100th Infantry Battalion Veterans aka Club 100

100th Infantry Battalion Veterans aka Club 100 This FB page is the personal one of a relative of 100th and 1399th veterans. It is not affiliated with or authorized by any WWII AJA veterans organiizations.

The opinions expressed are solely those of the administrator The 100th Wine Gang consisted of World War II veterans from the 100th Infantry Battalion and 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Army Reservists from the 100th Battalion, 442nd Infantry Regiment and their friends and family who used to get together every Thursday for lunch at the 100th Infantry Battalion Veterans Clubhouse.

The opinions expressed are solely those of the administrator The 100th Wine Gang consisted of World War II veterans from the 100th Infantry Battalion and 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Army Reservists from the 100th Battalion, 442nd Infantry Regiment and their friends and family who used to get together every Thursday for lunch at the 100th Infantry Battalion Veterans Clubhouse.

Operating as usual

As expected, crimes skyrocketed in 2021, esp in big cities like New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles
05/06/2021
Anti-Asian hate crimes surged in early 2021, study says

As expected, crimes skyrocketed in 2021, esp in big cities like New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles

Reported hate crimes against Asians in 16 of the nation's largest cities and counties are up 164% since this time last year, according to a new study from the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State University San Bernardino.

So many great movies at HIFF’s J-Fest
05/06/2021

So many great movies at HIFF’s J-Fest

Passes & Tickets are available for J-FEST presented by First Insurance Company of Hawaii, LTD! Watch the North American Premiere of ARISTOCRATS, Directed by Yukiko Sode. Twenty-something Hanako (Mugi Kadowaki) comes from a wealthy family, born and raised within the confines of an upper class Tokyo world. In contrast, Miki (Kiko Mizuhara) is from a rural prefecture, and has worked hard to make a living as an outsider in the city. The lives of these two different women intersect when a politician’s son shows romantic interest in both of them, with vastly different results. For more go to https://hiff.org/j-fest-film-program

05/06/2021
CTSS, Butterflies and Birdsong

Welcome to our Cultural Talk Story Series. Our talk story today will focus on "Butterflies And Birdsong: On Radical Listening" with Julian Aguon and Maya Soetoro. Thank you for joining us today to sit down at our table to learn about indigenous communities near and far.

Healing from the hatred and violence through the teachings of various religions
05/05/2021
Learning How to Heal in the Wake of Anti-Asian Hate

Healing from the hatred and violence through the teachings of various religions

Buddhists from many cultures and communities gathered to repair the nation’s racial karma. The ceremony was held at a Los Angeles temple that had recently been vandalized in an arson attack.

Spaces going quickly so sign up asap
05/05/2021

Spaces going quickly so sign up asap

Join us on Friday, May 7th at 2 PM for a special conversation. The #LIVETOGETHER Virtual Panel brought you by the Live Together Campaign, will cover the importance of the film MINARI, the advocacy for #StopAsianHate, and the need for unity and allyship in the moral and cultural arc of "America"

Panelists include David Suh, Vice President - The United Korean Association of Hawaii (TUKAH), Edward Shultz - Dean of School of the Pacific and Asian Studies, UH Manoa, Moderated by Anderson Le - HIFF Artistic Director. Also with a pre-recorded message from MINARI Director, Lee Issac Chung.

You may resister for this FREE panel via: http://ow.ly/pJpx50EFNuo or watching the simulcast on the HIFF Facebook Live.

I missed this yesterday
05/05/2021

I missed this yesterday

It gives us a lot of joy to see today’s #GoogleDoodle honoring Nisei writer Hisaye Yamamoto ❤️📚

Originally from Southern California, Yamamoto was incarcerated at Poston during WWII. She wrote articles and a popular serialized murder mystery for The Poston Chronicle, and after the war worked at the Los Angeles Tribune, an African American newspaper that she later credited with deepening her understanding of racism and strengthening her solidarity. She published a number of short stories in prestigious literary journals in the early 1950s, exploring women’s experiences, intergenerational dynamics in Japanese American families, and the aftermath of WWII incarceration.

She focused on family life in the ensuing years, and remained little known to both mainstream and Japanese American audiences until the 1970s. But with the rise of ethnic consciousness and Asian American Studies, her works began to appear in numerous anthologies and become the subject of academic study and critical acclaim, including awards, a published collection of stories, and a TV adaptation. Even after her passing in 2011, Hisaye Yamamoto remains one of the most acclaimed writers of her generation.

Learn more: https://encyclopedia.densho.org/Hisaye%20Yamamoto

Watch an oral history with Hisaye Yamamoto: https://ddr.densho.org/interviews/ddr-densho-1002-10-1/

[ID: Google Doodle illustration of Hisaye Yamamoto writing at a desk. Pieces of paper float in the air next to her with drawings of people talking and dancing and concentration camp barracks.]

Childrens Day traditions explained
05/05/2021

Childrens Day traditions explained

Today, Japan celebrates Kodomo no Hi (こどもの日)🎉 - Children’s day, previously known as Boys’ Day. It is common to see carp-shaped streamers 🎏 decorating public spaces or hoisted outside homes. Carps are believed to be strong, spirited fish, admired for their determination to swim up currents and waterfalls. As such, they symbolize the desire for children to grow up brave and strong.

Here are some activities and food to enjoy together as families on Kodomo no Hi!

This makes me hungry!
05/04/2021

This makes me hungry!

Musubi#kokkafabric #kokka #cotton #oxfordxloth

Virtual Childrens Day events from the JACCC
05/04/2021
Children’s Day/Kodomo-no-Hi Festivities Planned at JACCC - Rafu Shimpo

Virtual Childrens Day events from the JACCC

The Japanese American Cultural & Community Center (JACCC) will be celebrating a series of events to commemorate Children’s Day, or Kodomo-no-Hi, also known as Tango no Sekku, in May. JACCC has historically hosted annual community children’s festivals in observance of Kodomo-no-Hi. With the impac...

Thank you for your service!
05/03/2021

Thank you for your service!

From two years ago, the true story behind the character of Mr. Miyagi in The Karate Kid franchise being a veteran of the...
05/03/2021

From two years ago, the true story behind the character of Mr. Miyagi in The Karate Kid franchise being a veteran of the 442nd

He remembered the song.

It reminded him of one family, who sent their son to the military, to defend America, their home. The old man, he remembers, held his son tightly, saying, "You just be a good goddamn soldier. Don't embarrass your momma."

He remembered that the young man never returned to his family. His mother would stare for hours at a small paper flag with a gold star on it. She was remembered as "The Gold Star Mother," the mother who lost her son fighting for America.

The family reminded him of the song, a Japanese folk song he would hear being sung at the internment camp, where the family was held, grieving for the son they lost, defending a country which had imprisoned them.

He was born in Northern California on June 28, 1932. He father was a migrant fruit picker, who followed the harvests. He remembers living on hard-dirt floors and a single bulb for electricity. But, that wasn't the worst of it. He was diagnosed with spinal tuberculosis, and he was taken from his family, hospitalized at a sanatorium for nine years.

He spent most of those years bedridden in a body cast. Doctors told his family he would never walk again.

But, he did. At the age of 11, he would be well enough to be able to walk again and see his family.

Unfortunately, World War II had begun, and Americans of Japanese ancestry living on the West Coast had been taken to internment camps. The young boy would finally be able to see his family again, but not at the home he remembered, but at the Gila Internment Camp in Arizona. An FBI officer picked him up from the hospital and transported him directly to the internment camp.

You may remember him in his role as "Arnold" in "Happy Days" or his most famous role as Mr. Miyagi in "The Karate Kid. "Noriyuki "Pat" Morita could make someone smile just by appearing on screen. But, very few people knew the adversity he encountered while growing up, the song he would always remember.

He later said in an interview, "One day I was an invalid. The next day I was public enemy No. 1 being escorted to an internment camp by an FBI agent wearing a piece."

At first he said, he couldn't understand, he was just a kid who didn't know anything about war or why he and his family was deemed dangerous, but he would eventually understand and would say he never agreed with the term "relocation camp" - it was a concentration camp with barbed wire fences, he would say.

He remembered in the camp having to say the "Pledge of Allegiance" each morning, and, as he looked out the window with the American flag waving, he also saw the guard tower in the background, and would ask himself, "What's this all about? Why am I saying 'liberty and justice for all?"

That's when he said he really felt the hurt of bigotry, and, for many years, it continued to hurt.

That's when he met the family who lost their son, the old man grieving, "The Gold Star Mother" at the internment camp.

After Morita made his name on television, he got the part of Mr. Miyagi in "Karate Kid." There was a scene in the movie in which Daniel discovers Mr. Miyagi drunk. This was the scene that would earn Morita an Academy Award nomination.

In the scene, Mr. Miyagi is singing a song, which when asked, says it is a "Japanese blues song."

Mr. Miyagi explains he was a soldier (a member of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, historically one of the most highly decorated regiments in the history of the United States Armed Forces). He received the Medal of Honor, but lost his pregnant wife and his unborn son due to terrible medical conditions at the Manzanar Japanese internment camp.

Mr. Miyagi says, "Land of free. Home of brave."

Morita is the one who suggested to the director that Mr. Miyagi gets drunk remembering his wife and the son he never had.

During that scene, Mr. Miyagi would sing a song - it was the same song that Pat Morita had heard as a child when he was in the internment camp.

Mr. Miyagi was a fictional character, but what Pat Morita, his family, and many other citizens of this country experienced was real, and he never forgot it.

~ jsr

Proceeds support the East West Players who have performed at our Las Vegas Mini-Reunion at the Cal
05/03/2021

Proceeds support the East West Players who have performed at our Las Vegas Mini-Reunion at the Cal

Watch AAPI themed films and documentaries for free.  You will need to set up an account to unlock and watch
05/03/2021
Asian Pacific Virtual Showcase — Visual Communications

Watch AAPI themed films and documentaries for free. You will need to set up an account to unlock and watch

During Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month, join us for the Asian Pacific Virtual Showcase (AVPS), which runs from May 1 - May 31, 2021 and aims to highlight Asian American & Pacific Islander artists of different communities and neighborhoods in the United States, Canada, and Oc

For all you beer fans out there
05/03/2021

For all you beer fans out there

Spend a night during Memorial Day weekend with us cheers'in and beers'in at our second beer tasting fundraising event of the year! Join us for food, drinks, lucky draw, and networking at Beer Lab University.🍻

This private HJJCC event is open to both members and non-members, so feel free to invite friends! $30 for HJJCC members and $35 for non-members.

Event fee includes heavy pupus, two 8 oz. beers, and 10% off any additional beers at the bar. 🍺 Guests will be seated in groups of 8-10. Temperature checks, contact tracing, and face masks/coverings will be enforced. All proceeds from this event will benefit HJJCC programs.

🚨 Space is limited and will be taken on a first-come, first-served basis. Please RSVP by Friday, May 21 to [email protected].

For more details, visit http://www.hjjcc.com/upcoming-events/2021/5/30/cheers-beers

#hjjcc #hjjccmanagementdevelopment #cheersandbeers #beertasting

Celebrate AAPI pride with the youngest members of the familu
05/02/2021
12 Children's Books to Celebrate Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage

Celebrate AAPI pride with the youngest members of the familu

Here are 12 books for preschool and elementary-age children that offer positive, diverse representations of Asian American Pacific Islander history and culture that can help our families deepen their knowledge of the AAPI community so we can become allies in the fight for peace and justice for every...

Very cool
05/02/2021

Very cool

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have a rich heritage thousands of years old and have both shaped the history of the United States and had their lives dramatically influenced by moments in its history. Every May during Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and throughout the year, the National Park Service and our partners share those histories and the continuing culture thriving in parks and communities today. Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/asian-american-pacific-islander-heritage-month.htm

Inspired by something you've learned or found a bit of family history in a national park? Share your experiences on social media using #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth and #FindYourPark / #EncuentraTuParque.

Image: Dancers at National Park of American Samoa perpetuate Fa’asamoa by sharing the living and vibrant traditions, language, legends, oral history, and values.

05/02/2021

Happy Saturday and Day One of Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

Buy 6 mochi, get 1 free (and eat them all)
05/01/2021

Buy 6 mochi, get 1 free (and eat them all)

Apply now for a paid internship at Minidoka
05/01/2021

Apply now for a paid internship at Minidoka

Before they were Park Rangers, they were Interns! Join the Minidoka team this summer!
Apply for a paid Internship with Minidoka National Historic Site in southern Idaho! Applications are due May 7th!
http://bit.ly/NYCInternApplicationForm
Position Description and Flyer:
https://www.nwyouthcorps.org/pdf/CIP/MHSINTERP_2021.pdf

Kurt Ikeda came to Minidoka National Historic Site as an Interpretation Intern in 2018, where he supported interpretive programs at the site and assisted with the site’s annual pilgrimage.
“I was able to learn from our Park Service team how to preserve and interpret the site, but also from the Friends of Minidoka on how to uplift the message of defending civil liberties to a diverse audience on a local and national level.”

Image: On the left Kurt Ikeda in 2018 wearing a red Minidoka shirt at the camp pilgrimage, on the right Kurt Ikeda in 2021 wearing a ranger uniform.

A new book includes the story of 442nd veteran, Rudy Tokiwa
04/30/2021

A new book includes the story of 442nd veteran, Rudy Tokiwa

Thank you for your service too, kids!
04/30/2021

Thank you for your service too, kids!

During the Month of the Military Child, we celebrate over two million military-connected children in the United States. Today, my office paid tribute to military kids by all wearing purple, the color representing support for every branch of service. Purple Up! #MOMC

Address

520 Kamoku St
Honolulu, HI
96826

General information

The Wine Gang used to meet for lunch every Thursday at the 100th Infantry Battalion Clubhouse located at 520 Kamoku Street in Honolulu (across from 'Iolani School). The 100th Infantry Battalion Veterans is a 501(c)(4) non-profit organization for WWII veterans of the 100th Infantry Battalion and their family members. The Clubhouse is open to members only.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 13:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 13:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 12:00
Thursday 09:00 - 13:00
Friday 09:00 - 13:00

Telephone

(808) 946-0272

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Comments

The Japanese American Veterans Assn (JAVA) is accepting applications for its 2021 Memorial Scholarship Program. Deadline is April 30th. JAVA Scholarships honor the memory and the legacy of World War II Nisei veterans. Several Memorial Scholarships will be awarded to graduating high school seniors who will be entering a 2-year or 4-year college or professional program in the fall. In addition, college undergraduate or graduate students may apply for the Taubkin Legacy Scholarship, the Phil Ishio Founder's Scholarship, or the Daniel K. Inouye Memorial Scholarship. Applicants should be direct or collateral descendants of World War II Nisei veterans who served in the 100th Infantry Battalion, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the Military Intelligence Service, and other groups. Current JAVA members who joined JAVA before April 2019, or their children may also apply. Past or present members of the Army’s 100th Battalion, 442nd Infantry (USAR), are eligible for the Inouye Memorial Scholarship. University ROTC cadets may also apply. Please visit the JAVA website or contact us by email for more information: [email protected] [email protected] We would welcome applications from the Club 100 ohana!
Hawaii 1948
What are our cities turning into?
Thank you to all of our veterans and to those that serve now. 🇺🇸
Here’s a few pages out of my grandparents album that documented some of his travels during his service in the war. Just looked up my grandpa’s (Takeo Ohara) decorations from WWII out of curiosity. He never really talked about his days in service during the war, and was pretty quiet in general. He was assigned to the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, 100th Battalion, Company D and held the rank of Private First Class. He received the Bronze Star Medal, Distinguished Unit Badge, oak leaf cluster, and the Combat Infantry Badge. According to my dad and what he recalls, my grandfather was a messenger between camps and had come under sniper fire at least once, but I can’t confirm it. If anyone recognizes a relative in the photos, I’d be happy to try and scan in the photos at a higher resolution in the future for you.
Good Evening- I am writing with an odd request and I will add a little backstory. I am asking if you can send my father carpenters pencils with your names, cities and state hand written onto the blank side of the pencil. These can be acquired for $0.18 at Home Depot, and free at most lumber yards. Backstory: First, my father is a proud veteran who served in the Marines. He has also been a volunteer firefighter and first responder for the last 12 years in Wishram Washington. I am asking that his brother's and sisters help lift his spirits during a difficult time. He has glioblastoma which is an incurable brain cancer. He has had brain surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. At this time he is taking part in clinical trials to help extend his life. He woodworks as a hobby. He is planning to build a wooden tool cabinet and would like the front doors to be made showing these pencils. A goal of his is to have 108 of them total to complete his project from different people, cities and states. He is finding great joy in receiving these in the mail and anything that brings him joy is very appreciated at this time. If you could share this information with others it will be very helpful. Charles Hargrove 108 Nelson Ave Kelso, WA 98626 Thank You, Amber Lennox
Tara Ross wrote a heartwarming article about the Purple Heart Battalion - our own One Puka Puka. Click on the photo to see the roughly 350 comments on the original post, which has had over 3,000 shares as well as over 5,000 likes, etc. Amazing! https://www.facebook.com/TaraRoss.1787/photos/a.236593749775572/2751496201618635/?type=3&theater
Richard Seiji Miyashiro, a member of Company "B", 100th Infantry Battalion who was treated at my grandfather's hospital after being wounded in Italy. https://www.facebook.com/32ndStationHospital/posts/290742582325019
Wow, this brings chicken skin... 100th/442nd Battalion based in Samoa. https://www.facebook.com/six84media/videos/374695806268228/?t=0
Japanese American Veterans Assn (JAVA) is offering 10 scholarships to high school seniors who will be entering college in Fall 2020. JAVA is also offering 3 scholarships to current/continuing college students who have completed at least one year of college. Please contact [email protected] for the url link. All applications and required documents are due on Sunday, April 19th. We would like to see many applications from students who are descendants of 100th Battalion veterans.
The Japanese America Veterans Assn (JAVA) is offering several scholarships to graduating high school seniors and current college students who are continuing their studies. Applicants should be members of JAVA, children of JAVA members, or descendants of World War II Nisei veterans. One scholarship is also available to past/current members of the 100th Bn/442nd Inf reserve unit. Applicants should first review published rules and forms, which can be found and downloaded at the JAVA website. Deadline for applications: Sunday April 19th, 2020 We encourage all eligible students to apply! (DM me for website URL) or click below...