Chehalis Valley Historical Society Museum

Chehalis Valley Historical Society Museum The CVHS's mission is to maintain an association interested in the preservation of history for the lower Chehalis River Valley (eastern Grays Harbor).
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Wooden Boat Foundation
06/03/2020

Wooden Boat Foundation

Look who’s in Port Townsend today! Lady Washington is in for a little maintenance at Boat Haven! It’s best to park and walk by rather than drive by; unnecessary driving in the marina adds to dust, noise and traffic. Lady is a fully functional sail training vessel and was used in popular productions such as Pirates of the Caribbean and Once Upon a Time. [Update- she’s definitely not retiring; sorry if this announcement that she was being hauled out led any to believe that!] 📷 @jesslikesbikes

HIS HOME IS HIS CASTLEBy Kathy Spears JOHN ANDERSON lives on 80 acres in rural McCleary with the Empress Victoria. The t...
06/01/2020

HIS HOME IS HIS CASTLE
By Kathy Spears
JOHN ANDERSON lives on 80 acres in rural McCleary with the Empress Victoria.
The tidy, 95-year-old home is crammed with prized antiques and dotted throughout with pictures and knick knack souvenirs of English and Irish Royalty.
Indeed, John Anderson is a legend of sorts around McCleary and at the Simpson Timber Company's McCleary Door Plant, where the bachelor has worked as a cutter for 32 years.
Every Christmas, Anderson cooks and bakes -- including about 20 pumpkin pies -- preparing a splendid spread at the door plant for all the employees. To top the succulent dinner, he adds silver candelabras to the table.
"I WORK WITH the best people in the world.
"I have about 300 and some cookbooks, because I love to cook."
Anderson wouldn't pinpoint his age. "I've lied so long, I would have to look up my birth certificate. Just say I'm in my 50s."
He said he's remained a bachelor because, "the ones I wanted didn't want me and the ones that wanted me I was skeptical of. I have nothing to offer but good looks and social standing, he said in jest.
Some of his antiques are showcase pieces once owned by Henry McCleary, founder of the town and of the door plant.
The Empress, most at home in her royal surroundings, enjoys to stretch her large feline body out on antique, needlepoint covered chairs and purr in the luxury.
ANDERSON HAS lived in the home for about 40 years. He lived with his parents, Alfred and Katherine Johnson, and after their death he took over management of the household.
"My mother was a good friend of the Townsends (an old pioneer McCleary family) who were friends of the McClearys and she gave my mother some of the McCleary furniture.
"The rest was handed down from my family," he said waving the expanse of his antique laden home.
One of the most exquisite pieces of McCleary furniture is a massive oak buffet that graces Anderson's dining room.
The buffet features carved characters of the four winds on each corner and is set off with three beveled mirrors.
Anderson uses bees wax to keep the first-class sheen on the English Oak chair that McCleary used in his office.
THE OFFICE chair sits next to a small rocker that Mrs. McCleary used to lull her children to sleep. The chair was made specifically for that purpose as the back is indented to make it easier for mother to cuddle her babies.
Hanging above the first stairway, which came from the old Elma Hospital, is a mountain painting that came from the old Olympic Cigar Store and Bar in McCleary.
"This old painter, who was an alcoholic, came to the bar and painted for his drinks," Anderson said of the creator of the painting.
The beautiful parlor set in the corner of the living room came from another old McCleary family he didn't name, but he did explain how his mother acquired the furniture.
"This family came here and the couple divorced. The man remarried again and his wife said, `I don't want that old biddy's furniture in my house.' "
Hand-carved panels surrounding his fireplace came from the door plant and were designed by Orna Harris, a retired carpenter living at Copalis Crossing.
BESIDES INHERITING a penchant for antiques from his mother, Anderson also acquired her interest in royalty.
One venerable china closet harbors a host of plates, cups and other knick knacks featuring English royalty. He even has a mug and small bowl depicting Edward VIII with a crown. Edward was never crowned king, and all the souvenirs in England that were made for the coronation were smashed, Anderson said. Only china that made it out of Europe survived.
He has relics graced with royalty from Queen Victoria to Lady Di and Prince Charles.
In fact, John Anderson's floors are carpeted in Irish wool that came from London in the same pattern Queen Victoria had made for her Scottish castle.
"I was up at 2 a.m. to watch the Royal Wedding. I took a big snort of Irish whisky and toasted the bridal couple, made breakfast and went to work."
Anderson's favorite royalty is Marie Antoinette and Queen Victoria.
So far Anderson has made no plans his prized possessions after he dies: "I plan to live a while."
Right now, he and the Empress are probably beginning to plan for his legendary Christmas dinner at the door plant.
Anderson displays a prized collectors item, his bowl depicting the coronation of Edward VIII. Edward was never crowned and the souvenirs were destroyed in England.
This stunning oak buffet was once owned by Henry McCleary, founder of the town and of the McCleary Door Plant. Anderson's mother acquired the buffet from a McCleary pioneer family.
Bees wax is used to polish the chair Henry McCleary used in his office. The chair sits in Anderson's living room.
Anderson's living room is filled with vestiges of an earlier McCleary. The Irish wool carpeting came from London and is done in a pattern Queen Victoria used in her Scottish castle.--The Daily World, October 4, 1981

Quinault Cultural Center & Misc. History
05/30/2020

Quinault Cultural Center & Misc. History

CONFESSIONS OF A 1930S PAPER BOY IN MCCLEARYBy Brandon Ford--East County News editor ELMA - It has been about 50 years s...
05/30/2020

CONFESSIONS OF A 1930S PAPER BOY IN MCCLEARY
By Brandon Ford--East County News editor
ELMA - It has been about 50 years since John P. Anderson was a paper boy in McCleary but to hear him tell it is like listening to him recount yesterday's events.
Anderson has a quality rare in a world filled with TVs, VCRs, and rock videos -- he can tell 'a good story.
He lives in Elma now, but he has worked in his home town of McCleary at the Simpson mill for the past 37 years. "When they take inventory they just count me as part of the machinery."
One day last week he recalled his days in McCleary as a paper boy. One of the jobs he had while his father worked in the mill.
"The paper boy knows everything that goes on, especially if you deliver a morning and evening edition like I did," said Anderson, who will admit to being in his 50s if he is pressed.
He peddled the P.I. in the morning and, what was then, The Aberdeen World in the afternoon. "I was at every house or motel room at one time of the day or another," he said.
McCleary was a different place then, according to Anderson. The town had a bowling alley and a roller skating rink. The down side was that the town then also had open sewer ditches, too.
"Everyone minded their own business but everyone was willing to help," Anderson said.
As a young paper boy, Anderson's mother cautioned him that no matter what he saw he should never say anything about it until he talked it over with her. He learned the importance of his mother's warning early one dark morning.
"I had just delivered a paper to the front door of a house and was going past a 6-foot fence when a shoe landed right in front of me," Anderson recalled. "The shoe was followed by a man wearing the shoe's mate with a shirt tucked under one arm and his pants half on.
"He saw me and stopped just long enough to reach in his pocket and pull out a dollar. He shoved it in my hand and said, 'Here kid. Keep your mouth shut about this."'
Anderson was so astonished he took the money. As he rounded the corner of the fence into the alley to continue delivering papers he had a double-barreled shot gun shoved in his face.
"Those barrels looked like they were this big," Anderson said, making a plate-sized outline with his hands.
When the man with his finger on the trigger of the shotgun saw that Anderson was only a boy he lowered the gun and asked, "Have you seen an S.O.B.?"
The terrified Anderson shook his head no. The man continued his search and Anderson continued delivering his papers.
"It was my most terrifying experience," Anderson said. "I don't think I've been that afraid since."
When he got home he told his mother about the incident. He then showed his mom what he thought was the dollar the partly-dressed man had given him. The dollar turned out to be $10, the better part of a mill worker's weekly wage.
"My mother just shook her head and said, 'Nine-years-old and hush money already."'
Disputes were seldom settled with a shotgun. The more common approach was to duke it out on Friday nights.
"We never called the sheriff," Anderson said. "If their was a problem it was settled at the Friday night fight."
Usually the paper route was not too eventful. Most of the time, in fact, it was enjoyable.
The radio was the main form of home entertainment of the day. "You could peddle all over town and listen to the same radio program," Anderson said.
"Being a paper boy was marvelous then because you ate all the way around the route," Anderson said. "At the Nelsons' you would have Swedish sweet breads and at the Pellegrinis' you would have wonderful Italian food.
"I was absolutely square back then," he continued, "pretty strong from peddling my bike all over town, but absolutely square."
Even before the first delivery was made Anderson would start to eat.
"We put the papers together at the old Fox Cafe," he said "That's where the bachelors would eat before they went to the mill. There were tables filled with waffles, pork chops, bacon, eggs hash browns, almost anything you can think of. They always gave you a waffle or something."
But it wasn't just food that Anderson received as a paper boy. He was often treated to stories by some of the old timers in town.
"I knew a lot of the old timers," he said. "Ida Sine Murray, the daughter of the Sine family who were some of the first settlers, was one I remember well. She could tell wonderful stories of the early days.
Collection day for both the Post-Intelligencer and The Aberdeen World was the 10th of the month, the same day as payday at the mill.
In those days the stores in town extended credit from pay day to payday. You could even go to the movies on credit and pay your bill on the 10th of the month.
Most of Anderson's subscribers were good about paying for their subscription on time. One occasion when a patron was not so willing remains a vivid memory for Anderson.
"One time at the hotel one of the bachelors who lived there wouldn't pay me," he recalled. "I told him that my mother said I couldn't deliver a paper to him any more unless he paid me what he owed.
"He grabbed me by the shirt and said he would slap me if I didn't keep delivering the paper to him. He wasn't that big of a guy but when you're just a kid every adult looks big."
Suddenly, the man's feet were at the same level as young Anderson's eyes. Anderson looked up and saw the cause of the man's miraculous levitation. Blacky Clemons.
Clemons was another resident of the hotel at the time and he was a very big man, according to Anderson.
"Blacky turned the guy up side down and shook him until his wallet and everything else in his pockets was on the floor," Anderson said. "Blacky told me to take the money that he owed me out of his wallet. Then he put the man down and said, 'You don't ever pick on a kid in this town.'
"When I went back that afternoon to deliver the World I walked past the man's room and saw that his door was open and his mattress folded over," Anderson said. "I guess Blacky scared him good."
Events like that were not uncommon. "The men would fight among themselves but they never cheated a kid or passed a smart remark about a woman," Anderson said.
When Anderson was in high school, he and his family moved to Elma on South Union Road. His father retired from the mill and raised beef and dairy cattle on an 80-acre farm.
After high school Anderson went into the service. When his stint was over he returned to his family's farm and has been there ever since.
Part of the attraction of the old farm house is that the neighborhood has many of the same qualities as the McCleary Anderson grew up in.
"I live in the best neighborhood in the world," he said. "Everybody minds their own business but they are all willing to help. If anyone has a need they are right there."--East County News, January 1, 1986

Washington State Historical Society
05/29/2020

Washington State Historical Society

Washington State Historical Society
05/29/2020

Washington State Historical Society

Washington State Historical Society
05/29/2020

Washington State Historical Society

Start your TGIF with a story of #younglove from Eileen in Collections:
I was recently searching for information on these two and came across a funny story uncovered by Deb at the Olympia Historical Society. “In 1864, Asenath Ann Kennedy and Christopher Columbus Simmons eloped via a “rudely fashioned rowboat.” Asenath Ann was only 14, and Christopher 19. Legend has it that Asenath Ann placed a piece of paper inscribed with the number 18 in her shoe, so she could answer the preacher truthfully when he asked “Are you over 18?” The couple lived to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary.” Christopher was the son of Col. Michael T. Simmons, an early pioneer, and the founder of Tumwater.
(And, that middle name?!)

Catalog ID: 2012.0.271

Work progressing on Historic David Byles Residence in Elma, WA.
05/29/2020

Work progressing on Historic David Byles Residence in Elma, WA.

Update on the painting project: We’re still in the scraping and sealing phase. This house has all the original siding, which is actually the only layer of the non-insulated walls. Every crack has to be sealed. The flower-petal molding has been restored. Numerous pieces of rotten trim has been replaced and flashed. Every exterior inch is being inspected and investigated, which led to the discovery of dry rot in part of the foundation and spreading up the wall. This has also been fixed. Our hope is to have this historic house restored and preserved to last at least another 100+ years for future generations to appreciate and enjoy. This 10 year restoration has been progressing from the inside moving outwards. We’re thrilled that we can finally begin to show off the restoration efforts from street view! Colors are still not confirmed, but we’re getting very close.

TheDailyWorld.com
05/28/2020

TheDailyWorld.com

Washington State Historical Society
05/27/2020

Washington State Historical Society

What do you love most about museums? For me it’s always been immersive experiences. I love to imagine living in different time periods, which is why I like exhibits that feature large dioramas and interactive displays, like in our Great Hall of Washington History (check out the mine, the covered wagon and Frontier Town, all in the Great Hall)!

Here’s a photo of me and my little sister at the Milwaukee Public Museum, circa 1995. Whenever we’d visit museums back then my parents would always have to keep an eye on me because I had a tendency to wander off, lost in daydreams of times past.

#museumlove #museumexhibits #tiediefashion

This group was started by Tori Kovach and friends in the late 1980s as a fun way to draw attention to Aberdeen past fasc...
05/27/2020

This group was started by Tori Kovach and friends in the late 1980s as a fun way to draw attention to Aberdeen past fascination with brothels. The society is not currently active.

This group was started by Tori Kovach and friends in the late 1980s as a fun way to draw attention to Aberdeen past fascination with brothels. The society is not currently active.

Washington State History Museum
05/26/2020

Washington State History Museum

Hello, fellow history lovers! As you may have noticed, our Collections team at the Historical Society has been hosting social media on the History Museum and Instagram channels, and it's my turn!

Let me introduce myself: my name is Eileen and I am the Reference Archivist. What do I do exactly? Well the long answer is I administer public services to patrons in locating archival and primary source materials within our collections relevant to their research. The short answer? I help you find things! So if you have a question about anything related to the history of Washington, I’m your girl. I do my best to answer your questions and teach basic research methods, and if the answer isn’t in our records I’ll point you in the right direction!

#introductions #archivist #archiveshelfie #washingtonhistory

Remembering those that served.
05/26/2020

Remembering those that served.

Remembering those that served.

Chehalis Valley Historical Society Museum
05/26/2020

Chehalis Valley Historical Society Museum

Remembering those that served.

John Tornow
05/26/2020

John Tornow

Washington State Historical Society
05/25/2020

Washington State Historical Society

A post from Ed in Collections about Memorial Day.

Gone, but not forgotten. Memorial Day was established in 1868 to honor the military dead. Until 1970 it was observed on the 30th of May. After 1970 it has been observed on the last Monday in May. It has generally evolved as a day on which people remember those who have died by decorating their graves.

1998.1.99 Resolutions on the deaths of Railway Clerks iMemorial Day was established in 1868 to honor the military dead. Until 1970 it was observed on the 30th of May. After 1970 it has been observed on the last Monday in May. It has generally evolved as a day on which people remember those who have died by decorating their graves.

1998.1.99 Resolutions on the deaths of Railway Clerks in the Wellington [WA] avalanche, March 1, 1910, in which a total of 96 people were killed.
1997.10.97.2 Receipt for embalming Charles Edwards in Seattle, Washington Territory, 1884
1999.122.161 Last honors for Bunny. A 1903 lithograph depicting three grieving children burying their pet bunny rabbit. This was a typical sentimental late Victorian print depicting death.
2004.46.2.61 Death announcement for Vilas Ross Twyman, who died in Spokane Falls, WA, August 24, 1890, aged 3 months, 19 days.
2017.49.12 Ambrotype of a Hall family daughter who died about 1860. In the early days of photography people often had post mortem photographs taken as possibly the photograph they had of their loved one. An early slogan of photographers urged people to “Capture the shadow, ere [before] the substance fades.”
n the Wellington [WA] avalanche, March 1, 1910, in which a total of 96 people were killed.
1997.10.97.2 Receipt for embalming Charles Edwards in Seattle, Washington Territory, 1884
1999.122.161 Last honors for Bunny. A 1903 lithograph depicting three grieving children burying their pet bunny rabbit. This was a typical sentimental late Victorian print depicting death.
2004.46.2.61 Death announcement for Vilas Ross Twyman, who died in Spokane Falls, WA, August 24, 1890, aged 3 months, 19 days.
2017.49.12 Ambrotype of a Hall family daughter who died about 1860. In the early days of photography people often had post mortem photographs taken as possibly the photograph they had of their loved one. An early slogan of photographers urged people to “Capture the shadow, ere [before] the substance fades.”

Address

703 W Pioneer Ave
Montesano, WA
98563

Opening Hours

Saturday 12:00 - 16:00
Sunday 12:00 - 16:00

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Comments

Hi Hoping someone can help me in my research, I'm from the United Kingdom and researching my family tree. My Contact Details [email protected] In documents that have been passed on to me I am looking for any relatives related to the following people: Richard Clement Moody Leon Delmar Leon married Wilma Cunningham David Leon married Nettie Moody (Born: 1908) Duncan Moody (Born: 1910) Maggie Moody (Born: 1897) who married I think Richard Bailey George Moody (Born: 1899) Mary A Moody (Born: 1905) Louis Moody possibly marrying Caroline Hall BIRTH 03 DECEMBER 1895 • Fort Langley, British Columbia, Canada DEATH 05 JUNE 1986 • Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Canada They are all related to Richard Clement Moody, b. 13 Feb. 1813 at St Anne’s Garrison, Barbados Any information of any living relatives would be greatly appreciated I have enclose picture of Richard Clement Moody Born 1813. He founded Port Moody. Many Thanks in Advance Liam
A family relative - the Rev Jilson Penix - was Pastor of the Montesano Presbyterian Church 1919-1020. I understand that the old church building was at Main and Spruce in Montesano but it is gone now. Was wondering if you or anyone might have a picture of that old church that you could share or post.
If anyone is looking, on eBay at this time, there are several Elma Yearbooks! As early as 1926 all the way to 1988!!
I enjoy history all over in this area
I LOVE HISTORY!
This is one of my family photos. Frank & Laura Terry were my Great Great Grandparents. Employees of the Chehalis School November 1895 Back Row L2R: Policeman William Choke Assistant Cook Mollie Justice Apprentice Mabel Benn Farmer Robert D. Shutt Assistant Seamstress Lena Hick Domestic Louise Conkepe (? unreadable) Apprentice George Sanders Second Row L2R: Matron Eugenie M. Edwards Seamstress Mellie E. Dohse & "Pyke" Superintendent Frank Terry Cook Lizzie S. Shutt Baby Laurance Terry Teacher Laura E. Terry Front row: Baby Edith Heck Standing in the doorway: Eva Davis
This is one of my family photos. Frank & Laura Terry were my Great Great Grandparents. Employees of the Chehalis School November 1895 Back Row L2R: Policeman William Choke Assistant Cook Mollie Justice Apprentice Mabel Benn Farmer Robert D. Shutt Assistant Seamstress Lena Hick Domestic Louise Conkepe (? unreadable) Apprentice George Sanders Second Row L2R: Matron Eugenie M. Edwards Seamstress Mellie E. Dohse & "Pyke" Superintendent Frank Terry Cook Lizzie S. Shutt Baby Laurance Terry Teacher Laura E. Terry Front row: Baby Edith Heck Standing in the doorway: Eva Davis
Medcalf, John~ 2001, 05, 24, Montesano Vidette- 1878 Montesano pioneer pics
Medcalf, John~ 2001, 05, 24, Montesano Vidette- 1878 Montesano pioneer
Satsop~ 1886, Satsop's Dinky No. 1 [from 1959, 06 Grays Harbor Farmer]
The Chehalis Valley Pat Clemons Museum will be participating in he Montesano City Wide Yard sale starting Friday 8AM. Lots of good stuff including antiques. WE also have quite a few Montesano and Elma yearbooks included. In preparation for this I found a Elma High School Graduation announcement for a Marjorie Walker May 28th at the Graham Theater. No year given. If anyone knows Marjorie and the year she graduated I will put tin the appropriate year book.
I'm looking for the name of a Physician that practiced in the Montesano area in 1918. He was South American, possibly Brazilian..... any information would help.....