SETI AIR - SETI Institute

SETI AIR - SETI Institute The SETI Institute's Artist in Residence Program page.

SETI AIR and the SETI Institute have become an international leader in the movement to integrate the arts and sciences. SETI AIR facilitates an exchange of ideas between artists and scientists so that these disciplines may inspire each other and lead to new modes of comprehension and expression. This program expands upon the SETI Institute’s mission to explore, understand, and explain the origin, nature, and prevalence of life in the universe. Our artists bring fresh eyes to help navigate difficult concepts and act as a bridge to broaden awareness of the science carried out at the SETI Institute.

10/31/2016

Hello Friends and Aliens alike. Six years since that chance meeting with Jill Tarter in NYC which led to visiting the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) with her and eventually proposing this program. SETI AIR now has a dozen artists in various stages of their residencies and inter-actions with scientists, both at the SETI Institute and at NASA Ames. Very proud of whats been accomplished together - the Art, the new friendships, the mind expansion. Our first group show is open - we hope this SETI AIR exhibition will become a biennial affair. Please spread the word. And if you are in California please come to the panel discussion on Saturday November 5th at 3 pm.

SETI AIR - SETI Institute's cover photo
10/31/2016

SETI AIR - SETI Institute's cover photo

SETI AIR - SETI Institute
10/31/2016

SETI AIR - SETI Institute

SETI AIR Program Inaugural Group Show
10/31/2016

SETI AIR Program Inaugural Group Show

SETI AIR Program Inaugural Group Show

SETI AIR - SETI Institute
10/31/2016

SETI AIR - SETI Institute

Address

189 Bernardo Ave, Suite 100
Mountain View, CA
94043

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 15:00
Sunday 10:00 - 15:00

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(650) 961-6633

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How should we respond to alien contact? Scientists ask the public Scientists searching the universe for aliens to conduct survey of the public for views on first contact Ian Sample Science editor @iansample Mon 1 Jul 2019 07.00 BSTLast modified on Mon 1 Jul 2019 11.01 BST Scientists wrestling with the delicate issue of how to respond should humanity ever be contacted by an alien civilisation have hit on a radical idea: a survey that asks what the public would do. Members of the UK Seti Research Network (UKSRN) are to launch what they believe will be the largest ever survey of public attitudes towards alien contact on Monday at the Royal Society’s summer science exhibition. The views they gather will help them shape plans for an international protocol that sets the ground rules on how organisations should share news of any signals that are detected; what sense can be made of them; and how, if at all, humans might reply. “There is absolutely no procedure enshrined in international law on how to respond to a signal from an alien civilisation,” said Martin Dominik, an astronomer at the University of St Andrews. “We want to hear people’s views. The consequences affect more people than just scientists.” We can’t rely on there being a Rosetta stone, or some great decipherment crib, in the signal Dr John Elliott Beyond sending probes to other planets in the solar system, the search for alien life has largely focused on listening for complex radio signals from outer space with the world’s most powerful telescopes. Last month, astronomers on the Breakthrough Listen project announced they had heard nothing after eavesdropping on more than 1,000 star systems within 160 light years of Earth. But Dominik points out that with 300bn stars in the Milky Way alone, Breakthrough Listen has barely begun the mammoth task of scanning the cosmos for life elsewhere. “If there were tens of quintillions of other civilisations like ours evenly distributed in the Milky Way, the Breakthrough Listen project would not have heard a thing,” he said. Dr John Elliott, a reader in intelligence engineering at Leeds Beckett University, said the global Seti community would announce any bona fide alien signal immediately. But in an era of social media that would spark a flood of fake news and conspiracy theories that leave people utterly confused about the truth, he said. The Rosetta Stone on display at the British museum. Photograph: Graham Turner/The Guardian The problem is that while scientists might quickly realise that an intercepted signal was complex enough to be broadcast from an advanced civilisation, it might take weeks or months to understand, if it can be deciphered at all. Any signal could easily be electromagnetic noise from equipment or a snippet of a terrestrial broadcast that leaked into space, unintended for such distant ears. “We can’t rely on there being a Rosetta stone [an ancient Egyptian stone tabletthat enabled hieroglyphs to be read], or some great decipherment crib, in the signal. It could be an image or simply junk,” Elliott said. “It will take time to understand and if that work starts to drag out and there is nothing new we can say, the information vacuum will be filled with speculation,” he said. “Conjecture and rumour will take over.” A radio message about life on Earth was sent to a group of stars 25,000 light years away in 1974, from the Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico. Photograph: Alamy The survey will help scientists work out how best to provide reliable information but also what should be done if it seems only polite to respond to an interstellar missive. The late Stephen Hawking warned that humans would do well not to alert alien civilisations to life on Earth, but other researchers disagree. Later this year, an organisation called Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence (Meti) International plans to beam signals into space containing references to the periodic table of elements. They will not be the first attempts to contact ET. In 1974, scientists at the Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico sent a radio message about life on Earth to a group of stars 25,000 light years away. Given how baffling the message will be to many humans in the 21st century, it is unclear what any recipient will infer from it. “It makes sense to create a legally binding framework that is properly rooted in international law,” Dominik said. “I’m completely comfortable with taking the whole thing above the level of scientists. If there are public consequences of replying and sending out messages that is a political decision and not one to be taken by scientists.” Extraterrestrial UK SETI launches largest alien contact survey Posted on Monday, 1 July, 2019 How would you react in the event of alien contact ? Image Credit: CC0 Pixabay Researchers want to ascertain the public's views on how humanity should respond to first contact with aliens. The question of whether we are alone in the universe remains one of the biggest philosophical conundrums of our time. While it seems almost inconceivable that our civilization is alone in the cosmos, the fact still remains that we have yet to see any evidence to the contrary. But what would happen if we did happen to detect a signal from an intelligent alien civilization ? This week the UK Seti Research Network (UKSRN) is launching what is being billed as the largest ever survey of the general public's attitude towards contact with intelligent alien life. "There is absolutely no procedure enshrined in international law on how to respond to a signal from an alien civilization," said astronomer Martin Dominik. "We want to hear people's views." "The consequences affect more people than just scientists." Even if we did happen to intercept an alien signal however, would we be able to understand it ? "We can't rely on there being a Rosetta stone, or some great decipherment crib, in the signal," said Dr John Elliott. "It will take time to understand and if that work starts to drag out and there is nothing new we can say, the information vacuum will be filled with speculation." "Conjecture and rumour will take over." Suffice to say, in such a scenario, determining truth from speculation may prove a challenge. You can view and respond to the UK Seti Research Network survey - here. Have you attended the exhibit “A message from afar”? Yes No Do you think that it is worth searching for extra-terrestrial intelligence? Yes No Do you think that there is life beyond Earth? Yes No Do you want to know whether there is life beyond Earth? Yes No If we discover a signal from extra-terrestrial intelligence, would you not care much about it just follow the news comment or interact on social media about this topicsocial media about this topic How would you feel about it? How would you feel about it? How would you feel about it? What would you consider a credible source? main news channels direct quotes from expert scientists official government statements all other sources If we discovered simple life rather than a signal from extra-terrestrial intelligence, would you find that less interesting similarly interesting more interesting? Some people think we should send messages into space even if we don’t receive a message first. What is your opinion? This is a bad idea. We should ban people from sending messages There should be rules or laws about who can send messages and what they can say Anybody who wants to send a message into space should be allowed to do so Many transmitters on Earth are broadcasting signals into space. Should we turn these transmitters down, or off, even if it affects things like TV reception or navigation? Yes No Is there anything else that you would like to share with us? Is there anything else that you would like to share with us? Is there anything else that you would like to share with us? Tell us something about you. Are you: Student (primary school) Student (secondary school) Student (university/college) Teacher Professional Scientist Retired Other