Grinter Place State Historic Site

Grinter Place State Historic Site The home of Annie, a Lenape (Delaware), and Moses Grinter, who operated a ferry and a trading post on the Kansas River.
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In 1853, a second lieutenant named Joseph L. Tidball reported to his superiors that he thought the Kansas River was navi...
02/14/2020

In 1853, a second lieutenant named Joseph L. Tidball reported to his superiors that he thought the Kansas River was navigable by steamer or keep boat, as far west as within one mile of Fort Riley. In that report he mentioned four river ferries: Uniontown, Weld’s, Papan’s and Grinter’s. #kansashistory

Moses Grinter had established his Kansas River Ferry in 1831, but in 1858, a ferry was established over the Missouri Riv...
02/07/2020

Moses Grinter had established his Kansas River Ferry in 1831, but in 1858, a ferry was established over the Missouri River at Quindaro. Quindaro was also a stop on the Underground Railroad. Quindaro was a free state port of entry, and residents, such as Clarina Nichols, took advantage of this opportunity to help enslaved individuals. Clarina was associate editor for the Quindaro Chindowan, an abolitionist newspaper. #kansashistory

Of the eight children that Elizabeth Ketchum Marshall had, only three survived past infancy. One of these surviving chil...
01/31/2020

Of the eight children that Elizabeth Ketchum Marshall had, only three survived past infancy. One of these surviving children was Annie Grinter. Annie herself had 10 children but saw only five reach adulthood. These five were named Frances, William, Mary Jane, Martha, and Cunningham (pictured). #kansashistory

In addition to their well-known efforts to mark the Santa Fe Trail, The Daughters of the American Revolution took the ti...
01/24/2020

In addition to their well-known efforts to mark the Santa Fe Trail, The Daughters of the American Revolution took the time to mark and honor the Grinter home. #kansashistory

While the Grinters were busy building their two-story brick house north of the Kansas River in 1857, just down the road,...
01/17/2020

While the Grinters were busy building their two-story brick house north of the Kansas River in 1857, just down the road, Lecompton was full of activity. The Lecompton Constitutional Convention took place in November and produced a proslavery constitution. In the end, Kansas was not admitted as a state under this constitution. #kansashistory

01/11/2020

Tomorrow's program will be canceled due to weather. Join us next month for the next program! Stay safe! #kansashistory

53 years before Moses and Annie Grinter built their 1857 house overlooking the Kansas River, Lewis and Clark camped alon...
01/10/2020

53 years before Moses and Annie Grinter built their 1857 house overlooking the Kansas River, Lewis and Clark camped along that same river, just nine miles to the east. One of their journal entries states, “Deer to be seen in every direction and their tracks ar (sic) as plenty as hogs about a farm.” #kansashistory

In 1867, Alexander Gardner took a series of 170 photographs across Kansas, providing a great record of many cities and t...
01/03/2020

In 1867, Alexander Gardner took a series of 170 photographs across Kansas, providing a great record of many cities and towns across the state. This photograph was taken of a farm on the Delaware Reservation, the same reservation land that the Grinters lived on.
#kansashistory

In December of 1837, 72 Munsee Indians arrived on the Delaware Reserve. They settled just eight miles west of the Missou...
12/27/2019

In December of 1837, 72 Munsee Indians arrived on the Delaware Reserve. They settled just eight miles west of the Missouri River, along the north Kansas River and just east of where the Grinter House would one day be built. Their settlement was called the Munsee Moravian Mission, or as it was later called “Old Muncytown,” “Muncytown,” and eventually just simply “Muncie.” In December 1874 there was an excitement when a train was robbed at Muncie Station, allegedly by the Jesse James gang. #kansashistory

Treaties in 1829 described the Delaware Indian Reserve and implemented their removal from the east. The treaties describ...
12/20/2019

Treaties in 1829 described the Delaware Indian Reserve and implemented their removal from the east. The treaties described “an outlet” to western hunting grounds. #kansashistory

Annie Marshall Grinter was born in 1820 in Ohio. By 1826, her family was relocated to Missouri. A few years later, they ...
12/13/2019

Annie Marshall Grinter was born in 1820 in Ohio. By 1826, her family was relocated to Missouri. A few years later, they were relocated once again to present day Wyandotte County at only 12 years old. She married Moses Grinter in 1838. #kansashistory

In 1835 the Kickapoo Indian settlements were located north of Fort Leavenworth.  Catholic missionaries planned to live a...
12/06/2019

In 1835 the Kickapoo Indian settlements were located north of Fort Leavenworth. Catholic missionaries planned to live among the Kickapoos. Father Van Quickenborne traveled from St. Louis to scout the area and to ensure that the missionaries would be welcomed by the chiefs and leaders. The priest stopped in Independence, Missouri, and at the junction of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers. He later crossed the Kansas River on Grinter’s Ferry and traveled up the Fort Leavenworth Road to the Kickapoo Reserve. #kansashistory

In 1857, the Grinters began construction of their new two-story red brick house which would overlook the Kansas River. M...
11/29/2019

In 1857, the Grinters began construction of their new two-story red brick house which would overlook the Kansas River. Much had to be done in order to make the house possible. Lime from the surrounding hills was used to make mortar. Bricks were fired on the grounds using local clay and Kansas River sand, along with animal hair incorporated for strength and rigidity. #kansashistory

Matilda and Junius Groves were potato farmers near Edwardsville, located just west of Grinter Place. They farmed over 1,...
11/22/2019

Matilda and Junius Groves were potato farmers near Edwardsville, located just west of Grinter Place. They farmed over 1,000 acres, and he was known as the "Potato King." The Groves shipped their produce all over the United States by railroad. Because of the quantity shipped, the Union Pacific placed a spur on the Groves' farm to load its produce. Junius Groves served as trustee for Western University in Quindaro, Kansas. #kansashistory

From 1950 to the mid-1960s, Harry and Bernice Hanson operated a Fried Chicken Dinner Restaurant in Grinter Place.  This ...
11/15/2019

From 1950 to the mid-1960s, Harry and Bernice Hanson operated a Fried Chicken Dinner Restaurant in Grinter Place. This is the March 12, 1950 KC Star ad they answered when they purchased the home:
“Old Homestead—7 room brick with 5 fireplaces. High and slightly overlooking Kansas river. 19.5 acres, large horse barn. Ideal for country home, ten minutes to city. Bonner Springs bus line. Hugh Nesselrode, Realtor. DR 1-6978.” #kansashistory

Grinter Place State Historic Site
11/08/2019

Grinter Place State Historic Site

When the military command at Fort Leavenworth was established in 1827, among its duties was to maintain peace among the Native American tribes, protect travelers on the Santa Fe Trail, and enforce the laws of the land. Grinter’s Ferry was established just a few years later in 1831 and made the lives of patrolling infantrymen easier. The ferry allowed them to cross the river and perform their duties more efficiently.
#kansashistory

When the military command at Fort Leavenworth was established in 1827, among its duties was to maintain peace among the ...
11/08/2019

When the military command at Fort Leavenworth was established in 1827, among its duties was to maintain peace among the Native American tribes, protect travelers on the Santa Fe Trail, and enforce the laws of the land. Grinter’s Ferry was established just a few years later in 1831 and made the lives of patrolling infantrymen easier. The ferry allowed them to cross the river and perform their duties more efficiently.
#kansashistory

Prior to donating land for a Methodist Church, the 1857 home of Moses and Anna Grinter was used for services which were ...
11/01/2019

Prior to donating land for a Methodist Church, the 1857 home of Moses and Anna Grinter was used for services which were presided over by pioneer circuit riding preachers. The Grinter Chapel, located at 78th and Swartz in Kansas City, Kansas is still in operation. #kansashistory

William Grinter, son of Moses and Annie Grinter, was born in 1841 and died in 1887. He never married and served as a vol...
10/25/2019
Grinter Place, Wyandotte County, Kansas - Kansas Memory

William Grinter, son of Moses and Annie Grinter, was born in 1841 and died in 1887. He never married and served as a volunteer in the Kansas 15th Regiment. He attended the Shawnee Indian Mission, entering in October of 1848. #kansashistory

Grinter Place, Wyandotte County, Kansas - Kansas Memory

In 1836 the chief and leading men of the Delaware Indians signed an agreement allowing the United States to “establish a...
10/18/2019

In 1836 the chief and leading men of the Delaware Indians signed an agreement allowing the United States to “establish a road through the country.” They each received $300.00 and that road became the Military Road and crossed the Kansas River at Grinter Ferry. #kansashistory

Even though tomorrow is our last day before beginning our winter hours, don’t forget we can still schedule tours this wi...
10/11/2019

Even though tomorrow is our last day before beginning our winter hours, don’t forget we can still schedule tours this winter! Thank you for a great season, and we already can’t wait to see you all in the 2020 season! #kansashistory

Harry and Bernice Hanson purchased Grinter House in 1950 and began operating a fried chicken dinner restaurant in the ho...
10/08/2019

Harry and Bernice Hanson purchased Grinter House in 1950 and began operating a fried chicken dinner restaurant in the home. In 1962, the moved the restaurant into the converted barn on the property and opened the house as a museum. Grinter Place was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. #kansashistory

As our 2019 season comes to an end next week, we would like to take a moment to thank you all for another successful yea...
10/05/2019

As our 2019 season comes to an end next week, we would like to take a moment to thank you all for another successful year! We appreciate your interest in Grinter Place! It has been our deepest pleasure to serve you and we hope to see you again in 2020! If you haven’t made it by this season, you have one more week before we close on October 12 and don’t forget that we can also schedule tours during the off season! #kansashistory

The front porch of the 1857 Grinter House has seen a lot of different transportation modes over the years. Wagon trains,...
10/04/2019

The front porch of the 1857 Grinter House has seen a lot of different transportation modes over the years. Wagon trains, river ferries, and military roads eventually changed into railroads and automobile highways. Even as early as 1864, the Union Pacific Railroad hosted a picnic excursion of ladies and gentlemen to “Muncietown,” just east of Grinter Place. #kansashistory

In 1837 Civil Engineer Charles Dimmock reported on a survey of the proposed Fort Leavenworth to Fort Gibson military roa...
10/01/2019

In 1837 Civil Engineer Charles Dimmock reported on a survey of the proposed Fort Leavenworth to Fort Gibson military road. Part of that report read; “From ‘Spring River’ to Fort Leavenworth, a distance of one hundred and fifty-eight miles, the route is over extensive rolling prairies, presenting no obstruction to a road direct from ford to ford on the intervening watercourses, … Of these, ‘Spring River’, ‘Marais de Cygne’, and the ‘Kanzas’, are the largest, and will require established ferries;…at the Kanzas there is one already established.” That established Ferry which Dimmock is reffering to was Grinter’s overlooking the Kansas River in Wyandotte County. #kansashistory

In 1849, a Private Percival G. Lowe wrote, “At Grinter’s Ferry crossing of the Kaw River, the old Ferryman and his wife ...
09/27/2019

In 1849, a Private Percival G. Lowe wrote, “At Grinter’s Ferry crossing of the Kaw River, the old Ferryman and his wife lived near the river bank. He was an old soldier and ‘fond of talking’, and while we waited until all caught up, he explained that the Military Road that we had come into between the ferry and Westport, ran south to Fort Scott about 100 miles and thence to Fort Gibson and south, and after crossing the ferry the road ran north and west 22 miles to Fort Leavenworth.” #kansashistory

Delaware, Wyandot, Munsee, and Shawnee Indians were among the Eastern tribes resettled in this area beginning in 1830.  ...
09/24/2019

Delaware, Wyandot, Munsee, and Shawnee Indians were among the Eastern tribes resettled in this area beginning in 1830. This Munsee cemetery is located seven miles from Ottawa, Kansas. #kansashistory

Have you been wanting to visit Grinter Place? Tomorrow we are participating in Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day Live!  Th...
09/20/2019
Visit A Participating Museum For Free on 9/21/19

Have you been wanting to visit Grinter Place? Tomorrow we are participating in Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day Live! This offers two free admissions per household and address. To participate visit smithsonianmag.com/museumday and print your free tickets! #kansashistory

Join us for Museum Day on Saturday, September 21, 2019.

Many immigrants to Oregon and California used Grinter’s Ferry over the Kansas River in the 1840s and early 1850s as they...
09/20/2019

Many immigrants to Oregon and California used Grinter’s Ferry over the Kansas River in the 1840s and early 1850s as they traveled to their new homes. By 1850, traffic was increasing, and a post office was established at the ferry landing. This was the second non-military post office in what was to one day be Kansas.#kansashistory

In October of 1831, the same year as Moses Grinter established his ferry across the Kansas River, smallpox spread throug...
09/17/2019

In October of 1831, the same year as Moses Grinter established his ferry across the Kansas River, smallpox spread through the Delaware. Several Delaware and Shawnee died of the illness. The epidemic subsided in December. Decades later, the Kansas State Board of Health tried to control smallpox with orange flyers. #kansashistory

Moses Grinter established the first ferry across the Kansas River in 1831, and by 1833 his ferry was identified in a wri...
09/13/2019

Moses Grinter established the first ferry across the Kansas River in 1831, and by 1833 his ferry was identified in a written account. J.T. Irving wrote, “We disembarked and galloped up the bank. On the top was a large log house, inhabited by the blacksmith of the Delaware Indians…”

Below is of a Delaware Farm. #kansashistory

In May of 1843, Captain P. St. George Cook and his dragoons set out from Fort Leavenworth headed toward Council Grove to...
09/10/2019

In May of 1843, Captain P. St. George Cook and his dragoons set out from Fort Leavenworth headed toward Council Grove to serve as an escort along the Santa Fe Trail for the spring caravans. They crossed the Kansas River on Grinter’s Ferry and spent a busy two days at the ferry transporting the approximately 160 soldiers, 11 mules-drawn wagons, and two mountain howitzers. Here we can see dragoon uniform buttons. #kansashistory

1836 federal legislation provided for the establishment of the Military Road from Fort Leavenworth to Fort Scott and ont...
09/06/2019

1836 federal legislation provided for the establishment of the Military Road from Fort Leavenworth to Fort Scott and onto Fort Gibson. The Delaware, Shawnee, Wea, and Piankashaw leaders gave their permission to cross their land later that year. Grinter’s Ferry was used to cross the Kansas River in Wyandotte County. The attached map shows Indian boundaries. #kansashistory

In 1866 Delaware Indians faced with a dilemma.  They had the choice to either leave Kansas and relocated to Indian Terri...
09/03/2019

In 1866 Delaware Indians faced with a dilemma. They had the choice to either leave Kansas and relocated to Indian Territory in present day Oklahoma, or to stay and become citizens of the United States. Annie Grinter was among those forced to choose. Unsurprisingly she chose to stay living at Grinter Place with her husband Moses. 68 others chose to stay in Kansas as well. #kansashistory

In July of 1843 the Wyandots of Ohio arrive at the Town of Kansas, which is present day Kansas City, Missouri.  They set...
08/30/2019

In July of 1843 the Wyandots of Ohio arrive at the Town of Kansas, which is present day Kansas City, Missouri. They settle on a strip of United States Government land between the Missouri State line and the Kansas River. This is located near the current day American Royal Association Building and HyVee/Kemper Arena in the west bottoms. Soon, negotiations begin with the Delaware for purchase of the east end of the Delaware Reserve in Wyandotte County.

#kansashistory

It was 1842 when the Military Road was finally completed connecting Fort Leavenworth with Fort Scott and the forts farth...
08/27/2019

It was 1842 when the Military Road was finally completed connecting Fort Leavenworth with Fort Scott and the forts farther south. Grinter Ferry in Wyandotte County provided the transportation across the Kansas River. See Fort Scott Government Hospital, circa 1860s, below. #kansashistory

There is a church in Kansas City, Kansas known as White Church, located at 85th and Parallel Parkway. It was called Whit...
08/23/2019

There is a church in Kansas City, Kansas known as White Church, located at 85th and Parallel Parkway. It was called White Church for a simple reason: it was painted white. It was established in 1832. The whole area surrounding the church was once known as White Church, Kansas. Moses and Anna Grinter are honored and depicted in a Stained-Glass window in the church. James Ketchum was a Delaware Indian who preached at the church. He is pictured in the front row on the far left. #kansashistory

Francis Catherine Grinter was born in 1839 to Moses and Anna Grinter.  Her brother, William Henry Harrison Grinter, was ...
08/20/2019

Francis Catherine Grinter was born in 1839 to Moses and Anna Grinter. Her brother, William Henry Harrison Grinter, was born two years later in 1841. Both attended school at the Shawnee Indian Mission in Fairway, Kansas. Francis entered in 1847, followed by William in 1849. Pictured is the mission in the 1870s. #kansashistory

Grinter Place is a participant in Blue Star Museums, presented by National Endowment for the Arts and Blue Star Families...
08/19/2019

Grinter Place is a participant in Blue Star Museums, presented by National Endowment for the Arts and Blue Star Families, to offer free admission to active military, guard, and reserve personnel and up to five family members from May 18, 2019, to September 2, 2019. #kansashistory

Moses Grinter operated the first ferry across the Kansas River.  His ferry began operation in 1831 and was located in Wy...
08/16/2019

Moses Grinter operated the first ferry across the Kansas River. His ferry began operation in 1831 and was located in Wyandotte County. The Kansas River is often referred to as The Kaw. Early references to the river had it called other names such as the Kanza, The Great River of the Cansez, River des Padoucas, River of the Cansez, and Padoucas. Those names were listed on various maps from 1673 to 1758. #kansashistory

This China cabinet was built by Sylvanus Stephens.  His daughter, Sarah Ann, married James F. Grinter, a cousin of Moses...
08/13/2019

This China cabinet was built by Sylvanus Stephens. His daughter, Sarah Ann, married James F. Grinter, a cousin of Moses Grinter, in 1867. The cabinet is on display in Grinter Place. #kansashistory

William Marshall was the father of Anna Marshall Grinter and the father-in-law of Moses Grinter.  Marshall operated a tr...
08/09/2019

William Marshall was the father of Anna Marshall Grinter and the father-in-law of Moses Grinter. Marshall operated a trading post among the Indians. In March 1833, he received payment from the Department of Indian Affairs for $12,000.00. It came from the office of Superintendent Clark. William Clark, of the Lewis and Clark expedition, was the Indian agent for the district. Pictured is Clark. #kansashistory

In October of 1846 the renewal of a one-year Indian trading license was issued to “Pierre Chouteau, Jr. and Company.”  T...
08/06/2019

In October of 1846 the renewal of a one-year Indian trading license was issued to “Pierre Chouteau, Jr. and Company.” The persons engaged in that ‘trading post’ were Frederick Chouteau, Charles Chouteau, Thomas Elliott and John Owens. Thomas Elliott died of Cholera in 1849. He is buried in the front yard of the Grinter House overlooking the Kansas River, with his tombstone marking his grave. #kansashistory

Twelve years after Moses Grinter established his ferry across the Kansas River in 1831, the Delaware Indians sold 36 sec...
08/02/2019

Twelve years after Moses Grinter established his ferry across the Kansas River in 1831, the Delaware Indians sold 36 sections of land, in what would become Wyandotte County Kansas, to the Wyandot Indians from Ohio. Pictured is John W. Greyeyes, a Wyandot Indian, who was born at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. He came to the Wyandotte County, Kansas area in 1843. #kansashistory

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1420 S 78th St
Kansas City, KS
66111

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I lived in Kansas City Kansas for the first 19 yrs of my life and never heard of or have been here. Very sad. I will definitely put it on my list to see if I make a trip back there.
Love this picture of the Grinter House decorated for Christmas.
In about 1971, I and my friends from "Sing Out Heart of America" performed an "Up With People" benefit concert for the Grinter Place to help in renovation, maintenance and to aid it getting on the registry. Hope to visit there again after all these years.