CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center

CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center The CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center showcases the State’s largest historic artifact and state of the art exhibits. The remains of the CSS Neuse and the associated artifacts were relocated to a fully enclosed and climate controlled facility at 100 N.
(43)

Queen Street on June 23, 2012. After years of planning and hard work the museum held its grand opening on March 7, 2015. The CSS Neuse was a Confederate Ironclad that was used in the Kinston, NC area during the Civil War. The ship was built at White Hall (now Seen Springs, NC) in 1862 and was completed in Kinston in 1864. The Gunboat was involved in the Battle of Wyse’s Forks (just outside of Kinston headed toward New Bern) before being scuttled by her own crew on March 11, 1865. The ship was recovered from the Neuse River by a few local men with help from the community between 1961-63. The State of North Carolina acquired control of the CSS Neuse in 1964 and the site officially opened in 1966 at 2612 W. Vernon Avenue.

Operating as usual

We are so sorry to hear of his passing.  Truly an icon!  He will be missed.
09/16/2020

We are so sorry to hear of his passing. Truly an icon! He will be missed.

It is our sad duty to announce the passing of beloved historian Ed Bearss, one of the legends of the battlefield preservation movement and a long-time member of the American Battlefield Trust board. Ed’s career is unmatched in the Civil War community – from his discovery of the USS Cairo to his role as chief historian emeritus of the National Park Service. For many of us, our love of history was nurtured through battlefield tours led by the indomitable Ed. Rain or shine, through muddy creeks and daunting climbs, the decorated World War II veteran always led the way. And his ability to convey history in a relatable and entertaining way mesmerized his audiences for generations. Rest in peace – we will not see your like again.

Our artifact of the week is this tortoise-shell comb.  It isn't so much for combing the hair as it is a decorative item ...
09/16/2020

Our artifact of the week is this tortoise-shell comb. It isn't so much for combing the hair as it is a decorative item to be worn in the hair. Tortoise shell comes from the outer layer of the shells of large sea turtles or land tortoises.It is similar in appearance to cowhorn, and can be worked in similar ways, it can be bent into different shapes by being heated. It is light in weight and quite strong for its weight, similar to the brown and amber streaked cellulose acetate plastic that replaced it. If you've ever wondered why so many combs, brush handles, eyeglasses frames and whatnot are made from streaked brown and amber colored plastic, it is in imitation of tortoise shell material so widely used in the past.#cssneusemuseum #cssneuse #artifact #comb #cssneuseartifactoftheweek

The Secret History of Women, Told in Earrings
09/12/2020
The Secret History of Women, Told in Earrings

The Secret History of Women, Told in Earrings

Annette Klein has more than 2,000 pairs of earrings, most from the 18th and 19th centuries. Each one, she says, represents a story.

Today, we remember September 11, 2001. We will #NeverForget the victims who lost their lives and the selfless first resp...
09/11/2020
9/11 Attacks

Today, we remember September 11, 2001. We will #NeverForget the victims who lost their lives and the selfless first responders. 🇺🇸

On September 11, 2001, 19 militants associated with the Islamic extremist group al Qaeda hijacked four airplanes and carried out suicide attacks against

Our article of the week is this fan.  It is composed of black dyed horn or bone, covered in black silk and tipped with b...
09/09/2020

Our article of the week is this fan. It is composed of black dyed horn or bone, covered in black silk and tipped with black dyed turkey feathers. The black color is not for style; in the mid to late nineteenth century wearing black clothes for mourning was a popular and widespread practice. Almost every accessory or apparel, even jewelry, could be found in this somber color. #mourningfan #nchistoricsites #cssneuseartifactoftheweek #cssneusemuseum #fan #artifact

Gettysburg National Military Park
09/08/2020

Gettysburg National Military Park

On this day in 1828 Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, future hero of Gettysburg, was born.

Chamberlain's name will always be associated with Little Round Top. Hundreds of thousands of visitors travel to the hill each year to follow in his footsteps and visit the small rocky spur where he led the 20th Maine on the afternoon of July 2nd. Many search in vain for a statue to Chamberlain, only to walk away disappointed. Yet, a bronze likeness of Chamberlain almost ended up on the hill. The Chamberlain Statue is perhaps the most famous (but certainly not the only) monument that *almost* ended up at Gettysburg.

For more on this, check out our blog:
https://npsgnmp.wordpress.com/2014/01/30/joshua-chamberlain-little-round-top-and-the-memorial-that-never-was/

09/08/2020

The last video in our Civil War Disease series is on the effects of war on the mental health of combatants. Please let us know what you thought of this video series and what you would like to see in the future.

Hunter House Victorian Museum
09/05/2020

Hunter House Victorian Museum

As our Summer 2020 exhibition ends today, we are so thankful for each of you that visited the museum for a tour of "Corsets to Crinoline: Unmentionables and the Road to Women's Suffrage". Thank you also to our amazing volunteers that learned so much new information to be able to give this extensive tour. This exhibit would not have been possible for our talented docent, Jennifer Lucy, who was our guest Exhibition Graphic Designer and designed all of the amazing signs shown in this album.

Thank you to the partners who loaned items for this show, including the Hermitage Museum, the Hill House Museum, the Little Theatre of Norfolk, and the personal collections of Anna Barbay, Gloria Eatroff, and Billie Ernest. We could not have done this exhibition without your assistance.

Look forward to a virtual tour of this exhibit that will be posted in a few weeks!

The CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center  will welcome visitors back into our Visitor Center and museum beginning on ...
09/04/2020

The CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center will welcome visitors back into our Visitor Center and museum beginning on September 5, with some new procedures in place to help ensure the safety of staff and visitors, including:

- Limiting visitors to 50% of occupancy, to allow a comfortable visit to the Visitor Center and CSS Neuse Museum.

- Requiring cloth masks to enter the Visitor Center and historic structures, as outlined in Executive Order 163.

- All exhibits in the Visitor Center will be open.

- Installing hand sanitizer stations and increasing the frequency of cleaning high touch public areas and restrooms.

- Installing protective barriers at sales counters and information desks.

- Interactive exhibit features will be paused or modified.


Visitors are expected to follow the “Three W’s” as outlined by the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services – WEAR a cloth mask over your nose and mouth, WAIT in line at least six feet away from others, and WASH your hands frequently or use hand sanitizer. If you are experiencing symptoms of illness, we ask that you postpone your visit.

We look forward to seeing you soon!!

Governor Cooper has announced that under Phase 2.5 of his plan to ease COVID-19 restrictions, museums, aquariums, and hi...
09/03/2020

Governor Cooper has announced that under Phase 2.5 of his plan to ease COVID-19 restrictions, museums, aquariums, and historic sites can soon partially open to the public.

We’re looking forward to seeing you again soon! Stay tuned for details about how and when we will welcome visitors back to the CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center.

A woman waits for the hoops of her crinoline to be finished in a London dress shop in 1860 | Compelling, inspiring stori...
09/03/2020
A woman waits for the hoops of her crinoline to be finished in a London dress shop in 1860 | Compelling, inspiring stories & images, discoveries & memories from human history on 8monks.com

A woman waits for the hoops of her crinoline to be finished in a London dress shop in 1860 | Compelling, inspiring stories & images, discoveries & memories from human history on 8monks.com

Home Photography A woman waits for the hoops of her crinoline to be finished... A picture in timePhotography A woman waits for the hoops of her crinoline to be finished in a London dress shop in 1860 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter A crinoline is a stiffened or structured petticoat designed to ho...

Our artifact of the week is this fan.  Made of bone, silk, and cardboard with an embroidered silk border, this late 19th...
09/02/2020

Our artifact of the week is this fan. Made of bone, silk, and cardboard with an embroidered silk border, this late 19th century fan is representative of the type that was a must-have accessory for a well-dressed woman. Aside from the obvious use of generating a cooling breeze, the fan found wide use for flirting, hiding the face while spying on others and adding accentuation to hand motions. Fans could be had in a wide range of styles and materials, from simple wood veneer and paper to more elegant materials like sandalwood or whale baleen covered with lace or silk. #cssneusemuseum #cssneuseartifactoftheweek #fan #nchistoricsites

Rose O'Neal Greenhow
08/30/2020
Rose O'Neal Greenhow

Rose O'Neal Greenhow

Rose O’Neal Greenhow was born into obscurity, but became one of the most powerful women in Washington, D.C. Unfortunately for the Federal government, she was a “Southern woman” and a Confederate spy.

08/28/2020
USS Underwriter with Andrew Duppstadt

Historic Sites Education & Interpretation Supervisor discusses the USS Underwriter Expedition, part of a larger Confederate attempt to regain control of New Bern from Union occupation forces in February 1864. Naval personnel from the entire southeastern coast participated in this expedition, and some officers remained in Kinston following the action to become part of the crew of the CSS Neuse. #nchistoricsites #USSUnderwriter #CSSNeuseMuseum

https://youtu.be/t0kirLCyt_Y

Historic Sites Education & Interpretation Supervisor discusses the USS Underwriter Expedition, part of a larger Confederate attempt to regain control of New ...

08/27/2020

Video six in our Disease in the Civil War series is on Sexual Transmitted diseases during the civil war.

The CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center will remain closed during Phase II.
08/27/2020

The CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center will remain closed during Phase II.

Happy #internationaldogday2020 from staff members at the CSS Neuse! Say hello to Molly, Troup, and Rowan! Please share y...
08/26/2020

Happy #internationaldogday2020 from staff members at the CSS Neuse! Say hello to Molly, Troup, and Rowan! Please share your cutest dog pics with us! 🐶 🐾
.
.
#cssneusemuseum #dogsofinstagram #dogs #weloveourpets #adorableanimals

National Museum of Civil War Medicine
08/23/2020

National Museum of Civil War Medicine

Charlotte Forten, a freeborn black woman from Philadelphia, was already a powerful voice in the anti-slavery movement in her twenties. During the Civil War, she volunteered as a nurse to care for the black soldiers serving the US Army.

Forten recorded her experiences in her diary:

"Wednesday, July 22 [1863].
My hospital life began today. Went early this morning with Mrs. L. and Mrs. G the surgeon's wife, saw that the Dr. had not finished dressing the wounds, and while I waited below Mrs. S gave me some sewing to do-mending the pantaloons and jackets of the poor fellow. (They are all of the 54th [Massachusetts]).

It was with a full heart that I sewed up bullet holes and bayonet cuts. Sometimes I found a jacket that told a sad tale-so torn to pieces that it was far past mending. After awhile I went through the wards. As I passed along I thought 'Many and low are the pallets, but each is the face of a friend.' And I was surprised to see such cheerful faces looking up from the beds.

Talked a little with some of the patients and assisted Mrs. G. in distributing medicines. Mrs. L. kindly sent her carriage for me and I returned home, weary, but far more pleasantly impressed than I thought possible, with hospital life."

Source:
Charlotte L. Forten Grimké, "The Journals of Charlotte Forten Grimké," Brenda Stevenson, Ray Allen Billington editors, New York: Oxford University Press, 1988, page 495.

Image credit:
Charlotte L. Forten Grimke, c.1870, New York Public Library via Wikimedia Commons.

08/20/2020

video six is the last video in our cultural influences on southern cuisine series. Many other immigrant groups have influenced our southern cuisine and still do everyday! But we will end with the influence of Asian cultures up to the time of the civil war.

NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources
08/19/2020

NC Department of Natural & Cultural Resources

A century ago today, the United States ratified the 19th Amendment, enshrining a woman’s right to vote in the Constitution.

Women fought long and hard for the vote—before and after the passage of the 19th Amendment, which declares the right to vote “shall not be denied … on account of sex.” Diverse communities and organizations blazed the trail for equal voting rights across the nation. For many women, especially women of color, the fight didn’t end when the 19th Amendment went into effect on August 26, 1920. Yet the stories of these suffragists have often been overlooked.

Learn more here: https://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/08/counting-down-with-19suffrage-stories-100th-anniversary-of-the-19th-amendment

08/18/2020

Video five in our Disease in the Civil War is about Home remedies and make do Confederate medicines.

Children of the Civil War
08/16/2020
Children of the Civil War

Children of the Civil War

Biographies of notable children during the Civil War including Johnny Clem, Edwin Jemison, John Cook, Charlie King, Orion P Howe, Joseph Evan Davis, and Susie King Taylor.

08/14/2020

video five in our Cultural influences on southern cuisine is focused on German and swiss immigrants.

Bentonville Battlefield State Historic Site
08/13/2020

Bentonville Battlefield State Historic Site

Don't miss our exciting programs coming up Friday and Saturday!

Join our interpreters for Historic Musket Demonstrations at 11 both days, Tar, Pitch, and Turpentine on Friday at 1, and Witness Spotlight on Wounded Soldiers at the Harper House Saturday at 1. Also don't forget Harper House talks every day at 10, 12, 2, and 4.

Although our Visitor Center and historic buildings are closed, we invite you to enjoy an exciting day at Bentonville with outdoor programs as well as our self-guided driving tour and walking trails.

We look forward to seeing you!

Richmond National Battlefield Park
08/13/2020

Richmond National Battlefield Park

Happy International Left Hander's Day! Speaking of left hands, one of the most famous of the Civil War is "Stonewall" Jackson's. On May 2, 1863 Jackson was wounded by the mistaken fire of his own troops at Chancellorsville. General Robert E. Lee said, "To say he has lost his left arm, I have lost my right."

"Stonewall" Jackson's left arm lies in Ellwood Manor at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County Battlefields National Military Park separate from his body which is buried in Lexington, Virginia.

#NationalLeftHandersDay #FindYourPark #FindYourArm

Photo used from Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park NPS page.

08/11/2020

You get that feeling something crawling on you? Video four in our Disease in the Civil War series is about tiny hitchhikers.

Gettysburg National Military Park
08/11/2020

Gettysburg National Military Park

Today’s #Gettysburg101 installment highlights the role in the battle of the Signal Corps.

Though the only formally authorized by Congress in March 1863, the United States Army Signal Corps traced its origins to a few years before the war, when army surgeon Albert Myer devised a method of transmitting messages by waving a flag in prescribed patterns. In 1860, the army created the signal corps with Myer as its only officer. The next year, the outbreak of war created a proving ground for Myer’s method.

While Myer trained officers and men in his technique and soon assigned signal teams across the Union field armies, his pre-war assistant, Edward Porter Alexander (who commanded an artillery battalion at Gettysburg), joined the Confederate army and convinced its commanders to form their own signal corps. On July 21,1861, at the First Battle of Bull Run (Manassas), Alexander and his team sent the first modern battlefield telecommunication.

At Gettysburg, both sides utilized battlefield signaling, but the Army of the Potomac used it to great advantage. A team of signalers was attached to each corps and placed at prominent locations, such as Cemetery Hill, Meade’s Headquarters, and Little Round Top, allowing the corps and army headquarters to stay in near constant contact. While records survive for hundreds of message sent by Union signal corps teams throughout the battle, Confederate signalers are record to have only sent three messages during the battle. On July 2, it was the Union signal team on Little Round Top that detected the movement of General Longstreet’s column as it marched behind Seminary Ridge and into position to attack the Union left. Spotted by the enemy, Longstreet’s men were forced to countermarch, losing valuable time (and daylight) and allowing Union reinforcements to draw closer to that vulnerable part of the line.

#Gettysburg101 #findyourpark #EncuentraTuParque

Image: A diagram showing how the flag was waved for signaling.

Pastimes of the 1860’s
08/09/2020
Pastimes of the 1860’s

Pastimes of the 1860’s

This page describes what soldiers did to pass the time while on campaign.

Beer and Bullets: The History of Beer in the Civil War
08/08/2020
Beer and Bullets: The History of Beer in the Civil War

Beer and Bullets: The History of Beer in the Civil War

Sawbones. Crazy Bet. Killer Angel. These are just some of the names of beers that today bear names inspired by the Civil War. Along with historical names, breweries throughout the nation have also chosen Civil War inspired locations or recipes, and the National Museum of Civil War Medicine has even....

Richmond National Battlefield Park
08/08/2020

Richmond National Battlefield Park

Who Was Robert Ford?

At the start of the Civil War, Robert Ford was thirty-two, a free Black man living in Frederick, Maryland. He volunteered to be a civilian employee of the United States Army in 1862. As a “teamster,” Ford could have driven wagons and moved supplies for the army in the years before African Americans were permitted to enlist as soldiers.

Ford was captured by Confederate forces in the Shenandoah Valley in April. Confederate policy did not recognize African Americans employed by the U.S. Army as prisoners of war, so Robert Ford was, according to Virginia law, subject to enslavement.

Ford was forced to work at Libby Prison, attending the stables and horses of the jailer, Dick Turner. Contacted by one of the Richmond underground - Abby Green - Ford served as the prisoners’ contact with the outside world. He delivered messages in and out of the prison and assisted in the tunnel escape of February 9, 1864.

To find out more about the sacrifices Ford made to assist the American POWs at Libby, join us on August 15 at 1pm for our online tour: “The Great Escape of the Civil War: Jailbreak from Libby Prison.”
Tour is free, but reservations are required. Follow this link to sign up: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-great-escape-of-the-civil-war-jailbreak-from-libby-prison-tickets-115499569321?fbclid=IwAR2m4r4VmAr0qdaROIXi4-PBhxF8C3Y4G4fkcriQe1LbiOKMR1-tnesG13c

(Photo: detail from “Virginia, City Point. Park of Army Wagons, July 1863” Library of Congress)

Address

100 N Queen St
Kinston, NC
28501

Opening Hours

Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(252) 526-9600

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center:

Videos

Category

Our Story

The CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center showcases the State’s largest historic artifact and state of the art exhibits. The remains of the CSS Neuse and the associated artifacts were relocated to a fully enclosed and climate controlled facility at 100 N. Queen Street on June 23, 2012. After years of planning and hard work the museum held its grand opening on March 7, 2015. The CSS Neuse was a Confederate Ironclad that was used in the Kinston, NC area during the Civil War. The ship was built at White Hall (now Seven Springs, NC) in 1862 and was completed in Kinston in 1864. The Gunboat was involved in the Battle of Wyse’s Forks (just outside of Kinston headed toward New Bern) before being scuttled by her own crew on March 11, 1865. The ship was recovered from the Neuse River by a few local men with help from the community between 1961-63. The State of North Carolina acquired control of the CSS Neuse in 1964 and the site officially opened in 1966 at 2612 W. Vernon Avenue.

Nearby museums


Comments

Jones Co, NC: The Jones County Historical Society has updated its website. Please visit and learn more about the rich cultural heritage of Jones County, North Carolina. Wishing everyone a Very Merry Christmas and Holiday Season! www.jonescountyhistoricalsociety.org www.jonescountyhistoricalsociety.org
These axe heads were found 6" deep within a 25 foot diameter in my front field in Greene County
These axe heads were found 6" deep within a 25 foot diameter in my front field Greene County
Im not sure who to contact about this, but the Third National Flag atop the CSS Neuse is missing the red bar on the edge. It appears to have been torn away during recent winds. Could you please replace it?
Please share:
Join us for this exciting event coming up next week!
I also stopped by and visited the CSS NEUSE!! Great museum and a great display. It is really impressive how big those ships were. I wish more of the structure was still in place but the hull is still impressive.
I had a great time at the event. Drove down from Virginia. Everyone was very knowledgeable and the demonstrations were first rate. I enjoyed the artillery demonstrations and the professionalism of all the gun crews. They enjoyed their work. Very good day and I would like to come back next year!!
Well worth the visit. Always a pleasure to stop in. Mr. Mckee taught me a few things !
Does the site have on display any of the ship making tools?