Masonic Library and Museum of Indiana

Masonic Library and Museum of Indiana The Masonic Library and Museum of Indiana (MLMI) is an immersive experience to learn, and listen about the influence of the fraternity of Freemasons in the state of Indiana.
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The Masonic Library and Museum of Indiana (MLMI) is transitioning from a primarily collection-based viewing, to enhancing the visitor experience for those with and without a Masonic background. The concentration of this museum is to improve a visitor's accessibility to the MLMI's collection, and illuminate the Indiana Masonic story, and its influence to the people of Indiana. To make an appointment to visit the Library & Museum, contact Michael Brumback directly at (765)-744-0424.

Operating as usual

Pantagraph Publishing and Stationery announced that they will not publish a new edition of the List of Lodges, Masonic f...
10/21/2020
Amity to Publish 'List of Lodges Masonic'

Pantagraph Publishing and Stationery announced that they will not publish a new edition of the List of Lodges, Masonic for 2021. After many decades of printing the List, Pantagraph is finally calling it quits. But there is good news to be reported. For several years now, Pantagraph has been working with the brethren who created the Amity smartphone app, knowing this day would come, sooner or later. While the timing of Pantagraph's decision this month came as a surprise, Amity has just announced that they will soon be offering a print-on-demand, up to date book version of the List of Lodges, Masonic. They are expected to start calling for orders in December.

http://freemasonsfordummies.blogspot.com/2020/10/amity-to-publish-list-of-lodges-masonic.html

by Christopher Hodapp As reported here last week, Pantagraph Publishing and Stationery has announced that they will not publish a new editio...

Lovers of Masonic books can again rejoice - that which was lost has been reborn! After years of hopeful rumors, the Maso...
09/16/2020
The Masonic Book Club Is Reborn By AASR-SJ

Lovers of Masonic books can again rejoice - that which was lost has been reborn! After years of hopeful rumors, the Masonic Book Club (MBC), which has been defunct since 2010, has been resurrected by the Scottish Rite Southern Jurisdiction's Supreme Council!

If you've been reading and collecting Masonic books for very long, or if you hang out in Masonic libraries, you doubtless know about a very special series of blue hardback volumes from the Masonic Book Club. Formed in 1970 by Brothers Alphonse Cerza and Louis Williams, the MBC operated out of the Illinois Lodge of Research for forty years, primarily reprinting long out-of-print works of importance, or occasionally obscure gems. The new MBC will continue that tradition.

There will be no dues for the new Club - payments will only be collected as books are ready to be manufactured, and all transactions will be handled exclusively online. Book prices are expected to range in the $25 vicinity for pre-publication orders, or $35 retail if you miss the ordering window. Volumes will no longer be numbered, but the good news is that, if the hardback edition sells out, the MBC will make a paperback print-on-demand edition available of the book.

And to the relief of the MBC's older original members, they say they actually intend to communicate with members twice a year with an electronic newsletter to keep everyone in the loop about upcoming volumes in the works and their production status. (MORE AT LINK BELOW)

https://freemasonsfordummies.blogspot.com/2020/09/the-masonic-book-club-is-reborn-by-aasr.html

by Christopher Hodapp Lovers of Masonic books can again rejoice - that which was lost has been reborn! After years of hopeful rumors, t...

For many years, Mark Tabbert at the George Washington Masonic National Memorial in Alexandria, Virginia has been activel...
09/05/2020
George Washington Memorial's Masonic Digital Archive Is a Research Treasure

For many years, Mark Tabbert at the George Washington Masonic National Memorial in Alexandria, Virginia has been actively seeking support for and promoting a digital collection made up of the proceedings of all U.S. grand lodges and appendant grand bodies. The scope of the Masonic Digital Archives project is enormous - consider that a grand lodge like my own has been publishing these reports annually for over two hundred years, generally at the rate of a couple of hundred pages each year. Then multiply that by 51 Grand Lodges, plus Grand Royal Arch Chapters, Grand Cryptic Councils, and Grand Knights Templar Commanderies.

The Memorial Association is digitizing each governing body’s complete annual proceedings collections for a flat rate of $1000 as a service to the Craft. That price is non-adjustable, regardless of the number of books or pages digitized. After that, a $200 annual subscription fee maintains and updates the online collection on the Memorial's LUNA database platform. LUNA presents each book in pdf form and is fully searchable, making the hunting of names, places, topics, dates and more fast and simple.

This massive undertaking is an incredible research resource for historians and researchers, be they Masonic, academic, or genealogical. Indiana scanned our proceedings many years ago, and to have them in digitized form has been a godsend - I couldn't have written my book 'Heritage Endures' without it.

So far, there are proceedings from 21 grand lodges and grand bodies online...

http://freemasonsfordummies.blogspot.com/2020/09/george-washington-memorials-masonic.html

by Christopher Hodapp For many years, Mark Tabbert at the George Washington Masonic National Memorial in Alexandria, Virginia has been ...

The Gazette in Cedar Rapids, Iowa yesterday featured a substantial and nicely written piece about the Grand Lodge of Iow...
08/27/2020

The Gazette in Cedar Rapids, Iowa yesterday featured a substantial and nicely written piece about the Grand Lodge of Iowa's magnificent Library and Museum and its curator/librarian, WB Bill Krueger. It doesn't get the attention that the venerable Masonic museums and libraries in America's northeast often do, but Cedar Rapids is arguably one of the top Masonic research resources in the world. The original library's home was erected in 1884 and was the first Masonic-specific library building in America. The present 1955 facility today has more than 155,000 volumes, in addition to its fine museum collection.

The reporter asked Bill to name the top five treasures in the Museum today...(MORE)

https://freemasonsfordummies.blogspot.com/2020/08/iowas-masonic-library-museum-highlighted.html

08/19/2020
Grand Lodge of Indiana

Indiana Grand Master Kenneth Roy, Jr. delivers a message about safely conferring Masonic degrees in lodges under current COVID restrictions. Degree work may be conferred on candidates in Indiana starting September 1st, 2020.

The detailed documents he refers to will be located in the Member and Lodge Portals of the Grand Lodge website, and will be available late today. Worshipful Masters and lodge officers must consult them and follow all safety procedures before undertaking any degree conferrals.

Indiana Grand Master Kenneth Roy, Jr. outlines permission and rules for safely resuming Masonic degree conferrals beginning September 1, 2020. The documents reffered to in his statement can be found in the Member and Lodge Portals of the Grand Lodge website. Worshipful Masters and lodge officers need to read those guidelines carefully and see that they are followed before conferring degrees on candidates.

(Please note: Documents referred to in the video will be posted late in the day 8/19)

At the end of the Spanish Civil War in 1939, Fascist dictator Francisco Franco took power and would rule Spain for anoth...
08/10/2020
Spain's Biblioteca Pública Arús

At the end of the Spanish Civil War in 1939, Fascist dictator Francisco Franco took power and would rule Spain for another four decades. Like his fascist contemporaries Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini, Franco outlawed Freemasonry. Lodges were shuttered, many Masons were persecuted, and more than a few Masonic leaders were imprisoned or killed. And for almost three decades, the top Masonic library in Spain had to remain hidden from view.

In 1895, the Biblioteca Pública Arús (or the Arús Public Library) opened on the second floor of a downtown townhouse in Barcelona as one of the city's first public libraries. The library was donated to the people of Barcelona upon his death by Spanish playwright, journalist, philanthropist and Freemason Rossend Arús for the education of the working classes. Located at 26 Passeig de Sant Joan in Barcelona, the Arús Public Library today is home to 80,000 books, booklets, manuscripts, documents, microforms and more. In addition to being one of the largest reference libraries on Freemasonry in Spain, it also houses one of the world’s most comprehensive Sherlock Holmes collections. It is also has extensive material about labor unions, social and cultural movements, and more. But because of its large Masonic collection, the rise of Franco resulted in the owners of the library closing its doors to the public in 1939, and it remained safely closed and hidden from sight for another 28 years...(MORE BELOW)

http://freemasonsfordummies.blogspot.com/2020/08/spains-biblioteca-publica-arus.html

by Christopher Hodapp At the end of the Spanish Civil War in 1939, Fascist dictator Francisco Franco took power and would rule Spain ...

At the age of five and a half, my father took me to the 1964 New York World's Fair in Flushing Meadow. Flying cars, rock...
08/09/2020
Freemasons, Fairs and the Future

At the age of five and a half, my father took me to the 1964 New York World's Fair in Flushing Meadow. Flying cars, rocket packs, video phones, Moon rockets, robots - they were all there, and more. I glimpsed the future that weekend in New York, and I wanted in. The Fair succeeded at what world's fairs in those days were supposed to do - it inspired a whole generation of fairgoers about the exciting technology of the time, and the greater achievements we would make in the future that was closer than we thought. It's a shame that world's fairs lost their ability to do that in the decade after New York's, because we seem to have given up on our ability to be optimistically inspired in the last 50 years.

Freemasons used to think a lot about the future, too. They thought about their past achievements, but they also planned big for the future. World's fairs were a part of that big thinking for Masons. There were major Masonic themed pavilions and exhibits at noteworthy world's fairs in Chicago in 1893, St. Louis in 1904, and New York in 1964...(MORE AT LINK)

https://freemasonsfordummies.blogspot.com/2020/08/freemasons-fairs-and-future.html

by Christopher Hodapp There's an article this week on the Scottish Rite Museum's blog about an Order of the Eastern Star display at th...

"In this historic period in American life, the sites that preserve the nation’s history are in jeopardy. Based on a surv...
07/27/2020
The Uncertain Future of Places That Preserve America’s Past

"In this historic period in American life, the sites that preserve the nation’s history are in jeopardy. Based on a survey of 760 museum directors released July 22, the American Alliance of Museums says one-third of institutions are not confident that they will survive past the next 16 months, and the same portion expect to lose 40% or more of their budgeted operating income for 2020. More than half (56%) have less than six months of operating reserves. Already museums are losing at least $33 million a day."

In a moment of crisis, a local museum can easily be an afterthought

07/23/2020
Grand Lodge of Indiana

Grand Master Ken Roy wants to know why you are a Freemason. Say why in 120 words or less...

Sometimes accidents happen... even when you are really good at what you do. We accidently deleted GM's message (don't tell him) and we need you to share it around again because it had been shared over 50x And Its Gone!

Grand Master Ken Roy wants to know why you are a Freemason. Give some thought and write an essay on what Freemasonry means to you or why you became a Freemason. What made you travel this way? Why are you still here? What would you say to another man to help him make that first knock on the door to your lodge room?

We want to hear from you as individuals, as groups and/or as your lodge. Do your best to keep it to less than or about 120 words. Deadline November 1, 2020. Watch to learn why...

Include your name, lodge name and number.

Email to [email protected]
or USPS to
Indiana Grand Lodge
Attn: John Bridegroom
P.O. Box 44210
525 N. Illinois St.
Indianapolis, IN 46244-0210

07/02/2020

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION CANCELED
Released at 2PM July 2, 2020

Dear Brother,
The Grand Master and Grand Lodge Officers after careful deliberation and consideration of the current Covid-19 situation, have determined that it is not in the best interest of our Membership to hold the Annual Communication on July 14, 2020. The Annual Communication for 2020 is cancelled and the next Annual Communication will be on May 18, 2021. The current Grand Lodge Officers will continue to serve in their respective positions until May of 2021.

Official notification and additional information on Grand Lodge events will be distributed next week following the 4th of July Holiday. Lodge stated and called meetings may continue following previously outlined precautions. Degree work is not to be conducted until further notice.
We apologize for any inconvenience this decision may have caused, the health and safety of the Indiana Freemasons and their families is our top priority. Continue to follow and practice the precautions as outlined by the Governor during the holiday and into the future.

Please enjoy a safe and happy 4th of July Holiday!

Sincerely and fraternally,
Richard J. Elman, PGM
Grand Secretary

"If you make a mistake, do it sharply."These were the wise words of Sir Knight George D. Kivett, Jr., who is known far b...
06/14/2020
George D. Kivett Jr.

"If you make a mistake, do it sharply."

These were the wise words of Sir Knight George D. Kivett, Jr., who is known far beyond the boundaries of Indiana for his long career as the Captain of Raper Commandery No. 1's Drill Team.

Sir Knight George D. Kivett, Jr., passed to the Celestial Lodge on Tuesday, June 9, 2020 in Indianapolis, Indiana at the age of 90.

George Kivett has been universally acknowledged as the most successful Drill Captain in the history of the Grand Encampment of the Knights Templar of the USA, serving from 1970 through 2007 and winning seven Triennial Drill Competitions out of eight - six of which were won consecutively.
George was born Indianapolis, Indiana on April 25, 1930 to George D. Kivett, Sr. and Maggie Effie Kivett. He enlisted in the United States Army in 1951 and served three years before returning to Indianapolis Power and Light for a long and fulfilling career, retiring after 45 years of service as the Assistant to CEO for Employee Affairs.

George D Kivett, Jr, was raised to the sublime degree of a Master Mason at Mystic Circle Lodge No 685 on June 28th, 1958. He was exalted as a Royal Arch Mason at Indianapolis Chapter No 5 and greeted as a Royal & Select Master at Indianapolis Council No 2 on March 18th, 1960. He was dubbed and created a Knight of the Temple at Raper Commandery No 1 on March 23rd, 1960. He has received the Grand Commandery’s Distinguished Service Award. He is a Knight of the York Cross of Honor (KYCH), a Knight Commander of the Temple (KCT), and an Honorary Past Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of Indiana.

George is survived by his children, David Kivett, Mark (Belinda) Kivett and Tony (Terri) Kivett; brother, Harold Kivett; his grandchildren, Kelly (Shawn) Phillips, Chad (Jennifer) Kivett, Josh Kivett and Aaron (Cassandra Duncan) Kivett and great-grandchildren, Chase Phillips, Emma Phillips, Jaden Haywood, Blayne Kivett, Brooklyn Kivett, Jayden Kivett, Trenton Kivett, Jackson Whitfield and Carter Agal and numerous cousins, nieces, nephews and friends.

George is preceded in death by his parents, his wife, Martha Kivett and brothers Adolphus Kivett, William (Bill) Kivett and John Kivett.

Due to COVID-19 private services for the family will be held at Flanner Buchanan - Floral Park at 425 N. Holt Road, Indianapolis, Indiana.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to The American Cancer Society.

If you knew George, please visit the Flanner & Buchanan website and leave a message on the guest book there: https://flannerbuchanan.com/obit/george-d-kivett-jr/

His column is broken, and his brethren mourn.

Requiescat in pace.

Flanner Buchanan Indianapolis obituaries funeral, cremation, preplanning and burial services.

The Library & Museum will remain closed this week as we finish up painting on the 5th floor of Indiana Freemasons Hall a...
06/09/2020
Masonic Library and Museum of Indiana – Grand Lodge Free and Accepted Masons of Indiana

The Library & Museum will remain closed this week as we finish up painting on the 5th floor of Indiana Freemasons Hall and re-set some of our displays. We hope to reopen the week of June 15th. In the meantime, please visit our website where you will find online access to our collections, links to the Indiana Freemason magazine archives dating back to 1923, book resources, featured artifacts and more.

http://mlmindiana.org

Göbekli Tepe in Turkey is the oldest place of worship on Earth ever discovered, predating the Egyptian pyramids by 6,500...
04/29/2020
Turkey's Göbekli Tepe: Discoveries at World's Oldest Temple

Göbekli Tepe in Turkey is the oldest place of worship on Earth ever discovered, predating the Egyptian pyramids by 6,500 years. New discoveries are emerging from the ancient site about the primitive hunter/gatherers here who developed a rudimentary understanding of geometry to create the first temples.

by Christopher Hodapp The 10,000- to 11,500-year-old site of Göbekli Tepe in Turkey is the oldest place of worship on Earth ever di...

The Prestonian Lecturer for 2020 is George Boys-Stones, and it's the unfortunate bum luck of the moment that his travels...
04/19/2020
2020 Prestonian Lecture Now in Print

The Prestonian Lecturer for 2020 is George Boys-Stones, and it's the unfortunate bum luck of the moment that his travels have been curtailed worldwide by the COVID-19 Wuhan virus pandemic shutdown. Brother Boys-Stones' lecture is entitled, 'A System of Morality: Aristotle and English Masonic Ritual,' and he was scheduled to travel to the United States later this year as part of his international speaking tour.

Fortunately, the printed version of the 2020 Prestonian Lecture was published earlier this month, and now is available for purchase via Amazon in both paperback and Kindle versions.

https://freemasonsfordummies.blogspot.com/2020/04/2020-prestonian-lecture-now-in-print.html

Address

525 North Illinois Street (Located On The 5th Floor Of Indiana Freemasons’ Hall
Indianapolis, IN
46204

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(765) 744-0424

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The Masonic Library and Museum of Indiana, Inc. (MLMI) is the official preservation and research institution for the Grand Lodge Free & Accepted Masons of Indiana. Located on the 5th floor of the Indianapolis Masonic Temple, we are presently transitioning from a primarily collection-based viewing for our own members into enhancing the visitor experience for those with and without a Masonic background. Our ultimate mission is to illuminate the wider story of Freemasonry, with a special concentration on its profound, historic influence for the people and communities of the state of Indiana. To make an appointment to visit the Library & Museum, contact Director Michael Brumback directly at (765)-744-0424, or Associate Director Christopher Hodapp at 317-443-9354.

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Had a great visit with these brothers and their beautiful lodge.
INDIANA MASONIC MARKERS No. 3 Vincennes Masonic Temple Fifth and Broadway (relocated) Unveiled October 31, 1964 “Cradle of Freemasonry in Indiana At historic Vincennes the first Lodge of Freemasons in the present State of Indiana was established, 1809, by the Grand lodge of Kentucky. Since 1818 it has worked under Indiana charter as Vincennes Lodge No. 1” Albert Mackey and the many subsequent writers who copied and pasted his 1870’s Masonic Encyclopedia entry about our state claim that Masonry was introduced into Indiana as early as 1795, by military lodges. From there it jumps to Kentucky’s chartering of Vincennes Lodge No. 15, convened in 1809, and the rest, as they say, is history. But there’s no discussion of why Vincennes Lodge was chartered to begin with, at that moment in time, and by those men. 'Guard well the South Gate.' Indiana did, and the best of Freemasonry came to the territory through it. The Grand Lodge of Kentucky, after it was formed in 1800, became a little factory, chartering lodges not only in its own state, but eighteen lodges outside it, located in what would eventually become a total of nine other states. In the summer of 1807 while Vincennes was capital of Indiana Territory, a handful of Freemasons residing in that little town petitioned the Grand Lodge of Kentucky through Abraham Lodge No. 8, Louisville, for a dispensation to organize a Lodge. In the second legislative Assembly, in 1808, one unusual man, known for his flamboyant speech, took up a place at the forefront of the opposition to slavery in Indiana. Like Governor Harrison, he was born in Virginia, but in the Piedmont, in Culpepper County, a man with an improbable first name—General Washington Johnston. Many secondary sources are muddy regarding this man who would bring Freemasonry across the Ohio River to Vincennes, and this incredibly important moment in Indiana history. Johnston was already a Freemason, member of Abraham Lodge No. 8 at Louisville, through which he petitioned Grand Lodge of Kentucky for a dispensation for the lodge in Vincennes. In fact, his dispensation fell into limbo for two years, while he mounted his campaign for Congress and prepared a report on slavery in the Indiana Territory. He’s often credited as the initial force behind Indiana Masonry, regardless of never being made Grand Master of the state. His Masonry was important to him; later he would say he stood for three things, “Free Soil, Freemasonry and Free Education.” Large pieces of his biography are a blank, but we know some things. Johnston was the first man to be made an attorney in Indiana, and served in many public positions over the years. But frontier lawyers weren’t wealthy, and he had other jobs, including postmaster and auctioneer. He was self-educated, and was fluent in French, a valuable skill in Vincennes. He knew his history as well as his classics, and was a charter member of the Vincennes library that was founded in 1806. People who met him were often openly disappointed that he wasn’t actually a general, but he took his turn as a citizen soldier, fighting as a volunteer in the Light Dragoons at Tippecanoe, under the command of Jo Daveiss. He married, was widowed, and married again, fathering eight children. Interestingly, the brother-in-law with whom he studied law in Louisville was a cousin of Governor Harrison’s. Politics doesn’t seem to have spoiled a personal friendship with the Governor. In 1809 he signed the petition asking the President to reappoint Harrison as territorial governor. He also didn’t have a reputation as an abolitionist. Petitions were pouring into the capital of Vincennes, for and against slavery, and the Territory had to take a position. A three-man committee was appointed to consider the issue. As its head, Johnston put together a statement document covering the history of slavery in America, and the potential ruin in its extension to the West. He had wanted to run for territorial delegate to the Congress, but put it aside in order to do his report. It’s a masterful statement of the principles of abolition. When he read the report in October of 1808, he brought the legislature to a standstill, pronouncing that any slave must be free the moment he set foot in the Indiana Territory. Anything else constituted a “retrograde step into barbarism.” It was a shot heard all the way to the new federal capital of Washington, D.C. And in a remarkable instance of the moral compass of one man pulling the thousands with him, opinions in Indiana on the issue began to shift. On the Masonic front, difficulties in transportation and communication were encountered causing numerous delays, so that the new Vincennes Lodge No. 15 chartered by Kentucky was not able to work until March 13, 1809. Colonel John Gibson, first Secretary of the Indiana Territory, a Pennsylvania Fellow Craft, was the first man to be raised a Master Mason—interestingly on March 14th, just one day after the lodge received its charter. William Prince and Parmenas Beckes were the first to petition for and receive all three degrees. Early in 1809 the election came that Johnston walked away from, the vote for a territorial delegate to the Congress. The Vincennes newspaper, the Western Sun, and General Washington Johnston helped make it a referendum on slavery. There were three candidates - the two majors were Thomas Randolph, the Governor’s handpicked choice, and Jonathan Jennings, new to the territory, a young lawyer out of Pennsylvania. The third candidate was John Johnson, a Knox County representative who split the difference, being pro-slavery and anti-Harrison. Of course, he still drew votes from Randolph. But in the end it was Jennings, the anti-slavery candidate, who won. Over the course of the next decade, slavery would lose each time the issue came to any sort of a vote. Jennings would eventually become the first elected governor of the state of Indiana, in 1816. In Johnston’s fight, the emerging state was shaped. The small farmers of Indiana certainly could have used a slave, even one, since they were chronically short of labor. This was the bone thrown to them by advocates of slavery, one they generally ignored. A sharp-eyed early traveler to Corydon remarked on the neat and orderly small farms, adding the observation that the people of Corydon didn’t wish for larger holdings, any more than a tired housewife without servants wishes for a house with twice as many rooms. Pointing out two facts in conjunction, that Johnston was a Mason and a force to end slavery, seems like a reach for low-hanging fruit, playing into Masonic myth. It might be better to point out that, after an incredibly contentious election, Thomas Randolph, General Washington Johnston, Jonathan Jennings and John Johnson were all Freemasons, and quite probably at some point sat together in lodge. Men like General Washington Johnston would have felt the lack of a Masonic lodge, deeply, for far more reason than entertainment. In the early years in Indiana, with so few buildings, the lodge generally met in the upper rooms of an inn or tavern. Taverns were almost public buildings, usually a post office and inn and stage stop. The early Puritans forbid taverns by law from closing without permission of the government. The next log buildings to go up were churches, schools, and town halls or courthouses, and Dwight Smith’s history of Indiana outlines in more detail the many joint efforts in these struggling towns to share the burden of the expense. Freemasons would get together with the builders of the school or another community structure, like the courthouse, and share use and cost. The overall point being that they combined with another community building. It’s difficult to explain to the modern American mind the place of Freemasonry in the early development of America. In the tidewater cities of the original colonies, Masonry was nothing less than an integral part of the civic landscape. Lodges constantly opened their doors to non-Masonic community events. And in the West, the republican civic order represented by Freemasonry was a civic handmaiden that had never betrayed them. By 1817, eight other lodges were at work in the new state of Indiana. During that summer the Brethren of Vincennes Lodge made the first overture to the other lodges that led to the eventual constituting of the Grand Lodge of Indiana. The Masonic marker was originally erected on the campus of Vincennes University, but the school evicted it eventually when they began to discourage tourists from visiting its campus. It now stands in front of the Masonic Temple of Vincennes Lodge No. 1 at Fifth and Broadway.
This past Tuesday, I was privileged with the opportunity to briefly visit the new Masonic Library and museum. It has been well done and there are numerous items on display. Our history is something to be proud of.