African American Jazz Caucus

African American Jazz Caucus Jazz is an art form which has its origins, spiritual, heritage and cultural roots in Africa, African American communities and the African Diaspora. The focus of this page is to promote the preservation of timeless genre of music.

History The Black Jazz Music Caucus (BJMC) of the National Association of Jazz Educators (NAJE) was founded in 1977 primarily by Larry Ridley and Anderson White at the NAJE Conference in Daytona Beach, Florida. The initial purpose in forming the Caucus was to increase the representation of African American Jazz artists and educators within the larger body of the Jazz Educators Association which originated as a spinoff of the Music Educators National Conference (MENC). Both jazz organizations have since expanded their concepts, outreach and parameters. As a result, they each have renamed themselves, the African American Jazz Caucus (AAJC) in the year 2000 and the International Association for Jazz Education (IAJE) in 2001. The early aims of the Caucus were also to provide support to African American Jazz artists and educators at elementary, secondary and higher educational institutions. Since the Caucus inception, it has produced clinics, workshops and performances annually at the NAJE/IAJE Conferences. These activities have featured highly acclaimed African American jazz artists including the Harlem Renaissance Jazz Orchestra, Barry Harris, Stanley Turrentine, Hank Marr, Everett Greene, Cedar Walton, Ron Carter, Phil Ranelin, Billy Higgins and many others. The activities of the Caucus in the late 1970s to the present continue to have a profound impact on Jazz education. They help to ensure that all Jazz educators recognize and acknowledge accurately the African American progenitors and their contributions made to the Jazz art form, i.e., its African, African American historic cultural, spiritual aesthetic and musical roots, stylistic individuality, diversity, improvisation, theory, composition and arranging concepts. As more and more educational institutions continue to establish courses and degree programs in Jazz performance, compostion, arranging, history, pedagogy and the music industry, the AAJC is actively working to develop the resources to provide much needed support to Jazz artists and educators. The AAJC has become a proactive entity in addressing the challenges that its members face in teaching Jazz at the elementary, secondary and collegiate levels. These challenges include the creation of employment opportunities, the sustenance and protection of employment and programming, the allocation of adequate resources, and, the creation and monitoring of curricula that rightfully acknowledge and position the history and contributions of African Americans as the progenitors of the Jazz art form. AAJC President Badi Murphy appointed Larry Ridley, internationally renowned jazz artist and member of the IAJE Hall of Fame, as the Executive Director of the AAJC in the Fall of the year 2000. Ridley's first goal and accomplishment came to fruition in 2001 with the acquisition of the organization's I.R.S. 501, (C) 3, tax exempt status. This was an important step in the expansion of the fiscal and programming capabilities of the AAJC. Through his creative vision and ongoing efforts, the African American Jazz Caucus also began to establish a stronger cooperation of networking, interaction and interfacing as an affiliate of the International Association for Jazz Education. The National Association of Schools of Music, NASM, is an organization of schools, colleges, and universities that offer music studies. The organization was founded in 1924 and is recognized by the United States Department of Education. It has 589 institutional members and has established threshold standards for undergraduate and graduate degrees and other credentials. Institutional membership is obtained and continued through the peer-review process of accreditation. NASM provides statistical information, professional development, and policy analysis services. It also makes available for purchase many helpful publications, including a listing of accredited institutions. An important liaison in 2001 was instigated by Executive Director Ridley and established in an AAJC SubCommittee (Ridley, Dr. Jesse McCarroll, Ben Dixon) spending a full day meeting with the NASM Executive Director, Dr. Samuel Hope. The agenda was the reviewing of the guidelines and criteria used by NASM in the accreditation of jazz degree programs at colleges, universities and conservatories of music in the United States. The meeting was very substantive and thorough in it's review and analysis. All of the meeting's suggested recommendations for revision were unanimously accepted and approved by the NASM Board of Directors.

Mission: The African American Jazz Caucus, Inc., is dedicated to protecting, preserving and perpetuating the rich cultural heritage and legacy of jazz, which is one of our indigenous musical art forms. Accentuating Its Roots from Mother Africa which has evolved and developed Global Fruits.

Schomburg Center acquires Harry Belafonte’s historic archive
05/15/2020
Schomburg Center acquires Harry Belafonte’s historic archive

Schomburg Center acquires Harry Belafonte’s historic archive

"It is deeply moving that this destination so critical to my life and well-being, from the days of my youth until now, should be the repository for much of my life's work," Belafonte said.

The African American Jazz Caucus recognizes the life and legacy of announcer and long time AAJC member and supporter Jay...
05/14/2020
Remembering Wclk Announcer Jay Edwards

The African American Jazz Caucus recognizes the life and legacy of announcer and long time AAJC member and supporter Jay Edwards. Jay was passionate about the music and committed to perpetuating the legacy of jazz. He was well respected in the industry and most importantly loved and appreciated by his colleagues and friends. He will be dearly missed. Our prayers and condolences are with his family during this time. Our message to the family is "Thank You. Thank you for sharing your father. Your father was a wonderful man's who's legacy will continue through the work of all those he supported."

With Love,
Dr. Trineice Robinson
AAJC Executive Director

https://www.cau.edu/news/2020/05/Remembering-Wclk-Announcer-Jay-Edwards.html

Remembering Wclk Announcer Jay Edwards 05/14/2020 Atlanta, GA (May 14, 2020) – Jazz 91.9 WCLK is saddened by the loss of our dear friend and colleague John “Jay” Edwards, who passed away on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 after a lengthy illness. An ardent Jazz curator and art lover, Jay had been part o...

the pulse, the bridge, the legacy...
05/11/2020

the pulse, the bridge, the legacy...

03/16/2020
Tommy Flanagan - "Peace"

Legend has it that Uncle Donald Meade called him the head waiter at the last supper. Can neither confirm or deny but it made a great story when Unk told me.

Larry Cobb‎
THIS IS JAZZ

From Tommy Flanagan's album "Something Borrowed Something Blue", a great cover of Horace Silver's "Peace". Notably was used as an intro/theme by Eric Jackson...

The history of 'Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing'
02/29/2020
The history of 'Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing'

The history of 'Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing'

On February 12, 1900, James Weldon Johnson's song 'Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing' was sung for the first time by a choir of Jacksonville children for a celebration of Abraham Lincoln's birthday. Here's the story of the song known as America's black national anthem.

Ella Fitzgerald, the first African-American woman to perform at a Super Bowl halftime show - Face2Face Africa
02/09/2020
Ella Fitzgerald, the first African-American woman to perform at a Super Bowl halftime show - Face2Face Africa

Ella Fitzgerald, the first African-American woman to perform at a Super Bowl halftime show - Face2Face Africa

The Super Bowl halftime show didn’t always have the most talked-about pop stars as headliners as it does today.   Years back, halftime shows were usually a showcase for the country’s top marching bands and drill teams to perform the national anthem, in addition to a separate halftime performanc...

01/19/2020
Jazz Stage

Jazz Stage

CBS television doc. from 1957 with Count Basie, Billie Holiday, Coleman Hawkins, Thelonious Monk among others.

A Mighty Girl
01/08/2020

A Mighty Girl

Happy 129th birthday to pioneering author, anthropologist, and folklorist Zora Neale Hurston! While she was born in 1891, Hurston often claimed 1901 to be her birth year as she received a gift of books at the age of ten that she said opened her mind to literature and represented her literary “birth.”

Hurston grew up in Eatonville, Florida, an all-black town formed following the U.S. Civil War. This gave her a unique viewpoint on the African American experience that clearly comes through in her writing. Hurston was a flamboyant figure in the Harlem Renaissance in the late 1920s. Later, she used her training in anthropology to collect and retell traditional folk stories from the many regions and countries, including the American South, Honduras, Jamaica, and Haiti.

Although she wrote published more than fifty short stories, plays, and essays as well as four novels, including her best-known novel, "Their Eyes Were Watching God," Hurston’s dialectical style fell out of favor with the literary world. Hurston might have fallen into complete obscurity following her death in 1960 were it not for the work of another African American writer, Alice Walker, whose 1975 Ms. Magazine article "In Search of Zora Neale Hurston," revived interest in Hurston’s incredible body of writing. The reemergence of Hurston's work coincided with the emergence of other female authors such as Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison, and Walker herself, whose writing focused on the African American experience.

Fortunately, Hurston's true genius is now well-recognized and "Their Eyes Were Watching God" is considered an American literary classic. Through her life and legacy, she demonstrated the truth of her famous assertion: "A thing is mighty big when time and distance cannot shrink it."

To learn more about Zora Neale Hurston's famous novel, "Their Eyes Were Watching God," visit http://amzn.to/1DiY76H -- or find all of her finest work in one volume at https://amzn.to/2LTjfsv

For an excellent biography on Hurston for young readers, we highly recommend "Zora!: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston" for ages 9 to 14 at https://www.amightygirl.com/zora

She is also featured in several inspiring books that pay tribute to a variety of trailblazing women: "Amelia to Zora: Twenty-Six Women Who Changed the World" for ages 6 to 10 (https://www.amightygirl.com/amelia-to-zora), "Bold Women in Black History" for ages 6 to 10 (https://www.amightygirl.com/little-leaders), and "Rad American Women A-Z" for ages 10 and up (https://www.amightygirl.com/rad-american-women-a-z)

For adult readers, we also recommend Hurston's fascinating autobiography, "Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography (http://amzn.to/1OdkFat), her memoir "Wrapped in Rainbows" (http://amzn.to/2CztVr4), and her recently published work "Barracoon: The Story of the Last 'Black Cargo'" (https://amzn.to/2QrWPm6)

African American Jazz Caucus
01/08/2020

African American Jazz Caucus

African American Jazz Caucus's cover photo
01/08/2020

African American Jazz Caucus's cover photo

Timeline Photos
01/08/2020

Timeline Photos

01/06/2020
Charles Stepney

Chicago Legend #legend #music 💜👏🏿💯🔥

This video is a little about Charles Stepney Please like, share, subscribe and comment

11/16/2019
Jaleel Shaw

Jazz Stage
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The great Roy Haynes

I had a great time w/ the amazing Roy Haynes at the Blue Note in NYC this week. Here’s a short clip from our soundcheck. 94 years young....

Bud Powell — the father of modern jazz piano
11/01/2019
Bud Powell — the father of modern jazz piano

Bud Powell — the father of modern jazz piano

Bud Powell was the father of modern jazz piano, and pianist and composer Paul Grabowsky is in The Music Show studio to show us why. Grabowsky breaks down Powell’s influences, what his right and left hands are doing in some of his most popular recordings and what it means to really swing.

A conscientious and accessible legislature who passed a bill to acknowledge and preserve Jazz music. We honored him as o...
10/28/2019
Former Rep. John Conyers dies at 90

A conscientious and accessible legislature who passed a bill to acknowledge and preserve Jazz music. We honored him as our fourth annual Donald Meade Legacy Jazz Griot Award recipient in 2015. Not minimizing his shortcomings, we knew him as a fierce warrior.

Former Rep. John Conyers, a longtime Michigan Democrat who represented parts of Detroit for more than 50 years before his resignation in 2017, died Sunday at age 90, his son, John Conyers III, told CNN.

10/24/2019
BABY DODDS (Full Film) -"NEW ORLEANS DRUMMING"

#legend💜🔥💯👏🏿

(i found this film in the Tito Martino's library) "BABY DODDS NEW ORLEANS DRUMMING" Produced by Barry Martyn Films With: WARREN BABY DODDS (filmed by Bill Ru...

The basics and more...
10/12/2019
Horizon In-Focus: Lewis Nash | Arizona PBS

The basics and more...

Ted Simons sits down with Phoenix native Lewis Nash, one of the biggest names in Jazz. He’s a drummer whose skills are celebrated regardless of whether he’s playing in a small group or a big band. He is considered by many as one of the most talented drummers of his generation.

Venus showed Serena how to win
09/08/2019
Venus showed Serena how to win

Venus showed Serena how to win

Even at my age, understanding what love is, is difficult. I’m a baby sister, too, and I remember watching my big sister be able to do everything. They used to t…

09/04/2019
Alice Coltrane Turiyasangitananda

#legend 💜👏🏿💯🔥

Alice Coltrane at 22 years old playing “Woody ‘n’ You” at Le Blue Note, Paris, January 9, 1960.

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