Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site

Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Hyde Park, New York Home (Springwood) "All that is within me cries out to go back to my home on the Hudson River" FDR

This quote captures FDR's connection to Springwood, the estate that he loved & the place he considered home.
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The first US Presidential Library was started by FDR here. Visit the Home of FDR and Presidential Library & Museum to learn about the only President elected to four terms.

Operating as usual

08/31/2021
75th Anniversary Congratulations!

Father Chuck Kramer of St. James Church, offers his congratulations to the Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt on 75 years of being a National Historic Site.

#FDR #HomeofFDR #FranklinDRoosevelt #PresidentoftheUnitedStates #75thAnniversary #StJamesChurch #NPSHydePark #HydeParkNY National Park Service Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum #findyourpark #encuentratuparque #congratulations

What did the letters in all those "alphabet agencies" stand for?FDIC , Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 1933From t...
08/30/2021
Fireside Chat: FDR and the Banking Crisis

What did the letters in all those "alphabet agencies" stand for?

FDIC , Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 1933

From the stock market crash in the fall of 1929 to the end of
1933, about 9,000 banks suspended operations, resulting in
losses to depositors of about $1.3 billion. The closure of 4,000
banks in the first few months of 1933, and the panic that
accompanied these suspensions, led President Roosevelt to
declare a bank holiday on March 6, 1933. The financial system was on the verge of collapse, and both the manufacturing and agricultural sectors were operating at a fraction of capacity.

The crisis environment led to the call for deposit insurance.
Ultimately, the force of public opinion spurred Congress to
enact deposit insurance legislation. The Banking Act of 1933,
which created the FDIC, was signed by President Roosevelt on June 16, 1933.

The 1933 Banking Act:

*Established the FDIC as a temporary government corporation. The Banking Act of 1935 made the FDIC a permanent agency of the government and provided permanent deposit insurance maintained at the $5,000 level.
*Gave the FDIC authority to provide deposit insurance to banks
*Gave the FDIC the authority to regulate and supervise state non-member banks
*Funded the FDIC with initial loans of $289 million through the *U.S. Treasury and the Federal Reserve, which were later paid back with interest.
*Extended federal oversight to all commercial banks for the first time
*Separated commercial and investment banking (Glass–Steagall Act)
*Prohibited banks from paying interest on checking accounts
Allowed national banks to branch statewide, if allowed by state law.

#FDR #NewDeal #FDIC #FDIC #BankingCrisis #BankingAct1933 #FDRL #NPSHydePark

The second in our series of "Fireside Chats."

In his speech accepting the Democratic Party nomination in 1932, Franklin Delano Roosevelt pledged "a New Deal for the A...
08/29/2021

In his speech accepting the Democratic Party nomination in 1932, Franklin Delano Roosevelt pledged "a New Deal for the American people" if elected. Following his inauguration as President of the United States on March 4, 1933, FDR put his New Deal into action: an active, diverse, and innovative program of economic recovery. In the First Hundred Days of his new administration, FDR pushed through Congress a package of legislation designed to lift the nation out of the Depression. FDR declared a "banking holiday" to end the runs on the banks and created new federal programs administered by so-called "alphabet agencies."

Through employment and price stabilization and by making the government an active partner with the American people, the New Deal jump-started the economy towards recovery.

But, what did the letters in all those "alphabet agencies" stand for?

AAA , Agricultural Adjustment Administration, 1933
Designed to boost agricultural prices by reducing surpluses.

"The goal of the Agricultural Adjustment Act, restoring farm purchasing power of agricultural commodities or the fair exchange value of a commodity based upon price relative to the prewar 1909–14 level, was to be accomplished through a number of methods. These included the authorization by the Secretary of Agriculture (1) to secure voluntary reduction of the acreage in basic crops through agreements with producers and use of direct payments for participation in acreage control programs; (2) to regulate marketing through voluntary agreements with processors, associations or producers, and other handlers of agricultural commodities or products; (3) to license processors, association, and others handling agricultural commodities to eliminate unfair practices or charges; (4) to determine the necessity for and the rate or processing taxes; and (5) to use the proceeds of taxes and appropriate funds for the cost of adjustment operations, for the expansion of markets, and for the removal or agricultural surpluses."
https://www.fdrlibrary.org/great-depression-facts

On January 6, 1936, the Supreme Court decided in United States v. Butler that the act was unconstitutional for levying this tax on the processors only to have it paid back to the farmers.[15] Regulation of agriculture was deemed a state power. As such, the federal government could not force states to adopt the Agricultural Adjustment Act due to lack of jurisdiction. However, the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938 remedied these technical issues and the farm program continued and became known as the NBA.

Enacted as an alternative and replacement for the farm subsidy policies, in previous New Deal farm legislation (Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933), that had been found unconstitutional. The act revived the provisions in the previous Agriculture Adjustment Act, with the exception that the financing of the law's programs would be provided by the Federal Government and not a processor's tax.
Wikipedia

The AAA photographed one-third of the land surface of the U.S. and created a huge map to determine compliance in the agricultural conservation program, plan soil conservation and Public Works projects, lay out roads, forests and public parks, and improve national defense (1937). Photo - Library of Congress

A Roosevelt County New Mexico farmer and a County Agricultural Conservation Committee representative review the provisions of the Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) farm program to determine how it can best be applied on that particular acreage in 1934. Photo - USDA

#FDR #NewDeal #Roosevelt #Depression #AAA #AgriculturalAdjustmentAdministration #FDRL

FDR and Architecture of Hyde Park and Surrounding Areaand finally....Springwood 1915.The original house was built about ...
08/27/2021

FDR and Architecture of Hyde Park and Surrounding Area

and finally....Springwood 1915.

The original house was built about 1793 and later renovated into an Italianate style villa about 1850. The Italiante style was a popular form of classicism in the 19th century, sometimes referred to as Hudson River Bracketed. Countless examples of the style survive throughout the Hudson Valley, and remnants of the old house are visible today on the west facade of Springwood. Signature features include pitched roofs, projecting eaves with large, ornate brackets, and square towers or cupolas. This is how the house appeared when Franklin was born here in 1882. The Roosevelts undertook a substantial enlargement and redesign of the house, transforming it from an Italianate villa into a Colonial Revival–style mansion designed by Hoppin & Koen of New York City. The enlargement, completed in 1916, accommodated Franklin and Eleanor's growing family while creating a more formal and stylish residence that reflected FDR's political aspirations. The new design was evocative of neoclassical mansions in the Hudson Valley during the formative years of the United States of America.

The 1915 alterations resulted in extensive changes to the house interior including the raising of the central roof to create a full third floor, expansion of the entrance hall, addition of the living room and a large suite of bedrooms above, and enlargement of the service areas. The stone and stucco house has a roughly U-shaped plan of two and three stories, and today reflects a Colonial Revival style appearance. The allusion of balance and symmetry on the east façade, typical of neoclassical and Colonial Revival architecture, is achieved with opposing projecting wings, the central semi-circular portico, horizontal articulation of the roof balustrades, and the alignment of the windows. Some architectural features—octagonal forms, white-trimmed bold cornices, dominating roof balustrades, and Doric columns—are reminiscent of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, one of FDR's heroes, and perhaps a nod to his hope to one day become President of the United States himself.

To read more about the history of the house visit:
https://www.nps.gov/hofr/learn/historyculture/history-of-the-house.htm

#FDR #Architecture #DutchColonial #ColonialRevival #NPSHydePark #PresidentoftheUnitedStates #DutchessCountyNY #Fieldstone #Springwood #FDRHome #HoppinKoen

Painting - Springwood, by I. V. Lounsbery, as it appeared before the 1915 renovations. Courtesy of Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

Photos - NPS

FDR and Architecture of Hyde Park and Surrounding AreaStone Cottage at Val-KillThe stone cottage was the first structure...
08/26/2021

FDR and Architecture of Hyde Park and Surrounding Area

Stone Cottage at Val-Kill

The stone cottage was the first structure built at Val-Kill. Architect Henry Toombs of Georgia designed the cottage, with substantial input from Franklin Roosevelt, who had very definite ideas regarding details of the Dutch vernacular building traditions in the Hudson Valley. Franklin offered to serve as general contractor, but the entire building was financed by Eleanor and her friends Marion Dickerman and Nancy Cook. Construction began in 1925 and was completed early 1926. The one-and-a-half story cottage is clad in fieldstone gathered from the walls crisscrossing the estate. The oak floor boards were harvested from local trees. Nancy took on the work of interior finishes—walls were finished with “Craytex,” a liquid plaster rather than paint. When complete, the cottage included a large, two-story living room, bedroom, bathroom, shop room, and kitchen on the first floor, and a second bedroom and bathroom on the second floor.

The cottage was originally intended to serve as the residence and a small furniture workshop. As plans for Val-Kill Industries developed into a much larger operation, construction for a separate factory were underway before the stone cottage was complete. Nancy spent more time living at the cottage from where she managed the Val-Kill Industries. Marion was in New York City for much of her week serving as Principal of the Todhunter School (also jointly owned by Eleanor, Marion, and Nancy). Eleanor’s time was divided between Hyde Park, Albany, Washington, or New York City, as dictated by Franklin’s political career and the needs of her family.

Alterations to the original building occurred after 1936, when Val-Kill Industries closed and Eleanor began conversion of the factory into a cottage for her independent use. Additions and changes made to the stone cottage at this time, from 1936 to 1937, included enlargement of the second floor bedroom, an additional bedroom and bathroom on the first floor, and an enclosed terrace.

Shortly following Franklin’s death in 1945, Marion and Nancy sold their interest in the property to Eleanor and moved to Connecticut. From that time, the stone cottage served as Eleanor’s guest house until her son John Roosevelt moved to Val-Kill in the 1950s. Subsequent alterations were made on the second floor while John occupied the cottage with his family, adding the dormer window on the second floor to create an additional small bedroom, and a partition dividing the large bedroom into two rooms.

Today, the Stone Cottage is open to the public with exhibits illustrating the history of Val-Kill, the use of the property by Franklin and Eleanor, and the early political work of women who helped shape the New Deal as FDR became the 32nd President of the United States.
https://www.nps.gov/places/the-stone-cottage-at-val-kill.htm

#FDR #Architecture #Schools #DutchColonial #ColonialRevival #NPSHydePark #PresidentoftheUnitedStates #DutchessCountyNY #Fieldstone #StoneCottage #ValKill #HenryToombs #EleanorRoosevelt

NPS Photos

#NPSBirthday #August25th #NationalParkService #NPSHydePark #FDR #CCC #HoraceAlbright #105thBirthday #FranklinRoosevelt N...
08/25/2021

#NPSBirthday #August25th #NationalParkService #NPSHydePark #FDR #CCC #HoraceAlbright #105thBirthday #FranklinRoosevelt National Park Service

Early in his administration Franklin Roosevelt drove out to Camp Hoover to see if it was suitable for a presidential retreat. The presidential party drove from the camp to Skyland on a road improved by Hoover, but eventually to become the Skyline Drive, and then back to Washington. Former President Hoover’s offer was rejected because of the inconvenience of the camp for wheelchairs.

On the road back to Washington, Roosevelt listened to plans laid out by Horace Albright, director of the National Park Service, to make the Park Service the sole federal agency responsible for all federally owned public monuments and memorials. This transfer would include Civil War battlefields, such as Antietam, Chattanooga-Chickamauga, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Petersburg, and Shiloh, which were managed by the War Department; various national monuments; and the entire park system of the nation’s capital, at that time under the Army Corps of Engineers. By this time the Park Service had acquired Morristown National Historical Park in New Jersey; Colonial National Monument, including Jamestown and the Yorktown battlefield in Virginia; and George Washington Birthplace National Monument, also in Virginia. The executive order agreed upon by Roosevelt and signed on June 10, 1933, established the Park Service in the administration of East Coast historical parks, to be added to the great Western parks, as well as the national capital parks of Washington.

President Roosevelt proposed a Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) to take 250,000 jobless young men, pay them $30 a month, and give them useful work in federal and state parks and forests. Men of the CCC developed the Skyline Drive and Shenandoah National Park from 1933 to 1942 during the New Deal. In 1933 President Roosevelt visited a CCC Camp in Big Meadows in Shenandoah National Park to promote his national recovery program. He returned to dedicate the northern section of the Skyline Drive on July 3, 1936. The work of the CCC encompassed building roads, bridges, forests, cabin camps, and park structures in parks nationwide. It was the largest park improvement program, and the magnitude of its achievement in the national parks has never been surpassed.

By 1940 President Roosevelt needed his own presidential retreat convenient to Washington. Not since his visit to Camp Hoover in 1933 had he wished for a Washington area retreat; now visits to Hyde Park took him too far from his associates in the capital. He had spent relaxing weekends on the presidential yacht, Potomac, and he had visited Barnard Baruch’s Hobcaw Plantation in South Carolina. After consulting the Park Service, he chose Cabin Camp 4, one of a series of camps at Catoctin Recreational Demonstration Area near Thurmont, Maryland, within the Catoctin Mountains. A quickly rehabilitated boy’s camp for children from Baltimore, the retreat became Roosevelt’s “Shangri-La,” later renamed Camp David by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

https://www.whitehousehistory.org/the-presidents-and-the-national-parks

Photo - President Franklin D. Roosevelt visits a Civilian Conservation Core (CCC) camp in the Shenandoah National Park. One of Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, the CCC employed 3 million men during the Great Depression to improve parks nationwide by planting trees, building roads and bridges, and both building new structures and restoring historic ones.

Harpers Ferry, National Park Service Historic Photograph Collection

#NPSBirthday #August25th #NationalParkService #NPSHydePark #FDR #CCC #HoraceAlbright #105thBirthday #FranklinRoosevelt National Park Service

Early in his administration Franklin Roosevelt drove out to Camp Hoover to see if it was suitable for a presidential retreat. The presidential party drove from the camp to Skyland on a road improved by Hoover, but eventually to become the Skyline Drive, and then back to Washington. Former President Hoover’s offer was rejected because of the inconvenience of the camp for wheelchairs.

On the road back to Washington, Roosevelt listened to plans laid out by Horace Albright, director of the National Park Service, to make the Park Service the sole federal agency responsible for all federally owned public monuments and memorials. This transfer would include Civil War battlefields, such as Antietam, Chattanooga-Chickamauga, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Petersburg, and Shiloh, which were managed by the War Department; various national monuments; and the entire park system of the nation’s capital, at that time under the Army Corps of Engineers. By this time the Park Service had acquired Morristown National Historical Park in New Jersey; Colonial National Monument, including Jamestown and the Yorktown battlefield in Virginia; and George Washington Birthplace National Monument, also in Virginia. The executive order agreed upon by Roosevelt and signed on June 10, 1933, established the Park Service in the administration of East Coast historical parks, to be added to the great Western parks, as well as the national capital parks of Washington.

President Roosevelt proposed a Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) to take 250,000 jobless young men, pay them $30 a month, and give them useful work in federal and state parks and forests. Men of the CCC developed the Skyline Drive and Shenandoah National Park from 1933 to 1942 during the New Deal. In 1933 President Roosevelt visited a CCC Camp in Big Meadows in Shenandoah National Park to promote his national recovery program. He returned to dedicate the northern section of the Skyline Drive on July 3, 1936. The work of the CCC encompassed building roads, bridges, forests, cabin camps, and park structures in parks nationwide. It was the largest park improvement program, and the magnitude of its achievement in the national parks has never been surpassed.

By 1940 President Roosevelt needed his own presidential retreat convenient to Washington. Not since his visit to Camp Hoover in 1933 had he wished for a Washington area retreat; now visits to Hyde Park took him too far from his associates in the capital. He had spent relaxing weekends on the presidential yacht, Potomac, and he had visited Barnard Baruch’s Hobcaw Plantation in South Carolina. After consulting the Park Service, he chose Cabin Camp 4, one of a series of camps at Catoctin Recreational Demonstration Area near Thurmont, Maryland, within the Catoctin Mountains. A quickly rehabilitated boy’s camp for children from Baltimore, the retreat became Roosevelt’s “Shangri-La,” later renamed Camp David by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

https://www.whitehousehistory.org/the-presidents-and-the-national-parks

Photo - President Franklin D. Roosevelt visits a Civilian Conservation Core (CCC) camp in the Shenandoah National Park. One of Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, the CCC employed 3 million men during the Great Depression to improve parks nationwide by planting trees, building roads and bridges, and both building new structures and restoring historic ones.

Harpers Ferry, National Park Service Historic Photograph Collection

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Hello, friends and family of Hyde Park! I acquired these Christmas Village-type houses a few years ago, but can't find anything about them! If there's a chance that these are part of a "National Parks" series, I NEED TO COLLECT THEM ALL!!! (There are no marks, other than a sticker that says it was made in Taiwan, I believe. Both of these houses are about 10" long. You can see that the writing above the doors is similar, as is the treatment of the shrubbery, so I believe them to 'go together,' even though I bought them separately.) Your thoughts would be most appreciated!
I wonder what FDR would think about having the name of his ideals for the post-WWII peace appropriated as the name for a cheap vodka?
to all who may have hiked fdr on sunday. i was hiking the trail to the river and became overwhelmed by the heat. at some point i lost my prescription sunglasses. if any one found them please message me . thanks in advance David
A question about the shutters on the home. In 1989 the shutters were dark. Now they are green. Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe that a paint study was done to determine what color the paint was at one time. Can you tell me more about the current color of the shutters? Were you trying to match the color to one of the years that FDR lived there? A specific year? Thank you.
"Front view of the Roosevelt Home, Home of Franklin . Roosevelt National Historc Site, Hyde Park, New York" Postmarked 1947.
FDR Estate has been a blessing during social distancing!
The Saudis, the Jews and FDR’s dog On March 10, 1945, several weeks after meeting, Ibn Saud wrote to Roosevelt, asking him to oppose the continued development of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. By RAFAEL MEDOFF APRIL 5, 2020 08:19Email Twitter Facebook fb-messenger US President Franklin D. Roosevelt meets with King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia, on board the U.S. Navy heavy cruiser USS Quincy (CA-71) in the Great Bitter Lake, Egypt, on 14 February 1945 (photo credit: COURTESY U.S. NAVAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE COMMAND/U.S. NAVY/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS) US President Franklin D. Roosevelt meets with King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia, on board the U.S. Navy heavy cruiser USS Quincy (CA-71) in the Great Bitter Lake, Egypt, on 14 February 1945 (photo credit: COURTESY U.S. NAVAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE COMMAND/U.S. NAVY/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS) Seventy-five years after president Franklin D. Roosevelt’s controversial embrace of the king of Saudi Arabia, FDR’s grandson has become part of a Saudi-financed public relations campaign to celebrate his late grandfather’s pro-Saudi policies. Hall Delano Roosevelt has been working with the LS2 Group, an Iowa-based public relations firm, to draw attention to the recent 75th anniversary of FDR’s meeting with King Abdul Aziz Ibn Saud, according to documents released by the Arab-American news site Al-Monitor. In the LST Group’s Foreign Agents Registration filings last year, it stated that it was being paid $126,500 monthly by the Saudi Embassy in Washington to provide “public relations and media management services.” Read More Related Articles Could the coronavirus bring peace among Israelis and Palestinians? Berlin confirms to the 'Post' it banned Palestinian terrorist for 4 years Plastic Surgeon Tells: “Doing This Every Morning Can Snap Back Sagging Skin (No Creams Needed)” (Beverly Hills MD) Recommended by The FDR-Ibn Saud meeting took place on February 14, 1945, on the deck of the USS Quincy. The king came aboard “with his whole court, [black] slaves, taster, astrologer, & 8 live sheep,” FDR wrote to his cousin, Margaret Suckley. “Whole party was a scream!” The president does not seem to have expressed concern about the slaves. The US ambassador to Riyadh, William Eddy, was the official note-taker. He wrote down the two leaders’ remarks in the form of a “Memorandum of Conversation,” which both the president and the king signed. One of the topics they discussed was whether or not the Arab world could accept the creation of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. Roosevelt asked Ibn Saud for his view of “the problem of Jewish refugees driven from their homes in Europe.” Ibn Saud responded that he opposed “continued Jewish immigration and the purchase of land [in Palestine] by the Jews.” The king insisted that “the Arabs and the Jews could never cooperate, neither in Palestine, nor in any other country.” President Roosevelt “replied that he wished to assure his majesty that he would do nothing to assist the Jews against the Arabs and would make no move hostile to the Arab people.” The king asserted that the Jews should be “given living space in the Axis countries which oppressed them,” rather than Palestine. Latest articles from Jpost TOP ARTICLES 2/5 How did Israelis catch coronavirus? In response, “The president remarked that Poland might be considered a case in point. The Germans appear to have killed three million Polish Jews, by which count there should be space in Poland for the resettlement of many homeless Jews.” On March 10, several weeks after the meeting, Ibn Saud wrote to Roosevelt, asking him to oppose the continued development of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. In his April 4 reply, FDR recalled “the memorable conversation which we had not so long ago” and reaffirmed that “no decision [will] be taken with respect to the basic situation in that country without full consultation with both Arabs and Jews.” He also reiterated that he “would take no action, in my capacity as Chief of the Executive Branch of this Government, which might prove hostile to the Arab people.” SPEAKING TO a joint session of Congress on March 1, 1945, FDR departed from his prepared text to offer an ad-libbed comment about Palestine: “I learned more about the whole problem, the Muslim problem, the Jewish problem, by talking with Ibn Saud for five minutes than I could have learned in the exchange of two or three dozen letters.” Roosevelt’s remark ignited a firestorm of criticism in the American Jewish community. “One wonders why Arab [leaders] were consulted about the fate of the Jewish national home,” the American Zionist leader Dr. Abba Hillel Silver complained. “Were the Jewish people consulted about the fate of Iraq, or Syria, or Saudi Arabia?” “Did [the president] learn nothing from years of association with Zionist leaders?” the editors of The Reconstructionist asked. “Does the fact that all these Arab states waited until they got a personal invitation to declare war upon Germany teach him nothing? Does the all-out war effort by the Jewish yishuv [of Palestine] convey nothing to our president? Was his personal pledge last fall to the Zionist convention based upon little or no knowledge?” There was criticism on Capitol Hill, too, including from members of FDR’s own party. “The choice of the desert king as expert on the Jewish question is nothing short of amazing,” Colorado Democrat Sen. Edwin Johnson declared. “I imagine that even Fala [the president’s dog] would be more of an expert.” Nothing about that controversy was mentioned at the US Navy’s recent commemoration of the 1945 meeting between FDR and Ibn Saud. Speakers lavished praise on the US-Saudi alliance, sailors hoisted the two countries’ flags, and a reenactment of the famous photo of the original meeting was staged - this time featuring the president’s grandson, a descendant of the Saudi king, and the head of the US Naval Forces Central Command. No black slaves were visible in the reenacted scene. As president of the US-Saudi Arabian Business Council and co-founder of the Friends of Saudi Arabia, Hall Delano Roosevelt is devoted to expanding relations between the United States and Saudi Arabia. Not surprisingly, FDR’s grandson has been emphasizing what he sees as the positives of the 1945 meeting. It was “historic” and demonstrated that the Saudis wanted to be “a productive part of the world,” he said in recent interviews. But the unsavory side of that 1945 meeting - from the king’s black slaves to the disturbing comments by President Roosevelt and Ibn Saud regarding the Jews - should not be papered over. The public has a right to know the full story. The writer is director of The David S. Wyman Institute for Holocaust Studies in Washington, DC, and author of more than 20 books about the Holocaust, Zionism, and American Jewish history. Tags Israel United States saudi arabia jews Sign up for The Jerusalem
Are there any photographs of the third floor?
Is the museum free on President's weekend? We have visitors in town and thought they might consider this as an option.
We are visiting the FDR home in September with a group trip. Is it all handicapped accessible? We have someone who has rollator.
#NPSHydePark