Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site

Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Hyde Park, New York Home (Springwood) "All that is within me cries out to go back to my home on the Hudson River" FDR This quote captures FDR's connection to Springwood, the estate that he loved & the place he considered home.
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The first US Presidential Library was started by FDR here. Visit the Home of FDR and Presidential Library & Museum to learn about the only President elected to four terms.

Operating as usual

New-York Historical Society
12/23/2020

New-York Historical Society

🎁 Each Christmas during his presidency Franklin Roosevelt produced a limited edition of his writing as gifts to friends, associates, and family. In 1944, he selected his D-Day prayer, which he recited in his radio address in which he informed the American public of the Normandy invasion.

#DidYouKnow FDR became a New-York Historical Society member in 1906? Or that in 1923, he outbid the society for a manuscript at auction?

Find out more on the #FromTheStacks blog: https://bit.ly/2KP0REZ

12/22/2020

The grounds at the Home of FDR will be closed on December 24th and 25th

#FDR #Christmas #Springwood #HydeParkNY Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum
12/22/2020
Michael Beschloss on Twitter

#FDR #Christmas #Springwood #HydeParkNY Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

“Last Christmas of FDR’s life, Hyde Park, 1944: #FDRL”

Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site's cover photo
12/21/2020

Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site's cover photo

Young FDR's favorite winter sport was ice-yachting on the Hudson River. He is seen here sailing his yacht "Hawk"- 1905.W...
12/21/2020

Young FDR's favorite winter sport was ice-yachting on the Hudson River. He is seen here sailing his yacht "Hawk"- 1905.

Why was it such fun? At the time, ice yachts were the fastest vehicles on Earth -- literally flying faster than the wind, and easily outrunning trains.

Photo - FDR Library

The Roosevelt’s occupied the White House for 10 consecutive Christmases and the last two would be in Hyde Park. As Elean...
12/21/2020

The Roosevelt’s occupied the White House for 10 consecutive Christmases and the last two would be in Hyde Park. As Eleanor Roosevelt writes in her Autobiography, “Franklin and I tried to maintain our home traditions as well as those that had been established in the White House particularly in regard to the celebration of the holidays”.

Christmas Eves were the busiest time for President Roosevelt and the First Lady. Mrs. Roosevelt went to various charity functions in Washington D.C. Then she met up with her husband for an afternoon party for the White House staff in the East Room for refreshments and gifts. The President and Mrs. Roosevelt made an effort to greet every guest and give out small tokens of appreciation for the hard work done by everyone that particular year. Then the President and First Lady with family went to light the National Christmas Tree where FDR would broadcast a Christmas message. Upon returning home the Roosevelt family gathered around the President and listened to him read Dickens’, " A Christmas Carol," to any family that were gathered in Washington on any given year.

On behalf of the Roosevelt-Vanderbilt NHS we would like to wish you Seasons Greetings!

First Image- President Roosevelt with his grandchildren Franklin Roosevelt III (left) and John R. Boettiger (right) on December 24th, 1939. Image from FDR Library.

Second Image- President Franklin Roosevelt and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt attend the National Tree Lighting on December 24, 1933. Girl Scout Margaret Lusby gives a Bouquet of red roses to the First Lady and granddaughter, Anna Eleanor “Sistie” Dall. Image from FDR Library.

Third Image- Visitors admiring a decorated Christmas Tree in December 1934. The tree stands in the East Room of the White House, which was the preferred space because of the room’s height. Image from White House Historical Association.

#OTD December 20, 1941Fala sits with FDR in the White House Oval Study.#FDR #Fala #WhiteHouse #PresidentialPets #Scottis...
12/20/2020

#OTD
December 20, 1941
Fala sits with FDR in the White House Oval Study.

#FDR #Fala #WhiteHouse #PresidentialPets #ScottishTerrier #OnThisDay

12/18/2020

The grounds of the Home of FDR will reopen at 8:00 on Saturday morning. Please be mindful of the potential for slippery surface when you visit.

Meowy Christmas and Happy #FalaFriday from Springwood! I’m Sitka, a 5 month old kitten that was out on a walk with my ow...
12/18/2020

Meowy Christmas and Happy #FalaFriday from Springwood! I’m Sitka, a 5 month old kitten that was out on a walk with my owner at the home of FDR. I know what you’re thinking, but cats like walks too! This time of year is my favorite because Christmas trees are so much fun to play in, much to my owner’s chagrin. I am a Maine Coon mix, but I’m neither from Maine or a Raccoon 😉 My namesake honors the Sitka Spruce tree, which isn’t found in this part of the world, but is related to evergreens like the Norway Spruce FDR would grow on his property and sell commercially as Christmas trees throughout the 1920s and 30s.

I learned that Christmas was a favorite holiday for the Roosevelts, and they took special measures to make it a memorable occasion. Although FDR was a tree farmer and would gift his own Christmas trees grown on his farm to people like Winston Churchill, FDR accepted a tree from a particular location in 1941. Several days before Pearl Harbor was attacked, FDR fulfilled an offer to have a tree from St. Croix Island to be put on display in the White House that year. Check out the story written by a coalition of National Park Sites and historical societies about the momentous Christmas of that year. A Very Roosevelt Christmas (U.S. National Park Service) (nps.gov)

There are so many more interesting stories about how the Roosevelts spent Christmas, which you can read more about here Christmas with the Roosevelts - White House Historical Association (whitehousehistory.org)

I hope you all get to spend the ornament-smashing holiday with a hooman you love. Thanks for tuning in to this special #FelineFriday and visit the sites in Hyde Park NY for a chance to be featured on our next #FalaFriday!

The grounds of the Home of FDR will remain closed on Friday December 18th for ongoing snow removal.
12/17/2020

The grounds of the Home of FDR will remain closed on Friday December 18th for ongoing snow removal.

The grounds of the Home of FDR will be closed on Thursday December 17th due to impending winter weather conditions.

#WreathofFranklins #FDR #Springwood #HolidaySeason #BeWellStaySafe
12/16/2020

#WreathofFranklins #FDR #Springwood #HolidaySeason #BeWellStaySafe

The grounds of the Home of FDR will be closed on Thursday December 17th due to impending winter weather conditions.
12/15/2020

The grounds of the Home of FDR will be closed on Thursday December 17th due to impending winter weather conditions.

Now, Therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate December 15, 19...
12/15/2020

Now, Therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate December 15, 1941, as Bill of Rights Day. And I call upon the officials of the Government, and upon the people of the United States, to observe the day by displaying the flag of the United States on public buildings and by meeting together for such prayers and such ceremonies as may seem to them appropriate.

The fifteenth day of December, 1941, is therefore set apart as a day of mobilization for freedom and for human rights, a day of remembrance of the democratic and peaceful action by which these rights were gained, a day of reassessment of their present meaning and their living worth.

The first 10 amendments to the United States Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. Passed by Congress on September 25, 1789, these rights place limits on government power.

Did you know?

The bill was introduced by James Madison. He later became the 4th President of the United States.

The Bill of Rights initially had 12 proposed amendments. One concerned the number of constituents for each representative. The other addressed the compensation of a Congressman. Neither was ratified.

In 1992, the compensation of a Congressman was ratified 203 years later and is now the 27th amendment.

The Bill of Rights is displayed in The Rotunda of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC.

There were 14 copies of the Bill of Rights; one for each of the 13 states to sign and one for the federal archives. Only 12 copies survive today.

#BillofRightsDay #FDR #OTD #DYK

Many people find peace in remarkable places.  Parks can be places of healing, inspiration, and peace. #FindingPeace #Fin...
12/14/2020

Many people find peace in remarkable places. Parks can be places of healing, inspiration, and peace.

#FindingPeace #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #NPSHydePark #FDR #Springwood #TopCottage

12/13/2020
Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site

Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site

It was tradition for the Roosevelts to read Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" at family Christmas gatherings. Listen to Eleanor Roosevelt herself read a few passages from this classic story. Originally recorded in 1952.

Governor Franklin Delano RooseveltBefore he was elected President of the United States, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was Go...
12/12/2020

Governor Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Before he was elected President of the United States, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was Governor of New York State. FDR was a two term Governor, first elected in 1928 and re-elected in 1930. Back then, it was only a two year term. He was initially very reluctant to run for this office because he was in the midst of trying to regain use of his legs after polio and he felt, along with his political advisor, Louis Howe, that 1928 would not be a good year for Democrats. However, former Governor Alfred Smith and the Democratic Party officials wanted FDR to run for the office at the same time Smith was running for President of the United States. They were convinced that FDR was would be a strong candidate who could easily win and perhaps Mr. Smith thought he could control Roosevelt. Should Smith lose the Presidency, he could still be the real Governor, giving FDR the opportunity to continue polio treatments in Warm Springs, Georgia. That did not happen. Al tried to put the pressure on FDR, who kept evading his phone calls until Eleanor Roosevelt intervened. She answered a call from Al Smith and put her unsuspecting husband on the line, who then proceeded to talk FDR into running.

When FDR took office in 1929 all was well with New York State and the entire country. It was the tail end of the Roaring Twenties era when prosperity reigned. As FDR saw it, his main problem was that the New York state legislature controlled how lump sum budget monies were spent. He felt that as the chief executive of the state, it should be his decision. Because of this, Governor Roosevelt vetoed the first budget that was submitted to him. The fight over who controlled the budget was taken to the New York State Supreme Court. The court initially ruled for the legislature. FDR appealed and he won. As governor, he supported aid to farmers, state regulation of the power industry and labor laws to protect workers. He also supported prison reform, eliminating mandatory life sentence for the 4th time offenders. He had new prisons constructed.

Initially, everything was going along smoothly for the new Governor, until unexpected disaster struck in October of 1929 with the stock market crash. This brought devastating economic hardship to the state and the nation and ultimately the world. Everyone was suffering. People had lost their jobs, their homes many businesses closed as well as banks. There were food lines and unemployment lines. The established rule had always been that Governors took care of handling problems in their own states. President Herbert Hoover felt that charitable organizations could help people or they should deal with economic hardship it on their own. Hoover believed that the government should support businesses and banks. He thought that government assistance to citizens would result in their becoming too dependent on the government getting them out of financial hardship. This could lead to socialism.

Governor Roosevelt decided that government intervention was the way to go. He said, “When widespread economic conditions render large numbers of men and women incapable of supporting either themselves or their families…aid must be extended by the government…as a matter of social duty.” In New York State he created the Temporary Emergency Relief Administration (TERA) to help the homeless and unemployed. He appointed Harry Hopkins as administrator. This would be the forerunner to FERA – the Federal Emergency Relief Administration that he would establish to help the unemployed when he became President of the United States. As President he would continue to create nationwide programs to help people who were suffering great economic hardship.

Photo - Governor Roosevelt and Al Smith
Photo- Governor Roosevelt
Photo - Governor Roosevelt

While December 7th is the day most people associate with the United States entering World War II, it was actually 4 days...
12/11/2020

While December 7th is the day most people associate with the United States entering World War II, it was actually 4 days after the invasion of Pearl Harbor, on December 11th 1941 that Germany and Italy declared war on the United States. These declarations brought America fully into World War II, which it had vowed to stay out of, thus changing the future of the country and the world. The United States would never again be an isolationist nation. Franklin Roosevelt would address Congress after receiving the declarations from Germany and Italy.

“To the Congress:

On the morning of December eleventh, the Government of Germany, pursuing its course of world conquest, declared war against the United States.

The long known and the long expected has thus taken place. The forces endeavoring to enslave the entire world now are moving toward this hemisphere.

Never before has there been a greater challenge to life, liberty, and civilization.

Delay invites greater danger. Rapid and united effort by all of the peoples of the world who are determined to remain free will insure a world victory of the forces of justice and of righteousness over the forces of savagery and of barbarism.
Italy also has declared war against the United States.

I therefore request the Congress to recognize a state of war between the United States and Germany, and between the United States and Italy.”

Photo - Declaration of War - National Archives

Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site
12/11/2020

Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site

Gimme paw for another #FalaFriday! I’m Zoey, an 18 month old Boxer puppy that loves walking the grounds of the historic sites in Hyde Park. One of my absolute joys is to greet the rangers on site, especially Ranger Dana, because she gives me so much love and attention. She is part of a legacy that empowers women as stewards for our national treasures. *Tail Wag*

The NPS sites in Hyde Park, NY possess notable firsts for prominent women of the time period. The rangers tell me that the first female superintendent to the National Park Service was stationed here at the Vanderbilt Mansion, appointed by FDR. Gertrude S. Cooper oversaw park operations and incorporated the Gilded Age into a component of the American story. This meant organizing tours throughout the home, all while keeping tabs on the rowdy Secret Service who were stationed on the third floor of the Mansion during WWII. She cared for the rooms and curbed the influx of late-night visitors after hours into the mansion, and also had to deal with the agents’ laundry. When it opened in the summer of 1940, Gertrude employed former servants and aides of Frederick Vanderbilt to lead tours, and when it became more popular, CCC men were trained to give tours as well. Gertrude was a good friend of Eleanor Roosevelt, who recommended her for the job. Her role as superintendent lasted through WWII, approximately 5 years until she switched jobs to become the director at the Greenwich Home in NYC.

Yet, this certainly wouldn’t be the only connection to the NPS for Eleanor. Since 1977, her home of Val-Kill has been designated as the first National Historic Site dedicated to a First Lady-- her life and activism. In another connection to the NPS, she actively took part in planning FDR’s home for public use following the president’s death. She even led tours herself on occasion. Can you imagine having Eleanor as your tour guide at Springwood? I have a feeling she would have given me all the love and attention I could ever want too!

Check out the photo below to see a news story of Gertrude’s first few days on the job. Visit any of the sites to learn more about the women who were integral to the history here and have a chance to be featured on our next #FalaFriday!

St. James Episcopal Church: “The Church of the President (Formerly God’s)”Founded in 1811, St. James’ Episcopal Church w...
12/09/2020

St. James Episcopal Church: “The Church of the President (Formerly God’s)”

Founded in 1811, St. James’ Episcopal Church was where the Hyde Park Roosevelts attended religious services. James Roosevelt, FDR’s father, converted to the Episcopal faith, upon marrying his first wife and became a regular churchgoer at St. James’. Sunday services here were a constant during FDR’s boyhood. As an adult, he served as a Vestryman and Senior Warden, just as his father and half-brother, “Rosy,” had done before him. St. James’ was an important institution to the Roosevelt family. Many Roosevelts are buried in its graveyard, including FDR’s parents, James and Sara; James’ first wife, Rebecca Howland Roosevelt; FDR’s half-brother, “Rosy” and both of his wives; as well as three of FDR’s children: Anna, Franklin Jr., and John. St. James’ received extra attention during Roosevelt’s presidency. In response, the Rector at the time put a sign in front of the church that said: “Church of the President.” FDR was highly amused when someone mischievously added “(Formerly God’s)” to the end of this sign. The current church building dates to 1844.

For more on St. James: http://www.stjameshydepark.org/sjhistory.htm

Photo of St. James - NPS
Photo - June 11, 1939, Franklin D. Roosevelt with King George, Queen Elizabeth, Eleanor Roosevelt and Sara Delano Roosevelt in front of St. James - FDR Library

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4097 Albany Post Rd
Hyde Park, NY
12538

Telephone

(845) 229-5320

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Hello, friends and family of Hyde Park! I acquired these Christmas Village-type houses a few years ago, but can't find anything about them! If there's a chance that these are part of a "National Parks" series, I NEED TO COLLECT THEM ALL!!! (There are no marks, other than a sticker that says it was made in Taiwan, I believe. Both of these houses are about 10" long. You can see that the writing above the doors is similar, as is the treatment of the shrubbery, so I believe them to 'go together,' even though I bought them separately.) Your thoughts would be most appreciated!
I wonder what FDR would think about having the name of his ideals for the post-WWII peace appropriated as the name for a cheap vodka?
to all who may have hiked fdr on sunday. i was hiking the trail to the river and became overwhelmed by the heat. at some point i lost my prescription sunglasses. if any one found them please message me . thanks in advance David
A question about the shutters on the home. In 1989 the shutters were dark. Now they are green. Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe that a paint study was done to determine what color the paint was at one time. Can you tell me more about the current color of the shutters? Were you trying to match the color to one of the years that FDR lived there? A specific year? Thank you.
"Front view of the Roosevelt Home, Home of Franklin . Roosevelt National Historc Site, Hyde Park, New York" Postmarked 1947.
FDR Estate has been a blessing during social distancing!
The Saudis, the Jews and FDR’s dog On March 10, 1945, several weeks after meeting, Ibn Saud wrote to Roosevelt, asking him to oppose the continued development of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. By RAFAEL MEDOFF APRIL 5, 2020 08:19Email Twitter Facebook fb-messenger US President Franklin D. Roosevelt meets with King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia, on board the U.S. Navy heavy cruiser USS Quincy (CA-71) in the Great Bitter Lake, Egypt, on 14 February 1945 (photo credit: COURTESY U.S. NAVAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE COMMAND/U.S. NAVY/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS) US President Franklin D. Roosevelt meets with King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia, on board the U.S. Navy heavy cruiser USS Quincy (CA-71) in the Great Bitter Lake, Egypt, on 14 February 1945 (photo credit: COURTESY U.S. NAVAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE COMMAND/U.S. NAVY/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS) Seventy-five years after president Franklin D. Roosevelt’s controversial embrace of the king of Saudi Arabia, FDR’s grandson has become part of a Saudi-financed public relations campaign to celebrate his late grandfather’s pro-Saudi policies. Hall Delano Roosevelt has been working with the LS2 Group, an Iowa-based public relations firm, to draw attention to the recent 75th anniversary of FDR’s meeting with King Abdul Aziz Ibn Saud, according to documents released by the Arab-American news site Al-Monitor. In the LST Group’s Foreign Agents Registration filings last year, it stated that it was being paid $126,500 monthly by the Saudi Embassy in Washington to provide “public relations and media management services.” Read More Related Articles Could the coronavirus bring peace among Israelis and Palestinians? Berlin confirms to the 'Post' it banned Palestinian terrorist for 4 years Plastic Surgeon Tells: “Doing This Every Morning Can Snap Back Sagging Skin (No Creams Needed)” (Beverly Hills MD) Recommended by The FDR-Ibn Saud meeting took place on February 14, 1945, on the deck of the USS Quincy. The king came aboard “with his whole court, [black] slaves, taster, astrologer, & 8 live sheep,” FDR wrote to his cousin, Margaret Suckley. “Whole party was a scream!” The president does not seem to have expressed concern about the slaves. The US ambassador to Riyadh, William Eddy, was the official note-taker. He wrote down the two leaders’ remarks in the form of a “Memorandum of Conversation,” which both the president and the king signed. One of the topics they discussed was whether or not the Arab world could accept the creation of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. Roosevelt asked Ibn Saud for his view of “the problem of Jewish refugees driven from their homes in Europe.” Ibn Saud responded that he opposed “continued Jewish immigration and the purchase of land [in Palestine] by the Jews.” The king insisted that “the Arabs and the Jews could never cooperate, neither in Palestine, nor in any other country.” President Roosevelt “replied that he wished to assure his majesty that he would do nothing to assist the Jews against the Arabs and would make no move hostile to the Arab people.” The king asserted that the Jews should be “given living space in the Axis countries which oppressed them,” rather than Palestine. Latest articles from Jpost TOP ARTICLES 2/5 How did Israelis catch coronavirus? In response, “The president remarked that Poland might be considered a case in point. The Germans appear to have killed three million Polish Jews, by which count there should be space in Poland for the resettlement of many homeless Jews.” On March 10, several weeks after the meeting, Ibn Saud wrote to Roosevelt, asking him to oppose the continued development of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. In his April 4 reply, FDR recalled “the memorable conversation which we had not so long ago” and reaffirmed that “no decision [will] be taken with respect to the basic situation in that country without full consultation with both Arabs and Jews.” He also reiterated that he “would take no action, in my capacity as Chief of the Executive Branch of this Government, which might prove hostile to the Arab people.” SPEAKING TO a joint session of Congress on March 1, 1945, FDR departed from his prepared text to offer an ad-libbed comment about Palestine: “I learned more about the whole problem, the Muslim problem, the Jewish problem, by talking with Ibn Saud for five minutes than I could have learned in the exchange of two or three dozen letters.” Roosevelt’s remark ignited a firestorm of criticism in the American Jewish community. “One wonders why Arab [leaders] were consulted about the fate of the Jewish national home,” the American Zionist leader Dr. Abba Hillel Silver complained. “Were the Jewish people consulted about the fate of Iraq, or Syria, or Saudi Arabia?” “Did [the president] learn nothing from years of association with Zionist leaders?” the editors of The Reconstructionist asked. “Does the fact that all these Arab states waited until they got a personal invitation to declare war upon Germany teach him nothing? Does the all-out war effort by the Jewish yishuv [of Palestine] convey nothing to our president? Was his personal pledge last fall to the Zionist convention based upon little or no knowledge?” There was criticism on Capitol Hill, too, including from members of FDR’s own party. “The choice of the desert king as expert on the Jewish question is nothing short of amazing,” Colorado Democrat Sen. Edwin Johnson declared. “I imagine that even Fala [the president’s dog] would be more of an expert.” Nothing about that controversy was mentioned at the US Navy’s recent commemoration of the 1945 meeting between FDR and Ibn Saud. Speakers lavished praise on the US-Saudi alliance, sailors hoisted the two countries’ flags, and a reenactment of the famous photo of the original meeting was staged - this time featuring the president’s grandson, a descendant of the Saudi king, and the head of the US Naval Forces Central Command. No black slaves were visible in the reenacted scene. As president of the US-Saudi Arabian Business Council and co-founder of the Friends of Saudi Arabia, Hall Delano Roosevelt is devoted to expanding relations between the United States and Saudi Arabia. Not surprisingly, FDR’s grandson has been emphasizing what he sees as the positives of the 1945 meeting. It was “historic” and demonstrated that the Saudis wanted to be “a productive part of the world,” he said in recent interviews. But the unsavory side of that 1945 meeting - from the king’s black slaves to the disturbing comments by President Roosevelt and Ibn Saud regarding the Jews - should not be papered over. The public has a right to know the full story. The writer is director of The David S. Wyman Institute for Holocaust Studies in Washington, DC, and author of more than 20 books about the Holocaust, Zionism, and American Jewish history. Tags Israel United States saudi arabia jews Sign up for The Jerusalem
Are there any photographs of the third floor?
Is the museum free on President's weekend? We have visitors in town and thought they might consider this as an option.
We are visiting the FDR home in September with a group trip. Is it all handicapped accessible? We have someone who has rollator.
#NPSHydePark