Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site

Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site Frederick W. Vanderbilt's Hyde Park Estate 1895-1938 Vanderbilt Mansion NHS, in terms of architecture, interiors, mechanical systems, road systems and landscape, is a remarkably complete example of a gilded-age country place, illustrating the political, economic, social, cultural, and demographic changes that occurred as America industrialized in the years after the Civil War.
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Operating as usual

07/26/2021
Behind The Scenes

A team from our Buildings and Utilities division finish putting the final touches on the boiler in the basement of the Vanderbilt coach house.
Thanks, to Sam, Randy and Dana!

#NPSHydePark #BandU #VanderbiltMansion #Coachhouse #behindthescenes #NationalParkService

From an I LOVE NEW YORK post on July 25, 2016#OTD #ScenicSunday #scenicview #npshydepark #overlook #VanderbiltMansion #f...
07/25/2021

From an I LOVE NEW YORK post on July 25, 2016

#OTD #ScenicSunday #scenicview #npshydepark #overlook #VanderbiltMansion #findyourpark #EncuentraTuParque #iloveny #NYState #NYStateofMind #hudsonriver #hudsonvalley #HudsonValleyNY #HydeParkNY

From an I LOVE NEW YORK post on July 25, 2016

#OTD #ScenicSunday #scenicview #npshydepark #overlook #VanderbiltMansion #findyourpark #EncuentraTuParque #iloveny #NYState #NYStateofMind #hudsonriver #hudsonvalley #HudsonValleyNY #HydeParkNY

#FalaFriday #BARKRanger #NPSHydePark #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #VanderbiltMansion Meet one of the newest BARK Ran...
07/23/2021

#FalaFriday #BARKRanger #NPSHydePark #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #VanderbiltMansion

Meet one of the newest BARK Rangers, Larry.
Larry recently retired from the NYPD as a bomb sniffing dog and now enjoys visiting National Parks. Good boy Larry!

Bring your four-legged friend to any of our contact stations at Vanderbilt, Home of FDR or Val-Kill and ask about getting your BARK Ranger badge.

B - Bag your pets waste
A - Always leash your pet
R - Respect wildlife
K - Know where you can go

#FalaFriday #BARKRanger #NPSHydePark #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #VanderbiltMansion

Meet one of the newest BARK Rangers, Larry.
Larry recently retired from the NYPD as a bomb sniffing dog and now enjoys visiting National Parks. Good boy Larry!

Bring your four-legged friend to any of our contact stations at Vanderbilt, Home of FDR or Val-Kill and ask about getting your BARK Ranger badge.

B - Bag your pets waste
A - Always leash your pet
R - Respect wildlife
K - Know where you can go

A garden of such beauty doesn’t happen by chance, and it doesn’t prosper alone. This is how caring hands came together t...
07/20/2021

A garden of such beauty doesn’t happen by chance, and it doesn’t prosper alone. This is how caring hands came together to restore life to the once-weary Vanderbilt Gardens.

Vanderbilt Riverfront Trail
Stop 11 - Tending the Garden

We invite you to tour and explore the garden on your own, and as you look—listen—as we share its special story. A garden of such beauty doesn’t happen by chance, and it doesn’t prosper alone. This is how caring hands came together to restore life to the once-weary Vanderbilt Gardens. In 1940, the family of Frederick Vanderbilt donated his estate to the National Park Service. With the expense of World War Two, government funds and manpower needed to maintain the elaborate gardens were unavailable. These once carefully tended beds became overgrown; the structures and pathways fell into disrepair. What was once a living legacy bearing witness to Hyde Park and American history was in danger of disappearing all together. SOUNDBITE, MARGIE DELAFIELD: The Garden Association was formed in 1984 following an idea that some local women had about restoring the gardens. And the Park Service decided to give it a try and see what happened. NARRATION: Margie Delafield is the current President of the Frederick W. Vanderbilt Garden Association. She recalls the partnership that was formed with the National Park Service to restore these gardens to their original magnificence, and credits her predecessor, Marian Asher, with the vision and drive to begin the process. SOUNDBITE, MARIAN ASHER: There was no organization–there was just three people–those three people–talked about how nice it would be if there was a garden inside the walls. We met on a very cold February evening with a horticulturalist with our idea, and managed to persuade him that he should help us to begin this–and that’s how it began. This was 1984. And by the end of the summer, we were no longer three people, we were eight or nine people. And by the time the next spring arrived and we began planting some plants, there were 32 of us. So it just grew, and that was when it really became an organization. NARRATION: With much of the major structural restoration complete, the spring of 1985 welcomed the first planting of the annual beds since 1938. The following year saw the replanting of perennials. Roses soon followed. And ever since, the gardens have flourished, as they did under the care of Vanderbilt’s gardeners. Marian Asher… SOUNDBITE, MARIAN ASHER: We had to prove ourselves–we really had to prove ourselves–and I always felt that no one really thought it would happen, that we would succeed, but it just kept going along, year after year and it just sort of happened. NARRATION: While the elaborate greenhouse and palm house complexes are no longer in existence, their inventories survived, and became the basis for a more accurate restoration of the garden. Margie Delafield explains… SOUND BITE, MARGIE DELAFIELD: Because we’re a volunteer organization—Managing a public garden—an important public garden at a National Park. We want to make sure that the decision we make are driven by research and that they’re accurate and what we’re creating is a historically accurate heirloom garden. This new research is going to eventually mean that the visitor is going to have an experience similar to what they would have had in the 1930s when the Vanderbilts were still using the house in Hyde Park. But every time we can bring back things that actually were in the garden, it’s just really exciting. NARRATION: And, because garden work knows all seasons, approximately 150 volunteers still meet each week to plant, w**d, trim, mow grass and work on fundraising projects. Volunteers like Anita Whalen… SOUNDBITE: ANITA: I have been with the garden about eight years now. Number of hours? I think this year my name was added to the thousand hour plaque. NARRATION: …and founding member, Marian Asher… SOUNDBITE: MARIAN: I’m a founding member of the organization probably 4000 or 5000 hours–I don’t know. Quite a few. NARRATION: There’s Don Bernard, a new volunteer… SOUNDBITE: DON: I wasn’t a gardener, but I am now. I engage in a lot of conversations with visitors they’re very amazed at the amount of work that’s done by the people who do it. When they find out it’s all great volunteers. NARRATION: Or JoAnn Wheate, who’s been volunteering since 1990. SOUNDBITE, JOANN: I think gardeners, when they find a project, they will just stay with it. We’re tenacious, we’re nurturers, we just band together against all odds or something. And that’s how the association has lived for 25 years. NARRATION: And through their work in the Vanderbilt Garden, the Association has blossomed as well, into a model for the beauty of the volunteer spirit.

https://www.nps.gov/thingstodo/vanderbilt-riverfront-trail.htm

#VanderbiltMansion #NPSHydePark #RiverfrontTrail #HydeParkTrail #Podcast #HydeParkExplorer #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #GetOutside #HudsonRiver #HudsonValleyNY #GildedAge #GreatEstates #DutchessCountyNY #NPS #FWVGA

NPS Photos

The gardens are characterized by their “tiered” multiple levels, partitioned by walls of evergreen or masonry, to create...
07/19/2021

The gardens are characterized by their “tiered” multiple levels, partitioned by walls of evergreen or masonry, to create garden rooms where specific types of plants are grown.

Vanderbilt Riverfront Park
Stop 10 - The Formal Garden

Whether slumbering under winter snow, budding with the promise of spring, flush with summer’s profusion, or retiring into fall’s glory, each season in the Garden has its own distinct beauty. Walk, and share its story… When the Vanderbilts purchased this property in 1895, the Gardeners Cottage and Tool House, both to your left, were already in place. At one time, a glass carnation house connected these buildings. Among the Vanderbilts’ many additions was an expansion of the existing garden. They hired New York City landscape designer James L. Greenleaf, for the task. The gardens are characterized by their “tiered” multiple levels, partitioned by walls of evergreen or masonry, to create garden rooms where specific types of plants are grown. Start by looking all around you. The top level contains the “annual” beds, plants that only live for one season. There are over 6000 annuals that must be planted each year. The next level down is home to the “perennials”, plants that come back the following year. Their flowering schedule assures that there is always color in this garden. The lowest level is the rose garden. Typically, there are more than 1800 rose bushes–including “vintage” roses, varieties that may have been present in the original garden.

https://www.nps.gov/thingstodo/vanderbilt-riverfront-trail.htm

#VanderbiltMansion #NPSHydePark #RiverfrontTrail #HydeParkTrail #Podcast #HydeParkExplorer #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #GetOutside #HudsonRiver #HudsonValleyNY #GildedAge #GreatEstates #DutchessCountyNY #NPS #FormalGardens #FWVGA

NPS Photos

Hyde Park is thought to be the country’s oldest surviving romantic landscape.Vanderbilt Riverfront TrailStop 9 - Romanti...
07/18/2021

Hyde Park is thought to be the country’s oldest surviving romantic landscape.

Vanderbilt Riverfront Trail
Stop 9 - Romantic Landscape

“Romantic” is a term applied to landscape that is meant to look natural, not designed, although it is easy to see how guests of the Vanderbilts fell in love with the estate’s lawns and gardens–even before they saw the mansion that hid behind the artfully planted and pruned foliage. Hyde Park is thought to be the country’s oldest surviving romantic landscape. Its roots extend deep in time–perhaps as far back as the late 1700s. A most notable planting is the tree to your left –the Gingko. This rare specimen, planted well over 200 years ago, is described in more detail by National Park Service Chief of National Resource Management for the Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historic Site, Dave Hayes… SOUNDBITE DAVE HAYES: This gingko is one of the largest gingkoes in North America by most big tree standards–it was planted sometime between 1795 and 1835–we don’t know exactly when it was planted. The interesting thing about gingko trees in general is that it’s an ancient kind of tree. They’re known as a living fossil because there are fossil records of gingko leaves that look exactly like gingko leaves today. And it’s very resistant to disease, it’s very resistant to pests, and that made it a pretty nice landscape tree for land owners who wanted to have a landscape tree that would last. And if you look at this tree you’ll notice that for a 200 year old tree it’s in pretty good shape. NARRATOR: Dave Hayes directs your attention to other noteworthy tree species… SOUNDBITE DAVE HAYES: As you are standing by the gingko tree with your back toward the mansion, look to the down the lawn and you’ll see a large tree with a weeping shape to it, and it’s got a couple of hemlock trees, conifer trees by either side of it–that is a weeping beech–there are about 45 different species of trees on the estate. NARRATOR: The plantings also delivered an additional aesthetic benefit… SOUNDBITE DAVE HAYES: We know that this landscape was designed–it was not just random. And these plantings were often put in place to give you a certain view as you walked along a path, to make a feature hidden until just the right moment when you’d come around a curve and then ‘boom’–there would be the mansion suddenly come up. And each of these estate owners had some interest in horticulture. NARRATION: In 1940, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, a Hyde Park native and self-proclaimed tree farmer , was so impressed with the collection and condition of the estate’s trees that he influenced Congress to enter the property into the National Park Service. The NPS has honored the legacy of the land by working to keep the landscape as close to its original state as possible, including replacing a dead tree with the same species and variety. You could say they’re working to keep the romance alive.

https://www.nps.gov/thingstodo/vanderbilt-riverfront-trail.htm

#VanderbiltMansion #NPSHydePark #RiverfrontTrail #HydeParkTrail #Podcast #HydeParkExplorer #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #GetOutside #HudsonRiver #HudsonValleyNY #GildedAge #GreatEstates #DutchessCountyNY #NPS #RomanticLandscape #GinkgoTree

NPS Photos of the Ginkgo Tree

The house, completed in 1898, was the centerpiece of an estate that encompassed 700 acres and included approximately 50 ...
07/17/2021

The house, completed in 1898, was the centerpiece of an estate that encompassed 700 acres and included approximately 50 other structures.

Vanderbilt Riverfront Trail
Stop 8 - The Vanderbilt Home

You are standing before one of the finest examples of Beaux-Arts residential architecture in America, a home for Frederick William Vanderbilt and his wife, Louise. Frederick, a third generation Vanderbilt, built his stately home on one of the most prized and historic properties on the banks of the Hudson River. Three different homes once stood on this exact spot where the house stands today, and later on the tour stop you will learn why this was a preferred location. The house, completed in 1898, was the centerpiece of an estate that encompassed 700 acres and included approximately 50 other structures. The property was first developed over two centuries ago, with early ownership including some of the founding fathers of Hyde Park. National Park Service Supervisory Park Ranger Allan Dailey introduces you to the last landowners of this storied estate… SOUND BITE ALLAN DAILEY: Frederick and Louise were latecomers to the town of Hyde Park. There had been estates, in Hyde Park, for a couple of centuries before they arrived, so the idea of there being wealthy people in their midst of the town certainly was not new to the residents of the town. But, Frederick and Louise, like other members, like the Newbolds, and the Rogers, and the Roosevelts, participated in providing a better life for the people of the town. But also, the estate was open to the residents of the town and their children, and they could come and use the estate, like we use it today, as a park. NARRATION: This building is a monument to an age when wealthy American industrialists sought to express their worth through structures that would stand the test of time, reminding the world of their accomplishments long after their passing. Frederick Vanderbilt and his siblings, heirs to vast family fortunes, became known as inexhaustible house builders. Frederick chose the firm of McKim, Mead & White, to create this residence. Note the hallmarks of Beaux-Arts design–strict classicism, perfect symmetry, heavy ornamentation–the perfectly balanced façade - all around the house. Allan Dailey… SOUND BITE ALLAN DAILEY: A lot of the workers who worked on the house were immigrants, who were leaving Europe–where fortunes were on the decline, and buildings like that weren’t being built anymore, and they were bringing their craft with them, and they were getting their foot in the door, building houses that were heavily modeled after European architecture and style and decoration. NARRATION: Walk now to the west façade to see why each subsequent land owners chose to build their homes on this same spot…and listen to Allan Dailey tell more about Vanderbilt’s home on the Hudson… SOUND BITE ALLAN DAILEY: The house itself, it had electricity–they produced in on the property – they had hot and cold running water–they had a water tower across the estate from the mansion–they had telephone, telegraph, tickertape machines, central heat - any amenity – any technology that was available–was employed. These are people who made their money in technology–these are people who embraced technology in their day to day lives. We know that in the earliest days townspeople would stand at the edge of the wall and watch the lights go on and off, so it was kind of a show. NARRATION: One look from the west portico, and you can see why this was the premier building site. The Hudson River below, and beyond, the expanse of hills leading up to the distant Catskill Mountains made this a favorite gathering place for Vanderbilt and his guests to relax and simply enjoy the view that today remains unequalled among Hudson Valley panoramas.

https://www.nps.gov/thingstodo/vanderbilt-riverfront-trail.htm

#VanderbiltMansion #NPSHydePark #RiverfrontTrail #HydeParkTrail #Podcast #HydeParkExplorer #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #GetOutside #HudsonRiver #HudsonValleyNY #GildedAge #GreatEstates #DutchessCountyNY #NPS

NPS Photos

It is a view that has been immortalized in countless paintings and photographs. Some are the works of famous artists, wh...
07/16/2021

It is a view that has been immortalized in countless paintings and photographs. Some are the works of famous artists, while others were created by everyday people wishing to capture the moment that this dramatic landscape inspired them.

Vanderbilt Riverfront Trail
Stop 7 - Inspirational Views

The iconic scene before you is captured in a popular Currier and Ives lithograph. Starting at your left, you will see the Shaupeneak Ridge…the Hudson River…Esopus Island, the seminary of Mount St. Alphonsus, and, rising in the distance, the Catskill Mountains. It is a view that has been immortalized in countless paintings and photographs. Some are the works of famous artists, while others were created by everyday people wishing to capture the moment that this dramatic landscape inspired them. The most notable style of American landscape art is known as the work of the Hudson River School, fostered by British artist Thomas Cole in 1825, as he traveled by steamship up the Hudson River to paint the first landscapes of New York State. Cole’s work was a celebration of spectacular scenery. Art of the Hudson River School depicted America as its early settlers were discovering and exploring the vast lands, and through the prolific work of Cole and others, it helped people learn to place a value on the American wilderness. Later artists, including Cole’s protégé Frederic Edwin Church, shared this respect and awe for nature with American writers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Art and literature together helped initiate the preservation movement, which led to the creation of national parks. Take a few moments and immerse yourself in this captivating view of the Hudson Valley, and join so many before you who have been moved by nature’s canvas.

https://www.nps.gov/thingstodo/vanderbilt-riverfront-trail.htm

#VanderbiltMansion #NPSHydePark #RiverfrontTrail #HydeParkTrail #Podcast #HydeParkExplorer #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #GetOutside #HudsonRiver #HudsonValleyNY #GildedAge #GreatEstates #DutchessCountyNY #NPS #CurrierandIves

Currier and Ives Hyde Park on the Hudson River

William H. Bartlett 1837 View from Hyde Park

NPS Photos of the Overlook

Address

81 RTE 9
Hyde Park, NY
12538

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 7pm
Tuesday 8am - 7pm
Wednesday 8am - 7pm
Thursday 8am - 7pm
Friday 8am - 7pm
Saturday 8am - 7pm
Sunday 8am - 7pm

Telephone

(845) 229-7770

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Comments

Can u parking on the grounds
Beautiful views of the Hudson River, lovely grounds and a great mansion to explore. Lots of history here!
Does the Mausoleum at Moravian, ever get opened? Ever recent picture shows it locked up
Since Mr. Vanderbilt visited Tallapoosa, Georgia - you guys should be a sponsor of our NYE Celebration - the POSSUM DROP 2019 / 2020 !
when will the Christmas open house take place this year?
Beautiful historic house museum and grounds. Accessible to everyone, the house has an elevator, the guides are super helpful. Grounds are beautiful. The house is crazy hot in the summer but worth going anyway. The visitors center/gift shop has AC and is worth going to see on its own.