Grey Art Gallery

Grey Art Gallery The Grey Art Gallery is New York University's fine arts museum, located on historic Washington Square Park in NYC's Greenwich Village. Temporarily closed but active virtually via digital programs and projects.

Operating as usual

We're wishing everyone a #HappyEarthDay today. 🌎  This Earth Day, we're sharing a print by artist Frank Moore (1953–2002...
04/22/2021

We're wishing everyone a #HappyEarthDay today. 🌎 This Earth Day, we're sharing a print by artist Frank Moore (1953–2002). Many of his works reference his HIV-positive status and the state of the health care industry, and many others address ecological concerns.

Born in NYC, Moore was raised on Long Island and spent his childhood summers in the Adirondacks, sparking a lifelong interest in the natural environment. Gardening drew his attention to America’s vast industrial farms and ill-used national parks—in his words, nature’s “sites of great, but toxic, beauty.” Many of his paintings reflect his admiration for Hudson River School landscape artists. But rather than marveling at nature’s sublime power, Moore focused on the looming threat of environmental pollution.

Image: Frank Moore, "Oily Rainbow," 1999. Woodcut, 17 1/2 x 22 1/2 in. Grey Art Gallery, NYU Art Collection, Gift of Sperone Westwater and the Gesso Foundation, 2011.2.1a

We're wishing everyone a #HappyEarthDay today. 🌎 This Earth Day, we're sharing a print by artist Frank Moore (1953–2002). Many of his works reference his HIV-positive status and the state of the health care industry, and many others address ecological concerns.

Born in NYC, Moore was raised on Long Island and spent his childhood summers in the Adirondacks, sparking a lifelong interest in the natural environment. Gardening drew his attention to America’s vast industrial farms and ill-used national parks—in his words, nature’s “sites of great, but toxic, beauty.” Many of his paintings reflect his admiration for Hudson River School landscape artists. But rather than marveling at nature’s sublime power, Moore focused on the looming threat of environmental pollution.

Image: Frank Moore, "Oily Rainbow," 1999. Woodcut, 17 1/2 x 22 1/2 in. Grey Art Gallery, NYU Art Collection, Gift of Sperone Westwater and the Gesso Foundation, 2011.2.1a

Love these artist spotlights created by McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College!
04/22/2021

Love these artist spotlights created by McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College!

04/16/2021
Check out a virtual walkthrough of "Taking Shape"

How great does "Taking Shape" look at McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College?! The show we organized and curated with the Barjeel Art Foundation, featuring approximately 90 abstract artworks by artists in the Arab world, is currently open only to members of the Boston College community. But, the museum also has an amazing virtual walkthrough available on their website! Take your own virtual journey through the exhibition—with interactive exhibition texts and videos—at the following link:
https://www.bc.edu/sites/artmuseum/exhibitions/taking-shape/walkthrough/

Looks like there will be a great event tonight with our friends at NYU Tisch Department of Art and Public Policy and NYU...
04/07/2021

Looks like there will be a great event tonight with our friends at NYU Tisch Department of Art and Public Policy and NYU Skirball—make sure to join for a discussion on how the arts can help us to rethink concepts of freedom, equality, and social transformation!

This Wednesday, April 7th at 6pm EST, join Senator José M. Serrano and @publictheaterny’s Oskar Eustis, in conversation with #NYUArtsPolitics professor Pato Hebert for “Agents of Recovery & Change: The Arts in Year Two of the Pandemic”.

This discussion will explore how the arts can continue to serve as agents of recovery and change as we rebuild our society after a year of plague, political polarization, protests and public acknowledgements of racism and police violence. In this profoundly challenging moment, what role will the arts play in dismantling structures of inequity and reinvigorating democratic values?

Read more and register at the link in our bio.

This event is part of APP’s Art & Its Publics program series, developed in partnership with NYU Skirball with generous support from Tisch’s Institute of Performing Arts and The 370J Project.

#ArtAndPolitics #nyuskirball #PublicTheater

Hello friends—please join us for another free Zoom event in partnership with the NYU Center for Disability Studies. This...
04/06/2021

Hello friends—please join us for another free Zoom event in partnership with the NYU Center for Disability Studies. This Friday, April 9 at 4 pm ET, artist and writer Joseph Grigely will have a conversation with critic and curator Emily Watlington. The pair will discuss art, disability, apologies, and other matters.

Grigely's work addresses questions about the materialization of language and communication, and the ways conversations might be represented in the absence of speech. Watlington is a critic, curator, and assistant editor at Art in America. She writes on topics including art, design, disability justice, and feminism.

Register now: bit.ly/39Mo58h

Organized by the NYU Center for Disability Studies. Co-sponsors: ACLS Scholars & Society Program; Grey Art Gallery, NYU; The Institute of Fine Arts, NYU; NYU Office of Global Inclusion, Diversity, and Strategic Innovation

Image: Joseph Grigely, Fourteen Untitled Conversations, 2002. Ink and pencil on paper

Hello friends—please join us for another free Zoom event in partnership with the NYU Center for Disability Studies. This Friday, April 9 at 4 pm ET, artist and writer Joseph Grigely will have a conversation with critic and curator Emily Watlington. The pair will discuss art, disability, apologies, and other matters.

Grigely's work addresses questions about the materialization of language and communication, and the ways conversations might be represented in the absence of speech. Watlington is a critic, curator, and assistant editor at Art in America. She writes on topics including art, design, disability justice, and feminism.

Register now: bit.ly/39Mo58h

Organized by the NYU Center for Disability Studies. Co-sponsors: ACLS Scholars & Society Program; Grey Art Gallery, NYU; The Institute of Fine Arts, NYU; NYU Office of Global Inclusion, Diversity, and Strategic Innovation

Image: Joseph Grigely, Fourteen Untitled Conversations, 2002. Ink and pencil on paper

04/01/2021

Congrats #NYU2025 !!! 😁 💫

We're happy to share news of a new program for university students interested in careers in art museums! Join the Associ...
04/01/2021

We're happy to share news of a new program for university students interested in careers in art museums! Join the Association of Art Museum Directors and the Office of Experiential Professional Development in the University of Georgia Graduate School for a panel discussion on April 13.

Museum directors and staff will discuss the wide variety of career positions in museums, with a particular emphasis on attracting a diversity of scholars to the art museum space. Panelists will share their own professional trajectories, what their roles involve, and how their graduate education prepared them for their specific roles.

The program will be presented on April 13 from 3:30–4:45 pm Eastern Time. The program is free but registration is required. Register here: https://uga.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0ld-6hpzwvEty-dth-DHD_qdVFeatcN58i

We're happy to share news of a new program for university students interested in careers in art museums! Join the Association of Art Museum Directors and the Office of Experiential Professional Development in the University of Georgia Graduate School for a panel discussion on April 13.

Museum directors and staff will discuss the wide variety of career positions in museums, with a particular emphasis on attracting a diversity of scholars to the art museum space. Panelists will share their own professional trajectories, what their roles involve, and how their graduate education prepared them for their specific roles.

The program will be presented on April 13 from 3:30–4:45 pm Eastern Time. The program is free but registration is required. Register here: https://uga.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0ld-6hpzwvEty-dth-DHD_qdVFeatcN58i

#Fromthearchives — In the fall of 2004, the Grey Art Gallery hosted the exhibition "Electrifying Art: Atsuko Tanaka, 195...
03/24/2021

#Fromthearchives — In the fall of 2004, the Grey Art Gallery hosted the exhibition "Electrifying Art: Atsuko Tanaka, 1954–1968." Atsuko Tanaka (1932-2005) is a pioneering figure in the postwar Japanese art scene and an early member of the Gutai group of avant-garde artists.
•••
In her work, Tanaka explores the expressive limits of the body, the use of technology, and the notion of interactivity. Along with her Gutai companions, she radically extended not only the possibilities for painting, but the very definition of art itself.
•••
Featured in the exhibition was Tanaka's best-known work, Electric Dress of 1956, a garment composed of multi-colored flashing light bulbs which she wore onstage, as well as an enormous red satin dress with outstretched sleeves over 30 feet wide. Her subsequent paintings employ her signature vocabulary of circles and lines, executed in the bright colors and enamel paints of commercial signage.

Images (c) Grey Art Gallery, NYU. The exhibition was organized in partnership with The Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery @belkinartgallery at The University of British Columbia in Vancouver.

#atsukotanaka #electrifyingart #museumarchives #greyartgallery #nyuniversity #nyuart #belkinartgallery #japaneseart #gutai #avantgardeart #postwarart

Did you know that McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College offers free virtual docent tours of "Taking Shape" (which is no...
03/24/2021

Did you know that McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College offers free virtual docent tours of "Taking Shape" (which is now on tour after its debut at the Grey in winter 2020!) EVERY Friday? Make sure and register at the link below. 😁

The McMullen Museum is excited to offer free virtual docent tours every Friday from 3-4 pm! Take a tour of our spring exhibition, 'Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s-1980s.' Learn more below and register for a tour here: https://buff.ly/2OjZAb8

Congratulations to our friend, NYU Department of Psychology professor Denis Pelli for his art installation, “Lateral Sky...
03/17/2021

Congratulations to our friend, NYU Department of Psychology professor Denis Pelli for his art installation, “Lateral Sky View,” currently installed at Morgane Le Fay SoHo. Drawing on Pelli’s research on the science of visual perception, the work features a parabolic cylindrical mirror mounted to the wall at 45 degrees, reflecting a view of the skylight overhead. The installation brings a mesmeric vista of the New York City sky into the windowless basement below.

When Grey Art Gallery intern Charlotte Kinberger visited the installation, it was late afternoon on a clear winter day, and soft white light streamed into the downstairs space. The cloudless, white-blue sky, neighboring buildings, and black iron grates of the fire escape above were transposed so that they could be seen straight ahead, bringing light into the otherwise dark room. The reflection warped and wobbled as she moved around the piece.

“Lateral Sky View” is installed in the basement of Morgane Le Fay’s Soho location at 150 Greene Street. It is on view 11 am–6 pm, Monday–Sunday until Wednesday, March 31.

Happy Friday! Today we're sharing this etching by Somnath Hore (1921–2006). Hore was born in a small village in the city...
03/12/2021

Happy Friday! Today we're sharing this etching by Somnath Hore (1921–2006). Hore was born in a small village in the city of Chittagong, in present-day Bangladesh. By straining, contorting, and abstracting elements of the human form, Hore represents what he views as the abjectness of the human condition.

In this etching, Shepherd, the artist employs the pastoral trope of the peasant. The skeletal shepherd in the brown, fallow field—which is depicted in spare curvilinear forms—buckles under a burden of hopelessness.

As a young man, Hore met members of the Communist Party, for which he made posters, and the party’s leader helped him gain entrance to the Government College of Arts and Crafts. Hore championed printmaking as an inexpensive, reproducible medium accessible to the masses and an ideal platform for social critique.

Read more about Somnath Hore and other Indian artists in our publication "Abby Grey and Indian Modernism," digital version available here: https://www.blurb.com/books/5948281-abby-grey-and-indian-modernism-selections-from-the

Image: Somnath Hore, Shepherd, 1965. Etching on paper 8 × 9 7/8 in. Grey Art Gallery, New York University Art Collection, G1975.200

Happy Friday! Today we're sharing this etching by Somnath Hore (1921–2006). Hore was born in a small village in the city of Chittagong, in present-day Bangladesh. By straining, contorting, and abstracting elements of the human form, Hore represents what he views as the abjectness of the human condition.

In this etching, Shepherd, the artist employs the pastoral trope of the peasant. The skeletal shepherd in the brown, fallow field—which is depicted in spare curvilinear forms—buckles under a burden of hopelessness.

As a young man, Hore met members of the Communist Party, for which he made posters, and the party’s leader helped him gain entrance to the Government College of Arts and Crafts. Hore championed printmaking as an inexpensive, reproducible medium accessible to the masses and an ideal platform for social critique.

Read more about Somnath Hore and other Indian artists in our publication "Abby Grey and Indian Modernism," digital version available here: https://www.blurb.com/books/5948281-abby-grey-and-indian-modernism-selections-from-the

Image: Somnath Hore, Shepherd, 1965. Etching on paper 8 × 9 7/8 in. Grey Art Gallery, New York University Art Collection, G1975.200

Tonight, our friend Alex Dika Seggerman is discussing her book on Egyptian art! The program is in conjunction with the e...
03/10/2021

Tonight, our friend Alex Dika Seggerman is discussing her book on Egyptian art! The program is in conjunction with the exhibition "Taking Shape" currently on view at McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College. There's still time to register, so head to the link below. 😁

Join us tomorrow for a Publication Highlight: “Islam & Surrealism: Abdel Hadi el-Gazzar’s Postwar Painting in Egypt” with Rutgers University Professor Alex Dika Seggerman. She will be discussing her recent publication "Modernism on the Nile: Art in Egypt between the Islamic and the Contemporary."

Register here: https://buff.ly/3kRD5Gl

Our second co-sponsored public program, in partnership with our friends at the NYU Center for Disability Studies, is com...
03/09/2021

Our second co-sponsored public program, in partnership with our friends at the NYU Center for Disability Studies, is coming up this Friday, March 12 at 4 pm on Zoom! Join us for a reading of "Golem Girl: A Memoir" (2020) and a conversation with authors/artists/disability activists Riva Lehrer and Sunaura Taylor.

Riva Lehrer’s memoir is a vivid portrait of her life, growing up disabled and Jewish, discovering her sexuality and her place as an artist in the emerging world of Disability Culture.

Head to this link to register for the event: https://nyu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_w0KVMHn8RLO-cJf0gOz5Qg

Organized by the NYU Center for Disability Studies. Co-sponsors: ACLS Scholars & Society Program; Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at NYU ; Grey Art Gallery, NYU; Goldstein-Goren Center for American Jewish History/Skirball Department of Hebrew & Judaic Studies at NYU ; Department of Social and Cultural Analysis; NYU Office of Global Inclusion, Diversity, and Strategic Innovation

Our second co-sponsored public program, in partnership with our friends at the NYU Center for Disability Studies, is coming up this Friday, March 12 at 4 pm on Zoom! Join us for a reading of "Golem Girl: A Memoir" (2020) and a conversation with authors/artists/disability activists Riva Lehrer and Sunaura Taylor.

Riva Lehrer’s memoir is a vivid portrait of her life, growing up disabled and Jewish, discovering her sexuality and her place as an artist in the emerging world of Disability Culture.

Head to this link to register for the event: https://nyu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_w0KVMHn8RLO-cJf0gOz5Qg

Organized by the NYU Center for Disability Studies. Co-sponsors: ACLS Scholars & Society Program; Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at NYU ; Grey Art Gallery, NYU; Goldstein-Goren Center for American Jewish History/Skirball Department of Hebrew & Judaic Studies at NYU ; Department of Social and Cultural Analysis; NYU Office of Global Inclusion, Diversity, and Strategic Innovation

Starting this week, you can join free Friday virtual tours of "Taking Shape" at McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College! ...
03/08/2021

Starting this week, you can join free Friday virtual tours of "Taking Shape" at McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College! Registration info below. 😁

Starting March 12, the McMullen Museum will offer free virtual docent tours every Friday of "Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s" from 3:00 to 4:00 pm. Register yourself and guests (optional) for a virtual tour at https://buff.ly/3bYvfGy.

If you're interested in a private tour, please contact Rachel Chamberlain at least two weeks in advance at [email protected].

Happening tomorrow at 4 pm ET: a screening of the film Vision Portraits (2019) by Rodney Evans, organized by NYU Center ...
03/04/2021

Happening tomorrow at 4 pm ET: a screening of the film Vision Portraits (2019) by Rodney Evans, organized by NYU Center for Disability Studies. Register at bit.ly/3uAnpLO 😁

Synopsis:
VISION PORTRAITS is a deeply personal documentary by award-winning filmmaker Rodney Evans (BROTHER TO BROTHER) as he explores how his loss of vision may impact his creative future, and what it means to be a blind or visually impaired creative artist. It’s a celebration of the possibilities of art created by a Manhattan photographer (John Dugdale), a Bronx-based dancer (Kayla Hamilton), a Canadian writer (Ryan Knighton) and the filmmaker himself, who each experience varying degrees of vision loss. Using archival material alongside new illuminating interviews and observational footage of the artists at work, Evans has created a tantalizing meditation on blindness and creativity, a sensual work that opens our minds to new possibilities.

We're happy to be co-sponsoring several public programs from our friends at the NYU Center for Disability Studies this spring! The first is coming up next Friday, March 5 at 4 pm on Zoom—join us for a screening of "Vision Portraits" (2019) by Rodney Evans, and a discussion with Evans and performance artist/dancer Kayla Hamilton.

This feature-length documentary chronicles the creative paths of blind and visually impaired artists—photographer John Dugdale, dancer Kayla Hamilton, writer Ryan Knighton, and the director, award-winning filmmaker Rodney Evans.

Register at: https://nyu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_3rrjUEIZQ16mkN7CofF_-Q

Organized by the NYU Center for Disability Studies. Co-sponsors: ACLS Scholars & Society Program; The Center for Media, Culture and History at NYU; Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at NYU; NYU Institute of African American Affairs & Center for Black Visual Culture; Grey Art Gallery, NYU; NYU Office of Global Inclusion, Diversity, and Strategic Innovation

Address

100 Washington Sq E
New York, NY
10003

Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F or V train to West 4th Street W or R to 8th Street 6 to Astor Place 1 to Christopher Street Bus: M1, M2, M3, M5, M6 or M8 to 8th Street

General information

The Grey Art Gallery is located within New York University's Silver Center--on the site of NYU's original home, the legendary University Building (1835 to 1892). Winslow Homer, Daniel Huntington, Samuel C**t, George Innes, and Henry James all lived and worked there, as did Professor Samuel F. B. Morse, who established the first academic fine arts department in America on the site now occupied by the Grey Art Gallery. Demolished in 1892, the original building was replaced by the Main Building (renamed the Silver Center in 2002). Here was located, from 1927 to 1942, A. E. Gallatin's Museum of Living Art, NYU's first art museum and the first institution in this country to exhibit work by Picasso, Léger, Mirò, Mondrian, Arp and members of the American Abstract Artists group. Gallatin aspired to create a forum for intellectual exchange, a place where artists would congregate to acquaint themselves with the latest developments in contemporary art. In 1975, with a generous gift from Mrs. Abby W**d Grey, the Museum's original space was renovated, offices and a collection storage facility were added, and the doors were reopened as the Grey Art Gallery. Exhibitions organized by the Grey Art Gallery encompass aspects of all the visual arts: painting, sculpture, drawing and printmaking, photography, architecture and decorative arts, video, film, and performance. In addition to originating its own exhibitions, some of which travel throughout the United States and abroad, the Gallery hosts traveling exhibitions. Award-winning scholarly publications, distributed worldwide, are published by the Grey Art Gallery. In conjunction with its exhibitions, the Grey also sponsors public programs, including lectures, symposia, panel discussions, performances, and films.

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Grey Art Gallery posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Grey Art Gallery:

Videos

Category


Other Art Museums in New York

Show All