Wings and Rotors Air Museum

Wings and Rotors Air Museum Wings and Rotors Air Museum is a non-profit org dedicated to restoring former military aircraft to flying condition paying attention to the Vietnam era.
(130)

Happy Independence Day!!! Merica!
07/04/2019

Happy Independence Day!!! Merica!

Due to unforseen circumstances because of health issues, we are cancelling our Fundraiser/Dinner/Silent Auction this yea...
06/28/2019
BiddingOwl - Wings & Rotors Air Museum Auction

Due to unforseen circumstances because of health issues, we are cancelling our Fundraiser/Dinner/Silent Auction this year.

We have been blessed with a lot of marvelous donations and would like to go forward with the Silent Auction by doing it On-line.

I hope everyone will take advantage by participating, we have a lot of wonderful items to bid on.... from Hornblower Cruises, Night Stay & Dinner at our local Casinos, and a Tuscany Oil Painting to name a few.

https://www.biddingowl.com/Auction/home.cfm?auctionID=18477&CFID=240176&CFTOKEN=3e108bb22177cacb-3381DC07-AA6C-DDF2-EEE1D45647B60FBA

Due to unforseen circumstances because of health issues, we are cancelling our Fundraiser/Dinner/Silent Auction this year.  

Due to unforseen circumstances because of health issues, we are cancelling our Fundraiser/Dinner/Silent Auction this yea...
06/21/2019
BiddingOwl - Wings & Rotors Air Museum Auction

Due to unforseen circumstances because of health issues, we are cancelling our Fundraiser/Dinner/Silent Auction this year.

We have been blessed with a lot of marvelous donations and would like to go forward with the Silent Auction by doing it On-line.

I hope everyone will take advantage by participating, we have a lot of wonderful items to bid on.... from Hornblower Cruises, Night Stay & Dinner at our local Casinos, and a Tucany Oil Painting to name a few.

Due to unforseen circumstances because of health issues, we are cancelling our Fundraiser/Dinner/Silent Auction this year.  

06/06/2019
You go girl!!
06/05/2019

You go girl!!

On this day in 1974, Second Lieutenant Sally D. Woolfolk, (now retired Colonel Sally Murphy) became the first female U.S. Army helicopter pilot to graduate from flight school at Fort Rucker, Alabama. Murphy joined the Women Army Corps in 1972, and entered the aviation school when women were first allowed in. She flew helicopters for the 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, Kansas, and commanded the 62nd Aviation Company in Germany and the 78th Aviation Battalion (Provisional) in Japan.

In 2009, Colonel Murphy received the U.S. Army Freedom Team Salute Veteran Commendation to commemorate her 27 years of service and her place in military history.

#TopicTuesday #womenRvets2 #FlyGirls #womeninaviation #SeeHer #BreakingBarriers U.S. Army Women You Should Know U.S. Army Women's Museum Pittsburg State University Fort McClellan Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority Fort Rucker, Alabama HuffPost Women National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution National Women's History Museum

Never forget their sacrifice.
05/27/2019

Never forget their sacrifice.

Happy Armed Services Day!
05/18/2019

Happy Armed Services Day!

05/09/2019

Thank you HAL-3 Seawolves for the beautiful card. I have to share this poem with everyone.

"The Oak Tree"

A mighty wind blew night and day.
It sole the oak tree's leaves away,
Then snapped its boughs and pulled its bark
Until the oak was tired and stark.
But still the oak tree held its ground
While other tress fell all around.

The weary wind gave up and spoke,
"How can you still be standing, Oak?"
The oak tree said, 'I know that you
Can break each branch of mine in two,
Carry every leaf away,
Shake my limbs, and make me sway.

But I have roots stretched in the earth,
Growing stronger since my birth.
You'll never touch them, for you see,
They are the deepest part of me.
Until today, I wasn't sure
Of just how much I could endure.
But now I've found, with thanks to you,
I'm stronger than I ever knew".

04/29/2019
We Are The Mighty

Back in 75...

On this day in 1975: the largest helicopter evacuation on record begins removing the last Americans from Saigon.

Have a blessed day!
04/21/2019

Have a blessed day!

Due to unforeseen circumstances, the M*A*S*H BASH Event has been postponed until August 3, 2019.  We are sorry for any i...
04/04/2019

Due to unforeseen circumstances, the M*A*S*H BASH Event has been postponed until August 3, 2019. We are sorry for any inconvenience that this may have caused.

Wow incredible story!!! Must read!!
04/02/2019

Wow incredible story!!! Must read!!

Another incredible story from the annals. To my knowledge, it has never been told in such detail before. If you enjoy this kind of storytelling, please check out our book!

USS Corporal (SS-346): First Submarine To Reel in a Helicopter!

By Charles G. Hood, MD

On Thursday, 26 April 1956, off the southern coast of Florida about 20 miles from Key West, Cmdr. William F. Culley of Augusta, Georgia noticed a problem mid-flight. Culley, the pilot of Navy helicopter #51 on an antisubmarine warfare (ASW) training run as part of Squadron VX-1, realized that he was losing oil quickly from the main rotor assembly. He was too far from the coast to return for an emergency landing. Culley’s mind raced as he considered his options. Bailing was certainly possible, giving Culley and his three fellow crewmembers the best opportunity to survive the incident, although at the cost of a very expensive Navy helicopter—the Sikorsky HSS-1, known as the Seabat because of its ASW package. Finding a small cay in the vicinity to land on would be ideal, but a sweep of the ocean landscape failed to show any small land masses that might have provided such an opportunity. Crashing into the ocean was not a desirable option. Culley, his co-pilot Lt. J. K. Johnson, and two other crewmembers, G.A. DeChamp (SO3) and M.R. Dronz (AT2), realized that they had precious minutes to make a decision before mechanical failure required a costly abandonment. A “May-Day” call was sent from the helicopter in hopes that another Navy or even merchant vessel could lend a hand.

Meanwhile, not far from the distressed chopper, the USS Corporal (SS-346), assigned to the submarine base at Key West, was submerged, also participating in the ASW exercises as a designated opposing boat. The Corporal was a Balao-class submarine. She was built at the Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, Connecticut and commissioned shortly after the conclusion of World War II in November 1945. She carried a complement of 10 officers and about 70 enlisted men. The Corporal was 312 feet in length with a beam of 27 feet, 3 inches. As it turned out, she would need every inch of that beam for her next unscheduled assignment.

The radio shack of the Corporal intercepted the May-Day call from the disabled helicopter. This news was communicated immediately to the sub’s skipper, Lt. Cmdr. Erman O. Proctor in the Conn. He wasted little time. “Emergency surface. Blow all main ballast.” The words reverberated over the sub’s 1-MC as the Corporal executed an emergency blow and came to the surface with a gargantuan splash. In contact with the helicopter, Proctor ascertained that the chopper could remain airborne for only a short time longer. Culley requested the Corporal to make heavy knots in his direction to pick up survivors should the need to ditch the helicopter arise.

The Corporal radioed that they were on their way to the scene directly and then proceeded at flank speed to the provided coordinates of the chopper. In just a few minutes, the Corporal made it first visual contact of the stationary chopper suspended only a short distance above the ocean surface. Moving in to the helicopter’s immediate vicinity, Proctor had an idea that he shared with Culley. “How about attempting an on-deck landing?” The reply from the chopper was emphatic: “Hell yes, let’s give it a go.” Absolutely no one wanted to see a valuable asset plunge needlessly to the ocean depths; the replacement price for the Sikorsky helicopter was about $250,000.

The Corporal carefully positioned itself directly under the still-hovering helicopter. Communications between chopper and submarine continued at a fast and furious pace. The mechanical issue with the helicopter prevented it from turning in any direction; hovering was still functional, but no adjustment in heading could be made from the cockpit. Once the Corporal understood this problem, the submarine maneuvered herself in the open seas such that her after deck was lined up with the landing wheels of the chopper. But did the helicopter have enough room to land on the deck?

There were two critical issues to ponder. First, was the beam of the submarine wide enough to accommodate the landing wheels of the helicopter? The answer to that question wasn’t immediately clear to those crewmembers of the Corporal who had gone topside to inspect the underside of the hovering helicopter. (The “recovery party” in this case consisted of volunteers headed up by the COB.) Second, assuming that there was enough room from side to side, could the pilot of the helicopter bring her down in the very tight window from fore to aft on the submarine deck without striking the sail with its main rotor or the fantail with its rear rotor? Since no one had ever seriously contemplated the answers to these questions, all the men could do was to look closely and guess. To all who were there, it seemed like a very tight proposition, but there seemed to be just enough room from fore to aft and from port to starboard along the after deck to give it a shot. Still, given the vagaries of the sea and wind conditions that could shift the relative positions of the submarine and helicopter, the whole idea was incredibly risky. However, short of dumping the chopper there seemed to be no other viable alternatives, so the submarine crew prepared for the surprise drop-in.

The COB and his topside men had no protocol manual to draw from. They simply relied on their instincts and collective ingenuity to mitigate the risks of the impending landing—such as taking down the long wire antenna to avoid an inadvertent snag. The men then grabbed mooring lines in preparation for the next step. The helicopter began its final descent as pilot Culley attempted to keep his bird directly over the centerline of the submarine hull. Except for one intrepid sailor, the members of the recovery party stayed crouched at a safe distance just forward of the sail during this time. The person who volunteered to remain in harm’s way was engineering officer LTJG George Ellis, who braced himself along the after edge of the sail and provided hand signals for the pilot to fine-tune his landing. Ellis’ role was critical as the margin for error was razor-thin. He risked serious injury or even death from any errant move during his makeshift role as a signal officer, as the main rotor blades of the descending helicopter spun very close to his head.

The radio shack of the sub sent the message, “Do you think you will make it?” Any response from the helicopter was delayed, since the message was received just as the three wheels of the chopper (2 front, 1 rear) made contact with the weather deck. The landing had to be absolutely perfect, and fortunately the seas had become mercifully calm during the attempt. With the precise teamwork between the hand signals of LTJG Ellis and the considerable skill of the chopper pilot, the bird miraculously touched down. Incredibly, a small part of each front wheel ended up overhanging the deck edge on each side, but there was just enough room for most of the rubber for the helicopter to remain stable topside. The men on board estimated that an inch or two longer span on the landing gear would have made the attempt a no-go.

“We’re on your deck and damn happy to be here!”, came the relieved reply from the helicopter. The pilot had stuck the landing on the very first try. The recovery party rushed over with their mooring lines to tie up the chopper to the submarine. It was the first time that a submarine had ever rescued a helicopter, and it was entirely coincidental (and fortuitous) that the width of the submarine deck was just enough to accommodate the chopper’s landing gear.

Once the blades of the helicopter had spun to a complete stop and the assembly was properly secured, the crew emerged onto the deck, where they were met by Lt. Cmdr. Proctor. “Welcome aboard!”, offered the skipper, in perhaps one of the most unusual unplanned visits in submarine history. The guests were escorted down the hatch and offered food and drink, while the Corporal steamed back to the Naval Annex at Key West, arriving just before sunset around 1830 hours local time. Word had spread about the plight of the helicopter and the unconventional heroism aboard the Corporal that had saved her; as a result, a large crowd had gathered spontaneously at the pier to greet both submarine and helicopter. It must have been quite a curious sight to witness the sleek submarine heading into her berth with the most unlikely bounty lashed to her dorsal hull.

Navy mechanics made the necessary repairs to the helicopter after a large crane lifted the bird from its precipitous perch on the Corporal. The broken oil casing on the rotor was replaced, and the chopper again was ready for flight. Subsequently, the four-man crew climbed back into the cabin to depart, after grateful handshakes had been exchanged all around. Giving the thumbs up, Cmdr. Culley started the main engine, and those assembled at the pier to see the chopper off held onto their hats as the big bird took to the sky. In minutes, the helicopter was out of sight, and the men of the Corporal had themselves the yarn of a lifetime—about the big one that didn’t get away.

My thanks to the members of the Poopie Suits and Cowboy Boots advisory board who contributed in various ways to the final product.

Today is a day we honor all Vietnam Veterans, though we do this every day, today the Nation will recognizen them for the...
03/29/2019

Today is a day we honor all Vietnam Veterans, though we do this every day, today the Nation will recognizen them for their service and sacrifice to our country. To each and everyone WELCOME HOME!! 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸❤️

Come join us on Saturday, May 11, 2019 for an Evening of Fun with Cocktails, Dinner, Live Entertainment and Silent Aucti...
03/01/2019

Come join us on Saturday, May 11, 2019 for an Evening of Fun with Cocktails, Dinner, Live Entertainment and Silent Auction at our M*A*SH BASH Fundraiser. Come dress as one of your favorite Mash Characters. Best dress Klinger Costume Contest. Tickets are $65/per person or $100/per couple. Call (951)696-3901 today to get your tickets before they are all gone.

It’s beautiful today at French Valley!
02/25/2019

It’s beautiful today at French Valley!

On this day in 1945 US Marines raised the flag on Iwo Jima. 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸
02/23/2019

On this day in 1945 US Marines raised the flag on Iwo Jima. 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

Happy Valentines Day from all of us and the US Navy ❤️😬
02/14/2019

Happy Valentines Day from all of us and the US Navy ❤️😬

Wow Courage under fire! Well done!
01/14/2019
Mo Rucker

Wow Courage under fire! Well done!

Well done! Thank you for making Army Aviation and Dustoff proud!

Just a damn cool helicopter photo from Italy
01/06/2019

Just a damn cool helicopter photo from Italy

Awesome shot by our great friend Oscar Bernardi of an S64 snorkelling on a water source in Italy.

May all your dreams come true!
01/01/2019

May all your dreams come true!

Merry Christmas everybody!!! 🎄🎄
12/22/2018

Merry Christmas everybody!!! 🎄🎄

Huey got an early Christmas present,, blades! 🎄🎉
12/21/2018

Huey got an early Christmas present,, blades! 🎄🎉

Wings and Rotors Air Museum's cover photo
12/06/2018

Wings and Rotors Air Museum's cover photo

RIP Sir you served your country with honor, pride and integrity. 🇺🇸
12/01/2018
The National WWII Museum

RIP Sir you served your country with honor, pride and integrity. 🇺🇸

A final salute to naval aviator George Herbert Walker Bush, last of a four-decade line of US presidents to serve in World War II and recipient of the American Spirit Award, the Museum's highest honor.

Wings and Rotors Air Museum's cover photo
11/20/2018

Wings and Rotors Air Museum's cover photo

Wings and Rotors Air Museum's cover photo
11/11/2018

Wings and Rotors Air Museum's cover photo

Happy Birthday to the US Marines! Semper Fi!
11/10/2018

Happy Birthday to the US Marines! Semper Fi!

Wings and Rotors Air Museum
10/31/2018

Wings and Rotors Air Museum

Have a spooktacular day!

Have a spooktacular day!
10/31/2018

Have a spooktacular day!

Happy Birthday to the US Navy!
10/13/2018

Happy Birthday to the US Navy!

Until they all come home....
09/21/2018

Until they all come home....

Did you know that you can make your groceries count for more than the food on your table?Thanks to Ralphs Grocery Stores...
09/20/2018

Did you know that you can make your groceries count for more than the food on your table?

Thanks to Ralphs Grocery Stores, we have found a very easy way for you to support Wings & Rotors Air Museum. All you need to do is become a member of Ralph’s Community Contribution Program!

Just register your rewards card and choose Wings & Rotors Air Museum (#RW604) as the charity you would like to support. After you register, your purchases will be credited to Wings & Rotors and Ralph’s will donate a percentage (up to 4%) of your total to Wings & Rotors Air Museuml!

Ralphs Online Registration Instructions
REGISTERING YOUR REWARDS CARD ONLINE:
1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click on ‘Create an Account’
3. Follow the 5 easy steps to create an online account
4. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
5. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to www.ralphs.com and click on ‘my account’ (you may have to sign in again first).

ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ONLINE:
(This means that you have already entered your email address and chosen a password)
1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘My Account’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. Link your card to our organization (Wings & Rotors Air Museum #RW604) by clicking on ‘edit my community contribution’ and searching for Wings & Rotors Air Museum. Click the button to the left of our name and click Enroll.

Address

37552 Winchester Rd
Murrieta, CA
92563

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 15:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 15:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 15:00
Thursday 09:00 - 15:00
Friday 09:00 - 15:00

Telephone

(951) 696-3901

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Wings and Rotors Air Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Wings and Rotors Air Museum:

Videos

Category

Nearby museums