian soldiers slowed the Bolshevik march towards Kyiv by days, eastern and part of western Ukraine were brought under full control of the Soviet Union by 1923. All students who fought in the Battle of Kruty were killed or imprisoned and executed later. The battle is commemorated as a symbol of patriotic self-sacrifice and is immortalized in numerous literary works.

Mark your calendars to see The Earth Is Blue As an Orange movie on February 11 and 15 at MoMA The Museum of Modern Art w...
01/24/2020
The Earth Is Blue as an Orange. 2020. Directed by Iryna Tsilyk Surematu (Immortal). 2019. Directed by Ksenia Okhapkina

Mark your calendars to see The Earth Is Blue As an Orange movie on February 11 and 15 at MoMA The Museum of Modern Art with the film director Iryna Tsilyk in attendance. This film won the Best Directing Prize at this year's Sundance Film Festival.

The Earth Is Blue as an Orange. 2020. Ukraine/Lithuania. Directed by Iryna Tsilyk. New York premiere. Courtesy Cat&Docs. In Russian/Ukranian; English subtitles. 70 min.

Read in PDN about our current exhibition Frontline – Peace Life | Photo exhibition by J.T. Blatty. On display through Ma...
01/20/2020
The Ukrainian Soldiers Who Can't Rest

Read in PDN about our current exhibition Frontline – Peace Life | Photo exhibition by J.T. Blatty. On display through March 8, 2020.

A new exhibition at the Ukrainian Institute of America by J.T. Blatty captures the fierce patriotism and struggles of Ukraine's volunteer soldiers.

У Нью-Йорку відкрилася виставка американської фотохудожниці про війну на Донбасі
01/17/2020
У Нью-Йорку відкрилася виставка американської фотохудожниці про війну на Донбасі

У Нью-Йорку відкрилася виставка американської фотохудожниці про війну на Донбасі

В Українському інституті Америки у Нью-Йорку відкрилася виставка фотографій “Лінія фронту – мирне життя. Українські революціонери забутої війни”, американської...

Art at the Institute was pleased to present Frontline / Peace Life, an exhibition of photographic portraits by J.T. Blat...
01/17/2020

Art at the Institute was pleased to present Frontline / Peace Life, an exhibition of photographic portraits by J.T. Blatty, chronicling a generation of volunteer soldiers of the war in eastern Ukraine and their stories of a return to a marginalized existence, “peace-life,” as the war moves into its sixth year without resolution. The exhibition opened on January 16, 2020 and will continue through March 8, 2020.

Photos by Pavlo Terekhov

Art at the Institute was pleased to present Frontline / Peace Life, an exhibition of photographic portraits by J.T. Blatty, chronicling a generation of volunteer soldiers of the war in eastern Ukraine and their stories of a return to a marginalized existence, “peace-life,” as the war moves into its sixth year without resolution. The exhibition opened on January 16, 2020 and will continue through March 8, 2020.

Photos by Pavlo Terekhov

Music of Old UkraineSaturday, February 1, 2020 at 7:30 p.m.Julian Kytasty, bandura and Roman Turovsky, lute
01/14/2020

Music of Old Ukraine
Saturday, February 1, 2020 at 7:30 p.m.
Julian Kytasty, bandura and Roman Turovsky, lute

Winter Art Show & Sale on display until February 2, 2020.Exhibition Hours: Tuesday-Friday, 12:00 – 6:00 p.m.
01/03/2020

Winter Art Show & Sale on display until February 2, 2020.
Exhibition Hours: Tuesday-Friday, 12:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Save the date! January 25, 2020 at 5:00 pm.  Book Talk and Signing by Author Anna Procyk
01/02/2020

Save the date! January 25, 2020 at 5:00 pm. Book Talk and Signing by Author Anna Procyk

Read in Photograph magazine about our upcoming Frontline – Peace Life | Photo exhibition by J.T. Blatty.  Do not miss th...
01/02/2020
Frontline / Peace Life: Ukraine’s Revolutionaries of the Forgotten War

Read in Photograph magazine about our upcoming Frontline – Peace Life | Photo exhibition by J.T. Blatty. Do not miss the opening reception on Thursday, January 16 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

New York – Art at the Institute is pleased to announce “Frontline / Peace Life,” an exhibition of photographic portraits by J.T. Blatty, chronicling a generation of volunteer soldiers of the war in eastern Ukraine and their stories of a return to a marginalized existence, “peace-life,” as ...

Warmest wishes for a Happy & Healthy New Year 2020!
12/31/2019

Warmest wishes for a Happy & Healthy New Year 2020!

Koliada Party
12/30/2019

Koliada Party

Warmest Wishes for a Joyous Christmas and a Happy & Healthy New Year!  Heartfelt thanks for your invaluable support of t...
12/24/2019

Warmest Wishes for a Joyous Christmas and a Happy & Healthy New Year! Heartfelt thanks for your invaluable support of the Ukrainian Institute of America!

З нагоди Різдва Христового і Нового Року прийміть нашi сердечні побажання Радісних Свят! Дякуємо за Вашу безцінну підтримку Українського Інституту Америки!

Image: Yuri Khymych 'Zabrovsky Gate' 1991, gouache.

Happy St. Nicholas Day! Saint Nicholas (Svyatyj Mykolaj) is one of the most popular saints of the Eastern and Western ch...
12/19/2019

Happy St. Nicholas Day! Saint Nicholas (Svyatyj Mykolaj) is one of the most popular saints of the Eastern and Western churches. Little is known about him except that he was bishop of Myra (now in Turkey) in the 4th century. Legends of his charity, especially toward children, and miracles associated with him soon spread throughout Europe. In Ukraine the cult of Saint Nicholas was introduced in the 11th century but as early as the 10th century a church in Saint Nicholas's honor had been built in Kyiv during the reign of Prince Ihor (d. 945).

In Ukrainian culture there are two figures known as Saint Nicholas. One, ‘warm Nicholas,’ is celebrated in the spring, on May 22, and the other, ‘old Nicholas,’ is commemorated in the winter, on December 19. The warm Nicholas is considered to be the patron saint of agriculture. He is said to walk the land examining the freshly sown fields, ‘drying places over-damp, and dampening those over-dry’ after the winter.

According to the Ukrainian tradition, the old Nicholas brought the first snow ‘by shaking his beard.’ He was considered the patron of spinning, and yarns and thread were often brought to church on his holiday ‘to add to his beard.’ In Western Ukraine gifts were given to children on the eve of St. Nicholas day. The Ukrainian Catholic church encouraged the development of ritual plays and games depicting Saint Nicholas, an angel, and the devil (in appropriate masks and garb), which exhorted children to do good deeds. These plays, some of which were written by professional authors, were often staged by amateur theaters.

Saint Nicholas often appears in carols and legends. In Ukraine icons with his image were greatly cherished and found in virtually every home. His icon was also placed in an important position in iconostases, usually flanking Jesus, the Mother of God, or the patron saint of the church. In Ukraine Saint Nicholas was so popular that over time the ‘functions’ of other saints (such as Saint Michael the Archangel, Saint Andrew, Saint George, and Saint Barbara) were ascribed to him.

Artwork by Olha Turetska / Olga Glass

12/14/2019
12/06/2019
GoCamp Volunteer Call 2020 is open – welcome to Ukraine!

GoCamp is looking for English/German/French-speaking volunteers who would come to Ukraine to share language skills, become cultural ambassador and mentor for Ukrainian children in summer camps all over the country.

Volunteers can choose any of the following dates:
May 27 – June 12, August 05 – August 21. September 02 – September 18, 2020.

Apply now! https://gocamps.com.ua/for-volunteers/

#1 volunteer destination in the heart of Europe GoCamp Volunteer Call 2020 🚀🇺🇦 APPLY NOW: https://gocamps.com.ua/for-volunteers We are looking for English, G...

Thank you to all who joined the #GivingTuesday movement and donated to the Ukrainian Institute of America!  We are grate...
12/04/2019

Thank you to all who joined the #GivingTuesday movement and donated to the Ukrainian Institute of America! We are grateful for your support!

Today we celebrate the life of the greatest Ukrainian philosopher and poet Hryhoriy Skovoroda. Born on this day in 1722,...
12/03/2019

Today we celebrate the life of the greatest Ukrainian philosopher and poet Hryhoriy Skovoroda. Born on this day in 1722, he was educated at the Kyiv Mohyla Academy. Hryhoriy spent over 10 years in Kharkiv, teaching poetics, syntax, Greek, and ethics. After his dismissal from the college he abandoned any hope of securing a regular position and spent the rest of his life wandering about eastern Ukraine. Financial support from friends enabled him to devote himself to reflection and writing. Most of his works were dedicated to his friends and circulated among them in manuscript copies.

Although there is no sharp distinction between Skovoroda’s literary and philosophical works, his collection of 30 verses (composed from 1753 to 1785) titled Sad Bozhestvennykh Pisen (Garden of Divine Songs), his dozen or so songs, his collection of 30 fables (composed between 1760 and 1770) titled Basni Khar’kovskiia (Kharkiv Fables), his translations of Cicero, Plutarch, Horace, Ovid, and Muretus, and his letters, written mostly in Latin, are generally grouped under the former category. Some of his songs and poems became widely known and became part of Ukrainian folklore.

His philosophical works consist of a treatise on Christian morality and 12 dialogues.

For Skovoroda the purpose of philosophy is practical—to show the way to happiness. Hence, the two central questions for him are what happiness is and how it can be attained. For him happiness is an inner state of peace, gaiety, and confidence which is attainable by all. To reach this state, some understanding of the world and oneself and an appropriate way of life are necessary. Skovoroda approaches metaphysics and anthropology not as a speculative thinker, but as a moralist: he does no more than outline those truths that are necessary for happiness. His basic metaphysical doctrine is that there are two natures in everything: the ideal, inner, invisible, eternal, and immutable; and the material, outer, sensible, temporal, and mutable. The first is higher, for it imparts being to the second. This dualism extends through all reality—the macrocosm or universe, and the two microcosms of humanity and the Bible. In the macrocosm the inner nature is God, and the outer is the physical world. Skovoroda’s view on God's relation to the world is panentheist rather than pantheist. In man the inner nature is the soul; the outer, the body. In the Bible the inner truth is the symbolical meaning; the outer, the literal meaning.

From this metaphysical scheme Skovoroda drew a number of fundamental conclusions for practical life. Since the universe is ordered by a provident God, every being has been provided with all that is necessary for happiness. The assurance that what is necessary is easy and what is difficult is unnecessary (for happiness) brings peace of mind. It also serves as a criterion for the material conditions of happiness: we need only those goods that are necessary to health and are available to all people. But to dispel anxiety about material security is not enough for happiness. Active by nature, humans must also fulfill themselves in action by assuming the congenial task or vocation assigned to them by God. To pursue one's task regardless of external rewards is to be happy, while to pursue wealth, glory, or pleasure through uncongenial work is to be in despair. Furthermore, since vocations are distributed by God in such a way as to ensure a harmonious social order, to adopt an uncongenial task leads to social discord and unhappiness for others.

The doctrine of congenial work is the central doctrine in Skovoroda’s moral system. Although it is not metaphysically plausible, it expresses his faith in the creative potential of human beings and the possibility of self-fulfillment in this life for everyone.

Hryhoriy’s poetic style, ideas, and moral example have played an important role in the rebirth of Ukrainian culture in the 20th century. The fullest editions of Skovoroda’s works were published in Kharkiv in 1894. An English translation of his fables and aphorisms, together with a biography and an analysis of the works, was published by D.B. Chopyk in 1990.

12/03/2019

It's #GivingTuesday! Today Facebook is matching up to $7 million in eligible donations made via Facebook. We invite you to join the movement and donate to help the Ukrainian Institute of America to support its mission!

For more than seven decades, the Ukrainian Institute of America has been promoting, through educational, professional and social activities, a greater awareness, knowledge and appreciation of Ukraine’s and Ukrainians’ rich culture, history and accomplishments.

As a National Historic Landmark located in the midst of “Museum Mile,” the building that is home to the Institute plays a significant role in helping draw visitors and heightening general interest in Ukraine and its culture. The Ukrainian Institute is a steward of one of America’s architectural treasures. Through our preservation work, the Ukrainian Institute guarantees that generations of Ukrainian Americans, as well as the global community, are able to enjoy an architectural masterpiece.

Throughout its existence the success of the Ukrainian Institute has been due to Mr. William Dzus, the founder of the Ukrainian Institute, the Institute’s members and its benefactors.

We continue to depend on generous donations from our members and friends. Thank you for your continued support of our organization!

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Sunday 12:00 - 18:00

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