The American Record Cover Museum

The American Record Cover Museum Our mission is to preserve and exhibit the best in record cover art, design, and photography. We are currently fundraising for a museum building and operational funds, so we can open to the public and begin our mission.
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If you'd like to donate, please use the Paypal link below. Anything is appreciated!! If you would like to donate records or related artifacts, thats great too!

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September 19th, 1988: Bon Jovi releases their 4th studio album, New Jersey. It reaches No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart ...
09/19/2020

September 19th, 1988: Bon Jovi releases their 4th studio album, New Jersey. It reaches No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart in its second week of release after making its debut at No. 8. It remains at No. 1 for four consecutive weeks. It produces five Billboard Hot 100 top ten hits, the most top ten hits to date for any hard rock/glam metal album.

Art Direction-Jon Bon Jovi, Art Direction/Design-Hugh Syme,
Cover Photography-Cameron Wong

September 17th, 1976: One-hit wonders Wild Cherry start a three-week run at No. 1 on the US singles chart with "Play tha...
09/19/2020

September 17th, 1976: One-hit wonders Wild Cherry start a three-week run at No. 1 on the US singles chart with "Play that Funky Music".

Cover Concept-Bob Rath, Photography-Frank Lafitte

09/18/2020
The American Record Cover Museum

September, 17, 1931: RCA Victor introduces the first 33 1/3 rpm Long Playing records to the public at the Savoy Plaza Hotel in New York. RCA names them "Program Transcription Records."

Victor presented their new development to the press on September 26, 1931:
"...Before a select audience of more than a hundred musical celebrities, prominent editors, and educators at the Plaza Hotel New York City, the RCA Victor Company held the first demonstration of a new long-playing record capable of reproducing an entire symphony or musical program lasting a full half hour... The first composition to be recorded as a program transcription was was of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra under the direction of Leopold Stokowski at the Philadelphia Academy of Music..."

These records were able to contain up to 15 minutes of recording on each side. Unlike the Columbia LP long playing 33 1/3 records introduced in 1948, the groove size was not a "microgroove" but was the same size as for the 78 RPM disc. However, grooves were somewhat closer together than conventional 78s. Most of these records were pressed on a new composition which Victor called "Vitrolac" which Victor considered superior to the standard shellac material used in 78 RPM discs of the era. However, over time, Vitrolac proved to wear more rapidly than conventional shellac records and they did not have a quieter surface.

The venture was doomed to fail however due to the high price of the record players, which started around $95 (about $1140 in today's dollars) and wasn't revived until 1948.
This same format disc was soon used for radio "program transcription discs" which allowed companies to create and syndicate radio programmes which they would distribute to radio stations to originate, locally, popular shows or to add to local radio content. These recordings were 16 inches (40 cm) in diameter recorded at 33 1/3 RPM similar to the Vitaphone format. Such transcriptions continued to be used into the 1940s.

September, 17, 1931: RCA Victor introduces the first 33 1/3 rpm Long Playing records to the public at the Savoy Plaza Hotel in New York. RCA names them "Program Transcription Records."

Victor presented their new development to the press on September 26, 1931:
"...Before a select audience of more than a hundred musical celebrities, prominent editors, and educators at the Plaza Hotel New York City, the RCA Victor Company held the first demonstration of a new long-playing record capable of reproducing an entire symphony or musical program lasting a full half hour... The first composition to be recorded as a program transcription was was of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra under the direction of Leopold Stokowski at the Philadelphia Academy of Music..."

These records were able to contain up to 15 minutes of recording on each side. Unlike the Columbia LP long playing 33 1/3 records introduced in 1948, the groove size was not a "microgroove" but was the same size as for the 78 RPM disc. However, grooves were somewhat closer together than conventional 78s. Most of these records were pressed on a new composition which Victor called "Vitrolac" which Victor considered superior to the standard shellac material used in 78 RPM discs of the era. However, over time, Vitrolac proved to wear more rapidly than conventional shellac records and they did not have a quieter surface.

The venture was doomed to fail however due to the high price of the record players, which started around $95 (about $1140 in today's dollars) and wasn't revived until 1948.

This same format disc was soon used for radio "program transcription discs" which allowed companies to create and syndicate radio programmes which they would distribute to radio stations to originate, locally, popular shows or to add to local radio content. These recordings were 16 inches (40 cm) in diameter recorded at 33 1/3 RPM similar to the Vitaphone format. Such transcriptions continued to be used into the 1940s.

September 16th, 1985: Kate Bush released her fifth studio album Hounds of Love. The album's lead single, 'Running Up Tha...
09/18/2020

September 16th, 1985: Kate Bush released her fifth studio album Hounds of Love. The album's lead single, 'Running Up That Hill', became one of Bush's biggest hits and the album produced three further successful singles, 'Cloudbusting', 'Hounds of Love', and 'The Big Sky'.

September 16th, 1979: The Sugarhill Gang's 'Rapper's Delight' was released. While it was not the first single to feature...
09/18/2020

September 16th, 1979: The Sugarhill Gang's 'Rapper's Delight' was released. While it was not the first single to feature rapping, it is generally considered to be the song that first popularized hip hop in the United States and around the world.

September 16th, 1967: Jimi Hendrix's debut LP, Are You Experienced? enters the Billboard Hot 200 album chart, where it s...
09/18/2020

September 16th, 1967: Jimi Hendrix's debut LP, Are You Experienced? enters the Billboard Hot 200 album chart, where it stays for 106 weeks, including 77 weeks in the Top 40. In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine ranks it No.15 on their 500 Greatest Albums of All Time and two years later it is selected for permanent preservation in the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress in the United States.

Riley B. King (September 16, 1925 – May 14, 2015), known professionally as B.B. King, was an American singer-songwriter,...
09/18/2020

Riley B. King (September 16, 1925 – May 14, 2015), known professionally as B.B. King, was an American singer-songwriter, guitarist, and record producer. King introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that influenced many later blues electric guitar players.

King was born on a cotton plantation in Itta Bena, Mississippi, and later worked at a cotton gin in Indianola, Mississippi. He was attracted to music and the guitar in church, and began his career in juke joints and local radio. He later lived in Memphis, Tennessee, and Chicago, and as his fame grew, toured the world extensively.

King was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, and is one of the most influential blues musicians of all time, earning the nickname "The King of the Blues", and is considered one of the "Three Kings of the Blues Guitar" (along with Albert King and Freddie King, none of whom are blood related). King performed tirelessly throughout his musical career, appearing on average at more than 200 concerts per year into his 70s.
King died at the age of 89 in Las Vegas, Nevada, on May 14, 2015.

Featured album: There Must Be A Better World Somewhere (1981) MCA Art Direction/Concept-Kathe Schreyer, Illustration-Ron Kriss

September 15th, 1965: The Ford Motor Company becomes the first automaker to offer an 8-track tape player as an option fo...
09/18/2020

September 15th, 1965: The Ford Motor Company becomes the first automaker to offer an 8-track tape player as an option for their entire line of vehicles on sale in the US. Initially, tapes were only available at auto parts stores, as home 8-track equipment was still a year away.

September 15th, 1956: Elvis Presley started a five-week run at No.1 on the US charts with 'Don't Be Cruel'. The track we...
09/18/2020

September 15th, 1956: Elvis Presley started a five-week run at No.1 on the US charts with 'Don't Be Cruel'. The track went on to become Presley's biggest selling single, with sales over six million by 1961. This “double-sided hit” which had 'Hound Dog' on the B side, became the most successful on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart.

One side reached No.1 on the chart, the other No.2. The two titles spent a combined 55 weeks in the Top 100 in 1956-1957.

The American Record Cover Museum's cover photo
09/11/2020

The American Record Cover Museum's cover photo

September 14th, 1974-Eric Clapton's cover of "I Shot the Sheriff" reaches number one on the US singles chart.
09/11/2020

September 14th, 1974-Eric Clapton's cover of "I Shot the Sheriff" reaches number one on the US singles chart.

Atlantic Records promotional poster for Yes's new album "Close to the Edge", which was released on September 13th, 1972....
09/11/2020

Atlantic Records promotional poster for Yes's new album "Close to the Edge", which was released on September 13th, 1972.

Album cover and Yes logo design by Roger Dean.

Promotional poster for Yes's album "Close to the Edge", which was released on September 13th, 1972. Album cover and Yes logo design by Roger Dean.

September 13th, 1972-Yes releases their 5th album, Close to Edge. Cover art, typography and logo design by Roger Dean.
09/11/2020

September 13th, 1972-Yes releases their 5th album, Close to Edge. Cover art, typography and logo design by Roger Dean.

September 13th, 1972-Yes releases their 5th album, Close to Edge. Cover art, typography and logo design by Roger Dean.

Colorful advertising poster for the Edison Phonograph, circa 1900s.At the turn of the twentieth century, phonographs lik...
09/11/2020

Colorful advertising poster for the Edison Phonograph, circa 1900s.

At the turn of the twentieth century, phonographs like these were too expensive for the average person, so companies like Edison focused more on leasing them to fairs and amusement arcades, thus creating the enormously popular nickel jukeboxes. This one shows Uncle Sam posing in front of an Edison "Triumph" model phonograph and holding an Amberol wax-coated cylinder, which were the standard format before the introduction of the flat, disc-type record.

Colorful advertising poster for the Edison Phonograph.
Phonographs like these were too expensive for the average person, so companies like Edison focused more on leasing them to fairs and amusement arcades, thus creating the enormously popular nickel jukeboxes.

Happy Uncle Sam Day!The man behind the iconic image and fascinating nickname for the United States government is recogni...
09/11/2020

Happy Uncle Sam Day!

The man behind the iconic image and fascinating nickname for the United States government is recognized on Uncle Sam Day, born on September 13, 1766.

Sam Wilson, a meatpacker from New York, supplied barrels of meat to soldiers during the war of 1812. To identify the meat for shipment, Wilson prominently stamped “U.S.” on the barrels. It wasn’t long before the soldiers dubbed the grub a delivery from Uncle Sam. As such nicknames tend to do, its popularity spread.

The first illustration of Uncle Sam is unlike the one we know today. Published by Harper’s Weekly in 1861, the young government representative (a starred bandana on his head and wearing a striped vest) is depicted dividing up Virginia like a butcher. The image of Uncle Sam would take many forms over the years.
Credit is given to German-born illustrator and cartoonist Thomas Nast for developing the long-legged Uncle Sam with the starred top hat and striped pants who is more like the one we know today. The Harper’s Weekly political cartoonist took on many issues with his Uncle Sam character including Boss Tweed, Union recruitment, and Reconstruction.

During the modern era, Uncle Sam obtained some color. The United States Army awarded Montgomery Flagg with the artwork for the familiar portrait used in the “I Want You For The U.S. Army” campaign during World War I. It first appeared on the cover of Leslie’s Weekly, an illustrated literary and news magazine.

Featured Cover: Various Artists: Hits of the Forties Vol. 2 (1976) Capital Records for Radio Shack. Illustration: Shusei Nagaoka.

Happy Uncle Sam Day!

The man behind the iconic image and fascinating nickname for the United States government is recognized on Uncle Sam Day, born on September 13, 1766.

Sam Wilson, a meatpacker from New York, supplied barrels of meat to soldiers during the war of 1812. To identify the meat for shipment, Wilson prominently stamped “U.S.” on the barrels. It wasn’t long before the soldiers dubbed the grub a delivery from Uncle Sam. As such nicknames tend to do, its popularity spread.

The first illustration of Uncle Sam is unlike the one we know today. Published by Harper’s Weekly in 1861, the young government representative (a starred bandana on his head and wearing a striped vest) is depicted dividing up Virginia like a butcher. The image of Uncle Sam would take many forms over the years.

Credit is given to German-born illustrator and cartoonist Thomas Nast for developing the long-legged Uncle Sam with the starred top hat and striped pants who is more like the one we know today. The Harper’s Weekly political cartoonist took on many issues with his Uncle Sam character including Boss Tweed, Union recruitment, and Reconstruction.

During the modern era, Uncle Sam obtained some color. The United States Army awarded Montgomery Flagg with the artwork for the familiar portrait used in the “I Want You For The U.S. Army” campaign during World War I. It first appeared on the cover of Leslie’s Weekly, an illustrated literary and news magazine.

Featured Cover: Various Artists: Hits of the Forties Vol. 2 (1976) Capital Records for Radio Shack. Illustration: Shusei Nagaoka.

Wish You Were Here is the ninth studio album by English rock band Pink Floyd. It was released on September 12th, 1975 by...
09/11/2020

Wish You Were Here is the ninth studio album by English rock band Pink Floyd. It was released on September 12th, 1975 by Harvest Records in the United Kingdom and a day later by Columbia Records in the United States.

Inspired by material the group composed while performing around Europe, Wish You Were Here was recorded during numerous recording sessions at Abbey Road Studios in London, England. Two of the album's four songs criticize the music business, another expresses alienation and the multi-part track "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" is a tribute to Syd Barrett. Barrett's mental breakdown had forced him to leave the group seven years earlier, prior to the release of the group's second studio album A Saucerful of Secrets (on which he only appeared on three tracks). It was lead writer Roger Waters' idea to split "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" into two parts that would bookend the album around three new compositions and to introduce a concept linking them all. The band had used a linking concept for their previous album, The Dark Side of the Moon, to great success.

As with The Dark Side of the Moon, the band used studio effects and synthesizers and brought in guest singers to supply vocals on some tracks of the album. These singers were Roy Harper, who provided the lead vocals on "Have a Cigar", and the Blackberries, who added backing vocals to "Shine On You Crazy Diamond".
Wish You Were Here was an instant commercial success (despite the fact that Harvest Records' parent company EMI was unable to print enough copies of the album to satisfy commercial demand), and although it initially received mixed reviews, the album has since gone on to receive critical acclaim. It appears on Rolling Stone's lists of "The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time" and the "50 Greatest Prog Rock Albums of All Time". Band members Richard Wright and David Gilmour have cited Wish You Were Here as their favorite Pink Floyd album.

Wish You Were Here was sold in one of the more elaborate packages to accompany a Pink Floyd album. Storm Thorgerson (A founder of the UK design firm, Hipgnosis) had accompanied the band on their 1974 tour, and had given serious thought to the meaning of the lyrics, eventually deciding that the songs were, in general, concerned with "unfulfilled presence", rather than Barrett's illness. This theme of absence was reflected in the ideas produced by his long hours spent brainstorming with the band. Thorgerson had noted that Roxy Music's Country Life was sold in an opaque green cellophane sleeve – censoring the cover image – and he copied the idea, concealing the artwork for Wish You Were Here in a black-colored shrink-wrap (therefore making the album art "absent"). The concept behind "Welcome to the Machine" and "Have a Cigar" suggested the use of a handshake (an often empty gesture), and George Hardie designed a sticker containing the album's logo of two mechanical hands engaged in a handshake, to be placed on the opaque sleeve (the mechanical handshake logo would also appear on the labels of the vinyl album this time in a black and blue background). The album's cover images were photographed by Aubrey 'Po' Powell, Storm's partner at the Pink Floyd design studio Hipgnosis and was inspired by the idea that people tend to conceal their true feelings, for fear of "getting burned", and thus two businessmen were pictured shaking hands, one man on fire. "Getting burned" was also a common phrase in the music industry, used often by artists denied royalty payments. Two stuntmen were used (Ronnie Rondell and Danny Rogers), one dressed in a fire-retardant suit covered by a business suit. His head was protected by a hood, underneath a wig. The photograph was taken at the Warner Bros. studios in Los Angeles. Initially the wind was blowing in the wrong direction, and the flames were forced into Rondell's face, burning his moustache. The two stuntmen changed positions, and the image was later reversed.

The album's back cover depicts a faceless "Floyd salesman", in Thorgerson's words, "selling his soul" in the desert (shot in the Yuma Desert in California again by Aubrey ' Po ' Powell). The absence of wrists and ankles signifies his presence as an "empty suit". The inner sleeve shows a veil concealing a nude woman in a windswept Norfolk grove, and a splash-less diver at Mono Lake – titled Monosee (the German translation of Mono Lake) on the liner notes – in California (again emphasizing the theme of absence). The decision to shroud the cover in black plastic was not popular with the band's US record company, Columbia Records, who insisted that it be changed (they were overruled). EMI were less concerned; the band were reportedly extremely happy with the end product, and when presented with a pre-production mockup, they accepted it with a spontaneous round of applause.

Wish You Were Here is the ninth studio album by English rock band Pink Floyd. It was released on September 12th, 1975 by Harvest Records in the United Kingdom and a day later by Columbia Records in the United States. Inspired by material the group composed while performing around Europe, Wish You Were Here was recorded during numerous recording sessions at Abbey Road Studios in London, England. Two of the album's four songs criticize the music business, another expresses alienation and the multi-part track "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" is a tribute to Syd Barrett. Barrett's mental breakdown had forced him to leave the group seven years earlier, prior to the release of the group's second studio album A Saucerful of Secrets (on which he only appeared on three tracks). It was lead writer Roger Waters' idea to split "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" into two parts that would bookend the album around three new compositions and to introduce a concept linking them all. The band had used a linking concept for their previous album, The Dark Side of the Moon, to great success. As with The Dark Side of the Moon, the band used studio effects and synthesizers and brought in guest singers to supply vocals on some tracks of the album. These singers were Roy Harper, who provided the lead vocals on "Have a Cigar", and the Blackberries, who added backing vocals to "Shine On You Crazy Diamond".

Wish You Were Here was an instant commercial success (despite the fact that Harvest Records' parent company EMI was unable to print enough copies of the album to satisfy commercial demand), and although it initially received mixed reviews, the album has since gone on to receive critical acclaim. It appears on Rolling Stone's lists of "The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time" and the "50 Greatest Prog Rock Albums of All Time". Band members Richard Wright and David Gilmour have cited Wish You Were Here as their favorite Pink Floyd album.

Wish You Were Here was sold in one of the more elaborate packages to accompany a Pink Floyd album. Storm Thorgerson (A founder of the UK design firm, Hipgnosis) had accompanied the band on their 1974 tour, and had given serious thought to the meaning of the lyrics, eventually deciding that the songs were, in general, concerned with "unfulfilled presence", rather than Barrett's illness. This theme of absence was reflected in the ideas produced by his long hours spent brainstorming with the band. Thorgerson had noted that Roxy Music's Country Life was sold in an opaque green cellophane sleeve – censoring the cover image – and he copied the idea, concealing the artwork for Wish You Were Here in a black-colored shrink-wrap (therefore making the album art "absent"). The concept behind "Welcome to the Machine" and "Have a Cigar" suggested the use of a handshake (an often empty gesture), and George Hardie designed a sticker containing the album's logo of two mechanical hands engaged in a handshake, to be placed on the opaque sleeve (the mechanical handshake logo would also appear on the labels of the vinyl album this time in a black and blue background). The album's cover images were photographed by Aubrey 'Po' Powell, Storm's partner at the Pink Floyd design studio Hipgnosis and was inspired by the idea that people tend to conceal their true feelings, for fear of "getting burned", and thus two businessmen were pictured shaking hands, one man on fire. "Getting burned" was also a common phrase in the music industry, used often by artists denied royalty payments. Two stuntmen were used (Ronnie Rondell and Danny Rogers), one dressed in a fire-retardant suit covered by a business suit. His head was protected by a hood, underneath a wig. The photograph was taken at the Warner Bros. studios in Los Angeles. Initially the wind was blowing in the wrong direction, and the flames were forced into Rondell's face, burning his moustache. The two stuntmen changed positions, and the image was later reversed.

The album's back cover depicts a faceless "Floyd salesman", in Thorgerson's words, "selling his soul" in the desert (shot in the Yuma Desert in California again by Aubrey ' Po ' Powell). The absence of wrists and ankles signifies his presence as an "empty suit". The inner sleeve shows a veil concealing a nude woman in a windswept Norfolk grove, and a splash-less diver at Mono Lake – titled Monosee (the German translation of Mono Lake) on the liner notes – in California (again emphasising the theme of absence). The decision to shroud the cover in black plastic was not popular with the band's US record company, Columbia Records, who insisted that it be changed (they were overruled). EMI were less concerned; the band were reportedly extremely happy with the end product, and when presented with a pre-production mockup, they accepted it with a spontaneous round of applause.

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We are currently fundraising for a museum building and operational funds, so we can open to the public and begin our mission. If you'd like to donate, please use the Paypal link below. Anything is appreciated!! If you would like to donate records or related artifacts, that’s great too!

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Come visit Facebook Group Old Album Album. Lots of rare and researched record cover artwork
Last show as Five by Five tonight. Changing the name to "The Record Selector" for next week's broadcast. Probably also gonna have to start a new page since the geniuses at FB wont' allow me to change the page name. Anyhow, here's a few of the records I'll be pulling from on tonight's all vinyl, live show. Tune it at 8pm on TheRecordSelector.com https://www.facebook.com/therecordselector/photos/a.144215909474145/326407737921627/?type=3&theater
United Artists, 1959 - out there Latin dance lp.