USS Bowfin Submarine Museum & Park

USS Bowfin Submarine Museum & Park Our nonprofit organization is home to WWII submarine USS Bowfin (SS-287). We are open to public tours of our submarine (museum currently under construction).
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Located at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, next to the USS Arizona Memorial Visitor Center. Visit the" Pearl Harbor Avenger," USS Bowfin (SS-287). Walk on board a WWII Submarine; experience first-hand what it was like to live as a submariner of the past. Museum: Explore the intriguing world of submarines, both past and present. Visitors can tour our 10,000 square foot Museum home to an impressive collection of submarine-related artifacts such as submarine weapon systems, photographs, paintings, battleflags, original recruiting posters, and detailed submarine models, all illustrating the history of the U.S. Submarine Service. Outdoor Exhibits: Poseidon C-3 missile Regulus missile Kaiten torpedo (and much much more) Onsite: Large gift-shop for your shopping needs concession stand-- with outdoor lanai dining; right on the water!

Operating as usual

Jumping into the weekend like…   📸 @theorytherapper // Instagram
02/20/2021

Jumping into the weekend like…


📸 @theorytherapper // Instagram

Barely eight square miles in size, Iwo Jima was a desolate volcanic island – a speck in the vastness of the Pacific Ocea...
02/19/2021

Barely eight square miles in size, Iwo Jima was a desolate volcanic island – a speck in the vastness of the Pacific Ocean – that, beginning 76 years ago on Feb. 19, 1945, served as the unlikely ground for one of the most hard-fought and pivotal battles of WWII.

Iwo Jima’s location was of key importance, but the US Navy and Marine Corps knew that the island would not be taken easily. Although the invading US troops significantly outnumbered the Japanese defenders (by a more than three-to-one margin), many Americans were wounded or killed over the five weeks of fighting, with some estimates suggesting 25,000 casualties.

The Battle of Iwo Jima was immortalized in the words of Commander, Pacific Fleet/Commander in Chief Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, who said, “Among the Americans who served on Iwo Island, uncommon valor was a common virtue.”

In addition to suffering major losses, the Japanese were also running low on supplies – namely, weapons and food. To offset these weaknesses, they organized frequent and devastating attacks under the cover of darkness. However, even these unconventional tactics did little to forestall the inevitable.

Just four days into fighting, US Marines captured Mount Suribachi, on Iwo Jima’s south side, famously raising an American flag at the summit.

On March 25, 1945, 300 Japanese mounted a final banzai attack. The word “banzai” was used to signify an all-out and usually desperate attack.
Two Japanese holdouts continued to hide in the island’s caves until their final surrender in 1949, almost four years after the end of WWII.

In the end, neither the US Army nor the US Navy was able to use Iwo Jima as a staging area despite the Navy Seabees rebuilding the airfields for use in case of emergency landings.

After two-years of ongoing renovation, we are pleased to announce the reopening of the Pacific Fleet Submarine Museum at...
02/19/2021

After two-years of ongoing renovation, we are pleased to announce the reopening of the Pacific Fleet Submarine Museum at Pearl Harbor!⁣

We will have a private reopening ceremony to celebrate. We regret that we cannot hold a larger event to mark this occasion, but we are hopeful that you will be able to visit in the near future.⁣

𝗪𝐚𝐭𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐲 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞 (𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐧 𝐅𝐚𝐜𝐞𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤) 𝐓𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐝𝐚𝐲, 𝐅𝐞𝐛𝐫𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝟐𝟑𝐫𝐝 𝐚𝐭 𝟏𝟎 𝐚𝐦 𝐇𝐒𝐓.

The USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park is a great place to learn about the history of WWII through the eyes of a subma...
02/18/2021

The USS Bowfin Submarine Museum and Park is a great place to learn about the history of WWII through the eyes of a submariner. ⁣

You can tour the inside of the Pearl Harbor Avenger, a real-life WWII submarine, and explore the inner workings of this historic diesel-electric sub! ⁣

📸: E9 Master Chief of USS Swordfish, George J Sapr shows teaches his great great grandchild about the life of a submariner. Photographed on USS Bowfin (SS-287). Photo courtesy of Mrs. Bicoy

On February 17, 1864 the Confederate submarine H. L. Hunley was the first to sink an enemy ship in combat. Hunley’s chie...
02/17/2021

On February 17, 1864 the Confederate submarine H. L. Hunley was the first to sink an enemy ship in combat.

Hunley’s chief weapon was a “spar torpedo”, literally a spear on the front of the vessel with explosives attached. Her target was the Union screw sloop USS Housatonic off Charleston, South Carolina. The spar torpedo succeeded against its target, however, the resulting concussion wave also sank the Hunley.


In 1995, over a century later, the National Underwater and Marine Agency (NUMA) recovered the H.L. Hunley and delivered her to the Warren Lasch Conservation Center, to conserve the vessel

The Hunley has since been excavated and proved to be a fascinating time capsule, holding surprisingly well-preserved Civil War treasures including coins, pipes, buttons, knives, firearms, tools, binoculars, a gold pocket watch belonging to the sub's commanding officer, Lt. George Dixon, and even a leather wallet.

The submarine and the hundreds of artifacts found onboard are currently undergoing preservation work while archaeologists use the historical clues they have found to piece together the final moments of the Hunley and her crew. Learn more by visiting: https://www.hunley.org/

On October 28, 2020 the secretary of the Navy announced the second Columbia-class ballistic-missile submarine USS Wiscon...
02/15/2021
Newest Columbia-class ballistic-missile submarine to be named USS Wisconsin

On October 28, 2020 the secretary of the Navy announced the second Columbia-class ballistic-missile submarine USS Wisconsin (SSBN 827) will be named after the great badger state. https://bit.ly/2WXIfW2

Happy #NationalWisconsinDay

An artist rendering of the future U.S. Navy Columbia-class ballistic missile submarines. The 12 submarines of the Columbia-class will replace the Ohio-class submarines which are reaching their maximum extended service life. This Image was released by the United States Navy. (WKBT) — Wisconsin’s ...

Happy Valentine’s Day to you and your loved ones. 💕    📸 : U.S. Navy
02/14/2021

Happy Valentine’s Day to you and your loved ones. 💕


📸 : U.S. Navy

Early in August 1945, Bowfin sailed for the Marianas, her staging point for her 10th war patrol. However, while en route...
02/12/2021

Early in August 1945, Bowfin sailed for the Marianas, her staging point for her 10th war patrol. However, while en route, she received word of Japan's capitulation. ⁣

As a result, she reversed course and returned to Hawaii and then headed for the Panama Canal on her way to the east coast of the United States. ⁣

Bowfin arrived at Tompkinsville, Staten Island, New York, on September 21, 1945 where she was briefly a star attraction along with other submarines and ships recently returned from the war. Navy Day in New York City, October 27, 1945 was a homefront tour of epic proportions, as the public was finally able to see up close the ships that had helped win the war.⁣

After taking part in this victory lap, Bowfin served in the Atlantic Fleet until decommissioned at New London on February 12, 1947.

#OTD in 1945 The Yalta Conference ended after an 8-day session. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister ...
02/11/2021
Yalta Conference and The Big Three | USS Bowfin

#OTD in 1945 The Yalta Conference ended after an 8-day session. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Soviet Premier Josef Stalin, (known as the Big Three) discussed Europe's post-war reorganization. The Soviets also agreed to enter the Pacific War against Japan upon Germany's defeat.

Read More about the Yalta Conference here: https://bit.ly/2Yy43sb

Learn more about the Yalta Conference; code-named “Argonaut” and the "Big Three"

#SubmarineSunday⚓ On the night of February 7, 1943 during her fourth war patrol, USS Growler (SS 215) fought a desperate...
02/07/2021

#SubmarineSunday⚓

On the night of February 7, 1943 during her fourth war patrol, USS Growler (SS 215) fought a desperate battle with the Japanese supply ship Hayasaki.

Commanding officer, Lt. Cmdr. Howard W. Gilmore, rammed the enemy ship, badly bending Growler's bow. Wounded by machine gun fire and unable to go below, Gilmore gave the order "Take her down!" sacrificing himself to save his men. For this action, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

After the loss of their beloved skipper, Growler returned to Australia with her bow bent 90-degrees to port.

Lt. Cmdr. Schade recalled that "When the Australians replaced our damaged bow they put two little kangaroos there - as a sort of figure-head. It is now our most prized distinctive marking." Shortly after the metal kangaroos were attached to the port and starboard sides of her bow, Growler received the nickname “The Kangaroo Express.”

Under the command of Cmdr. Oakley, she formed a wolfpack with USS Hake (SS-256) and USS Hardhead (SS-365). Steaming for the South China Sea, the submarines were assigned as a search and attack group. On November 8 Growler and her pack followed an enemy convoy and closed for an attack. Hake and Hardhead were both on the opposite side of the convoy, and received an order from Cmdr. Oakley to attack, with Hardhead to maintain position off the convoy’s port bow. It was the last communication ever received from Growler. A short time later, Hake noted in her war diary that she heard two explosions of undetermined character, and almost simultaneously, the convoy zigged away from Growler’s position. Hardhead heard what sounded like a torpedo explosion followed by three depth charges on the opposite side of the convoy.

Navy Department Communique No. 572, dated February 1, 1945, states: “Growler is overdue from patrol and presumed lost, cause unknown” and that the next-of-kin of her officers and crew had been informed. All 86 men were lost at sea.

Growler had sunk 15 enemy vessels for a total of 74,900 tons, and damaged 7 others for 34,100 tons. She was stricken from the Navy Register on February 8, 1945. USS Growler is also designated as the Hawaii State Boat by the U.S. Submarine Veterans of World War II.

02/05/2021
Jake's

Visit us this weekend. We're serving up your favorite meals! 🌭

Have you ever seen a sunset from a submarine? Please let us know and share your sunset photos for a chance to be feature...
02/04/2021

Have you ever seen a sunset from a submarine? Please let us know and share your sunset photos for a chance to be featured! ⁣

Historically, the U.S. strongly resisted enlisting Black servicemen; especially within the Navy. While black soldiers an...
02/01/2021

Historically, the U.S. strongly resisted enlisting Black servicemen; especially within the Navy. While black soldiers and sailors served as far back as the Revolutionary War, in peacetime black men were often prohibited from enlisting.

Those few permitted into the Navy were typically held to the ratings of messmen, stewards, or cooks.

After intense pressure from the NAACP, the Black Press, and President Roosevelt, the U.S. Navy began to open ratings to black sailors in 1942. Several African American construction battalions were established and deployed throughout the Pacific theater, serving under white officers and living in segregated facilities which they typically built for themselves.

The first Black officers were commissioned in March 1944. Known as the Golden Thirteen, the officers were not allowed to command white sailors and instead were put in charge of Black work details.

The United States Naval Women’s Reserve (better known as WAVES) recruited Black women starting in 1944, and the following year, the first Black woman enlisted as a member of the Navy.

Despite the additional obstacles and barriers, Black submariners and sailors played an integral role during World War II.

We’d like to pay tribute to the 2.5 million African-American men enlisted during WWII -- over 160,000 men served in the Navy including the 10 men who served on board USS Bowfin. 🌟

Submerge into history with a self-guided WWII submarine tour of USS Bowfin (SS -287)  ⁣ ⁣Our facilities are regularly ma...
01/29/2021

Submerge into history with a self-guided WWII submarine tour of USS Bowfin (SS -287) ⁣

Our facilities are regularly maintained for the Health & Safety of our guests so that you may experience history in a safe environment. ⁣

To reserve a ticket please visit: https://bit.ly/3nv4D4x⁣
📸 Richard Min ⁣

Did you Know Smokey the Bear originated as a result of World War II? “Remember Pearl Harbor!” and “Loose Lips Sink Ships...
01/27/2021

Did you Know Smokey the Bear originated as a result of World War II?

“Remember Pearl Harbor!” and “Loose Lips Sink Ships” are among the most famous slogans during WWII. But another poster child birthed during the war—Smokey Bear—might have the most well-known slogan during that time. The ad campaign that spawned the cartoonish bear, and a fire prevention legend, was only made possible by wartime paranoia about the possibility of a Japanese invasion of the continental United States.

Visit our blog to read more: https://www.bowfin.org/article/smokey-bear-and-wwii

January 24, 1943 Wahoo spotted a destroyer with submarines around it. Morton fired three torpedoes on the destroyer, but...
01/26/2021

January 24, 1943 Wahoo spotted a destroyer with submarines around it. Morton fired three torpedoes on the destroyer, but they missed. Wahoo watched as the destroyer headed its way, and at dangerously close range, Wahoo fired another torpedo that broke the enemy ship in half. A few days later, Wahoo encountered another convoy and was credited with sinking Buyo Maru, Fukuei Maru, and an unknown maru. On February 7, Wahoo arrived at Pearl Harbor to a hero’s welcome. Morton was nicknamed “The One-Boat Wolf Pack.” He received the Navy Cross, and General of the Army Douglas MacArthur presented to him the Army Distinguished Service Cross.

📸 1: March 3, 1943, "Hero's Welcome. A Navy band is on hand to greet the submarine Wahoo on her return to Pearl Harbor following a patrol during which she sank a Japanese destroyer and an entire enemy convoy of four ships. The battle with the convoy lasted for a period of 14 hours." **Note that Wahoo's radar antennas have been crudely censored out of the image. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

📸 2: At Pearl Harbor after her third war patrol, circa February 7, 1943. Her Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Commander Dudley W. Morton, is on the open bridge, in right center. Officer standing at left appears to be the Executive Officer, Lieutenant Richard H. O'Kane. Note that the forward radar mast, mounted in front of the periscope shears, has been censored out of this photograph. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

#OTD 1945 USS Bowfin embarked on her 7th war patrol. This patrol largely took place in the waters east of the Japanese m...
01/25/2021

#OTD 1945 USS Bowfin embarked on her 7th war patrol. This patrol largely took place in the waters east of the Japanese mainland, and Bowfin’s secondary assignment was to assist with the many air raids being conducted by our B-29s.⁣

On March 18 Bowfin sighted a large object falling out of the sky towards the water. Upon closer inspection, the crew saw that it was a strange balloon about 30 feet in diameter. They shot at it to deflate it, and grabbed it out of the water. These types of balloons were used by the Japanese for intelligence gathering information. The next day Bowfin received information concerning a plane going down near their position. They were very close to the position and saw the plane go down with the tail destroyed. It made a water landing near the submarine and the crew rescued the two airmen of a torpedo bomber. Lieutenant R.U. Platt and Aviation Machinist Mate, third class J. Papazoglavis of Torpedo Squadron 83 were welcomed aboard Bowfin with open arms.⁣

USS Bowfin was underway for 14,325 miles during her seventh patrol. CDR Tyree and higher authorities believed Bowfin sank 2,950 tons (two vessels). JANAC credited USS Bowfin with sinking 750 tons (one vessel of that tonnage plus one small craft). CDR Tyree was awarded the Navy Cross.⁣

⁣Pictured: USS APOLLO (AS-25) at Apra Harbor, Guam, M.I. in April 1945. USS Bowfin was refitted alongside Apollo during this time between her 7th and 8th war patrols -- she is the fifth boat from the left (farthest outboard). *NOTE: Jack (fwd) is at half staff for F.D.R’s death.

Old McDonald had a farm… in the middle of the Pacific? 😮 ⁣⁣Sailing animals are most often dogs or cats, but historically...
01/23/2021

Old McDonald had a farm… in the middle of the Pacific? 😮 ⁣

Sailing animals are most often dogs or cats, but historically there were also numerous pigs, chickens, and goats on Navy ships.⁣

Livestock on board a ship before refrigeration would have been a source of fresh meat and milk. Goats were a logical choice because of their size. They were⁣ also able to maintain “sea legs,” in any weather. The Navy’s first goat mascot, El Cid, was the pet on board the cruiser New York (Armored Cruiser No. 2). ⁣

In 1893, New York crew members brought El Cid to Annapolis for the Army-Navy game—which the Navy won. Midshipmen attributed the victory to the presence of the goat. From this point onward, the U.S. Naval Academy’s tradition of having a goat as a mascot was born.⁣

During the 1960’s two submariners serving aboard the WWII vintage submarine, USS Archerfish (SS-311) stumbled back to their sub after a drunken night of shore leave. That’s when they came across an old farmer selling a goat and a rooster and concocted a plan. The sailors used the trunk of a taxi to get the animals back to the Archerfish. The goat ran amok on the sub for hours before the sailors realized that a confined space was no place for such an animal. The smell alone helped convince them of that.⁣

A goat, however, was not the largest or most unlikely animal ever lowered down a submarineh hatch.⁣ In 1941, the British submarine HMS Trident carried a reindeer.⁣

#OTD in 1961 USS George Washington (SSBN 598) completed the first operational voyage as a fleet ballistic missile submar...
01/21/2021

#OTD in 1961 USS George Washington (SSBN 598) completed the first operational voyage as a fleet ballistic missile submarine; staying submerged for 66 days. ⁣

Pictured: George Washington (SSBN-598) passes the USS Arizona Memorial in April 1973. ⁣

The sail of George Washington (SSBN-598) is on permanent display at the Submarine Museum in Groton, CT.⁣

Kind words from our recent guest, @imagesbymin 🌈 ⁣ ⁣“All the staff were friendly. USS Bowfin was well preserved, [and] o...
01/19/2021

Kind words from our recent guest, @imagesbymin 🌈 ⁣

“All the staff were friendly. USS Bowfin was well preserved, [and] our family really enjoyed being there.” ⁣

If an educational family excursion sounds like a nice break from online classes and work, please visit. ⁣

Get your tickets today! https://bit.ly/3nv4D4x⁣

#SubmarineSunday⚓⁣ ⁣Since the age of sail, a fire on a ship has always remained one of the greatest dangers. Historicall...
01/17/2021

#SubmarineSunday⚓⁣

Since the age of sail, a fire on a ship has always remained one of the greatest dangers. Historically, starting a fire on a⁣ ship, by accident or through carelessness, was severely punished. Even pirates felt⁣ compelled to flog offenders who fell asleep while smoking. ⁣

A fire on a submarine not only threatened to cause an explosion in the battery compartments, but it also quickly consumed already limited oxygen.⁣

This is a recollection of a fire on the USS Bass (SS-164) told by BMC (SS) Jack Stevenson who served on her from 1940 until 1943.⁣

In the summer of 1942 USS Bass (SS-164) deployed on her fourth war patrol from Coco Solo, Panama. ⁣

In the early morning of August 17, 1942 with her batteries fully charged she made a trim dive. The electrician was taking readings in the after battery when he heard a gurgling noise coming from the battery blower. He shined his flashlight on the blower and saw smoke coming from the intake. He immediately shouted “Fire in the After Battery'' and turned on the lights to alert the crew in the berthing area directly above the after battery. Batteries in the forward end of the compartment started exploding so he headed forward to the maneuvering room and sealing the compartment by shutting and dogging the watertight doors behind him. There were about 16 men sleeping in the crew’s quarters above the after battery and crew members were furiously attempting to wake them and send them aft. There was heavy smoke and fire in the after battery and the men evacuated the compartment heading to the after torpedo room.⁣

A total of 27 men were evacuated and given Artificial Respiration and oxygen for several hours, but only two men were revived. Another sailor who was trapped in the After Battery was discovered after the fire was brought under control.⁣

The 26 young men who lost their life aboard the USS Bass (SS-164) were buried in Corozal American⁣ Cemetery, Panama. ⁣

Address

11 Arizona Memorial Dr
Honolulu, HI
96818-3104

www.thebus.org

General information

We are located at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on the island of Oahu. If you are planning a trip to the island and would like more information please feel free to call us or visit us on the web. *Information provided below. www.bowfin.org www.twitter.com/USSBowfin https://www.instagram.com/ussbowfinmuseum/

Opening Hours

Monday 07:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 07:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 07:00 - 17:00
Thursday 07:00 - 17:00
Friday 07:00 - 17:00
Saturday 07:00 - 17:00
Sunday 07:00 - 17:00

Telephone

+18084231341

Website

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Please help a sister ship! Patriot’s Point wants to sink the USS Clamagore, SS353 and make her an artificial reef. There is a group that wants to move her to the Louisville Naval Museum and come up with a long term plan. Please print, sign and mail, and get as many family, friends and coworkers as possible. This is the updated link. https://www.facebook.com/groups/338689653415753/permalink/562122837739099/
Please help a sister ship! Please help! Patriot’s Point wants to sink Clamagore for an artificial reef. The Louisville Naval Museum wants her and is coming up with a long term plan to save her. Please get as many people as you can to print, sign and send this letter ASAP! https://www.facebook.com/groups/338689653415753/permalink/562090261075690/
I have just finished reading the latest edition of “ National Geographic History”, which has an article about the Battle of Midway. In that article it says that the “ destroyer” U.S.S. Nautilus fired torpedoes that helped sink the I.J.N.carrier Kaga. I assume that they made a mistake and are referring to the submarine U.S.S. Nautilus.
Is there any truth that the remains of USS HERRING were discovered by a Russian Survey and Dive team in 2016? I have heard conflicting stories on it. Thanks..
As Charter Life Members, both my wife Barbara and I are hoping to make it back next year when the museum is dedicated.
Veteran Submariner Bill Shabazz - Widow Help
**Help Support the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery Memorial Campaign** @SSHMarinersGenealogy The Descendants of Sailors’ Snug Harbor Mariners have been reaching out to Historical and Genealogical Societies, Museums, Military Veterans Groups, and Concerned Citizens, to invite them to join a Letters of Support Campaign to support their efforts to gain access to the old Sailors’ Snug Harbor Cemetery on Staten Island, in New York City, to honor their Ancestors and all of the 6,500 Forgotten Merchant, Coast Guard, and Naval Mariners interred there (1834-1976), by installing a Memorial Monument (Obelisk) and holding an annual Memorial Service. Some of the Mariners were famous Sea Captains and some sailed on famous Merchant and Naval ships dating back to the American Revolution. Many were just average seamen whom sailed and endured for many years on the sea under arduous conditions. The Mariners were from various areas of the United States, Canada, and many other countries. https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/2244490/sailors-snug-harbor-cemetery Sadly, the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery is devoid of gravestones or markers, except for 15 remaining gravestones. The Cemetery is closed and not open to the public. The Board of Trustees of Sailors' Snug Harbor have rejected the Descendants' requests to access the SSH Cemetery to honor their Ancestors. https://nypost.com/2018/12/29/caretakers-shoot-down-plans-for-monument-for-fallen-sailors/ The Descendants are collecting Letters of Support to persuade the Trustees of Sailors’ Snug Harbor to change their decision. You can help support the Descendants by writing a Letter of Support using the Support Letter Writing Instructions at the following link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sZv5VFLNWw0HA-pW2i33RhbgVFQ6oExx Sailors’ Snug Harbor has a very interesting history. It was one of the first large scale retirement facilities in the United States and the first established for Merchant Mariners. It was founded by the Randall family whom were New York City Merchant Sea Captains and Privateers during the French Indian War and Patriots during the Revolutionary War. Alexander Hamilton was a friend of the Randall family and their Attorney. He helped draft the Robert Richard Randall Will in 1801 to create the SSH Trust which funded the SSH Retirement Home. During its 140+ years of operation (1833-1976) approximately 16,000 Mariners resided there. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sailors%27_Snug_Harbor
Looking for some help. Were there any wartime boats (Gato, Balao, or Tench) with two 5in guns and two 40mm on the forward and aft parts of the boat? Thanks.
For all the mechanically inclined amongst us!
I visited the Bowfin in 2010 with my family and when we dropped down into the Torpedoe Room I started telling them about how the first thing you learned when you checked on board was the procedure to flush the "toilet', I then went on to tell them about the "Bridal Suite" and several other things. By the time we got to the Control Room everyone within earshot had turned their tour tapes off and started asking me questions. I wonder if my sunglasses are still in the bilges of the Forward Engineroom? Seems only fitting as that was where I stood most of the underway watches when I was on the old fleet boats. J. D. Spencer ENCS (SS) USN (Ret)
this was a wonderful time very educational for adults and children these men deserve a salute to there service for our freedom !