American Aviation Historical Society

American Aviation Historical Society The Society is dedicated to the preservation of American aviation history by collecting and preservin
(6)

Library and photo archives available to aviation history researchers

Paso Robles airport, in central California host Chuck Wentworth's fly-in  June 3, for an absorbing day of  airplanes and...
06/05/2023

Paso Robles airport, in central California host Chuck Wentworth's fly-in June 3, for an absorbing day of airplanes and vintage vehicles, bbq and catching up with AAHS friends, old and new.

A bit late for this post, but it was good weekend of flying and friends for AAHS at Flabob Airport's Low n Slow flyin ea...
05/28/2023

A bit late for this post, but it was good weekend of flying and friends for AAHS at Flabob Airport's Low n Slow flyin earlier this month. Members and friends kibitzed at the dinner and got to enjoy the camping, and low-n-slow flight events during the day.

05/22/2023

"One moonless night, while flying a routine training mission over the Pacific, I wondered what the sky would look like from 84,000 feet if the cockpit lighting were dark. While heading home on a straight course, I slowly turned down all of the lighting, reducing the glare and revealing the night sky. Within seconds, I turned the lights back up, fearful that the jet would know and somehow punish me. But my desire to see the sky overruled my caution, I dimmed the lighting again. To my amazement, I saw a bright light outside my window. As my eyes adjusted to the view, I realized that the brilliance was the broad expanse of the Milky Way, now a gleaming stripe across the sky. Where dark spaces in the sky had usually existed, there were now dense clusters of sparkling stars Shooting stars flashed across the canvas every few seconds. It was like a fireworks display with no sound. I knew I had to get my eyes back on the instruments, and reluctantly I brought my attention back inside. To my surprise, with the cockpit lighting still off, I could see every gauge, lit by starlight. In the plane's mirrors, I could see the eerie shine of my gold spacesuit incandescently illuminated in a celestial glow. I stole one last glance out the window. Despite our speed, we seemed still before the heavens, humbled in the radiance of a much greater power. For those few moments, I felt a part of something far more significant than anything we were doing in the plane. The sharp sound of Walt's voice on the radio brought me back to the tasks at hand as I prepared for our descent."

Brian Shul - Sled Driver
www.Sierrahotel.net

05/22/2023

I hope there's a place, way up in the sky
Where pilots can go when they have to die.
A place where a guy could buy a cold beer
For a friend and a comrade whose memory is dear.
A place where no doctor or lawyer could tread,
Nor a management-type would e'ler be caught dead!
Just a quaint little place, kind of dark, full of smoke,
Where they like to sing loud, and love a good joke.
The kind of a place that a lady could go
And feel safe and secure by the men she would know.

There must be a place where old pilots go,
When their wings become heavy, when their airspeed gets low,
Where the whiskey is old, and the women are young,
And songs about flying and dying are sung.
Where you'd see all the fellows who'd 'flown west' before,
And they'd call out your name, as you came through the door,
Who would buy you a drink, if your thirst should be bad,
And relate to the others, "He was quite a good lad!"

And there, through the mist, you'd spot an old guy
You had not seen in years, though he'd taught you to fly.
He'd nod his old head, and grin ear to ear
And say, "Welcome, my Son, I'm proud that you're here!
For this is the place where true flyers come
When the battles are over, and the wars have been won.
They've come here at last, to be safe and alone,
>From the government clerk, and the management clone;
Politicians and lawyers, the Feds, and the noise,
Where all hours are happy, and these good ol' boys
Can relax with a cool one, and a well deserved rest!
This is Heaven, my Son. You've passed your last test!"

— Captain Michael J. Larkin
www.Sierrahotel.net

05/17/2023

As a museum dedicated to the history of commercial aviation, we have been the fortunate recipients of many, many donations like uniforms, documents, photos, films, equipment, memorabilia, etc., much of it from the family members of those no longer with us. Among the many photos that have come into our possession was this one, which certainly appears to be of 20's-30's aviation race pilot and superstar Roscoe Turner. We believe it was shot in KC. Roscoe was a master pilot and master self-promoter. He toured the country with his pet lion, Gilmore (also the name of a sponsor, Gilmore Oil). He named the engines of his Boeing 247 "Nip" (port) and "Tuck" (starboard). In that plane he finished third in the McRobertson International Air Race in 1934 (it's now at the NASM). Preserving photos like these, as well as the many items donated to us over 30+ years, is what the Airline History Museum is all about. Please help us fend off the Signature Aviation land-grab and do your part to prevent this extra-legal injustice (read all about it at www. AirlineHistory.org) and sign our petition at Change.org/SaveAirlineHistory.

Aviation Fact Friday: According to the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, the Boeing F4B/P-12, which includes the Boeing ...
12/06/2022

Aviation Fact Friday:
According to the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, the Boeing F4B/P-12, which includes the Boeing F4B-4 variant depicted in this painting, was “the primary fighter of the U.S. Navy and U.S. Army Air Corps in the early 1930s.” Its first flight occurred on June 25th, 1928, and the Army purchased their first P-12/F4B in 1929.

The P-12/F4B had a maximum speed of 178 mph, a range of 675 miles, and a ceiling of 26,200 feet. Additionally, it was powered by a 450-horsepower P&W R-1340B Wasp engine and armed with two machine guns and a 500 pound bomb.

A total of 586 F4Bs had been produced by the time Boeing ceased production of the aircraft.

Fun fact: The upside-down flying record was set by Milo Burcham in 1933 using a P-12.
-
-
-
Aircraft pictured: Boeing F4B-4
Art by: Hobart B. Welsh
Sources: https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/boeing-f4b-4/nasm_A19610200000 and https://www.boeing.com/history/products/p-12-f4b-fighter.page

Some other pictures from our Veterans Day venue at Flabob Airport, in Riverside, CA
11/14/2022

Some other pictures from our Veterans Day venue at Flabob Airport, in Riverside, CA

11/14/2022

American aviation history owes much to this country's veterans. It was a pleasure to share Veterans Day with other aviation enthusiasts at Flabob Airport (home of AAHS headquarters) for their annual Veterans Day event. Airplane rides, veteran stories, re-enactors, pinups, popsicles, and an aviation book sale with AAHS volunteers were just some of the activities on this beautiful November day in Southern California.

07/21/2022

July 20, 1969, the world witnessed one of the singular most important achievements in history - humans walking on the moon. Neil, Michael and I were proud to represent America as we took those giant leaps for mankind. It was a brilliant moment for the world and one of America’s finest hours.

July 14th 1955: A Vought F7U-3 Cutlass, BuNo 129595, 'D 412', of VF-124, suffers ramp strike on landing aboard USS Hanco...
07/14/2022

July 14th 1955: A Vought F7U-3 Cutlass, BuNo 129595, 'D 412', of VF-124, suffers ramp strike on landing aboard USS Hancock during carrier qualifications off of the California coast, disintegrating airframe spins off portside; pilot LCDR Jay Alkire, USNR, executive officer of VF-124, killed when airframe sinks, still strapped into ejection seat. Dramatic footage from the port catwalk shows a burning fighter going over the side.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_axIrqqz6Is

Video shows ramp strike of a VF-124 F7U-3 on the USS Hancock on 14 July 1955. According to the website "Rich Kirsch's Fighting Hannah", pilot Jay T. Alkire l...

July 11th 1963: First flight of The Grumman American AA-1, American light, 2-seat aircraft which will lead to the AA-1 Y...
07/11/2022

July 11th 1963: First flight of The Grumman American AA-1, American light, 2-seat aircraft which will lead to the AA-1 Yankee Clipper and AA-1 A Trainer, the Grumman American AA-1 B Trainer and TR-2 and the Gulfstream American.

Based off the designs for the BD-1 by Jim Bede it used unique bonded aluminum honeycomb fuselage and bonded wing construction that eliminate the need for rivets without sacrificing strength. Over 1,800 were built and many are still flying today.

As pictured below The Grumman AA1B was one of the aircraft types used by NASA during it's extensive program of spin-testing of General Aviation aircraft in the 1970s.

July 8th 1941: A trial raid by three RAF Fortress I (B-17C) heavy bombers on the naval barracks at Wilhelmshaven, German...
07/08/2022

July 8th 1941: A trial raid by three RAF Fortress I (B-17C) heavy bombers on the naval barracks at Wilhelmshaven, Germany, is the first combat use of any variant of the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, on the very same city where the USAAF's 8th Air Force would itself first hit N**i Germany directly with later-model B-17s, eighteen months later.

The first combat operational use of aerial refueling takes place between a Lockheed RF-80 photo reconnaissance aircraft and a tanker aircraft while flying a combat mission over Korea. In less than a decade aerial refueling operations with jet a/c are commonplace.

July 7th 1946: Eccentric, iconoclastic millionaire and aviator Howard Hughes is gravely injured when he mishandles a pro...
07/07/2022

July 7th 1946: Eccentric, iconoclastic millionaire and aviator Howard Hughes is gravely injured when he mishandles a propeller pitch control failure and crashes his controversial Hughes XF-11 reconnaissance plane, 44-70155, during its maiden flight. Aircraft impacts homes in the Beverly Hills neighborhood near the Los Angeles Country Club golf course where Hughes was attempting an emergency landing.

July 6th, 1951: The first use of aerial refueling in combat took place during the Korean War, involving F-84 fighter-bom...
07/06/2022

July 6th, 1951: The first use of aerial refueling in combat took place during the Korean War, involving F-84 fighter-bombers flying missions from Japanese airfields, due to Chinese-North Korean forces overrunning many of the bases for jet aircraft in South Korea, refueling from converted B-29s using the drogue-and-probe in-flight refueling system with the probe located in one of the F-84's wing-tip fuel tanks.

The CG-4, the most common example of the early US glider program during WWII. In 1941, the Army Air Forces invited eleve...
06/22/2022

The CG-4, the most common example of the early US glider program during WWII. In 1941, the Army Air Forces invited eleven companies to build prototype gliders for their program. Waco Aircraft Company was the only one able to deliver a glider that met the Air Force’s conditions and won themselves a contract. Military gliders were still a brand new concept when the war started, and the army had little knowledge on how to properly train pilots or deploy the aircraft in combat. Most military gliders of this period were in the experimental stage for only a few short years, if not months, and then immediately pushed into combat. The CG-4 was the most common of these experiments, first used to transport troops during the invasion of Sicily as well as taking part in the D-Day invasion of Normandy.

Info and photo taken from AAHS Journal, Summer 2008 Edition.https://www.aahs-online.org/pubs/journals/files/532113.pdf

Norah O’Neill, the first woman pilot for Flying Tiger, a worldwide freight carrier. At the time of her employment, femal...
06/15/2022

Norah O’Neill, the first woman pilot for Flying Tiger, a worldwide freight carrier. At the time of her employment, female pilots were so rare that many people who heard her on the radio believed the “actual” pilot was letting her talk as a prank. O’Neill first learned to fly in 1973, when a trip in a light airplane up the mountains of Alaska sparked her interest in becoming a pilot and led to a nearly thirty-year career in aviation. She worked a 9 to 5 job (9 PM to 5 AM) as a waitress to pay for flight lessons and get her commercial flight certificate. She faced an uphill battle acquiring a job as a pilot, facing pushback from her male peers and slander at every turn. She eventually received a CFI and landed a job as a flight instructor. Finally, in 1976 a spur-of-the-moment call to Flying Tiger Lines, which luckily occurred the same day the line decided to start hiring more pilots, landed her a job as a freight pilot. O’Neill’s career had her flying DC-8s and the Boeing 747 and led her to locations all across the world. She wrote an autobiography, Flying Tigress, in 2005 which went in detail of her career and the challenges she faced.

Photo and Info taken from AAHS Journal, Fall 2015 edition.https://www.aahs-online.org/pubs/journals/files/603189.pdf ="The%20First%20Flying%20Tigress"

The X-47B is a tailless, strike fighter-sized unmanned aircraft developed by Northrop Grumman as part of the U.S. Navy’s...
06/06/2022

The X-47B is a tailless, strike fighter-sized unmanned aircraft developed by Northrop Grumman as part of the U.S. Navy’s Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) Carrier Demonstration program.

Under a contract awarded in 2007, the company designed, produced, and is currently flight testing two X-47B aircraft. In 2013, these aircraft were used to demonstrate the first-ever carrier-based launches and recoveries by a relevant, low-observable, unmanned autonomous aircraft. In April 2015, the X-47B once again made aviation history by successfully conducting the first-ever Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR) of an unmanned aircraft. AAR unlocks the full potential of what unmanned surveillance, strike and reconnaissance systems can do in support of the Navy. These historic demonstrations solidify the concept of future unmanned aircraft and prove that the X-47B can perform standard missions — like aerial refueling — and operate seamlessly with manned aircraft as part of the Carrier Air Wing.

A second-hand, rebuilt Ryan monoplane flown by ex-cowboy J. Kelly and former railway mechanic R. Robbins keeps going through a non-stop, aerial-refueling flight of 172 hr 32 min over Ft. Worth, TX. Kelly qualified as a pilot six weeks prior to the flight. During the flight the a/c is refueled fiftee...

A classified photo shows two Alaska Air Command officers (ALCOM) receiving advice from "moose," an expert consultant to ...
06/06/2022

A classified photo shows two Alaska Air Command officers (ALCOM) receiving advice from "moose," an expert consultant to the 46th strategic recon squadron. In 1947, ALCOM headed the defense of approximately 562,000 square miles of land, including several hundred square miles of uncharted territory and surrounding islands. Expert advisors like "moose" were brought in to provide intelligence on Alaska operations and survival in the bush.

Photo and info taken from AAHS Journal, Spring 2014 edition.https://www.aahs-online.org/pubs/journals/files/591002.pdf ="Arctic%20Operations"

The Boeing B-17. One of the most iconic aircraft of the second world war, the B-17 was the most prolific American bomber...
05/25/2022

The Boeing B-17. One of the most iconic aircraft of the second world war, the B-17 was the most prolific American bomber within the European theater. Primarily involved in daytime bombing raids to strike targets deep into N**i Germany, the B-17 developed a reputation for being tough due to many videos of the planes successfully landing safely even after sustaining heavy damage. The B-17 dropped around 640 thousand tons of bombs on N**i Germany and occupied territories, approximately 42% of all bombs dropped by American bombers in the war.

Photo taken from AAHS Archive https://www.aahs-online.org/resources/image_lib_panel.php?imgkey=1017539

Info taken from AAHS Journal, summer 1965 editionhttps://www.aahs-online.org/pubs/journals/files/102110.pdf

The American Expeditionary Forces in France received their first American-built aircraft: a license manufactured DeHavilland DH-4.

AAHS Welcomes Featured Speaker for AAHS 2022 Annual MeetingRandy Chamberlain, Director, Flight Operations, ZiplineThis A...
05/20/2022

AAHS Welcomes Featured Speaker for AAHS 2022 Annual Meeting

Randy Chamberlain, Director, Flight Operations, Zipline

This Annual Meeting will include a little bit of everything, to include early aviation in the San
Francisco area (viewing the Gonzales Brothers 1915 homebuilt airplane, at Nut Tree Airport),
golden age aviation with a tour of one of the few Douglas Sleeper Transports still on its wheels
at Schellville, listening to warbirds flying at our Saturday lunch, and viewing aerospace artifacts
at the Aerospace Museum at McClellan Field. What better way to top off this lineup than
hearing from a company using aviation technology to shape new paths- Zipline, using
programmed drones to deliver critical supplies to remote communities around the world.

AAHS is proud to welcome Randy Chamberlain, Director of Flight Operations at Zipline, as
Speaker for our upcoming Annual Meeting. Randy is part of history-making operations at
Zipline, a company called by industry magazine ‘Fast Company’ “one of the world’s most
innovative companies”. Randy will give us the history of their innovative use of drones, and
the exciting future that this new aviation process brings to many other aspects of our world.
You won’t want to miss out on hearing both the history of this innovation but also a heads up
on how you may soon be receiving your next Walmart deliveries!

The American Expeditionary Forces in France received their first American-built aircraft: a license manufactured DeHavilland DH-4.

11 May 1964: At Air Force Plant 42 near Palmdale, a small city in the high desert of southern California, the first prot...
05/12/2022

11 May 1964: At Air Force Plant 42 near Palmdale, a small city in the high desert of southern California, the first prototype North American Aviation XB-70A-1-NA Valkyrie, 62-0001, was rolled out. More than 5,000 people were there to watch.

(Photo: XB-70A-1-NA 62-0001 rollout at Air Force Plant 42, 11 May 1964. [North American Aviation, Inc.])

The American Expeditionary Forces in France received their first American-built aircraft: a license manufactured DeHavilland DH-4.

05/11/2022
Richard Halliburton (shown on the right) famous travel writer and adventurer who gained celebrity status in the 20s and ...
05/10/2022

Richard Halliburton (shown on the right) famous travel writer and adventurer who gained celebrity status in the 20s and 30s for his daring expeditions. In 1930, Richard set out on what would be known as his Flying Carpet Expedition, partnering with pilot Moye Stephens (shown on the left) to fly him around the world in an open cockpit biplane. Richard's venture took him to 34 different countries and cities, including San Francisco, Paris, Baghdad, Hong Kong, Yokohama, and many more. Richard constantly wrote throughout the entire trip. Some places received more attention than others, but what he did write about was always exciting and eye-grabbing. Richard's book, sharing the same title as the expedition, was released in 1932 and made him over $100,000 in royalties just a year after release. Moye Stephens, the expedition's pilot, would go on to an impressive career in aviation himself, with his most notable accomplishment being the chief test pilot of the Northrop YB-49 flying wing.

Info and Photo taken from AAHS Journal, summer 1970 edition.https://www.aahs-online.org/pubs/journals/files/152110.pdf

The American Aviation Historical Society is dedicated to preserving for future generations a detailed record of aviation events and milestones that have shaped the development and use of aviaiton.

04/28/2022

If you have chosen WW2 history we can help you learn about the aircraft used in combat, if you have chosen meat we host the occasional bbq. Either way sign up today!

https://www.aahs-online.org/

The Lockheed Constellation. Built in 1943, the Constellation was initially designed as a long-distance transport for tro...
04/26/2022

The Lockheed Constellation. Built in 1943, the Constellation was initially designed as a long-distance transport for troops and supplies during World War II. 22 total Constellations were completed before the end of the war, though not all of them entered service. After the war in the civilian sector, it gained greater fame as an airliner, serving Pan-Am in the first round-the-world air service in 1947. The Constellation also carries the honor of being the final plane flown by Orville Wright. The elderly aviation pioneer commented that the Constellation’s wingspan was longer than the distance of his first flight.

Photo and information taken from AAHS Journal, spring 1980 edition.

https://www.aahs-online.org//pubs/journals/files/251010.pdf ="Constellation"

Earthrise is a photograph of Earth and some of the Moon's surface that was taken from lunar orbit by astronaut William A...
04/22/2022

Earthrise is a photograph of Earth and some of the Moon's surface that was taken from lunar orbit by astronaut William Anders on December 24, 1968, during the Apollo 8 mission. Nature photographer Galen Rowell described it as "the most influential environmental photograph ever taken".

At the time this picture was taken every single human except for the Apollo 8 crew was in the frame of one photograph. It made humanity reflect on our relationship with our planet and sparked environmental movements around the world.

The Stearman Model 75. Built in 1934, this model served as the primary training aircraft for the U.S. Army Air Corps and...
04/13/2022

The Stearman Model 75. Built in 1934, this model served as the primary training aircraft for the U.S. Army Air Corps and the U.S. Navy before and during WWII. Highly praised by the military test pilots for its flight characteristics and handling qualities, more than 8,000 Model 75s were ordered for training purposes. It became the first aircraft that many WWII pilots would take to the skies in, earning it a beloved place in the hearts of many veterans.

After the war, thousands of surplus Model 75s were sold to the civilian market, making it commonly used as crop-dusters, sports planes, and for air shows. Even today, the Model 75 still holds a special place among vintage aircraft collectors, with many celebrating the 85th anniversary of the Model 75 in 2019.

Info and Photo taken from the AAHS Journal, Winter 2018 edition.https://www.aahs-online.org/pubs/journals/files/634242.pdf ="Stearman%2075"

Aviation Fact of the Week:According to the AAHS website’s “This Day in History,” on July 4th, 1992, “Operation Provide P...
07/04/2021

Aviation Fact of the Week:
According to the AAHS website’s “This Day in History,” on July 4th, 1992, “Operation Provide Promise begins in Bosnia,” becoming “the longest sustained humanitarian airlift in history.”
-
-
-
Aircraft pictured: Lockheed HC-130H Hercules
Photography by: Stephen Miller
Source: American Aviation Historical Society

Aviation Fact of the Week:Raymond Knight was born in Houston, Texas on June 15, 1922, and he enlisted in the Army Air Co...
06/28/2021

Aviation Fact of the Week:
Raymond Knight was born in Houston, Texas on June 15, 1922, and he enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1942, less than a year after the United States entered the Second World War.

In 1944, Raymond Knight began flying combat missions over Italy. According to the Air Force Historical Support Division, “...he flew 82 combat missions in 180 hours of combat time, earning the Distinguished Flying Cross and six Air Medals...”

But even more impressive than a Distinguished Flying Cross and six Air Medals, Raymond Knight was awarded the Medal of Honor for “...his fearless daring and voluntary self-sacrifice...” that “...averted possible heavy casualties among ground forces and the resultant slowing on the German drive culminated in the collapse of enemy resistance in Italy.” In fact, according to Military Times, Raymond Knight “...was the last Army airman of World War II to earn the Medal of Honor.”
-
-
-
Aircraft pictured: P-47 Thunderbolt
Art by: William S. Warren
Sources: https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/2631 and https://www.afhistory.af.mil/FAQs/Fact-Sheets/Article/639610/knight-1st-lt-raymond-l-knight/

Aviation Fact of the Week:To celebrate Father’s Day, this Aviation Fact of the Week will highlight a legendary father-so...
06/21/2021

Aviation Fact of the Week:
To celebrate Father’s Day, this Aviation Fact of the Week will highlight a legendary father-son duo: Robert Olds and Robin Olds.

Robert Olds was a pilot who served during the First and Second World Wars, eventually reaching the rank of Major General. Major General Robert Olds was a key member of the “Bomber Mafia,” which was a group of senior military officers that “...believed that airpower would become the deciding factor in future wars.”

Robin Olds, Robert Olds’ son, also served in the Army Air Corps during the Second World War, piloting a P-38 and a P-51. In addition to serving during the Second World War, Robin Olds served during the Vietnam War, and he “...is rated a triple ace, having shot down a total of 17 enemy aircraft during World War II and the Vietnam War.”

Both Robert and Robin Olds’ achievements were extraordinary, earning them their title as a legendary father-son duo!
-
-
-
Aircraft pictured: Lockheed XP-38 Lightning
Art by: Larry Lapadura
Sources: https://www.af.mil/About-Us/Biographies/Display/Article/1704626/major-general-robert-olds/, https://www.af.mil/About-Us/Biographies/Display/Article/106027/brigadier-general-robin-olds/, and https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/the-bomber-mafia-success-cost.html

The American Expeditionary Forces in France received their first American-built aircraft: a license manufactured DeHavilland DH-4.

Aviation Fact of the Week:According to Aero Corner, the “...Curtiss SBC Helldiver was designed and manufactured by Curti...
06/15/2021

Aviation Fact of the Week:
According to Aero Corner, the “...Curtiss SBC Helldiver was designed and manufactured by Curtiss-Wright as a two-seat scout bomber and dive bomber during the late 1930s” and “... was mainly used by the United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, Royal Air Force, and French Navy.” Briefly manufactured between 1938 to 1941, only 257 were produced.

The Curtiss SBC Helldiver was powered by a “Wright R-1820-34 ‘Cyclone’ Piston engine.” Additionally, the Curtiss SBC Helldiver could reach maximum speeds of 206 knots, and it had a range of 652 kilometers, a ceiling of 24,000 feet, and a “rate of climb” of 1630 feet per minute.

The Curtiss SBC Helldiver, according to Aero Corner, “...was the last military biplane acquired by the United States Navy.”
-
-
-
Aircraft pictured: The Curtiss SBC Helldiver
Art by: C.J. Rozelle
Source: https://aerocorner.com/aircraft/curtiss-sbc-helldiver/

Aviation Fact of the Week:According to the NOAA, “...the airship USS Macon was one of the largest flying machines in his...
06/07/2021

Aviation Fact of the Week:
According to the NOAA, “...the airship USS Macon was one of the largest flying machines in history…” The USS Macon was 785 feet long, had a 83 person crew, and “a squadron of five Sparrowhawk scout planes that could be launched and retrieved in midair!”

Unfortunately, in “February 1935, the Macon was damaged in a storm” and “foundered tail first into the Pacific off the coast of Point Sur with 81 of the 83 men onboard surviving the crash.”

According to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, “the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and the U.S. Navy located the Macon's remains at a depth of over 1,000 feet” in 1990 and 1991.
-
-
-
Aircraft Pictured: USS Macon
Art by: James M. Caiella
Sources: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/macon/ and https://montereybay.noaa.gov/maritime/macon/

Aviation Fact of the Week:According to Military.com, the B-1B Lancer was an “icon of the latter decades of the Cold War…...
05/31/2021

Aviation Fact of the Week:
According to Military.com, the B-1B Lancer was an “icon of the latter decades of the Cold War…” and “...was originally designed as a strategic nuclear bomber with a mission to fly at low altitude in order to avoid Soviet early warning radars.” But, after the Cold War ended, the Lancer “...has been adapted to carry conventional munitions...”

According to Boeing, the Lancer has a wingspan of 137 feet, a top speed of Mach 1.2, and a ceiling of 30,000 feet. The Lancer can carry a payload of 75,000 pounds, and it can hold 24 cruise missiles. Additionally, the Lancer has flown over 12,000 sorties since 2001, which explains its reputation as “the backbone of America's long-range bomber force.”
-
-
-
Aircraft pictured: Rockwell B-1B Lancer
Photography by: S. Miller
Sources: https://www.boeing.com/defense/b-1b-bomber/ and https://www.military.com/equipment/b-1b-lancer

Aviation Fact Friday: According to the National Air and Space Museum, the Grumman F9F-6 Cougar was “the U.S. Navy's firs...
05/22/2021

Aviation Fact Friday:
According to the National Air and Space Museum, the Grumman F9F-6 Cougar was “the U.S. Navy's first swept wing, carrier-based, fighter jet.” The F9F-6 Cougar was a modified version of the Grumman F9F Panther. This modification, according to NASA, was a response to “...an urgent need... for a Navy fighter with a higher performance than then available with straight-wing Navy jet fighters.”

According to the National Naval Aviation Museum, the F9F-6 Cougar was powered by “one 7,250 lb. static thrust Pratt & Whitney J-48-P-8A turbojet engine,” had a range of 600 miles, and could reach maximum speeds of up to 705 miles per hour. Additionally, the Cougar was armed with “four 20mm fixed forward-firing cannons, four AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles, or 2,000 lb. of ordnance.”

“Nearly 2,000 Cougars were produced for the Navy and Marine Corps, serving as fighter, ground attack, photo reconnaissance, and training aircraft,” according to the National Naval Aviation Museum, and “...a small number of them flown for a time in Vietnam as forward air control aircraft…”
-
-
-
Aircraft pictured: Grumman F9F-6 Cougar
Art by: Pat J. Macha
Sources: https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/grumman-f9f-6-cougar/nasm_A19750601000, https://history.nasa.gov/SP-468/ch11-3.htm, and https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/museums/nnam/explore/collections/aircraft/f/f9f-6-cougar.html

Aviation Fact Friday:For years, daredevil pilots had attempted to break the sound barrier, typically spiralling out of c...
05/08/2021

Aviation Fact Friday:
For years, daredevil pilots had attempted to break the sound barrier, typically spiralling out of control and occasionally crashing into the ground at fatal speeds. But the Army and Navy, who were researching high-speed flight, were not willing to capitulate. Bell was commissioned by the Army to develop a high-speed aircraft, which Bell called the X-1.

According to Ars Technica, Bell based the design of their aircraft on a .50 caliber bullet, because Bell scientists knew “that .50 caliber bullets traveled at supersonic speeds.” This explains the X-1’s unique shape.

On October 14th, 1947, Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier, piloting the X-1 at the speed of 700 mph. But his achievement wouldn’t be the last time the sound barrier would be broken in order to set records. Nearly 50 years later, the sound barrier was broken on land by Andy Green, an RAF pilot, on October 15th, 1997.

Several years ago, another sound barrier record was broken. Felix Baumgartner broke the sound barrier during a high altitude jump from a balloon on October 14th, 2012. According to Ars Technica, before the jump, Felix said, "I know the whole world is watching now. I wish you could see what I can see. Sometimes you have to get up really high to understand how small you are... I'm going home now."
-
-
-
Aircraft pictured: X-15 (a hypersonic plane)
Art by: Michael Machat
Source: https://arstechnica.com/cars/2015/10/breaking-the-sound-barrier-by-air-by-land-and-in-free-fall/

Aviation Fact of the Week:The Douglas SBD Dauntless, one of the most famous naval aircraft of the Second World War, play...
05/01/2021

Aviation Fact of the Week:
The Douglas SBD Dauntless, one of the most famous naval aircraft of the Second World War, played an integral role in the Battle of Midway, credited with “sinking four Japanese carriers.” “By some accounts,” according to the National WW2 Museum, “the Dauntless sank more Japanese ships than any other plane.”

The Douglas SBD Dauntless had a maximum speed of 250 mph, a maximum range of 950 miles, and a maximum bomb load of 1,000 pounds. Additionally, the Dauntless was powered by a Wright R-1820-52 engine, and it was armed with “two .50 caliber and two .30 caliber machine guns.”

In fact, the Dauntless performed so well during the war that a U.S. Naval Institute article called it “the plane that won the war.” But another title for the Dauntless is even more memorable: "Slow But Deadly” (the Navy claimed that SBD stood for “Slow But Deadly”).
-
-
-
Aircraft pictured: Douglas SBD Dauntless
Photography collection: NASM/AAHS Image Library
Sources: https://www.usni.org/magazines/naval-history-magazine/2017/february/plane-won-war and https://www.nationalww2museum.org/visit/museum-campus/us-freedom-pavilion/warbirds/douglas-sbd-dauntless

Address

15146 Transistor Lane
Huntington Beach, CA
92649

Opening Hours

8:45pm - 5pm

Telephone

(714) 549-4818

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when American Aviation Historical Society posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to American Aviation Historical Society:

Share

Category


Other History Museums in Huntington Beach

Show All

Comments

Some early field trips in my Das albums. Not sure how everyone is but love the history here. American Aviation Historical Society
We’re selling our moms house and going through my dad‘s dark room (Photographer: Clayton Jansson member 184), and there’s so much in here that we just don’t know what to do with.

Hundreds of publications, photos, manuals, negatives etc etc Too much to catalog in very little time.

Free to a good home
What company built the WW2 Norden bombsights? I have read that Cadillac built them. Is that correct?
Anyone remember this great group of men?!

My dad is first from Left, Clay Jansson. Then I believe Harry Gann?
Greetings from Australia. I have some aircraft photo's that may be of interest to you, taken by my Great Uncle just after WW1. Here are just 2 picked at random and if interested I can send more. Please advise as I feel they are all relevant to your aviation history. Thank you
Your friends in the Canadian Aviation Historical Society invite AAHS members to peruse our YouTube channel.
Hello. I thought that your Facebook members might like to view this new short documentary on the 1919 transatlantic flight of a Navy seaplane – eight years before Lindbergh.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xen85Zq3u3A

Please share with others who love aviation history!

Marking History YouTube Channel
Bruce Wittman
In Florida I came across a B-17G under restoration. Inside the fuselage was the signature of two of the "Rosie the Riveters" who helped originally build the plane.
The USMC Aviation Museum has been ordered to close. Please sign the petition and support them.

I found these is a huge lot of old aviation documents. Does anyone know what these are?
WORLDWIDE RELEASE TODAY! My critically acclaimed book about my lifelong search to solve the mysterious 1957 Pan Am plane crash that killed my father and 43 others is now available in bookstores, online and in e-versions. Please consider sharing this on your page, and thanks to all of my friends for your encouragement and support! Click here for more info or to order a book:
I have published a new book about the four-engined Fokker aircraft. It describes the Fokker F-32 in service in the USA, and the Fokker F. # # and F.XXII in Europa. Also all four-engined projects have been described. The book has 384 pages and 569 photographs and ten colour profiles.
The chapter about the Fokker F-32 in the USA has by Gert Blüm (specialist on Fokker Aircraft Corp. of America) been described as the best and most detailed description on the F-32 ever. In the book the chapter about the F-32 has 85 pages and more than 100 photographs. Also three colour profiles and posters have been added to the book. A book worth while buying:
https://www.europeanairlines.no/product/the-fokker-fours/

Here are some pages from the book (opens as PDF):
https://www.europeanairlines.no/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/The-Fokker-Fours-extract-1-19.pdf
Worthy of mentioning at this time is the work of George Akimoto, the creator of Pancho, who exemplifies the spirit that prevailed throughout the Center. The artistic abilities of our staff artist have done much in adding color to our pages and the press personnel envisions greater fields for him to conquer.

--

See some of his later work in this post!

Photo credits to
American Aviation Historical Society
California Watercolor
Voices of East Anglia