Saint Francis University HiPS (History and Poli Sci) Department

Saint  Francis University HiPS (History and Poli Sci)  Department The HiPS don't lie! See our official website at http://francis.edu/history-political-science
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National Museum of American History
12/24/2019

National Museum of American History

Today in 1783: George Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army.

His uniform:

National Historical Publications and Records Commission
12/19/2019

National Historical Publications and Records Commission

A few weeks after he demonstrated his first practical incandescent light in 1879, Thomas Edison decided to string together dozens of the lamps in a live outdoor display in front of his Menlo Park lab for the amazement of passers-by. Two years later, a member of Edison’s marketing staff, Edward H. Johnson, added a twist by placing a string of 80 lights of various colors around a Christmas tree in his home.and put the whole display on a rotating stand. President Grover Cleveland, first used electric lights on a White House Christmas tree in 1894, three years after electricity had been installed in the mansion.

The idea of electric lights spread, but it did not replace the relatively new custom of lighting candles on the Christmas tree (that was a Victorian fad). Not until 1902 did General Electric, a company founded by Edison, offered the holiday lights for rent to consumers who could afford such luxury.

But it wasn't until the 1920s that strings of electric Christmas lights really took off across the country, with the introduction of the longer-lasting and cheaper lights we know and love--until the wires get tangled or a bulb blows.

The NHPRC supports the Thomas Edison Papers, including a digital edition at http://edison.rutgers.edu/digital/. The Digital Edition provides powerful search capabilities enabling users to search for over 25,000 individual and organizational names in a database of more than 140,000 documents. These documents encompass a period of rapid industrialization and growth in the scale of enterprise from the Civil War to the onset of the Great Depression. In addition to Edison’s well-known contributions to the development of electric light and power, sound recording, and motion pictures, they also document his contributions to many other industries; including telecommunications (telegraph and telephone), electric batteries, mining, chemical production, cement manufacture, and office and home appliances. They include records of his pioneering laboratories and of the numerous companies he established at home and abroad. In addition they provide extensive documentation of his family and of his role as a symbol of American ingenuity.

League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania
12/19/2019

League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania

Act 77 allows voters to cast a ballot by mail up to 50 days before an election. Ballots must be received by 8:00pm on the day of the primary or election. Alternatively, you can visit your county’s election services office to request and fill out your ballot on the same day (in the same timeframe). Also, you can now request an absentee/mail ballot online!

More information: https://www.votespa.com/Voting-in-PA/Pages/Voting-by-Absentee-Ballot.aspx

National Historical Publications and Records Commission
12/19/2019

National Historical Publications and Records Commission

Nothing says Christmas like a glistening aluminum tree. If you are of a certain age, you may remember how ubiquitous these beauties were in the 1950s and 1960s. Fans of "A Charlie Brown Christmas" will remember the aluminum tree as a symbol of holiday commercialization.

Alcoa, one of the largest manufacturers of aluminum products, was one of the promoters of the silver and white trees. Shown here is an aluminum tree in the lobby of the Alcoa Building, 1966. Alcoa Company Photographs, MSP 282, Detre Library & Archives at the Heinz History Center. A grant from the NHPRC helped the archives to process 13 collections that document business and industries in western Pennsylvania, 1844-2002.

You can see more at the Heinz Blog (https://www.heinzhistorycenter.org/blog/collection-spotlight/a-very-aluminum-christmas), and according to the post:

"Alcoa did not stop at trees when imagining the possibilities of incorporating aluminum into Christmas displays. “Let the merriment begin with Alcoa Wrap aluminum foil,” begins an article in the December 1964 issue of the Alcoa Aluminum Newsletter. “You can make gift wrappings and glittering garlands…shape merry men and fanciful dolls…create gala ornaments both elaborate and simple and as countless as stars in the sky.”

Here's the Finding Aid for Alcoa: https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3AUS-QQS-msp282/viewer

Probably most famous for serving as a symbol of holiday commercialization in the popular “A Charlie Brown Christmas” TV special, aluminum Christmas trees began to decline in popularity in the mid-1960s. Though relegated to basements and garages for decades, aluminum trees have resurfaced as collector items on the second-hand market.

US National Archives
12/19/2019

US National Archives

Planning a holiday party? How about using President Eisenhower’s recipe for egg nog? You'll need a quart of bourbon and a pound of sugar to get started!

Recipe via Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum

Look at this fabulous sign courtesy of the woman who truly runs things at SFU, Ms. Melita O'Donnell!
12/11/2019

Look at this fabulous sign courtesy of the woman who truly runs things at SFU, Ms. Melita O'Donnell!

Remembering Pearl Harbor and the consequences.
12/07/2019

Remembering Pearl Harbor and the consequences.

After Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, through which nearly 75,000 American citizens of Japanese ancestry were taken into custody. Another 45,000 Japanese nationals living in the United States were also incarcerated.

Evacuees were allowed to bring only what they could carry. The Watanabe family brought this suitcase marked by identification number 17703 with them to the Minidoka camp in Idaho.

Learn more about Japanese incarceration in our online exhibit “Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II.” https://s.si.edu/RightingAWrong

Commemorating Pearl Harbor.
12/07/2019
Eyewitness to a "Day of Infamy": Commemorating Pearl Harbor

Commemorating Pearl Harbor.

We recently collected and digitized a series of letters written by a civilian, Beth Slingerland, as she watched the attack on Pearl Harbor from her home in the hills above the harbor. While she wrote, she wasn't sure if her husband had survived or not.

Madam C. J. Walker’s philanthropy
12/05/2019
Madam C. J. Walker’s philanthropy

Madam C. J. Walker’s philanthropy

A former laundress who became a millionaire from her hair-care company, Madam C. J. Walker was a leading philanthropist of the early 1900s.

Remembering Rosa Parks.
12/01/2019
The Library of Congress

Remembering Rosa Parks.

Today in History: On this date in 1955, Rosa Parks is arrested in Montgomery, Ala., for disobeying an Alabama law requiring black passengers to relinquish seats to white passengers when the bus was full. Her arrest sparked a 381-day bus boycott and led to a 1956 Supreme Court decision banning segregation on public transportation.

Our new exhibition, "Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words," opens at the Library this week: https://www.loc.gov/rosaparks/?loclr=fbloc

December 1 is World AIDS Day.
12/01/2019

December 1 is World AIDS Day.

By 1987, over 49,000 cases of AIDS had been reported in the United States, resulting in over 28,000 deaths.

That was the year ACT UP, a political action group working to end the AIDS crisis, was formed. This is one of their posters.

1987 was also the year that President Reagan declared AIDS "public health enemy number one." Prior to 1987, government officials including the Reagan administration remained largely silent on the topic of AIDS.

Activists were not silent, however. They placed more and more pressure on leaders to act. Americans had already been fighting AIDS for more half a decade. For instance, the Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC), one of the earliest AIDS organizations, formed in January 1982. You can learn more in our Twitter thread: https://s.si.edu/2NhmTkl

The AIDS epidemic modernized the gay rights movement and propelled gay liberation by decimating and restructuring communities, creating solidarity, and necessitating out-of-the-box confrontations.

Red Flash Student-Athlete Development & Academic Services
12/01/2019

Red Flash Student-Athlete Development & Academic Services

‪LAST WEEK OF STUDY TABLE! Normal hours this week starting with Study Table being open 6-9 PM tonight! On Wednesday, due to the Men’s Basketball game, Study Table will move to DiSepio 201 starting at 3 PM! Let’s #FinishStrong & make it 42 consecutive semesters above a 3.0! ‬

Forget impeachment- the real issue dividing Americans: was there really turkey at the first Thanksgiving?!
11/27/2019
American Folklife Center

Forget impeachment- the real issue dividing Americans: was there really turkey at the first Thanksgiving?!

Eating turkey on Thanksgiving is a longstanding tradition, and early colonists chowed down on turkeys in the autumn. But strangely, two years ago, an article appeared in the New York Times which claimed in forceful terms that "There Was No Turkey" at the 1621 feast often called "The First Thanksgiving." The article was sensationalistic and poorly sourced, and drew conclusions contrary to generally accepted history...so we said so in Folklife Today!

Find our critique, with a defense of the turkey as a standard Thanksgiving food, at the link. If you plan on eating turkey on Thursday, don't miss it!

https://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2017/11/dont-worry-turkey-on-thanksgiving-is-historically-accurate/?loclr=fbafc

When and why did Thanksgiving become a federal holiday?
11/27/2019

When and why did Thanksgiving become a federal holiday?

#NPS #FindYourPark #Thanksgiving

It was Sarah Josepha Hale, a magazine editor, whose efforts eventually led to what we recognize as Thanksgiving. Hale wrote many editorials championing her cause in her Boston Ladies' Magazine, and later, in Godey's Lady's Book. Finally, after a 40-year campaign of writing editorials and letters to governors and presidents, including President Lincoln. Hale's obsession became a reality when, in 1863, President Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday in November as a national day of Thanksgiving. (mk)

Ben Franklin on the wild turkey. If he were alive today,  he might say they are "majestic as heck."
11/27/2019

Ben Franklin on the wild turkey. If he were alive today, he might say they are "majestic as heck."

It's that time of year again when we turn to old Ben Franklin for his tribute to the turkey. Happy Thanksgiving!

"For my own part I wish the Bald Eagle had not been chosen as the Representative of our Country. He is a Bird of bad moral Character. He does not get his Living honestly. You may have seen him perch’d on some dead Tree near the River, where, too lazy to fish for himself, he watches the Labour of the Fishing Hawk; and when that diligent Bird has at length taken a Fish, and is bearing it to his Nest for the Support of his Mate and young Ones, the Bald Eagle pursues him and takes it from him. With all this Injustice, he is never in good Case but like those among Men who live by Sharping and Robbing he is generally poor and often very lousy. Besides he is a rank Coward: The little King Bird not bigger than a Sparrow attacks him boldly and drives him out of the District. He is therefore by no means a proper Emblem for the brave and honest Cincinnati of America who have driven all the King birds from our Country, tho’ exactly fit for that Order of Knights which the French call Chevaliers d’Industrie. I am on this account not displeas’d that the Figure is not known as a Bald Eagle, but looks more like a Turkey. For in Truth the Turkey is in Comparison a much more respectable Bird, and withal a true original Native of America. Eagles have been found in all Countries, but the Turkey was peculiar to ours, the first of the Species seen in Europe being brought to France by the Jesuits from Canada, and serv’d up at the Wedding Table of Charles the ninth. He is besides, tho’ a little vain and silly, a Bird of Courage, and would not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his Farm Yard with a red Coat on. "

From the Papers of Benjamin Franklin, supported by the NHPRC, an excerpt from an [unpublished] letter to his daughter Sarah Franklin Bache, Jany. 26th. 1784. To access the digital edition of the Franklin Papers, go to http://www.franklinpapers.org/franklin/ or at Founders Online at https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Franklin/01-41-02-0327

Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian
11/25/2019
Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian

Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian

The history of how these headdresses came to be part of the estate of a South Dakota physician hinges on an act of human decency that should have been routine. Because it wasn't, family members still remember, more than 100 years later.

Journalist Matt Stolle of the Rochester, Minnesota Post Bulletin, writes:

"When Native Americans give, they give things that are of value to them, Tamara St. John (Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate), a tribal preservation officer and descendant of the headdresses' original owner, said.

"'Either Dr. Peabody was given these headdresses because somebody was so grateful that they gave him a prized personal possession. Or they could have made it for him.... Absolutely they could have.'"

Matt Stolle, Post-Bulletin Rochester Post-Bulletin #Thanksgiving

Some great questions college students can talk about with family and friends over holiday meals!
11/24/2019
5 things to ask your family and friends over fall break

Some great questions college students can talk about with family and friends over holiday meals!

With midterms wrapping up and fall break right around the corner, this is a great time to reach out to your family and friends to ask them about their college experiences. By hearing about their journeys, you may gain some insight into navigating your own. Here's a list of questions to get you start...

Johnstown Flood National Memorial
11/21/2019

Johnstown Flood National Memorial

#NPS #Thanksgiving

An interesting Thanksgiving cartoon by Thomas Nast that appeared in Harper’s Weekly on November 20, 1869 entitled “Uncle Sam’s Thanksgiving Dinner” shows an optimistic view of the Thanksgiving holiday as a metaphor for the peaceful diversity of the nation. Beneath the portraits of Lincoln, Washington and President Grant and a view of Castle Garden (Ellis Island), Uncle Sam carves a fat turkey for his assembled guests representing the many nationalities that made up America. (mk)

(Picture: Thomas Nast Uncle Sam's Thanksgiving Dinner, c. 1869)

We see you History/Secondary Ed major Dakota Graham! :)
11/20/2019

We see you History/Secondary Ed major Dakota Graham! :)

‪Congratulations Elyssa, Dakota, Kei-shon, Carysse, and Josh for being selected to represent Saint Francis U Athletics at the 2020 APPLE Training Institute in Charlottesville! Going to be a powerful weekend at one of the best training institutes/conferences in the country! ‬

Today's Document
11/14/2019

Today's Document

"Joseph Ambrose, an 86-year-old World War I veteran, watches the dedication day parade for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. He is holding the flag that covered the casket of his son, who was killed in the Korean War," 11/13/1982
https://catalog.archives.gov/id/6375707

Series: Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files, 1982 - 2007. Record Group 330: Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, 1921 - 2008.

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