Sean Horton - NYC

Sean Horton - NYC ~aka~ Horton Gallery | Sunday LES | ZS&H
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David Byrd's artwork offers a highly expressive image of the medicalized experience of mental illness as it is shaped by...
09/17/2023

David Byrd's artwork offers a highly expressive image of the medicalized experience of mental illness as it is shaped by the enclosure of the hospital or group home itself. The figures in his pictures, both patients and attendants, assume forms determined by the walls, hallways, lavatories, and the psycho-pharmacology that confines them. On other occasions, we see beautiful hallucinations about what life might be like outside the confines of the institution, bathed in nature. David Byrd's work was presented alongside Peter Gallo in "The Patients And The Doctors" at the gallery in 2015.

The artist is featured in the gallery's current exhibition "Place-World," a group exhibition inspired by the book "Getting Back into Place: Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-World" by Edward S. Casey.

Rooted in architectural phenomenology, “place-world” is a concept that explores the intricate relationship between human beings and the environments we inhabit. Casey explores the idea that our understanding of place is not simply a physical location or a geographical point on a map, but rather a complex interplay of physical, emotional, cultural, and experiential factors. He argues that places are not just static spaces, but they are also deeply intertwined with human identity, memory, and meaning.

Casey's exploration considers five basic notions: “Finding Place,” the need to locate oneself in a multifaceted world; “The Body in Place,” the corporeal engagement and embodied experience within our environments; “Built Places,” the human construction of spaces and their impact on our identity; “Wild Places,” the significance of untamed landscapes and their role in human identity; and “Moving Between Places,” the transitions and connections that occur as individuals traverse and link different spatial realms while carrying the essence of each place with us.

Pictured: David Byrd / “Outer World,” n.d. / Oil on canvas / 20 x 26 in (50.8 x 66 cm) / © David Byrd Estate, Anton Kern Gallery



Elijah Burgher's "Oliver & the Martian" is from a series of allegorical portraits of friends, in which the artist draws ...
09/16/2023

Elijah Burgher's "Oliver & the Martian" is from a series of allegorical portraits of friends, in which the artist draws on imagery from magick and mythology to communicate something about their characters, personalities, and the relation between the two individuals. In this case, the drawing is a portrait of the painter, Oliver Coran, as a novice in an unspecified occult order. The artist curated the group exhibition "The Venusians" for the gallery in Berlin last year and his work was the subject of a solo exhibition entitled "Bachelors" in 2015.

The artist is featured in the gallery's current exhibition "Place-World," a group exhibition inspired by the book "Getting Back into Place: Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-World" by Edward S. Casey.

Rooted in architectural phenomenology, “place-world” is a concept that explores the intricate relationship between human beings and the environments we inhabit. Casey explores the idea that our understanding of place is not simply a physical location or a geographical point on a map, but rather a complex interplay of physical, emotional, cultural, and experiential factors. He argues that places are not just static spaces, but they are also deeply intertwined with human identity, memory, and meaning.

Casey's exploration considers five basic notions: “Finding Place,” the need to locate oneself in a multifaceted world; “The Body in Place,” the corporeal engagement and embodied experience within our environments; “Built Places,” the human construction of spaces and their impact on our identity; “Wild Places,” the significance of untamed landscapes and their role in human identity; and “Moving Between Places,” the transitions and connections that occur as individuals traverse and link different spatial realms while carrying the essence of each place with us.

Pictured: Elijah Burgher / “Oliver & The Martian,” 2022 / Watercolor and colored pencil on paper / 29 7/8 x 22 in (76 x 56 cm) / © Elijah Burgher

Using the Met's Gubbio Studio for inspiration, Michael Bühler-Rose's large-scale trompe-l’œil panels continue the biogra...
09/15/2023

Using the Met's Gubbio Studio for inspiration, Michael Bühler-Rose's large-scale trompe-l’œil panels continue the biographic method of revealing one's inner life through their collections. As a sort of self-portrait through one's domestic space, the works reveal the artist's inner life of growing up in both the Hare Krishna movement and the punk/hardcore music scenes, studying and practicing orthodox Hindu/Vaishnava ritualism, as well as his external studio practice and experience in art academia.⁠

The artist is featured in the gallery's current exhibition "Place-World," a group exhibition inspired by the book "Getting Back into Place: Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-World" by Edward S. Casey.⁠

Rooted in architectural phenomenology, “place-world” is a concept that explores the intricate relationship between human beings and the environments we inhabit. Casey explores the idea that our understanding of place is not simply a physical location or a geographical point on a map, but rather a complex interplay of physical, emotional, cultural, and experiential factors. He argues that places are not just static spaces, but they are also deeply intertwined with human identity, memory, and meaning.⁠

Casey's exploration considers five basic notions: “Finding Place,” the need to locate oneself in a multifaceted world; “The Body in Place,” the corporeal engagement and embodied experience within our environments; “Built Places,” the human construction of spaces and their impact on our identity; “Wild Places,” the significance of untamed landscapes and their role in human identity; and “Moving Between Places,” the transitions and connections that occur as individuals traverse and link different spatial realms while carrying the essence of each place with us.⁠

Pictured: Michael Bühler-Rose / “Tantra, Riley, Stella, Shechet, Sontag, Bosch and Gods,” 2023 (Detail) / Wood intarsia (inlay) / 32 1/2 x 17 x 1 1/2 in (82.5 x 43.2 x 3.8 cm) / © Michael Bühler-Rose⁠

With what Ken Johnson of The New York Times called an “infectious, distinctly contemporary mood of existential perplexit...
09/14/2023

With what Ken Johnson of The New York Times called an “infectious, distinctly contemporary mood of existential perplexity,” the human relationship to nature, fraught and imperiled, lies at the heart of Saul Becker’s paintings and works on paper. According to the artist, his aim is “to make the uncertainties of this relationship palpable…When we get out into real wilderness, it seems alien. I relish those moments when I can get in touch with how strange and beautiful it is.

The artist is featured in the gallery's current exhibition "Place-World," a group exhibition inspired by the book "Getting Back into Place: Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-World" by Edward S. Casey.

Rooted in architectural phenomenology, “place-world” is a concept that explores the intricate relationship between human beings and the environments we inhabit. Casey explores the idea that our understanding of place is not simply a physical location or a geographical point on a map, but rather a complex interplay of physical, emotional, cultural, and experiential factors. He argues that places are not just static spaces, but they are also deeply intertwined with human identity, memory, and meaning.

Casey's exploration considers five basic notions: “Finding Place,” the need to locate oneself in a multifaceted world; “The Body in Place,” the corporeal engagement and embodied experience within our environments; “Built Places,” the human construction of spaces and their impact on our identity; “Wild Places,” the significance of untamed landscapes and their role in human identity; and “Moving Between Places,” the transitions and connections that occur as individuals traverse and link different spatial realms while carrying the essence of each place with us.

Pictured: Saul Becker / “Red Mirror,” 2014 / Signed on verso Watercolor, ink & gouache on paper / © Saul Becker / 37 x 29 in (94 x 73.7 cm) / Photo: Inna Svyatsky (.art )


Gayleen Aiken’s “These Old Paintings are made by G. Aiken” is on view through October 7th, Fall hours are Thur-Sat 12-6 ...
09/13/2023

Gayleen Aiken’s “These Old Paintings are made by G. Aiken” is on view through October 7th, Fall hours are Thur-Sat 12-6 pm. So stop by and say hello! We’ve missed you!

For Barre, Vermont native Gayleen Aiken, the old farmhouse of her childhood, the granite quarries on the horizon, and the moonlit night-sky provide the backdrop for a reimagined life where playful imaginary cousins dance the days away, high-ceilinged heirloom rooms are dedicated to creative endeavors, and all kinds of musical instruments lie in wait.

The artist is featured in the gallery's current exhibition "Place-World," a group exhibition inspired by the book "Getting Back into Place: Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-World" by Edward S. Casey.

Rooted in architectural phenomenology, “place-world” is a concept that explores the intricate relationship between human beings and the environments we inhabit. Casey explores the idea that our understanding of place is not simply a physical location or a geographical point on a map, but rather a complex interplay of physical, emotional, cultural, and experiential factors. He argues that places are not just static spaces, but they are also deeply intertwined with human identity, memory, and meaning.

Casey's exploration considers five basic notions: “Finding Place,” the need to locate oneself in a multifaceted world; “The Body in Place,” the corporeal engagement and embodied experience within our environments; “Built Places,” the human construction of spaces and their impact on our identity; “Wild Places,” the significance of untamed landscapes and their role in human identity; and “Moving Between Places,” the transitions and connections that occur as individuals traverse and link different spatial realms while carrying the essence of each place with us.

Pictured: Gayleen Aiken / "These Old Paintings are made by G. Aiken," 1983 / Oil on canvas board / 24 x 18 in (61 x 45.7 cm)

Opening Thursday ~ please join us!Sean Horton is pleased to announce Ewelina Bocheńska's solo exhibition "Gypsy Sun, Des...
04/25/2023

Opening Thursday ~ please join us!

Sean Horton is pleased to announce Ewelina Bocheńska's solo exhibition "Gypsy Sun, Desert Moon" opens Thursday, April 27th from 6-8 pm.

"I am really curious about the relationship between consciousness and matter, that which cannot be grasped and that which can, that which can be perceived and that which cannot. Exploring that threshold is what motivates me. But I am also open to the idea that this is not the case, that what motivates me is something else entirely. Hawaiian shamans believe that our reality is like a dream, which can be molded and changed according to our perspective, that it is very fluid and not as solid as we assume it to be, including space-time and our past and future, which can be bent and changed."

Pictured: Ewelina Bocheńska / "Ghost Town Trail," 2023 / Oil and fabric on board / 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in (19.1 x 24.1 cm)

Opening Thursday ~ please join us! Sean Horton is pleased to announce Ewelina Bocheńska's solo exhibition "Gypsy Sun, De...
04/21/2023

Opening Thursday ~ please join us!

Sean Horton is pleased to announce Ewelina Bocheńska's solo exhibition "Gypsy Sun, Desert Moon" opens Thursday, April 27th from 6-8 pm.

[Bochenska's] "paintings place seemingly diametrical qualities such as real and imagined, visible and invisible, in productive tension: while the Native American imagery points to mythological beings, for instance, its origins in rock carvings give it an earthly quality; and while the landscapes are based on actual ones, they are portrayed subjectively—by memory rather than copied en plein air. In this, the images recall the way Joan Mitchell’s expressionistic landscapes mapped internal topography rather than observed fact. Bochenska’s work feels both of this world and outside it, bidding us to live an existence that more purposefully bridges the two." — Elizabeth Buhe, Art in America

Pictured: Ewelina Bocheńska / "In Ceremony," 2023 / Oil and fabric on board / 8 x 10 in
(20.3 x 25.4 cm)

Today is the last day to see Lauren dela Roche's solo presentation at Expo Chicago ~ please stop by the booth and say he...
04/16/2023

Today is the last day to see Lauren dela Roche's solo presentation at Expo Chicago ~ please stop by the booth and say hello! A huge thank you to Tony Karman and the whole team for a wonderful art fair!

"A solo presentation of Minneapolis-based Lauren dela Roche dips us into the interiority of expressly mindful, full-bodied, thigh-high-stocking-wearing, robust women with heaving thighs and well-rounded buttocks, seated or lying in repose in what seem to be courtyards or semi-indoor/outdoor domestic spaces. Perspectively misplaced archways and staircases float in and out of backgrounds expressed in full saturation. Painting with oil on found cotton feedsacks that appear to be sutured and repaired in patches, dela Roche’s adept use of pigment and line seductively teeter on uneasiness, as female n**es appear to lean in, listen, rest and repair while otherworldly presences loom within the depths of her frame." — Pia Singh, New City Art

Pictured: Lauren dela Roche / "Cruciform Parcheesi," 2023 / Oil on found cotton feedsacks / 52 x 62 in (132.1 x 157.5 cm)

Lauren dela Roche's solo presentation at Expo Chicago continues today and tomorrow ~ please stop by the booth and say he...
04/15/2023

Lauren dela Roche's solo presentation at Expo Chicago continues today and tomorrow ~ please stop by the booth and say hello!

“My figures inhabit aural, dreamlike settings, which I create by using rough fields of color and gestural paint strokes. My visual influences come from classical greek mythology, handmade embroideries, weavings, domestic interiors, music, and my vivid dreamworld. I create paintings that examine balance and unease at once: female n**es engage in ritualistic acts, cats and dogs live harmoniously, and wild animals appear tame and indoors. All creatures share the same stripes, spots, and gestures but given these figures in their domesticated context, harm is still a looming threat.”

Pictured: Lauren dela Roche / "Beta Fish," 2022 / Oil on found cotton feedsacks / 38 x 36 in (96.5 x 91.4 cm)

Congratulations to Lauren dela Roche on her sold-out booth at Expo Chicago! "One of the most immediately noticeable thin...
04/14/2023

Congratulations to Lauren dela Roche on her sold-out booth at Expo Chicago!

"One of the most immediately noticeable things about [Roche's] paintings is the cohesive world she’s built. Within vibrantly colored, abstracted and cropped interiors, she places a cast of female figures interacting with themselves, each other, and their environment in a way that feels staged yet ambiguous.

The locations and undefined actions mirror Roche’s own confusion and conflict when it comes to her body. As a child, her ability to dissociate from her surroundings served as an effective coping mechanism during periods of physical and emotional abuse. Now, it’s left Roche with a complicated relationship to her physicality, one that comes out in her painting.

“I’ll draw these women and they’ll be interacting with each other or with something in the painting in this way where I don’t realize what it means until afterwards,” she explains. “Then, I’ll see these crazy metaphors or symbolism that starts to make me understand what it means in a deeper way for me and the people around me.” — Bridget Kranz, MPLSArt

Pictured: Lauren dela Roche / "Bulldozer," 2022 / Oil on found cotton feedsacks / 36 x 46 in (91.4 x 116.8 cm)

Today's the day! Sean Horton is pleased to announce our participation in Expo Chicago, Profile with a solo booth of new ...
04/13/2023

Today's the day! Sean Horton is pleased to announce our participation in Expo Chicago, Profile with a solo booth of new works by Lauren dela Roche () between the dates of April 13 — 16th.

There is certainly no shortage of female n**es in art, but the self-taught artist Lauren dela Roche depicts female bodies in a new light. Her women are twisted, elongated, sometimes doubled, and always classically inflected. In ink and pigment, she places these bodies in lacelike interiors that float strangely; swans, jungle cats, and butterflies drift through the delicate domestic space. Born in Santa Rosa, California, and now living in Minneapolis, Roche dips into an elusive realm of imagination and memory. — Culture Matrix, Airmail

Pictured: Lauren dela Roche / "Easter Pearl," 2023 / Oil on found cotton feedsacks / 52 x 58 in (132.1 x 147.3 cm)

Sean Horton is pleased to announce our participation in Expo Chicago, Profile with a solo booth of new works by Lauren d...
04/06/2023

Sean Horton is pleased to announce our participation in Expo Chicago, Profile with a solo booth of new works by Lauren dela Roche between the dates of April 13 — 16th.

Using n**e female figures as the central subjects of her work, Roche distorts, elongates, and duplicates the female body in moody washes of paint and ink. Decorated interiors meld with exterior presences like wild animals, butterflies, and flowing rivers to create dream-like settings that explore balance and unease at once. Roche draws her influences from classical Greek mythology, handmade embroideries, domestic interiors, and her vivid dreamworld.

Lauren dela Roche / "Easter Pearl," 2023 / Oil on found cotton feedsacks / 52 x 58 in (132.1 x 147.3 cm)

This is the final week to see Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.C...
04/05/2023

This is the final week to see Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.

Claiborne's images are chosen intuitively from boxes of salvaged photographs gifted by his mother. He is drawn to subtle, intimate details – the gentle smile of his father observing his son, a plastic-covered couch in his grandmother's home, a rare portrait of his grandfather at a family gathering, or a moment of celebration at his parent's wedding. The unanswerable questions, the lapses between the events that precede a photographic exposure, and the resultant facsimile inspire the chemical and print processes that Claiborne will employ to render a restorative record.

Pictured: Kevin Claiborne / “Happiness?,” 2023 / Acrylic and ink on wood panel / 20 x 16 in (50.8 x 40.6 cm

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" closes April 8th, so there are two more weekends to see the show! — ...
03/30/2023

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" closes April 8th, so there are two more weekends to see the show! — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.

The artist's process of attentive gestural mark-making generates gradient landscapes that further enunciate the joy or trauma of his family members. By visualizing the sentiments he associates with the event or family member the image documents, Claiborne is freed to explore new aesthetic pathways that enable a heightened appraisal of recurring subjects; memory, aging, mental health, marriage, brotherhood, and divorce.

Pictured: Kevin Claiborne / "Forever?," 2023 / Acrylic and ink on wood panel / 30 x 30 in (76.2 x 76.2 cm)

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" is on view this week — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.From "The ...
03/24/2023

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" is on view this week — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.

From "The New Generation of Black Artists Boldly Redefining Conceptual Art" by Ayanna Dozier, Artsy, September 1, 2022:

"The Harlem-based artist takes inspiration from fashion photography and advertising. He cites Barbara Kruger for revealing to him the uneasy relationship that can arise between texts and images. Through this misalignment, Claiborne found answers that emboldened him to ask provocative questions about the Black body that would otherwise be left unsaid in public spaces.
..

Like many conceptual artists, Claiborne’s work prioritizes the integrity of the idea over the aesthetic outcome. “Working conceptually is a necessary and political starting point for me, because through this practice, one can reach a deeper, more critical space where a wider range of responses and conversations become available,” he said.

Claiborne defines Black conceptual thought as an immeasurable asset to contemporary creative practices with the capacity to transform the art world. He further added, “I believe there are many Black artists creating conceptual art that honors those who came before us while still taking risks and offering new exciting approaches [to see the world].”

Pictured: Kevin Claiborne / "Lonely?," 2023 / Acrylic and ink on wood panel / 30 x 30 in
(76.2 x 76.2 cm)

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" is on view this week — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.Photos are...
03/22/2023

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" is on view this week — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.

Photos are not proficient mediums to transmit complete accounts of history, and our attempts to make connections between the documented image and our memories are only sometimes reliable. The conflict between looking and seeing, as appraised in Darby English's seminal text, How to See a Work of Art in Total Darkness, elicits a keen vantage to assess Claiborne's body of work. A surface evaluation of the series may only perceive a collection of vintage photographic revisions about the artists' family members. A closer read will demonstrate the conceptual authority exhibited in the work. Claiborne's experiments successfully make meaning of speculative memories through gestural processes: the reproduction, visual redaction, and transformation of his family's archives. The resultant photographs arouse a restorative practice for the artist and contextualizes a series that is palpably Black and inescapably universal.

Pictured: Kevin Claiborne / "Strength?," 2023 / Acrylic and ink on wood panel / 24 x 18 in
(61 x 45.7

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" is on view this week — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.In another...
03/17/2023

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" is on view this week — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.

In another revelatory image from the series "Bond?" (2023), a green-tinged portrait of his grandfather and family members at a family gathering, Claiborne's interplay of applied pressure and release on the silkscreen replicates a scratch, a negative space over the mouth and throat of his grandfather that graphically illustrates illness. When the image was taken, his grandfather could not speak, muted by throat cancer. By distorting the picture, the artist can reveal an intimate detail that significantly defined his grandfather's identity while probing broader themes about aging. The various paint and print applications not only speak for his grandfather's loss but also chronicles his joy and survival.

Pictured: Kevin Claiborne / "Bond?," 2023 / Acrylic and ink on wood panel / 18 x 24 in / (45.7 x 61 cm)

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" is on view this week — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm. Unlike pr...
03/15/2023

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" is on view this week — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.

Unlike previous bodies of work that maintained a monochrome palette to explore similar themes, this series incorporates earth tones with green and blue pigments integrated through varied applications to replicate aged photographs. What the artist previously expressed with found text and collage overlays, he now imparts through acts of distortion -- glitch, negative space, warp, and tint. His process of attentive gestural mark-making generates gradient landscapes that further enunciate the joy or trauma of his family members. By visualizing the sentiments he associates with the event or family member the image documents, Claiborne is freed to explore new aesthetic pathways that enable a heightened appraisal of recurring subjects; memory, aging, mental health, marriage, brotherhood, and divorce.

Pictured: Kevin Claiborne / "Brotherhood?," 2023 / Acrylic and ink on wood panel / 24 x 30 in
(61 x 76.2 cm)

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" is on view this week — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm. Unlike pr...
03/15/2023

Kevin Claiborne's solo exhibition "Family Business" is on view this week — gallery hours are Wed-Sat, 12-6 pm.

Unlike previous bodies of work that maintained a monochrome palette to explore similar themes, this series incorporates earth tones with green and blue pigments integrated through varied applications to replicate aged photographs. What the artist previously expressed with found text and collage overlays, he now imparts through acts of distortion -- glitch, negative space, warp, and tint. His process of attentive gestural mark-making generates gradient landscapes that further enunciate the joy or trauma of his family members. By visualizing the sentiments he associates with the event or family member the image documents, Claiborne is freed to explore new aesthetic pathways that enable a heightened appraisal of recurring subjects; memory, aging, mental health, marriage, brotherhood, and divorce.

Pictured: Kevin Claiborne / "Brotherhood?," 2023 / Acrylic and ink on wood panel / 24 x 30 in (61 x 76.2 cm)

Kevin Claiborne’s solo exhibition “Family Business” opens Thursday, March 9th. Through material experimentation, concept...
03/02/2023

Kevin Claiborne’s solo exhibition “Family Business” opens Thursday, March 9th.

Through material experimentation, conceptual artist Kevin Claiborne curiously reviews and revises his family photographic archives to clarify his existential queries about life, history, memory, and intimacy. In Family Business, a new series of photographic allegories created during an 11-month residency (2022-23) at the Lower East Side Printshop, Claiborne invokes simulacrum through silkscreen printing processes to compound his intrinsic presumptions about the nuanced narrative threads each photo reveals.

This exhibition coincides with the conclusion of my Keyholder Residency at the Lower East Side Printshop. A special thank you to Angela N. Carroll for contributing an essay!

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