Iroquois Indian Museum

Iroquois Indian Museum Closed until further notice due to COVID-19 Admission Adults - $8 ($6.40 for Groups) Seniors - $6.50 ($5.20 for Groups) Students (12-17) - $6.50 ($5.20 for Groups) Children (5-12) - $5 ($4 for Groups of 7+) Children under 5 - No Fee School Programs & Group Tours: Please call for information.
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We can accommodate group visits on days that are otherwise closed to the public

Temporarily closed

08/12/2020
Mike Tarbell explains the background of the prayer of thanksgiving

Iroquois Museum cultural interpretar Mike Tarbell explains the background of the prayer of thanksgiving. American culture acknowledges one thanksgiving a year, but the Iroquois culture has at least two thanksgivings a day. Watch for more information. This video becomes becomes right-side-up at around 2 minutes. We're working on upcoming a clearer (right-sided) video soon, which we'll link here!

08/05/2020

Due to circumstances outside of our control, the artist cannot do the Facebook Live demo today at noon. However, we're tanning hides at the museum today, and will plan to share video of that process soon!

07/29/2020
Brenda LaForme: Three Sisters

Iroquois Indian Museum Cultural Interpreter Brenda LaForme talks about the relevance of the Three Sisters (corn, beans, and squash) to Iroquois culture, as well as the reason why Iroquois corn husk dolls have no faces.

07/22/2020
Quill worker Jamie Jacobs

Quillworker Jamie Jacobs talks about his background and how he does porcupine quill pieces.

Here’s an example of work by Jamie Jacobs. He carved the wooden face and did the porcupine quillwork for this ceremonial...
07/22/2020

Here’s an example of work by Jamie Jacobs. He carved the wooden face and did the porcupine quillwork for this ceremonial rattle made from a turtle. Jamie made a video for us today about his background and doing quillwork that will be on our page soon!

07/22/2020

Hi all! We're having some technical difficulties with Facebook Live today, so Jamie is going to make a 10-minute demo video right now and post it to our page in a few minutes. He'll stay online for a few minutes to answer any questions in the comment section of the video. We're sorry for this pivot! Thank you for bearing with us :)

Cultural interpreter Brenda working on tanning hides this week. #tanning #iroquois #haudenosaunee #schohariecounty #iroq...
07/14/2020

Cultural interpreter Brenda working on tanning hides this week. #tanning #iroquois #haudenosaunee #schohariecounty #iroquoismuseum @ Iroquois Indian Museum

07/08/2020

Iroquois Indian Museum Cultural Educator Mike Tarbell (Mohawk) talks about stereotypes during this week’s midday mini lesson.

Thanks for the great feature on our outdoor exhibit, WTEN ABC Channel 10 and Cassie Hudson! The exhibit is outdoors, fre...
07/02/2020
Off the Beaten Path: Iroquois Museum Outdoor Exhibition

Thanks for the great feature on our outdoor exhibit, WTEN ABC Channel 10 and Cassie Hudson! The exhibit is outdoors, free, and open to the public. Come check us out!

HOWES CAVE, N.Y. (NEWS10) – The Iroquois Indian Museum has a new outdoor exhibition called “Tonto, Tepees, and Totem Poles: Considering Native American Stereotypes in the 21st Century,” which…

Thank you to Spectrum News Albany and WTEN ABC for visiting the museum today to talk about our new outdoor exhibit on st...
07/02/2020

Thank you to Spectrum News Albany and WTEN ABC for visiting the museum today to talk about our new outdoor exhibit on stereotypes! Obviously, Little Boy charmed our visitors.

We're grateful to be the first recipient of Schoharie Economic Enterprise Corporation’s (SEEC) Resiliency Fund Loan/Gran...
06/28/2020

We're grateful to be the first recipient of Schoharie Economic Enterprise Corporation’s (SEEC) Resiliency Fund Loan/Grant Program and for The Mountain Eagle featuring our museum director, Steph Shultes, receiving the grant, which will support our virtual education programs.

Have you picked up your copy of the Mountain Eagle yet? On shelves today!

Thank you William Jasper for my treats!
06/19/2020

Thank you William Jasper for my treats!

Many thanks to SEEC for your generous support!
06/17/2020

Many thanks to SEEC for your generous support!

Many thanks to Walmart SuperCenter in Cobleskill, NY for your generous support!
06/15/2020

Many thanks to Walmart SuperCenter in Cobleskill, NY for your generous support!

Many thanks to Walmart Distribution Center in Sharon Springs, NY for your generous support!
06/15/2020

Many thanks to Walmart Distribution Center in Sharon Springs, NY for your generous support!

Little Boy wants to know if you've purchased your VIRTUAL RAFFLE tickets yet? Even though we can’t hold the Festival thi...
06/14/2020

Little Boy wants to know if you've purchased your VIRTUAL RAFFLE tickets yet? Even though we can’t hold the Festival this year, we can still offer you a virtual twist on our annual Raffle! This year we are featuring a winner’s choice of 6 prizes for 4 weekly drawings. Beginning on Sunday, August 16th we will draw 1 winner at random per week for 4 weeks. The Raffle will end on Sunday, September 6. Each weekly winner will be able to choose 1 of the six prizes.to keep at the end of the Raffle. Each of these prizes is valued at over $100! If you are one of the four weekly winners we can arrange local pickup or delivery or we can mail your prize to you. Tickets are $5 each and can be purchased online at: www.iroquoismuseum.org/virtual-raffle
Thanks so much for your support!

Check your inbox for our June newsletter, which includes news, education, strawberries, and more!
06/08/2020
Iroquois Museum June Newsletter

Check your inbox for our June newsletter, which includes news, education, strawberries, and more!

VIRTUAL RAFFLE DETAILS Even though we can’t hold our annual festival this year, we can still offer you a virtual twist on our annual raffle! We will draw a winner each week for four weeks, starting August 16. Winners will be able to choose from one of six prizes, a few of which are seen above, all...

Have you purchased your VIRTUAL RAFFLE tickets yet? Even though we can’t hold the Festival this year, we can still offer...
06/08/2020

Have you purchased your VIRTUAL RAFFLE tickets yet? Even though we can’t hold the Festival this year, we can still offer you a virtual twist on our annual raffle! We will draw a weekly winner Sundays August 16, 23, 30, and September 6. Our six prizes are valued at more than $100 each. Tickets are $5. To purchase and for more info, visit www.iroquoismuseum.org/virtual-raffle

Thank you Rose & Kiernan for your generous support!
06/07/2020

Thank you Rose & Kiernan for your generous support!

We hope you are all staying healthy during this difficult time. The COVID-19 pandemic has certainly changed our world in...
06/07/2020

We hope you are all staying healthy during this difficult time. The COVID-19 pandemic has certainly changed our world in ways we could never imagine! Due to concerns for the safety of our visitors, artists, performers, and staff we have made the very difficult decision to cancel all special events for 2020. This includes social dance Saturdays, artist demonstrations, and the annual Iroquois Festival on Labor Day weekend. The Museum itself will remain closed until we feel confident that we can navigate the necessary health protocols. Our Nature Trails are always open. The Iroquois Museum will provide updates on its website, iroquoismuseum.org, as well as through social media. We invite you to explore the Iroquois Museum collections online and learn more about the museum on our website, the Learning Longhouse - https://i36466.wixsite.com/learninglonghouse, Facebook, and Instagram accounts.

06/02/2020
Alf Jacques | The Stickmaker

Alf Jacques (Onondaga, Turtle Clan) talks about the art of making lacrosse sticks and playing lacrosse.

Using time-honored techniques passed down by generations of stick-makers, a few skilled artisans still make wooden sticks by hand. Native craftsmen such as A...

Today we're featuring lacrosse stickmaker and carver Alfred Jacques from Onondaga Nation, Turtle Clan. Alf is known inte...
06/02/2020

Today we're featuring lacrosse stickmaker and carver Alfred Jacques from Onondaga Nation, Turtle Clan. Alf is known internationally for his lacrosse sticks, of which he estimates he's made around 80,000.

Alf was inducted into the Ontario Lacrosse Hall of Fame (2011), the Upstate Chapter of the US Lacrosse Hall of Fame (2014), and is recognized worldwide for his intimate knowledge of the wood, the sport, and his commitment to craftsmanship.

He has exhibited at the Iroquois Museum, Ganondagan Historic Site (Victor, NY), NY State Museum, Everson Museum (Syracuse), and the Lacrosse Hall of Fame (Baltimore, MD) and been featured in numerous publications and documentaries.

Watch the Lacrosse Hall of Fame's excellent video with Alf explaining the art of making lacrosse sticks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKb1rArGurA

Just watching over my Museum...
05/28/2020

Just watching over my Museum...

Athletic prowess, sportsmanship, competitiveness, and spirituality are qualities valued by Native cultures, so it's no s...
05/28/2020

Athletic prowess, sportsmanship, competitiveness, and spirituality are qualities valued by Native cultures, so it's no surprise that baseball, America's pastime, has been popular with Native people since the 1800s. Visit our online exhibit on Native Americans and baseball, including Native players in the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum as well as the problematic history of Native stereotypes in baseball: https://www.iroquoismuseum.org/2008

Love Visit Schoharie’s photo series!
05/22/2020

Love Visit Schoharie’s photo series!

Front Porch Friday -

“When we think about museums we usually think about history and how important the past is to the present, but the Iroquois Indian Museum has a special way of focusing on the present through the artist. This gives us another way to look at cultures that are different from our own.”

Steph Shultes, Director, Iroquois Indian Museum, has been involved with the Museum since the mid-1980’s in one way or another. Her steadfast dedication to IIM is remarkable as she has seen it grow from the top floor of a building on the campus of the Old Stone Fort to the present-day state of the art Museum and 45 acres of well-marked Nature Trails. First, she was a volunteer, then Curator, then the natural next step of Director and it all seemed so flawless to those of us who watched her journey, but it takes someone special with focus and quiet determination to do all this. Someone with the deep understanding of how important it is to focus on Iroquois identity and the beauty of their on-going stories. Her favorite part of working at the Museum has been working with a small staff that becomes family. Over the years Steph has also connected with Iroquois artists and extended the “family” even further – especially with the potters who are often multi-generational. In one instance, Steph works with a family from Six Nations in Canada where the husband, wife, daughter, and granddaughter all have exhibited at the Museum. It is no wonder “stunning” is a favorite word you hear Steph speak so often as she describes the art, the Museum and of course, her cats.

The Front Porch Friday Series for Schoharie County strives to provide a fresh look at our County through the words and thoughts of participants who have agreed to sit on their “front porch” and share their stories. Our County, Schoharie County is a very special place – there is only one – and with this Series, we wish to once again illuminate the ideas and passions that makes it so special. We wish to thank all participants of this project for their wisdom, insights and time given.

It’s a perfect weekend to explore our 45-acre nature park, with four trails surrounded by lushness. If you’re nearby, co...
05/22/2020

It’s a perfect weekend to explore our 45-acre nature park, with four trails surrounded by lushness. If you’re nearby, come Visit Schoharie County.

A 1746 report from Conrad Weiser, who learned his Mohawk language while a resident of Schoharie, described his idea of I...
05/17/2020

A 1746 report from Conrad Weiser, who learned his Mohawk language while a resident of Schoharie, described his idea of Iroquois heaven of that time: "There a man can lie in the shade the whole day, and the most beautiful maidens wait upon him. There no one grows old. Those who have been the best and most heroic warriors here, there [in that heaven] have the preeminence, and rule over the good women." This large soapstone carving titled “Warrior’s Dream” in the museum’s collection by artist Tom Huff (Seneca/Cayuga, 1993) is playful and light with the spirit of Iroquois humor. In Iroquois society on earth, if anyone rules, it is the women, not the warriors. #DreamsMW

05/17/2020
Bow Drill Making a Friction Fire

Each year the museum hosts an Early Technology Day (we’re hoping to be back in 2021!) when visitors can watch and participate in the process of flintknapping (the ancient art of making chipped stone tools), fire making, cordage making, atlatl spear throwing, and early archery. This video shows the use of a bow drill to make a friction fire from a past Early Technology Day.

This 2014 acrylic painting by Onondaga artist Brandon Lazore, “Broken Treaties,” is about big business causing climate c...
05/15/2020

This 2014 acrylic painting by Onondaga artist Brandon Lazore, “Broken Treaties,” is about big business causing climate change. The back side of U.S. paper money features the words “filthy rich,” oil rigs, and industrial pollution. A man in traditional dress wears a gas mask and holds Two-Row wampum and Washington Covenant wampum belts. #ClimateMW #MuseumWeek20

We can’t wait to have visitors exploring again the Children’s Museum on the lower level of our building, like in this 20...
05/14/2020

We can’t wait to have visitors exploring again the Children’s Museum on the lower level of our building, like in this 2019 photo of visitors designing quilt blocks inspired by those of the Akwesasne Mohawk quiltmakers in our Treasured Traditions exhibit. #MuseumMomentsMW

Unity is a core value of the six nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, consisting of Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Se...
05/13/2020

Unity is a core value of the six nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, consisting of Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora. The Confederacy is constructed on the idea that these nations are stronger together than any one of them could be alone. The creation of the Confederacy is represented by the purple Hiawatha Wampum Belt, seen in this 2001 blue tie-dye t-shirt design by Roger Thompson (Seneca) that also features the Tree of Peace, a great white pine symbolizing the promise of peace and friendship between the nations. The black t-shirt design also features the Tree of Peace, in addition to the nine clans within the six nations, represented by Turtle, Eel, Snipe, Deer, Hawk, Wolf, Bear, Heron, and Beaver. Atop the Tree of Peace is an eagle to scream out a warning at anything that could threaten the peace and unity of the people. #TogetherMW #Group #Collectivity #Unity #Community #MuseumWeek

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324 Caverns Rd
Howes Cave, NY
12092

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Celebrate Iroquois Creativity with Us

The Iroquois Indian Museum is an educational institution dedicated to fostering understanding of Iroquois culture using Iroquois art as a window to that culture. The Museum is a venue for promoting Iroquois art and artists, and a meeting place for all peoples to celebrate Iroquois culture and diversity. As an anthropological institution, it is informed by research on archaeology, history, and the common creative spirit of modern artists and craftspeople.

Admission:

Adults - $8 ($6.40 for Groups) Seniors - $6.50 ($5.20 for Groups) Students (12-17) - $6.50 ($5.20 for Groups) Children (5-12) - $5 ($4 for Groups of 7+) Children under 5 - No Fee

School Programs & Group Tours:

Visit our website https://www.iroquoismuseum.org/schoolprograms or call us for more information. We can accommodate group visits on days that are otherwise closed to the public.

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