National Black Doll Museum

National Black Doll Museum " Mothers! Give your children dolls that look like them to play with and cuddle. They will learn as they grow older to love and care for their own children and not neglect them."

Marcus Garvey The Museum
The 1st in New England, the second in the country , and most probably the largest in the WORLD! FOUND: DOLL HOUSE 5,000sq FT. This unique cultural and educational facility will be the second museum in the nation dedicated to preserving the history of black dolls. It is the brainchild of sisters Debra Britt and Felicia Walker .. They established the non profit organizati

Marcus Garvey The Museum
The 1st in New England, the second in the country , and most probably the largest in the WORLD! FOUND: DOLL HOUSE 5,000sq FT. This unique cultural and educational facility will be the second museum in the nation dedicated to preserving the history of black dolls. It is the brainchild of sisters Debra Britt and Felicia Walker .. They established the non profit organizati

Operating as usual

Good Afternoon FacebookI posted this last week on the website and have been debating if I wanted to share on Facebook..T...
09/28/2021
Black Superhero Toy Sun-Man Joins Forces With Mattel & He-Man

Good Afternoon Facebook
I posted this last week on the website and have been debating if I wanted to share on Facebook..
The dilemma was Mattel and creator Yla Eason collaborated to bring back sun-man it was a pre-order, problem was it sold out in hours. I received an alert a day later and it was sold-out.
I am not fond of having to be glued to a screen either a phone or computer to purchase an item. Why don't they just make enough so we can all enjoy the product. The museum owns an original. I am disappointed that my great grandson will not have the opportunity to share the experience of knowing his super power
is from the sun because of his melanin.

Sun-Man is once again helping to fill the void of inclusion among superhero toys now that he’s joined forces with He-Man and the Masters of the Universe.

Doll Blogger Debbie Behan Garrett posted last week about the debut of Makena Williams in the American Girl line. Here is...
09/28/2021
Three Harlem's Fashion Row Designers Created the Looks Worn by the Newest American Girl Dolls

Doll Blogger Debbie Behan Garrett posted last week about the debut of Makena Williams in the American Girl line. Here is the back story on the new collection a "World By Us" . I am hopeful that we are listening to the voices of the people.

"It was all about, 'Who's the future? What's the future?' And when I look at the landscape of designers, Samantha Black, Nichole Lynel and Kristian Lorén represent what the dolls stand for and what the future of fashion will be."

09/06/2021
08/06/2021
Team work gets it done! Volunteers from Mansfield Historical Society, Mansfield Historical Commission, Mansfield NRT and...
08/02/2021

Team work gets it done! Volunteers from Mansfield Historical Society, Mansfield Historical Commission, Mansfield NRT and The Museum gathered to help an amazing geosurveyor named Mike, and his colleagues Martha and Alex, scan the Leonard burial ground. Here likely rests enslaved African Americans. The burial ground is one of many locations significant to the history of Black people in Mansfield. We cant wait to see the scan results.

Photos from National Black Doll Museum's post
06/19/2021

Photos from National Black Doll Museum's post

Another great reason to come join us tomorrow!
06/18/2021

Another great reason to come join us tomorrow!

Another great reason to come join us tomorrow!

Mansfield unknown History being told
06/18/2021

Mansfield unknown History being told

Pleased to share the Juneteenth Proclamation adopted by the Select Board at last night's meeting. In addition to recognizing the genesis of Juneteenth Independence Day, the proclamation refers to Black history specific to Mansfield that is not represented in, for example, the Mansfield mural. Looking forward to a Juneteenth observance here in Mansfield next year, as well as further recognition of our Town's unique and diverse history.

06/16/2021
Good Morning FacebookToday is world Doll Day! A day of giving a doll starting a new friendship. My car is packed and as ...
06/12/2021

Good Morning Facebook
Today is world Doll Day! A day of giving a doll starting a new friendship. My car is packed and as I go about my daily chores I will give away a variety of dolls to some unexpected new lucky friends.
Good Luck
Happy Doll Day

Good Morning Facebook
Today is world Doll Day! A day of giving a doll starting a new friendship. My car is packed and as I go about my daily chores I will give away a variety of dolls to some unexpected new lucky friends.
Good Luck
Happy Doll Day

Juneteenth Celebration we will  exhibit, have mask ,doll and music kits available  in the kid zone, Storytelling ,Be ful...
06/11/2021

Juneteenth Celebration we will exhibit, have mask ,doll and music kits available in the kid zone, Storytelling ,Be fulfilled . Feel Free!

Juneteenth Celebration we will exhibit, have mask ,doll and music kits available in the kid zone, Storytelling ,Be fulfilled . Feel Free!

Archaeologists say Harriet Tubman's home discovered in Maryland
04/24/2021
Archaeologists say Harriet Tubman's home discovered in Maryland

Archaeologists say Harriet Tubman's home discovered in Maryland

Maryland state officials said in a news release Monday that archaeologists working on land owned by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service believe they have discovered the home where abolitionist legend Harriet Tubman lived as a young girl.

Connie Morgan  1935-1993Constance “Connie” Enola Morgan was one of the first three African American women to play in the...
04/04/2021

Connie Morgan 1935-1993
Constance “Connie” Enola Morgan was one of the first three African American women to play in the Negro Leagues. Morgan was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on October 17, 1935. Her mother, Vivian Beverly, stayed at home with her five children while her father, Howard Morgan, worked as a window cleaner. She first attended Landreth Elementary School and graduated from John Bartram High School in Philadelphia in 1952 before enrolling in the William Penn Business School.

Morgan first played baseball in high school as a catcher with the North Philadelphia Honey Drippers, an African American women’s baseball team for a total of five seasons. She played several positions, with a final batting average of .338. While in business school, Morgan read an article in the local newspaper about African American women playing for the Indianapolis Clowns, a Negro League team. She wrote the manager, Syd Pollack, and asked for a tryout. She was invited to come to a game in 1954 when the Clowns were in an exhibition game with the Baltimore Orioles. Pollack was so impressed with Morgan’s skills that he signed her to a two-year contract, replacing Toni Stone at second base.

Morgan stood at five feet four and weighed just one hundred and thirty-five pounds. She was called lightning fast when she had an opportunity to run the bases. She hit around .300, batting third in the lineup, and played in a total of forty-nine games. In addition to playing baseball, Morgan also played basketball for a well-known city wide team, The Rockettes at the Christian Street YMCA in South Philadelphia. She was mentioned several times in her hometown newspaper, The Philadelphia Tribune, as well as other African American and white newspapers where she often received special attention during her single year in the Negro Leagues.

A highlight of Morgan’s career was returning to Philadelphia for her first game in the city as a player for the Indianapolis Clowns at Connie Mack Stadium (formerly Shibe Park). The Clowns swept the doubleheader against the Philadelphia Monarchs. The stadium, located at north 21st Street and West Lehigh Avenue, was home to the Major League teams, the Philadelphia Athletics of the American League and Philadelphia Phillies of the National League. The stadium was demolished in 1976.

After just one season with the Indianapolis Clowns, Morgan retired from professional baseball and returned to her classes at William Penn Business School, graduating in late 1955. Soon afterward, she was hired as a typist at Moss and Demany Furriers in the city. She later worked for the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), the largest federation of unions in the United States until she retired in 1974. Morgan was inducted into the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame in 1995. She died on October 14, 1993, in her hometown, Philadelphia, just three days before her fifty-eighth birthday.

Marcenia Lyle “Toni” Stone Alberga was the first of three African American women to play professionally in the Negro Lea...
04/03/2021

Marcenia Lyle “Toni” Stone Alberga was the first of three African American women to play professionally in the Negro Leagues.

Stone was born on July 17, 1921, in Bluefield, West Virginia. Her parents, Willa and Boykin Stone, moved the family to St. Paul, Minnesota, when she was ten years old. In her youth, she developed a love of sports, including track and field, ice skating, and baseball. By the time she was ten years old, her parents invited a local Catholic priest over to talk her out of playing baseball, but instead the priest invited her to play with his team, the St. Peter Clavers, in the Catholic Midget League. Stone attended Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis but dropped out of school by the age of fifteen. She first played second base with the Twin Cities Colored Giants semipro team, a local barnstorming club which traveled around the Midwest and Canada.

During the 1936–1937 season, Stone worked out with the St. Paul Saints of the American Baseball Association. She moved to the California Bay Area to care for her sister Bunny and lived there from 1937 to 1946. She worked at a shipyard in the daytime as a forklift Operator, and at night, she worked at a cafeteria. While in San Francisco, Stone played for the Wall Post American Legion Team and the San Francisco Sea Lions in the West Coast Negro Baseball League, making about $200 to $300 a month. In 1949 she played a season with the New Orleans Creoles but left to play with the Black Pelicans, another Louisiana team.

Stone married Aurelious Pescia Alberga in 1950, a man forty years her senior who did not approve of her playing baseball. Nonetheless in 1953, Stone was signed with the Indianapolis Clowns, a team with a reputation like the Harlem Globetrotters. She dropped ten years off of her birthday and claimed she had a master’s degree to add to her appeal. Stone appeared in fifty games in her first season but was traded off-season to the Kansas City Monarchs.

Stone usually dressed in the umpire’s room and would come out by the middle innings, so she had a chance to shower and change before the rest of the team returned. After the 1953–1954 season with the Monarchs, Stone retired from professional baseball, finishing her career with a batting average of .243. She cared for her husband until his death in 1987 at the age of one hundred and three.

Toni Stone was inducted into the Women’s Sports Foundation’s International Women’s Sports Hall of Fame on Long Island, New York, and the Sudafed International Women’s Hall of Fame, both in 1987. In 1990 her hometown of St. Paul, Minnesota, declared March 6 “Toni Stone Day,” and Toni Stone Field was dedicated in that city in 1996. Toni Stone died of heart failure on November 2, 1996, in Oakland, California.

Toni Stone  1921-1996        Batter UpMarcenia Lyle “Toni” Stone Alberga was the first of three African American women t...
04/03/2021

Toni Stone 1921-1996 Batter Up
Marcenia Lyle “Toni” Stone Alberga was the first of three African American women to play professionally in the Negro Leagues.

Stone was born on July 17, 1921, in Bluefield, West Virginia. Her parents, Willa and Boykin Stone, moved the family to St. Paul, Minnesota, when she was ten years old. In her youth, she developed a love of sports, including track and field, ice skating, and baseball. By the time she was ten years old, her parents invited a local Catholic priest over to talk her out of playing baseball, but instead the priest invited her to play with his team, the St. Peter Clavers, in the Catholic Midget League. Stone attended Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis but dropped out of school by the age of fifteen. She first played second base with the Twin Cities Colored Giants semipro team, a local barnstorming club which traveled around the Midwest and Canada.

During the 1936–1937 season, Stone worked out with the St. Paul Saints of the American Baseball Association. She moved to the California Bay Area to care for her sister Bunny and lived there from 1937 to 1946. She worked at a shipyard in the daytime as a forklift Operator, and at night, she worked at a cafeteria. While in San Francisco, Stone played for the Wall Post American Legion Team and the San Francisco Sea Lions in the West Coast Negro Baseball League, making about $200 to $300 a month. In 1949 she played a season with the New Orleans Creoles but left to play with the Black Pelicans, another Louisiana team.

Stone married Aurelious Pescia Alberga in 1950, a man forty years her senior who did not approve of her playing baseball. Nonetheless in 1953, Stone was signed with the Indianapolis Clowns, a team with a reputation like the Harlem Globetrotters. She dropped ten years off of her birthday and claimed she had a master’s degree to add to her appeal. Stone appeared in fifty games in her first season but was traded off-season to the Kansas City Monarchs.

Stone usually dressed in the umpire’s room and would come out by the middle innings, so she had a chance to shower and change before the rest of the team returned. After the 1953–1954 season with the Monarchs, Stone retired from professional baseball, finishing her career with a batting average of .243. She cared for her husband until his death in 1987 at the age of one hundred and three.

Toni Stone was inducted into the Women’s Sports Foundation’s International Women’s Sports Hall of Fame on Long Island, New York, and the Sudafed International Women’s Hall of Fame, both in 1987. In 1990 her hometown of St. Paul, Minnesota, declared March 6 “Toni Stone Day,” and Toni Stone Field was dedicated in that city in 1996. Toni Stone died of heart failure on November 2, 1996, in Oakland, California.

Yesterday was April 1 and I wanted to post about Mamie Lee since we are all celebrating  America's favorite pastime Base...
04/02/2021

Yesterday was April 1 and I wanted to post about Mamie Lee since we are all celebrating America's favorite pastime Baseball and a glimmer of hope from this pandemic but this is no joke it's history and with the the season staring with two new African American women in the MLB I will share the stories of 3 players from the past.
First up
Mamie Lee Johnson 1935-2017
Johnson was born Mamie Belton on September 27, 1935, in Ridgeway, South Carolina, to Gentry Harrison and Della Belton Havelow. While her mother worked in Washington, DC, Belton lived with her grandmother, Cendonia Belton, in South Carolina and attended Thorntree School. Belton’s love of baseball began when she was six years old. Along with her uncle, she made bats out of tree limbs, bases out of pie plates, and balls from rocks wrapped in tape. In 1945 after her grandmother had a stroke, Johnson moved in with family in New Jersey.

Belton tried playing softball with the girls but was used to playing hardball with the boys. She tried out for all all-white boys’ baseball team organized by the Long Branch Police Athletic League (PAL) and became the only girl and only African American on the team. Her skill helped the team win the next two division championships.

By 1947, Belton moved to Washington, DC with her mother Della Belton, who had become a dietitian at Freedman’s Hospital (Howard University Hospital). Johnson graduated from Long Branch High in 1949. She attended a National League tryout in Alexandria, Virginia, in the early 1950s, but she was not allowed to try out.

In 1952 Belton met and married Charles Johnson, and the couple had one son, Charles Guy Johnson Jr. By 1953, Johnson was working in an ice cream shop and playing baseball on the weekends. She played with a few local minor league teams such as the Alexandria All Stars and St. Cyprians. She was signed by the Indianapolis Clowns as their starting pitcher in 1953 to replace their second baseman, Hank Aaron, who had gone into newly integrated Major League Baseball. Johnson would pitch for six, seven, or nine innings, striking out her fair share of players. Belton stood just five feet three and was once mocked by a rival player for being no bigger than a peanut, and the nickname stuck with her throughout her career.

Johnson hit between .252 and .284 in each season she played. When she wasn’t pitching, she would play second base. Her batting average ranged from .262 to .284. Johnson won thirty-three games and lost only eight games during her career where she earned about $400 to $700 a month. Satchel Paige helped Johnson perfect her curve ball before their opposing teams went on to play each other. That episode is depicted in a scene from the 1992 movie, A League of Their Own. Johnson is the subject of the 2002 book, A Strong Right Arm.

Mamie Lee Johnson retired from baseball in 1955, and after training, she had a second career as a Licensed Practical Nurse. She worked at Sibley Hospital in Washington, DC for 40 years before retiring in 1995.

Johnson’s list of achievements includes receiving the Mary McLeod Bethune Continuing the Legacy Award and being honored as a Female Baseball Legend by President Bill Clinton in 1996. She has made appearances with fellow former Negro League players Bob Scott, Jim Robinson, and Lionel Evelyn, and in 2005 she joined Washington DC Mayor Anthony Williams at the opening of a Washington Nationals game.

Johnson ran a Negro League Baseball shop in Bowie, Maryland, with her son until its closing. She passed away on December 18, 2017 in Washington, DC, reportedly of a heart ailment.

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Mansfield, MA
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Wonderful! Just found out about your existence! Thanks for all you do! :0) I started making black dolls this year - interested please check out my Etsy site:https://www.etsy.com/shop/Joysheartsdesigns?ref=seller-platform-mcnav Thanks! :0)
This baby belongs in a museum! Imagine my surprise… This is not a boy doll, even though she is dressed as one. The first person who comes up with her real name gets first dibs. I’m downsizing my collection and need to find a new home for her. Thanks!
Can someone explain to me while black dolls seem to be the most expensive. Even when its a new doll on the market they cone out ay either 30 40 or 50. Whats wtong with 20 10. Not every mother can afford to get her daughter 30 40 or 50 dollar dolls. They have to buy the white ones. Not saying i got any problem with pretty white dolls. But inventors especially black ones should come out with dolls no matter what the parents budget little black girls can have them.
So incredibly amazing
Thanks, Deb and NBDMHC!
We are pleased to announce the release of a new book. “Affectionately yours - Grace Storey Putnam” presents the designer of the historically unique Bye-Lo Baby doll in her own voice, through her letters. Grace vibrantly expresses her opinions on women's issues, fashion, art, literature, diet, and family – and dolls. The book contains scans of Grace’s original letters from 1933-44 along with easy-to-read transcriptions. Illustrations include never before seen photographs Grace took, as well as numerous images relevant to her letters. A chronology of her life and family puts the letters in a larger context. As a doll enthusiast, you are probably familiar with Grace’s “Million Dollar Baby”, created 100 years ago. Through the letters in this book, you will discover a woman who weathered the hardships and rewards of a young artist's life, who faced deprivation again during the Great Depression, and who retained her positive attitude and found creative solutions to the challenges she faced. This is Grace Storey Putnam as few people know her today. We look forward to sharing this work with you and hope you will consider including it in your museum shop. Joan Perry Anderson Weingartner Jodi Marie Montor Altendorf Tammy Lynne Montor Ramos “Affectionately yours - Grace Storey Putnam Letters from the designer of the Bye-Lo Baby” Now available from Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/1731537239?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860 Visit our page to see images from the book: https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=affectionately%20yours-grace%20storey%20putnam&epa=SEARCH_BOX If you’re in the Maryland, New York, or Texas areas, feel free to contact us about lectures by Joan about these letters and the friendship between Grace and Joan’s family. “How fitting! One hundred years after Grace Storey Putnam created the Bye-lo Baby, this book offers an intimate look at the artist’s friendships, struggles, and vision. These letters tell us how an artist finds creativity and stamina and beats odds that sometimes feel insurmountable. When I learned about the friendship Joan’s family shared with Putnam, I immediately knew she had an important story to tell.” Helga Althoff, doll curator
Airs tonight! Full episodes can be viewed online after tonight's airing.
You may have already seen this, but it popped up on my feed today so I thought I would share just in case:
A Knotted Rope - Jan 10 & Jan 11, 2019 - The Marilyn Rodman Performing Arts Center, 1 School Street, Foxborough
A wonderful visit at the NBD Museum. Generation and Bumble Bees