100th Infantry Battalion Veterans aka Club 100

100th Infantry Battalion Veterans aka Club 100 This FB page is the personal one of a relative of 100th and 1399th veterans. It is not affiliated with or authorized by any WWII AJA veterans organiizations. The opinions expressed are solely those of the administrator
The 100th Wine Gang consisted of World War II veterans from the 100th Infantry Battalion and 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Army Reservists from the 100th Battalion, 442nd Infantry Regiment and their friends and family who used to get together every Thursday for lunch at the 100th Infantry Battalion Veterans Clubhouse.

This FB page is administed by Wine Gang members. It is not an official publication of the 100th Infantry Battalion Veterans organization nor is it endorsed or sponsored by the organization. The posts do not reflect the views of the 100th Infantry Battalion Veterans organizations or its members.

Mission: To educate the public about the WWII Japanese American veterans and to have good fun

You can watch the storytelling performance of “Spark Matsunaga:  Warrior Poet” by Alton Takiyama-Chung now online courte...
06/02/2020

You can watch the storytelling performance of “Spark Matsunaga: Warrior Poet” by Alton Takiyama-Chung now online courtesy of Storybook Theater in Sparky’s hometown of Hanapepe

#MatsunagaInstitute #WhatMovesYou
•••
Repost @storybook_theatre_hawaii
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The Storybook Theatreʼs Spring Film Fest presents to you our latest documentary movie called “Warrior Poet - A Story Of Spark M. Matsunaga”. This film stars a nationally renown storyteller Hawaiʼi born Alton Takiyama-Chung. Take a few moments with your family, and travel all the way back to when Sparky was just a ‘Hanapepe boyʼ, through his WWII years, into Statehood politics and finally into National politics as a United States Senator devoted to World Peace in our lifetime! Rare video, photos and excellent storytelling will give you an inspiring look into the “good old days”.
Click on theYou Tube link below to enjoy our film! Donations Welcome at WWW.STORYBOOK.ORG https://youtu.be/I5eFIIAtw3w

05/31/2020

Thank you to Deb and Laura for being the first repeat customers to our Rifle Chapter fundraiser!

Shirokiya Yataibayashi is going to remain closed.  Sorry to all in our ohana who love those gigantic beers
05/31/2020
Shirokiya extends business closure until the end of August

Shirokiya Yataibayashi is going to remain closed. Sorry to all in our ohana who love those gigantic beers

HONOLULU (KHON2) — The once busy Shirokiya at Ala Moana has been deserted since COVID-19 hit the state. Though restaurants will be able to open up its doors to the dine-in experience again on…

Tsuru Rising events start on June 6.  Sign up noe
05/31/2020

Tsuru Rising events start on June 6. Sign up noe

Tsuru Rising! Update -
Thank you to the hundreds of you who have already registered. We want to ensure that everyone who wishes to join will register.

If you want to participate in the Regional Gatherings or the Healing Circles for Change, you must register by 5pm PDT on Monday, June 1st to give coordinators time to organize those meetings. Register now at TsuruForSolidarity.org/tsururising so you do not miss out!

Go to bit.ly/TsuruRisingSchedule for a full, printable schedule which includes speaker and performer photos and information.

05/30/2020
How To Fold An Origami Jumping Frog

Vegas is opening up so you’ll need some origami frogs so your money will kaeru

Learn how to fold an origami jumping frog! This is the best jumping frog ever. The steps are easy enough to memorize too! #howtodraw #artforkidshub 🎨 ART SUP...

Why today is an important day
05/30/2020

Why today is an important day

On May 30, 1942, Fred Korematsu was arrested for violating Executive Order 9066. While his family was sent to concentration camps, Korematsu refused to go, citing that it was unconstitutional. He brought his case to the Supreme Court which ruled against him. Decades later, Korematsu's case was revisited in a petition for coram nobis. The 1944 ruling was overturned in a landmark decision in 1983.

Korematsu spent the remainder of his life fighting for civil rights. In these last days of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we reflect on the figures who led the fight.

Image credits: Photo courtesy of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute

05/30/2020
09 VirtualMemorialDay2020 DreamBig+KeithHorikawa

Here’s the link to the segment on the 100th and the 100th/442d that recently was a part of the Nisei Veterans Virtual Memorial Day Service.

The first part is a clip from the documentary “Dream Big!”, courtesy of JN Productions.

The second part is a message from COL Keith Horikawa, former Battalion Commander of the 100th/442d.

These soldiers take their commitment to carrying on the legacy of our World War II veterans very seriously, not just in their Army duty but in civilian life also. They spent this morning doing yardwork and cleaning the interior at the Clubhouse.

05/30/2020
Japanese American National Museum

Behind the scenes at JANM

Behind the Scenes of JANM’s Collection

For over 30 years, JANM’s permanent collection has been committed to preserving and sharing the stories of the Japanese American experience.

With over 100,000 artifacts in its permanent collection, JANM’s two floor archive chronicles JA history in its entirety from early immigration to the present.

The museum’s permanent collection, which includes material culture artifacts, photographs, documents, artwork and ephemera, is unlike any other collection in the world.

#JANMcollections #unboxed #bts

100th members - no appointments were made to preview the Rifle Chapter “For Continuing Service” fundraiser so please fee...
05/30/2020

100th members - no appointments were made to preview the Rifle Chapter “For Continuing Service” fundraiser so please feel free to stop by the Clubhouse on Saturday, May 30 from 8 am to 12 noon to shop.

A maximum of 5 people will be allowed in the Board Room and there will be no entry if you aren’t wearing a face mask. 100th members may bring non-members with them.

Payment by cash or check only.

The 100th/442d soldiers of Rifle Chapter will be doing yardwork and cleaning the Clubhouse so there may not be parking available at the Club.

100% of your purchase will support Rifle Chapter’s community service projects.

You can download a PDF of a new graphic novel about Medal of Honor awardee and 442nd veteran, the late Senator Daniel In...
05/30/2020
AUSA Graphic Novel Highlights WWII Hero Inouye

You can download a PDF of a new graphic novel about Medal of Honor awardee and 442nd veteran, the late Senator Daniel Inouye. You can also read it online

The Association of the U.S. Army has released a new graphic novel as part of a series highlighting Medal of Honor recipients.

05/29/2020

Thank you to Patty, the niece of 442nd veteran, Masaji “Shadow” Kurozumi for being the first shopper at the Rifle Chapter fundraiser!

Honoring 100th veteran, the late Mas Takahashi
05/28/2020

Honoring 100th veteran, the late Mas Takahashi

HONOR A VETERAN: Mas Takahashi, 100th Battalion 💙

Today's tribute for Mas comes from his son, Scott Takahashi.
"Dad was smart, generous, honest and a friend to everyone. Gone too soon, he set a great example for us."

Mas' name is engraved on our Monument on panel 3B, row 91.

05/28/2020
Wing Luke Museum

Thank you Chef Roy Choi!

Meet June Jo Lee, who teamed up with Jacqueline Briggs Martin and graffiti artist Man One to bring you the story of food hero Chef Roy Choi, who mixes dishes from his own Korean American background with the flavors of his neighborhood in Los Angeles. Choi’s Kogi Korean BBQ Taco Truck sparked the national food truck movement and celebrates a remix of the new American cuisine while building a better community through food. Thank you to @RReaders To Eaters Books for permission to repost this unique and lively story.

After you’ve seen the reading, you may like to learn how to make kimchi with June Jo Lee http://bit.ly/2T9zIPn (7 minutes) or instant ramen with the Chef Roy Choi http://bit.ly/2s7YBtP (1.5 minutes). Bon appetit!

05/28/2020
Lessons from the Past: Yellow Peril in COVID-19 Times

Recording of yesterday’s webinar on Yellow Peril in the Time of Covid 19

A discussion on Asian American mental health issues through a historical lens and the lens of the current pandemic. Our panelists will discuss how their fami...

For everyone who has been asking, the recording of Monday’s Nisei Veterans Virtual Memorial Day Service is now available...
05/28/2020
Virtual Memorial Day 2020 - YouTube

For everyone who has been asking, the recording of Monday’s Nisei Veterans Virtual Memorial Day Service is now available on YouTube. The link is to the event’s playlist.

We were so honored to be invited to participate in this so look for our 100th segment (once I start working on it)
05/26/2020

We were so honored to be invited to participate in this so look for our 100th segment (once I start working on it)

Please share!

This is going to be so cool and funny
05/26/2020

This is going to be so cool and funny

Attention all #kimbits and fans of Fresh off the Boat! May 30th 6PM/9PM PT/ET The casts of @KimsConvenience & @FreshOffABC are joining together to celebrate #AsianHeritageMonth with LIVESTREAMED TABLEREADS of our pilot episodes followed by an exclusive Q & A with cast members from both shows to raise funds for crucial Asian American/Canadian arts orgs @reelasian @ewplayers & @vcmedia https://www.seedandspark.com/fund/kimsofftheboat#story

Thank you to everyone who participated in and watched the first Nisei Veterans Memorial Day Service.  If you have any qu...
05/25/2020
100th Infantry Battalion Veterans | Education Center

Thank you to everyone who participated in and watched the first Nisei Veterans Memorial Day Service. If you have any questions, please send them to me at [email protected] and I'll send them off to the proper person to answer.

Our 100th website is at www.100thbattalion.org

They were men from working class families – mainly from Hawaii – with later arrivals volunteering from barbed wire-enclosed internments camps on the United States mainland. Called to duty in World War II, the men of the legendary 100th Infantry Battalion performed extraordinary feats fighting fo...

Honolulu Magazine article on the incredible Dr. Shinye Gima, World War II veteran of the Military Intelligence Service a...
05/25/2020
Nisei Veterans Share Stories of Life After WWII: Shinye Gima

Honolulu Magazine article on the incredible Dr. Shinye Gima, World War II veteran of the Military Intelligence Service and President of the MIS Veterans Club of Hawai

Nisei Veterans Share Stories of Life After WWII: Shinye Gima They’re our everyday heroes in plain clothes—the revered second-generation Japanese American veterans of World War II. Fewer than 250 Hawai‘i nisei vets are known to be alive today in Hawai‘i. And the war is just part of their life...

05/25/2020
Kaze Jones "Go For Broke" music video

The Go For Broke video by Kaze Jones with an introduction by director Shane Sato, photographer of The Go For Broke Spirit Book.

Appearing in the start of the video is a REAL World War II veteran, Tokuji "Toke" Yoshihashi of Able Company, 100th Infantry Battalion. Toke is still active in the Mainland Chapter of the 100th in Los Angeles, CA and you may be lucky to catch him volunteering at GFBNEC. He is an incredible person with some great stories, ask him about how his dog ended up with him at the Gila River Concentration Camp. I promise, I am not promoting him because I just received two boxes of pears from him.

When Kaze Jones' new video with Don Seki drops, we'll be sure to post it here.

Listen to Kaze Jones' new album https://ampl.ink/gyxJW Directed by Shane Sato

05/25/2020
Back to Bruyeres: The Legacy of the 100th

The entire "Back to Bruyeres: The Legacy of the 100th" video can be watched here. Mahalo again to producer Pamela Young for participating in today's Virtual Memorial Day Service. I'll deliver your toilet paper the next time I see you here!

Back to Bruyeres: The Legacy of the 100th

If you didn’t sign up on Zoom, you will be able to watch at the JACL FB page live TODAY.   It will also be recorded to w...
05/25/2020

If you didn’t sign up on Zoom, you will be able to watch at the JACL FB page live TODAY. It will also be recorded to watch later.

Please join us tomorrow for the Nisei Veterans Virtual Memorial Day Service to honor the Nisei veterans of foreign wars. Monday, May 25, 2020, 11am - 1pm.

Register for free online: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_XvjMFa2aSa6G3P2CpqNk7g

The incredible story of a 100th veteran nicknamed Spud
05/25/2020

The incredible story of a 100th veteran nicknamed Spud

He was described as a very strong family guy, a son who loved his mother very much. When he died that day for his country, a photo of his mother, now bloodstained, was found in his pocket.

“Sadao Munemori was born on August 17, 1922, to Kametaro and Nawa Munemori, immigrants from Hiroshima prefecture, in Glendale, California, a suburb of Los Angeles, the fourth of five children. He attended Fletcher Drive Elementary School and Lincoln High School, graduating in 1940,” according to Densho Encyclopedia.

In November 1941, Munemori volunteered for the U.S. Army. He would be the only Japanese American to be awarded the Medal of Honor during or immediately after World War II.

“Seventy-five years ago, Sadao Munemori was silently climbing in total darkness up Mount Belvedere in Italy, along with other members of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the Japanese-American World War II unit that is the most decorated unit in U.S. military history,” according to writer Martin Snapp. “Their mission was to attack one of the best outfits in the German army, the Kesselring Machine Gun Battalion.”

“It was April 1945, Munemori and his tough fellow soldiers broke the German's back by penetrating the heavily fortified Gothic line, high in the mountains over Pietrasanta,” according to ABC News.

“After his squad leader was wounded, Munemori assumed command,” according to the National Park Service (NPS).

“Munemori fought gallantly, single handedly taking out two enemy machine gun nests,” according to writer David Ono.

“Under murderous fire and showers of grenades, [Munemori then] made his way back to a shell crater where two of his fellow soldiers were taking refuge,” according to Snapp.

“Then, that fateful moment when a grenade lands at the feet of his comrades,” according to Ono.

“Without hesitation, [Munemori] dived for the missile,” wrote Snapp.

“Two weeks away from his 23rd birthday, Munemori threw himself on a German grenade,” according to NPS.

“Private First Class Munemori fought with great gallantry and intrepidity near Seravezza, Italy,” according to his Medal of Honor citation. “By his swift, supremely heroic action Private First Class Munemori saved two of his men at the cost of his own life and did much to clear the path for his company's victorious advance.”

That’s when the beloved photo of his mother was found.

This is a part of a series on the Peace Page this month honoring Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

~~~~~~~~~~

His Army buddies called Munemori “Spud” because he preferred potatoes over rice. They described him as always “laughing, happy, cheerful.”

But, his family remembers another side of him, when he used to be teased and called “good-for-nothing,” according to Ben Tamashiro, in The Hawaii Herald.

Another memory was when “Young Sadao had excitedly dashed off to go swimming at the community pool with his friend, a Norwegian lad,” wrote Tamashiro. “But when he returned he went straight to his room without a word to anyone. They all wondered why and, after a while. [his sister] went to check and found him on his bed, face down, but not asleep . . . he hadn't even gone swimming! Reluctantly, the boy explained that there was a big sign at the entrance to the pool: NO JAPS ALLOWED. But there were no tears in him.”

When he joined the Army, he said he wanted to prove himself.

“Despite the fact that they and their families had been forced into internment camps, thousands of the American sons of Japanese immigrants responded by volunteering to serve in the United States armed forces during World War II,” according to Google.

Munemori fought “for a country that was incarcerating his family behind barbed wire in a prison camp, merely for having Japanese ancestry,” wrote Snapp.

As military historian Bill Yenne writes, "It was their country, and they wanted to serve, just like anyone else their age. These young Japanese Americans thought of themselves as Americans, and they wanted to prove it."

“Spud was from L.A., I was from Berkeley,” remembers a friend, William Shinji Tsuchida in 100th Infantry Battalion Veterans. “Like many from the West Coast, we were determined to erase the stigma of being a ‘Jap’, enemy aliens, [but] in spite of our patriotism, we ran into difficulties proving our loyalty. We suffered suspicious stares and racial insults from our haole NCOs The all-purpose pejorative for Asians was ‘chink’. Of course the term “Jap” became a part of the American lexicon in a few more months.”

Sadao had written to his sister that "the scenery is very beautiful here, but all the beautiful forests remind me of now is terror, destruction and the painful cries of my buddies in agony. We all hate the Nazis over here,” he said, but added they respected the German soldier.

He said in another letter, according to Tamashiro, that he would listen to the young recruits cry at night, for “not having taken advice from their parents." He concluded, "Your mother is NEVER wrong."

He would compare himself to those "kids" as he called those 19-through-21 year olds and confessed, "I haven't cried because you know what kind of guy I am. I'm just a good-for-nothing.”

When his family no longer heard from him, “his mother, Nawa, had a dream that Sadao was lying on a snow-covered peak—not dead, but alive,” according to the Smithsonian.

She would receive the telegram while she was still at Manzanar that Sadao had been killed in action in Italy on April 5, 1945.

Later his mother would find the photo, blood-stained from the battlefield, among her fallen son’s personal belongings.

When the Medal of Honor was posthumously authorized on March 7, 1946, the family was in San Pedro. The actual medal was handed to his widowed mother a week later, along with his personal belongings, including the photo of his mother that he kept close to him.

At the time, Sadao Munemori “was the only Japanese American to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, the country's highest military award, for his service in World War II,” according to the Densho Encyclopedia.

The small Italian town Munemori and the 100th/442nd helped liberate would remember Munemori and the rest of the 100th/442nd by erecting a statue to recognize them, but it wouldn’t be until 2000 when 20 more Medal of Honors were issued after it was “revealed [there was] prejudice within the selection process.”

“The Japanese American GIs of the 442nd earned 21 Medals of Honor and 9,486 Purple Hearts, while their outfit was awarded eight Presidential Unit Citations,” according to Yenne.

In all, “the unit earned more than 18,000 awards in less than two years, including 4,000 Bronze Star Medals. In 2012, all surviving members were made chevaliers of the French Légion d'honneur for their actions contributing to the liberation of France and their rescue of the Lost Battalion.

In a column earlier this year, Snapp wrote, “I have to thank Spud and the other G.I.s who gave their lives. Spud died so I could live . . . He gave up all his tomorrows so I could have mine.”

“How can I repay him? The answer is I can’t,” Snapp wrote. “All I can do is try to lead my life in a way that would make him feel his sacrifice was worth it.”

Photo courtesy of the Smithsonian

Address

520 Kamoku St
Honolulu, HI
96826

General information

The Wine Gang used to meet for lunch every Thursday at the 100th Infantry Battalion Clubhouse located at 520 Kamoku Street in Honolulu (across from 'Iolani School). The 100th Infantry Battalion Veterans is a 501(c)(4) non-profit organization for WWII veterans of the 100th Infantry Battalion and their family members. The Clubhouse is open to members only.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 13:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 13:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 12:00
Thursday 09:00 - 13:00
Friday 09:00 - 13:00

Telephone

(808) 946-0272

Alerts

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Comments

Richard Seiji Miyashiro, a member of Company "B", 100th Infantry Battalion who was treated at my grandfather's hospital after being wounded in Italy. https://www.facebook.com/32ndStationHospital/posts/290742582325019
Wow, this brings chicken skin... 100th/442nd Battalion based in Samoa. https://www.facebook.com/six84media/videos/374695806268228/?t=0
Japanese American Veterans Assn (JAVA) is offering 10 scholarships to high school seniors who will be entering college in Fall 2020. JAVA is also offering 3 scholarships to current/continuing college students who have completed at least one year of college. Please contact [email protected] for the url link. All applications and required documents are due on Sunday, April 19th. We would like to see many applications from students who are descendants of 100th Battalion veterans.
The Japanese America Veterans Assn (JAVA) is offering several scholarships to graduating high school seniors and current college students who are continuing their studies. Applicants should be members of JAVA, children of JAVA members, or descendants of World War II Nisei veterans. One scholarship is also available to past/current members of the 100th Bn/442nd Inf reserve unit. Applicants should first review published rules and forms, which can be found and downloaded at the JAVA website. Deadline for applications: Sunday April 19th, 2020 We encourage all eligible students to apply! (DM me for website URL) or click below...
Xmas Cheer! My new Japangeles Go For Broke cap! 😊. Www.japangeles.com
American Samoa has the highest rate of military enlistment of any U.S. state or territory, yet American Samoans are barred from certain positions in the armed forces because they aren’t citizens. They are the last remaining caste of Americans who receive formal second-class citizenship. Bravo and Charlie Companies are based there.
Sad story about four 100/442 Soldiers who survived the war but lost their lives in a California plane crash in 1945. https://www.facebook.com/groups/272435146155702/permalink/2667140120018514/
100/442 display over here at the 311th SC on Shafter. Was genuinely surprised to see this when I reported into the command. GFB!