Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs

Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs (DGCP) is a
not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting
contemporary visual arts to a broad public audience.
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Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs (DGCP) is a 501(c)(3)
not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting
contemporary visual arts to a broad public audience. Our programs of independently-curated exhibitions,
publications, curator's talks, symposia, and art donations
seek to illuminate and deepen the public’s understanding
and appreciation of contemporary art as well as to foster
dialogue about contemporary art. With each exhibition,
we produce and distribute an illustrated brochure to
nearly 4,000 members of our audience: artists, art historians, critics, and arts-related institutions worldwide. The illustrated brochures feature a 2,000-2,500-word essay by the curator detailing the intellectual
underpinnings of the exhibition. Our efforts focus on contextualization and interpretation of issues in
contemporary art encompassing work both world-wide and from America, and from emerging as well as
long-established artists. Although most exhibitions are organized around an articulated theme, some
focus on artists working in a particular medium and others explore lesser-known aspects of a single
artist’s work. Admission to all our exhibitions and related events is free and open to the public.

Operating as usual

We can only do this together. Thank you to all essential workers and frontliners! We are with you. Additionally, thank y...
04/27/2020

We can only do this together. Thank you to all essential workers and frontliners! We are with you. Additionally, thank you to all who are supporting those frontliners and staying home to flatten the curve! 💚

03/09/2020

It's officially time for #SpringCleaning in NYC. 🌸🌻 Don't forget to bring your old electronics to Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs in Long Island City for responsible recycling!

Make Your Own Book! The Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs welcomes children (ages 6 - 12) on March 15 to make their ver...
03/02/2020

Make Your Own Book! The Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs welcomes children (ages 6 - 12) on March 15 to make their very own book with artist Furen Dai.

Participation is limited to 16 children. RSVP @ [email protected] or 718-937-6317

How to Get Over Yourself, According to Jerry Saltz
02/14/2020
How to Get Over Yourself, According to Jerry Saltz

How to Get Over Yourself, According to Jerry Saltz

"If you get to work, surround yourself with people who share your interests, and cast aside envy, the best is yet to come," the Pulitzer-winning critic writes.

TODAY @ 4pm: Join Curator Nadine Braquetti along with artists Furen Dai and Lena Miskulin in a walk through discussion o...
02/09/2020

TODAY @ 4pm:
Join Curator Nadine Braquetti along with artists Furen Dai and Lena Miskulin in a walk through discussion of Poem of the Earth!

📸: Lena Miskulin, "Ancestry" (details)

The Dorsky Gallery is honored to be featured in the Queens Chronicle - Please stop by and see the works mentioned in per...
02/07/2020
Environmentally conscious art at the Dorsky

The Dorsky Gallery is honored to be featured in the Queens Chronicle - Please stop by and see the works mentioned in person!

The Dorsky Gallery’s newest exhibition, “Poem of the Earth: From Ego to Eco — An intergenerational exhibition of Ecopoetic Art,” wants you to pause your daily rush and focus on the present if just for a moment.The exhibition, which opened in Long Island City on Jan. 26 and will remain on vie...

Incidents like these always constitute a tragedy. Our thoughts are with the museum workers and all future visitors who w...
02/07/2020
The Stories Lost in the Museum of Chinese in America Fire

Incidents like these always constitute a tragedy. Our thoughts are with the museum workers and all future visitors who will miss out on what was lost.

We tend to think of museums as holding the rare, the valuable, the precious. But MOCA was formed to tell the stories no one else thought were worth telling

A Multicolored Library of the World's Ochre Pigments Archived by Heidi Gustafson
02/06/2020
A Multicolored Library of the World's Ochre Pigments Archived by Heidi Gustafson

A Multicolored Library of the World's Ochre Pigments Archived by Heidi Gustafson

Washington-based artist and researcher Heidi Gustafson forages, processes, and catalogs natural mineral samples for the Early Futures Ocher Archive. Ranging in color based on its elemental structure, ochre is crushed into a powder and used in various applications from art to medicine. With over 550

02/06/2020

Events like these are just one example of the interesting cultural and artistic events that the #Queens community has to offer. We are definitely looking forward to this! 😃

As we enter #BlackHistoryMonth 2020, let us think on this:Often those who stand to learn the most from this month are th...
02/03/2020
Let America Be America Again by Langston Hughes | Poetry Foundation

As we enter #BlackHistoryMonth 2020, let us think on this:
Often those who stand to learn the most from this month are the ones who stand indifferent or opposed. The art world is growing increasingly smaller and as it does, it is paramount that we remember that there are a world of things to learn from and enjoy and listen to from those least heard.

Let America be America again.

Museum of Chinese in America
01/31/2020

Museum of Chinese in America

UPDATE 3/08/20:

Dear MOCA Friends and Neighbors,

We had a momentous day on Sunday, March 8. With the great leadership of NYC DCAS, including Quintin Haynes, NYC DCAS Executive Deputy Commissioner and his stellar team as well as multiple NYC agencies, the strong advocacy of community leaders, the generous spirit of our 70 Mulberry neighbors, Council Member Margaret Chin and Chief of Staff Gigi Li, MOCA was able to retrieve nearly all of its Collections (minus a few signs and boxes that were severely damaged).

We are calling it the miracle on Mulberry. What a day!

Members of the MOCA team greeted friends and neighbors throughout the day. We are delighted that Chen Dance Center and United East Athletics Association also were able to retrieve many important items.

To view images as recovery day unfolded, see below. Photos by Edward Cheng of MOCA.

Next stop: triage in Westchester!

We will continue to update you as soon as we have more information.

Gratefully,

The MOCA Team

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UPDATE 3/07/20:

So moved by the outpouring of support for 70 Mulberry—love and community. Thank you @chinatownfirerelief.❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

See photo below.

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UPDATE 3/06/20:

Please support @chinatownfirerelief and help the 5 non-profit organizations impacted by the fire at 70 Mulberry Street - Chen Dance Center @chendancecenter, Chinatown Manpower Project, CPC Chinatown Senior Center @cpc_nyc, United East Athletics Association @ueaaliondance, and MOCA. ⁣

This fundraiser will be an amazing evening of art, music and community building. ⁣

⁣Thank you to all the individuals, organizations, artists and volunteers who have made this fundraiser possible. ⁣

We are thankful to be a part of this community. We know that a victory for any of us is a victory for all of us. And we thank each and every one of you for showing the world what we can achieve when we come together in unity. ⁣

Please support by purchasing tickets at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/chinatown-fire-relief-fundraiser-tickets-96994726839⁣

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UPDATE 3/05/20: Thank you, thank you to Wing on Wo and the W.O.W. project. Their silent art auction raised nearly $10,000 for the MOCA Archives Fire Recovery effort. We promise to spend every dollar wisely to recover, restore and rebuild the collection and tell the community's stories. ⁣

We're glad so many art pieces offered in the auction found a home. Thank you to everyone for bidding.⁣

Thank you @wingonwoandco @stephaniehshih @jessicasorentang @lillikins @kuoskies @whatchidid @tiffanysawceramics @budglick @dianazeng_ @jenlouie_ @jxiaoooo @monkeymittens @jadessong @lynkeeart @heidiwtlau @tiffanytangstudio @s_kin @fu_ceramics @fffttts and to any and all artists, makers or creatives we may have missed. After the fire, we all rise!⁣

Photo: The W.O.W. Project's 1st Year Anniversary by Taylor Jung @ta________je. Taylor's photo was part of the After the Fire, We Rise auction. ⁣

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⁣UPDATE 3/04/20:

We've got the key. ⁣

We have big plans in store for a new space less than a block away from MOCA that we'll transform into the new Collections and Research Center.⁣

It will be the new home for our archives that we’ll recover from 70 Mulberry Street. Watch this space ...⁣

Photo credit: Beichen Zhang

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⁣UPDATE 3/02/20: In this era of digital communications, it’s nice to receive a handwritten letter once in a while. And even nicer when it’s hand delivered. ⁣

We discovered that a staff member of Children’s Museum of Art @cmainnyc took the time to walk from their location at Hudson Square, New York to personally deliver this letter along with a donation to aid MOCA’s recovery from the fire. The letter reads:⁣

“Dear MOCA,⁣

We were saddened to hear of the recent damage to your archives. Our staff held a pool & raised a modest $80 to contribute towards your recovery fund.⁣

Sending kindest regards, ⁣

Your neighbors”⁣

To our amazing neighbors at the Children’s Museum of the Arts, thank you so much for your thoughtful gift. ⁣

At a time when people seem to have lost the ability to take time and notice and listen to others, your thoughtfulness reminds us what it means to truly be neighbors. ⁣

We were very touched you took the time to hand deliver this letter. We will use the money wisely to recover, repair and rebuild the collection. Thank you! ⁣

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UPDATE 2/28/20: Gratitude. ⁣

That's what we're feeling in huge abundance right now. Immense heartfelt gratitude to everyone who has supported our fire recovery effort this past month. ⁣

We would like to take this moment and share with you a letter (picture below) we received in the mail from a school in New Jersey. It reads:⁣

"Dear Museum of Chinese in America,⁣

We are 3rd and 4th graders from Stevens Cooperative School, in Newport, Jersey City. We wanted to donate some money and support to your company, because in December we visited your museum for our study of Chinese Immigration.⁣

When we heard about the damage to your archives, we wanted to help by making a bake sale. We really enjoyed our visit so we thought this was a way to contribute and say thank you. ⁣

As a group we decided to do a bake sale because it was an easy and fun way to raise some money. We hope with this money you can recover from your loss.⁣

Sincerely, 3rd and 4th grade R." ⁣
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To the amazing students of 3rd and 4th Grade R of Stevens Cooperative School, we want to say a HUGE THANK YOU! ⁣

Your donation means so much to us and we promise to use every hard-earned dollar wisely to recover, repair and rebuild our archives. ⁣

We have pinned your letter to our wall so it has a special place in our office. We will always remember your kindness. ⁣

From all of us at MOCA, thank you⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣
⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣

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UPDATE 2/27/20:

Dear MOCA Friends and Neighbors,

Given the clear timeline and action plan by NYC agencies to retrieve the remaining 80% of the MOCA Collection at 70 Mulberry, the Museum held a community gathering at its main space at 215 Centre Street in lieu of a planned march and rally on Thursday, February 27.

Signs and posters that were originally created to be used for the march and rally were instead exhibited on the meeting room walls.

Nancy Yao Maasbach, MOCA president, provided an update that the NYC Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS) process to recover the remaining archives would begin the week of March 2, 2020 and that MOCA will be leasing a space at 3 Howard Street to serve as the museum's Collections and Research Center offering programs for digitization and recovery.

At the gathering, various community members in attendance were then invited to share their memories and stories of what 70 Mulberry Street means to them and to Chinese life in America, and what MOCA's Collections mean to American history.

The retrieval process of the archives is an ongoing one and we are committed to working with the community and gathering your input to ensure the efficient and effective recovery and restoration of the MOCA Collections.

We remain indebted to all of you for your support.

- The MOCA team

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UPDATE 2/26/20:

BREAKING NEWS!

Dear MOCA Friends and Neighbors,

MOCA is incredibly relieved to hear and share that the MOCA team just received word that the remaining 80% of the MOCA Collections, along with our neighbor tenants’ belongings, will be retrieved next week from 70 Mulberry. This is in no small part due to your steadfast support over the last couple of days!

Yesterday and today, MOCA gathered concerned members of the community, volunteers, and supporters to make known the urgent prioritization needed to salvage the MOCA Collections which have been stuck in 70 Mulberry since January 23. The constant drumbeat to save MOCA’s Collections by community members such as yourself was heard loud and clear in City Hall. NYC agencies led by DCAS have now committed to retrieve all of MOCA’s remaining archives alongside the prized belongings of our neighbors’.

This outcome was only made possible thanks to the support of all who expressed concern, prioritized response, and helped out to ensure that this vital history was not lost. Thank you for your role in this outcome!

Given the clear timeline and action plan to retrieve the remaining items at 70 Mulberry, MOCA will replace its march and rally with a recovery sign-up and breakfast gathering on Thursday, February 27 at 9:30AM at 215 Centre Street. The retrieval process is an ongoing one and we are committed to working with the community and gathering your input to ensure DCAS fulfills its commitments.

MOCA is indebted to all of you for your support…and most of all…your stories.

This is not just a victory for MOCA. This is a victory for the entire community, for Chinatown, for every family whose life stories enrich the American narrative. This is a victory because each of you showed the power of what can be achieved when we come together in unity. Thank you.

- The MOCA team

Photo of 70 Mulberry Street by Beichen Zhang

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UPDATE 2/26/20: We are staging a march and rally at 9:30AM this Thursday, February 27, 2020. We are marching from 215 Centre Street to 70 Mulberry Street.

We are doing this to heighten the importance of 70 Mulberry to Chinese life in America, the national status of MOCA's Collections, and the urgent prioritization MOCA and the community demand to salvage this priceless, national collection. Our reasons for the rally are as follows:

Four weeks have passed; despite sincere efforts by NYC agencies to retrieve materials from 70 Mulberry, the importance of MOCA’s irreplaceable national collection has not been given proper priority. This jeopardizes MOCA's Collections and the accurate telling of U.S. history.

We cannot let MOCA’s Collections “rot” without providing a space and platform for all concerned parties to voice their support and demand action.

The time is now: MOCA must make a concerted effort to move beyond the regular process and make loud and clear the importance of its Collections. Our motto is: Save Our Stories, Save Our Heritage, Save Our History, 70 Mulberry. Official announcement to come. Please stay tuned ...

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UPDATE 2/24/20: It's now been one month since the fire at 70 Mulberry Street placed our 85,000-item archive in jeopardy. ⁣

We want to take this moment and share a video that we just filmed today at https://www.instagram.com/p/B8-DmDBlYuj/?igshid=1kqzbohr1zvlq

Behind those windows on the second floor lies the majority of MOCA's collection - artifacts, letters, documents, and objects that represent family histories and tell the untold stories in the making of America. ⁣

We want to thank everyone who has supported the MOCA Archives Fire Recovery effort so far. We ask you to keep us in your thoughts and prayers.

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UPDATE 2/21/20: We want to express our deepest thanks and gratitude to @wingonwoandco and the W.O.W. Project for bringing together 25+ artists and makers for a silent art auction from Feb. 17 to Feb. 24. The auction will raise funds for the recovery, repair and rebuilding of MOCA's archives following the fire at 70 Mulberry Street.⁣⁣
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Link to the silent art auction is here at https://www.facebook.com/events/1072728656417708/

This support means so much to us at this time. It encourages us to work even harder to preserve the precious artifacts and life stories that tell the untold stories in the making of America. ⁣⁣
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Thank you @wingonwoandco @stephaniehshih @jessicasorentang @lillikins @kuoskies @whatchidid @tiffanysawceramics @budglick @dianazeng_ @jenlouie_ @jxiaoooo @monkeymittens @jadessong @lynkeeart @heidiwtlau @tiffanytangstudio @s_kin @fu_ceramics @fffttts and to any and all artists, makers or creatives we may have missed. Graphic by @bychristalsih⁣⁣
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UPDATE 2/20/20: We're continuing to share photos of materials preserved in MOCA's collection taken by Kevin Chu, MOCA's assistant director of collections. These are, as Kevin put it, "pictures from better times" before the fire at 70 Mulberry Street devastated our archives. ⁣

The photo below is of audiovisual materials used in the making of the documentary Who Killed Vincent Chin? The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 1989 for telling the story of Vincent Chin, who was beaten to death with a baseball bat in 1982 by two aggrieved white auto workers in Detroit who believed he was Japanese. ⁣

Although all of the items in our Who Killed Vincent Chin? collection were retrieved, their condition - like so many of the hundreds of artifacts we've recovered - is still being carefully assessed for damage. Thank you to everyone who has supported or donated to the MOCA Archives Fire Recovery effort so far. If you'd like to participate, please go to our GoFundMe page at https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/campaign/mocafirerecovery

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UPDATE 2/19/20: Here’s another photo shared by Kevin Chu, our assistant director of collections, of some of his favorite objects in MOCA’s archives.

The Chinese characters in this sign say “Bao Li No. 6 oldest pharmacy.” This sign is from the W.M. Olliffe Apothecary, which was founded in 1805, making it one of the oldest pharmacies in New York. The original apothecary would later relocate to 6 Bowery on the edge of Chinatown and end up being owned by brothers Toy and Buck Wong in 1962.

According to a New York Times article, in 1982 the Wong brothers closed the business and auctioned off the last remnants of the 177-year-old pharmacy.
This sign is just one of the many irreplaceable historical objects safeguarded in MOCA’s archives that tells the untold stories in the making of America.

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UPDATE 2/18/20: It's hard to believe that it's been nearly 4 weeks since the fire at 70 Mulberry Street changed our lives. As we reflect on what happened, we'd like to share excerpts from a social media post written by Kevin Chu (pictured), MOCA's assistant director of collections. Kevin wrote this a few days after the night of the fire:

"I’ve worked in the archives of @mocanyc for over 6 years and was there practically every day. ... I essentially learned everything I ever knew about archiving there. I knew the rooms and boxes of materials like they were the back of my hand. ...

I loved all the collections like they were my own. ...

We have been able to digitize a portion of the materials but they will never replace the physical objects. ... I still can’t really process what happened and can’t begin to think about where we go from here.

I’m physically and emotionally exhausted. ... I’ve included some pictures from better times. And to give you an idea of just a tiny portion of what could potentially be lost."

Nearly 4 weeks later, with the majority of our archives remaining unrecovered as we await word from NYC officials, the threat that we'll lose the majority of our collection remains very real. We'll be sharing more of Kevin's photos in the coming days. Please continue to support the MOCA Archives Fire Recovery effort here at https://bit.ly/2RsaiLa

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UPDATE 2/16/20: We mentioned that the biggest enemies in our fight to recover our archives is water, weather and time. Add mold to that list.

In this video at https://www.instagram.com/tv/B8pyXjnlkuD/?igshid=1uxxb2cgca4i0 an Alliance for Response NYC volunteer conservator skillfully and carefully treats this antique wooden furniture to fight against mold.

The stool is from The Rice Bowl Restaurant, founded by Chin Suey Bing and located on 44 Mott Street in NYC’s Chinatown until it closed in 1970. Mrs Chin donated this stool which she sat on while working as cashier at The Rice Bowl. “I raised all my kids sitting on this stool.”

Video by Edward Cheng of MOCA.

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UPDATE 2/15/20: In this interview with China Global Television Network's primetime nightly newscast China 24, MOCA's president Nancy Yao Maasbach gives an update on the Museum's archives recovery effort following the 70 Mulberry fire, growing concern over the majority of archives still sitting unretrieved three weeks later, the time pressure and resource-intensive cost of recovery both logistically and financially, and the challenging decisions MOCA faces in the coming weeks. Watch the interview at https://bit.ly/31XKRET

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UPDATE 2/14/20: This Valentine’s Day, instead of pictures of flowers or hearts, we’d like to share this photo from our archives.

Here is Lucky Florist on East Broadway; the sign above the door is advertising Valentine’s Day specials. The photo was taken by Jeanine Boubli in 2002, a few months after the horrific events of 9/11.

Chinatown was hit hard by 9/11’s aftermath. The neighborhood was 10 blocks away from Ground Zero and became a “frozen zone” like the rest of Lower Manhattan as vehicular traffic was blocked and pedestrian traffic restricted to residents below Canal St. The economic shock to Chinatown decimated neighborhood family businesses. 🥡🥡🥡🥡🥡

Many small businesses in Chinatown were not as fortunate as Lucky Florist, which managed to survive the aftermath of 9/11 and continues to operate to this day. 🌹🌹🌺🌺🌸🌸

This photo is part of MOCA’s Recovering Chinatown: The 9/11 Collection and reminds us of the resilient spirit of small businesses in Chinatown. The collection, which comprises images, documents, oral histories and artwork that tell the story of 9/11’s impact on Chinatown, is among the archives we’ve not yet been allowed to retrieve from 70 Mulberry Street.

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UPDATE 2/13/20: Remember that iconic photo of our intrepid volunteers hand-carrying these wrapped long objects one by one from our damaged archives to our recovery area at 215 Centre Street?

Well, we found out that this is one of the items [pictured below] they were carrying. It's from our P.S. 23 collection and it's a drawer containing the records of students who once attended P.S. 23 back when the building at 70 Mulberry Street was a public school starting in 1891.

P.S. 23 has such a rich history. Look out for more posts from us as we share more from our collection that tells the story of this historic school.

Photo credit: Edward Cheng of MOCA

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UPDATE 2/12/20: The Eric Ng collection is one of the largest collections at MOCA.

Eric Y. Ng (pictured below) is a well-known community leader and businessman in New York City’s Chinatown and the 63rd President of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association (CCBA). Fondly referred to as “Mayor Ng,” he was born in Toishan village in China and moved to Hong Kong in 1953. After immigrating to America in 1970, he juggled night classes and part-time work learning how to make fortune cookies, which paved the way for his first entrepreneurial ventures in the fortune cookie business.
🥠🥠🥠🥠🥠
A world-class collector of stamps, Eric made his first donation to MOCA in 2006, donating his collection of menus from Chinatown restaurants through the 20th century. In 2015, he donated another extensive collection of historical photos and vintage postcards that tell the history of Chinese Americans from the 1860s to 1970s.

We retrieved Eric's collection from the MOCA archives damaged at 70 Mulberry Street. The collection sustained heavy water damage and is currently being treated at an offsite facility; its condition is unknown.

The Eric Ng collection is so vast that no single object can do it justice. So instead, we're dedicating this post to Eric himself, a true scholar and gentleman whose love of art, history and community inspires us all.

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UPDATE 2/11/20: We’re highlighting artifacts that survived the fire at our archives at 70 Mulberry St. Today’s story is special because it’s about an artifact that’s a personal favorite of Yue Ma, MOCA’s Director of Collections who has been working tirelessly since the fire to recover our archives.

This is the Singer sewing machine donated to MOCA’s Collections by Sui Ling Tsang. It belonged to her mother Mok Sim Tsang, who worked as a seamstress at a garment factory in Manhattan’s Chinatown from 1968 until she passed away in 1977.

The lives of garment workers such as Mok Sim speak to the many untold stories that are told through our collections.

We were proud to loan the sewing machine to the Museum of the City of New York’s exhibition titled City of Workers, City of Struggle: How Labor Movements Changed New York. The exhibition ended on December 31, 2019 and the sewing machine was returned to MOCA shortly thereafter.

So when the fire broke out on January 23, 2020, we feared the worst (and for a moment wished we hadn’t taken this priceless artifact back so soon). Fortunately, the sewing machine is safe … and waiting to be shared with the public once again.

Photo of sewing machine by Edward Cheng of MOCA. Photo of Mok Sim Tsang by Sui Ling Tsang.

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UPDATE 2/10/20: Here’s a sign (pictured below) we recovered from our archives at 70 Mulberry. When it comes to how much we treasure every object and every life story told through our collection, we think that last line says it all: “ONLY ONE IN THE WORLD”

Photo credit: Edward Cheng of MOCA

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UPDATE 2/9/20: This framed water-damaged Chinese calligraphy scroll (photo below) was recovered from our archives at 70 Mulberry Street. It says “Museum of Chinese in the Americas” which was the precursor to MOCA before the museum changed its name officially in 2009 to Museum of Chinese in America.

During the transfer to our recovery area, it was accidentally placed upside down. Seeing it upside down triggers so many emotions, as if the fire has literally turned MOCA and her world upside down and we don’t know when or if things will be right side up again.

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UPDATE 2/8/20: Thank you for continuing to follow our updates about the MOCA Archives Fire Recovery effort. Here are some of the artifacts we’ve retrieved from 70 Mulberry Street that weren’t so lucky. These are from the Fly to Freedom collection.

The first photo is of a sculpture made by Golden Venture survivors that depicts the U.S. Capitol dome but is set within Chinese city walls.

The second photo is of remnants and pieces from one of the seven-tiered paper “Thank You” towers made by Golden Venture survivors as thank you gifts to people sympathetic to their plight.

Strange to think that the men who created these once thought of them as ephemera and never imagined they would last long. They survived so long, only to end up like this.

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UPDATE 2/7/20:

WATER. WEATHER. TIME.

These are the biggest forces working against us right now as we work to recover from the Jan. 23 fire at 70 Mulberry Street.

In NYC, we've had two straight days of rain. Two-thirds of our archives (you can see some of it through the window shown here) is still at 70 Mulberry Street whose roof has mostly caved in and is exposing what's inside to outside elements.

We've no word yet from NYC officials as to when the remaining artifacts can be retrieved. As time goes by, the ongoing damage from water and weather only adds to the uncertainty about whether the majority of our collection can be saved.

We will continue to update as information becomes available.

Video by Edward Cheng of MOCA.

To support the MOCA Archives Recovery Effort, please see link in bio.

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UPDATE 2/6/20: Our ongoing series of posts about the MOCA Archives Fire Recovery and the story of the lives represented by these artifacts continues.

Using archival photos, letters and documents from a scrapbook donated to our collection, this video at https://www.instagram.com/p/B8PfR-flOZC/ tells the story of the Ging Hawk Club, an association of Chinese American women founded in 1929 that offered an alternative to traditional, male-dominated associations. The Ging Hawk-"striving for knowledge"-Club brought together some of the first Chinese American women who attended college in the United States.

Over the years, they provided community services, formed the backbone of war relief efforts, and led the conversation around U.S.-China relations at a global level. By challenging traditional Chinese family values in their pursuit for education and demanding Chinese representation in American institutions, the Ging Hawk Club demonstrated extraordinary courage and persistence.

The video also features interviews with several donors to our Collections: Sandra Lee of Harold L. Lee & Sons Insurance, Dr. Betty Lee Sung and Marcella Chin Dear.

Fortunately, the original Ging Hawk Club photo scrapbook survived the fire at 70 Mulberry Street and we have sent it to an offsite facility for treatment. Its condition, however, remains unknown.

This video was originally produced in 2019, when we honored the Ging Hawk Club at our annual Celebration of Community Heroes. Video filmed and edited by Justin Onne.

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UPDATE 2/5/20: Here are more images of retrieved paper sculptures from our Fly to Freedom collection.

The Fly to Freedom paper sculptures were created by survivors of the Golden Venture, a ship that trafficked 286 undocumented Chinese passengers from Fujian province in China and ran aground off New York City in 1993. Ten people drowned as they attempted to flee the sinking ship. The story of the survivors and their subsequent years of legal limbo in jail as they awaited the possibility of deportation was a watershed moment in U.S. immigration policy. The outcome of their fate became a test of the system of detaining asylum-seekers in prisons.

To pass the time while they awaited their fate, the survivors created paper sculptures based on the Chinese paper-folding art form called zhezhi. They chose to make sculptures of items symbolizing freedom and the American Dream such as eagles, folding magazine covers and tissue paper into small triangles to make the wings.

These sculptures proved to be a watershed for the zhezhi paper-folding art form as well; the techniques revolutionized by the survivors combined with their use of a form of papier-mâché are considered so innovative that it is now known as ‘Golden Venture folding.’

Photo credit: Edward Cheng of MOCA

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UPDATE 2/5/20: It’s hard to believe that it was exactly one week ago that our shout was heard ‘round the world: “FIRST BOX IS OUT!” The artifacts recovered so far have varying degrees of damage from moisture and we have a long road to recovery ahead.

We will be sharing more images/videos of recovered artifacts. Stay tuned …

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UPDATE 2/4/20: A volunteer conservator from the Alliance for Response NYC tries to shore up this paper sculpture of an eagle from our Fly to Freedom collection, which is among the most delicate in MOCA’s archives.

Video is here at https://www.instagram.com/p/B8KnvjolmhG/

“Surviving this kind of fire and the water damage is going to be really tough. The ones that got pulled out last week, many of them suffered pretty severe damage,” says Herb Tam, MOCA’s curator, in an interview with the New York Daily News.

More to come. Stay tuned …

Video by Edward Cheng of MOCA

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UPDATE 2/4/20: As we await word from NYC officials as to when retrieval of the remaining two-thirds of our collection from 70 Mulberry Street can begin, we have been given the all-clear by conservators who have been treating artifacts recovered so far to begin releasing images/video of these objects.

This paper model of the Statue of Liberty shown in the video here https://www.instagram.com/p/B8J5dKXFYDQ/ is from our Fly to Freedom collection of paper sculptures created by survivors of the Golden Venture, a ship that carried 286 undocumented Chinese passengers from Fujian province, China and ran aground off New York City in 1993. This sculpture was salvaged during the second stage of our recovery effort.

More to come. Stay tuned …

Video by Edward Cheng of MOCA

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UPDATE 2/3/20: While we are immensely grateful to have retrieved one-third of our collection, we are aware that this represents a fraction of the entire 85,000-item collection. Our thoughts are very much focused on the two-thirds of the collection that is still sitting at 70 Mulberry Street whose condition is unknown.

As we await word from NYC officials as to when we can recover the rest of the archives, we would like to take a moment to share with you a series of videos / photos that we hope brings to life how much these artifacts mean to people. This will be an ongoing series of posts we will release in addition to our fire recovery updates.

With one more week left of Lunar New Year celebrations, the first video in the series is about Clarence Lee, a Chinese American artist from Hawaii who designed the first Lunar New Year postage stamp issued in 1992 and later designed stamps for the entire LNY cycle. Clarence passed away in January 2015 at age 79, and his widow donated his family photo albums and sketchbooks to MOCA’s collection. Clarence’s collection is still at 70 Mulberry Street.

We filmed this video at https://www.instagram.com/p/B8HWDtyl-eU/ at MOCA's archives at 70 Mulberry Street almost exactly a year ago in celebration of the Lunar New Year in 2019. Video filmed and edited by David Tan.

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UPDATE 2/2/20: CGTN (China Global Television Network) just broadcast a TV segment of our archives recovery effort. Interviews with our curator and a volunteer capture much of what we’re feeling during this challenging time.

Watch the TV segment here:
https://newsus.cgtn.com/news/2020-02-02/Assessing-damages-after-fire-in-museum-of-Chinese-American-experience-NKeGimVJUA/index.html?fbclid=IwAR0wDTmyE5OQtNYw3mMoBP6mOeFMmOtEgTPdkRwjz1Uu6PkyDt3-fQnNEQo

UPDATE 2/1/20: It’s been a difficult time since the fire that devastated our archives. Yet we know the show must go on and we are continuing with our Lunar New Year Family Festival at our main museum space at 215 Centre Street.

It’s especially meaningful to have @ueaaliondance performing the lion dance at MOCA this year. This is their first performance since the fire. Watch the video at https://www.instagram.com/p/B8CG0cFlIbW/

Today, we join hands together as we both cope with our loss at 70 Mulberry Street. It speaks to the resilience and grit of the people of Manhattan’s Chinatown, the Chinese American story’s place in history and the story of America. Video by Edward Cheng of MOCA.

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UPDATE 1/31/20: With the completion of the second stage of recovery, we have now recovered one third of MOCA's total collection. These include oral histories, A/V and media, photo negatives, and some materials from various collections such as P.S. 23 and Alex Jay. Wet items have been sent to an offsite facility for treatment while dry items have been sent to our recovery area at 215 Centre Street. Thank you to @nycdcas, NYC Municipal Archives and Alliance for Response NYC for retrieval, recovery and conservation / archiving assistance. Thank you to all the volunteers who helped us transport and care for recovered artifacts.

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UPDATE 1/31/20: SECOND STAGE of retrieval and recovery now underway! Initial assessment is 80% of what we’re retrieving is wet but appears salvageable. 3D paper sculptures from our Fly to Freedom collection of paper sculptures created by survivors of the Golden Venture and original copies of the Chinese American Times, the first Chinese American newspaper published in English, were retrieved. Condition of these objects is unknown. Photo credit: Edward Cheng of MOCA

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UPDATE 1/30/20: MOCA understands more fully the extraordinary expense and work to repair, recover, and rebuild its Collections + Archives. We're indebted to Comrise at https://comrise.com/en who will generously match $ for $ all funds raised for MOCA Archives Fire Recovery via GoFundMe. Thank you!

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UPDATE 1/29/20: Extraordinary efforts today. Deep gratitude to all City agencies, elected officials, and MOCA volunteers. We recovered approximately 160 boxes today. Holding tight to hope and focused on continued recovery of the MOCA Collection. We took our first steps today. Photo credit: Edward Cheng of MOCA

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UPDATE 1/29/20: There are indicators we might be able to salvage some of the MOCA archives. Thank you to all the volunteers who mobilized quickly to help us prepare space to assess damage once we receive affected artifacts. We will update shortly.

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UPDATE 1/28/20: Listen to NPR's All Things Considered radio interview with MOCA's president who has updates about the fire that damaged MOCA's archives and what's next. https://www.npr.org/2020/01/28/800559386/what-the-museum-of-chinese-in-america-lost-in-a-fire

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UPDATE 1/27/20: Thank you for your continued support. We are waiting to hear from #NYC officials as to when MOCA's collections and archives can be safely extracted. This picture below is keeping us focused on recovery, which will be a long, complex and costly process. We will update you as soon as possible.

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UPDATE 1/26/20: The outpouring of encouragement is keeping us going. Thank you. We continue to monitor the situation at 70 Mulberry. We are in close communication with officials. Main museum at 215 Centre Street is open. Special thanks to #FDNY, #NYPD, CM Chin and #NYC officials. Will update.

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UPDATE 1/25/20: A heartfelt thank you to everyone near and far who have supported the MOCA Archives Fire Recovery effort. We are now praying the 3rd floor of the building does not collapse on the 2nd floor that houses our archives. Please continue to keep MOCA in your thoughts and prayers.

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UPDATE 1/24/20: As we continue to receive information from officials, we are preparing for the possibility that the collection is severely damaged or lost. We are on call and ready to enter upon notification the building is safe. We will need help. Thank you for your continued prayers and encouragement.

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In response to your inquiries as to how you can help, please go to this page:
https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/campaign/mocafirerecovery

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11-03 45th Ave
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11101

Subway: E, M, G, or 7 to 23rd St./Court Sq.

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