Hawaii State Art Museum

Hawaii State Art Museum Come see Hawaii through the eyes of artists! The Hawaii State Art Museum (HiSAM) features contemporary art from across the state. Free admission.
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The Hawai‘i State Art Museum (HiSAM) is the “People’s Museum”. HiSAM is a venue for the Art in Public Places Collection of the Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts; most of the collection is out in public buildings including schools, libraries, hospitals, and legislative offices. The collection is primarily contemporary works of art that have a connection to Hawaii (e.g. artist born and raised in Hawaii). For more information about the SFCA, visit their website, www.sfca.hawaii.gov. Admission to museum galleries and activities is always FREE. The museum cafe is Artizen by MW, www.artizenbymw.com, (808) 524-0499. The museum gift shop is run by Showcase Hawaii, (808) 536-2644. Parking is available across S. Hotel street in the Alii Place building (entrance at 1099 Alakea St), cash only, across Richards St. at Iolani Palace (parking meters, quarters only). TheBus has several lines stopping in front of or close to the building. Call TheBus at (808) 848-5555 or visit their website at www.thebus.org for more information about routes and schedules. The Waikiki Trolley Red Line State Capitol Stop is a short walk from HiSAM. If you are taking a cab, there is a pull-in on the right side of Richards St. from N. Beretania St. Wheelchair/stroller/walker access: the Richards St gate (across from the State Capitol building) path goes to a side entrance with a ramp. When entering the main hallway, turn left to go to the lobby and elevators. COMMENT POLICY This is a limited public forum that serves as the official page for the Hawaii State Art Museum to share information about the work of the Hawaii State Art Museum with the people of Hawaii and our friends outside of Hawaii. We welcome your comment on our topics or posts, but please comment with “Aloha” since this page is family friendly. Please take personal responsibility for and be respectful in your comments. If your comment is deleted per the provisions below, you have the option of sending a hardcopy version of your comment to the following address: Public Information Officer Hawaii State Art Museum 250 South Hotel St., Second Floor Honolulu, Hawaii 96813 RE: DELETION OF COMMENTS. A comment that violates the Facebook‘s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities may be removed by Facebook. For information on what Facebook allows and does not allow, read the Facebook Community Standards both of which are available at the links below. We have activated the Profanity Blocklist feature provided by Facebook. This feature will block the most commonly reported words and phrases marked as offensive by the broader community. We will delete a comment, content, or expression (“comment”) that disrupts, disturbs, impedes, is contrary to, is inappropriate for, or interferes with function of and ability of this limited public forum to fulfill its purpose, such as a comment that is: · Off-topic; · Profane or sexually explicit; · Using an offensive term that targets a specific individual(s) or groups, including a term based on race, religion, gender, or sexual orientation; · Invasive of a person's privacy; · A commercial solicitation or advertisement, a chain letter, or a pyramid scheme; · Containing personal information such as a driver license number, a social security number, and other information protected by law; · Disclosing any detail about an ongoing investigation or court or administrative proceeding that could prejudice the process or interfere with the rights or claims of a person or entity; · Part of or is a repetitive post copied and pasted by multiple users; · Spam or could constitute spam; and · Speech for which content-based restrictions are permitted, including incitement, obscenity, defamation, speech integral to criminal conduct, so-called “fighting words,” child pornography, fraud, true threats, and speech presenting some grave and imminent threat the Government has the power to prevent. This page is subject to amendment or modification at any time. Thank you for taking the time to read this page. Facebook‘s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms Facebook Community Standards https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards

Join us for our next #HiSAMfromHome on Thursday at 10:00am on Zoom! This week, Hannah Shun will lead us through a bas-re...
08/11/2020

Join us for our next #HiSAMfromHome on Thursday at 10:00am on Zoom! This week, Hannah Shun will lead us through a bas-relief sculpture workshop!⁠⠀
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Recommended materials:⁠⠀
-Four pieces of 7”x7” medium-to-heavy weight paper (used priority flat rate envelop, used gift box, calendar cover, or card stock paper)⁠⠀
- Black shoe polish or a black sharpie and rubbing alcohol⁠⠀
- Medium grade steel wool, kitchen steel wool, or heavy duty Scotchbrite sponge ⁠⠀
-Blow dryer⁠⠀
-Rag or paper towel ⁠⠀
-Newspaper for covering the table⁠⠀
-Scissors⁠⠀
-Glue stick ⁠⠀
-8”x8” piece of aluminum foil⁠⠀
- Assorted colored sharpies⁠⠀
- Alcohol for sharpies⁠⠀
- 2 Q-tips⁠⠀
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Click the link below to join us on Zoom, or follow along on our page livestream!

https://zoom.us/j/91310511452?pwd=dC8weVZNaXRCbk82Q05La0xCTWo5Zz09

Today's #MuseumPetMonday artwork is "Tropic Birds #1," a woodblock print by Huc Mazelet Luquiens.⁠⁠Luquiens spent his fo...
08/10/2020

Today's #MuseumPetMonday artwork is "Tropic Birds #1," a woodblock print by Huc Mazelet Luquiens.⁠

Luquiens spent his formative years in New Haven, Connecticut, earning a BA and MFA at Yale University. He won a fellowship to study at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and the Academie Julian in Paris. Upon returning to America, he made a name for himself in portraiture, and continued to pursue his interest in printmaking. Luquiens came to Hawaii in 1917 to visit his sister who had married into the kamaaina Judd family, and to paint several commissioned portraits. ⁠

He was immediately enamored with the islands: "When I first saw Hawaii, I knew it was home. I had found the one perfect place in all the world." In 1924, after six years teaching at Punahou School, he became the first art instructor at the University of Hawaii. Luquiens organized the UH Art Department and served as its dead until his retirement in 1946. He also founded the Honolulu Printmakers in 1928, Hawaii's oldest art organization. Despite his career as a leader and education, the artist's substantial body of work became his most enduring legacy. Luquiens' prints are images of Hawaii before post-war economic growth gave rise to a whole new environment. His realistic impressions of landscapes, seascapes and panoramic views are always presented in black, white and intervening grays. They convey the forces of nature that are tangible but not always visible, such as wind and the movements of the sea.⁠

Woodblock printing, as applied to this work, is a relief technique. The background, produced by the uncut inked surface areas of the block, appears a uniform black, while lines and patterns that have been cut away from the surface on the block appear clean white. Woodblock prints present a high-contrast black and white appearance.⁠

This work is a piece in the Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts’ Art in Public Places collection. Our #MuseumPetMonday series highlights artwork in the collection that feature animals.

Join us at 10:00am for a #HiSAMfromHome illustration workshop with Kea Peters of @kakoucollective !⁠⠀⁠⠀Kea was inspired ...
08/06/2020

Join us at 10:00am for a #HiSAMfromHome illustration workshop with Kea Peters of @kakoucollective !⁠⠀
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Kea was inspired by several Kapa Kuiki pieces in the @hawaii_sfca Art in Public Places collection, and wants to demonstrate how to draw the plants that inspired them, or the plants we think of when looking at these pieces:⁠⠀
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1. "Lau Puka Puka" by Martha Marques (cotton quilt, 1995) - Marques picked a monstera from her friend's garden and cut the actual pattern of her quilt from it. Kea will show you how to draw the iconic monstera deliciosa, also known as the swiss cheese plant.⁠⠀
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2. "Plumeria" by Doris Iwalani Nosaka (quilt, 1983) - the artist, a very well-known quilt maker, created a gorgeous quilt displaying the plumeria, a flower commonly associated with lei and hula. We will learn how to draw three different types of plumeria in a very simple way.⁠⠀
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3. "Keahi O Pele" by Martha Marques (quilt, 1994) - the artist was inspired to create this quilt after seeing a lava flow. Kea will demonstrate how to draw the ʻōhiʻa lehua and kupukupu - two resilient plants that are the first to grow in these tough conditions.⁠⠀
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Kākou Collective is the studio of Native Hawaiian surface pattern designer, illustrator and hand lettering enthusiast Kea Peters, who is inspired by her homeland. She teaches workshops inspired by her interests, creates and sells her original artwork on lifestyle and stationary products in her online shop, and licenses original artwork to other businesses.

Join us for an illustration workshop for our next #HiSAMfromHome, tomorrow at 10:00am HST! We’ll be on Zoom with Kea Pet...
08/05/2020

Join us for an illustration workshop for our next #HiSAMfromHome, tomorrow at 10:00am HST! We’ll be on Zoom with Kea Peters of @kakoucollective !⠀

Click the link in our bio to join on Zoom, or follow along on our Facebook Live!

Join us at 6:00pm HST tomorrow night on IG Live for a performance with @goon_lei_goon !⁠⠀⁠⠀Goon Lei Goon is a four-piece...
07/30/2020

Join us at 6:00pm HST tomorrow night on IG Live for a performance with @goon_lei_goon !⁠⠀
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Goon Lei Goon is a four-piece indie/surf rock band based in Honolulu. The band consists of Dylan DeAngelo and Taylor Oishi on vocals/guitar, Andre Gonzalez on bass, and Stephen Radkov on drums.⁣ ⁠⠀
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Having met through skateboarding in their teen years, skate and surf culture have a strong impact on their music and aesthetics. Since they formed in 2017, Goon Lei Goon has performed for Honolulu's SOFAR Sounds showcase, Hawai‘i State Art Museum's First Fridays, The Honolulu Museum of Art's Surf Film Festival, as well as opening for indie rock artist Mac Demarco.⁠⠀
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You can check out the band’s latest single, “Slow Dance,” streaming now on all music platforms.⁠⠀
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#HiSAMfromHome

Today's #PublicArtTuesday is "Mana o Anuenue" (Spirit of the Rainbows or Rainbow Spirit) by Barbara Miyano-Young (copper...
07/29/2020

Today's #PublicArtTuesday is "Mana o Anuenue" (Spirit of the Rainbows or Rainbow Spirit) by Barbara Miyano-Young (copper and neon, 1998).⁠⠀
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The piece, located at the UH Mānoa Stan Sherriff Center, is a freestanding metal, neon, and plexiglass sculpture that tries to depict a kind of magical excitement and spirit in the air.⁠⠀
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When the University of Hawai‘i Rainbow athletes work together as one, the team shines with brilliance. The treasure at the end of the rainbow is team spirit. As spirit is something you cannot capture, like the end of a rainbow, it has to be experienced. ⁠⠀
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"Mana o Anuenue" symbolizes a team effort, yet acknowledges that individuals make up a team. This is depicted by a five-piece sculpture that makes up a visually unified and singular rainbow design. ⁠⠀
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This work is a piece in the Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts’ Art in Public Places collection.

Join us on Thursday for a #HiSAMfromHome conscious creativity workshop with Maia Lonergan. We will start with a short me...
07/28/2020

Join us on Thursday for a #HiSAMfromHome conscious creativity workshop with Maia Lonergan. We will start with a short meditation followed by a painting session!⁠

Recommended materials include: paint, water, brushes, positive attitude and an open mind!⁠

Click the link below to join us on Zoom this Thursday at 10:00am HST!

https://zoom.us/j/91310511452?pwd=dC8weVZNaXRCbk82Q05La0xCTWo5Zz09

In preparation for Hurricane Douglas, the Hawai‘i State Art Museum will be temporarily closed through Monday, July 27. P...
07/26/2020

In preparation for Hurricane Douglas, the Hawai‘i State Art Museum will be temporarily closed through Monday, July 27. Please be safe and we look forward to welcoming you back soon!

07/24/2020

Our final PechaKucha: EARTH presentation is with Kimeona Kane, director of 808 Cleanups.

Kimeona Kane was born and raised, and currently resides in Waimānalo, O‘ahu. He loves being outdoors and sharing his knowledge with his community. He spent his early years on a dairy farm, worked in the restaurant industry for fifteen years, and is currently a practitioner of the Hawaiian rock masonry style of uhau humu pōhaku.

Kimeona’s PechaKucha HNL: EARTH presentation gives an overview of the impact of climate change and asks us to consider: what can we do next?

@civilbeat @808cleanups @kimeona_kane

07/23/2020

HiSAM Workshop with Luke DeKneef

07/23/2020

Adele Balderston is a place-based storyteller from O‘ahu, specializing in new media and psychogeography. She is the founder of 88 Block Walks, a series of unconventional walking tours in Kaka‘ako. Working at the intersection of geography, art, and activism, Adele promotes awareness of socio-spatial inequality and advocates for community agency through personal narratives, mapping, installation, performance, and interaction with urban environments.

Adele’s PK: EARTH presentation is titled “A Blurry Map of Louisiana” and explores the question, “when it comes to climate change, how accurate are Google Maps, really?”

@civilbeat

07/22/2020

Claire Caulfield is a reporter at Honolulu @civilbeat and host of the “Are We Doomed?” podcast, where she answers people’s questions about the environment in Hawai‘i.

Claire’s PechaKucha Honolulu: EARTH presentation focuses specifically on the issue of recycling in Hawai‘i and explores alternatives to the current system.

Today's #PublicArtTuesday is "Dream Leaves" by Ed Carpenter (2005), located at the UH John A. Burns School of Medicine i...
07/22/2020

Today's #PublicArtTuesday is "Dream Leaves" by Ed Carpenter (2005), located at the UH John A. Burns School of Medicine in Kaka‘ako.⁠⠀
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"A garden of the mind" according to Carpenter, "Dream Leaves" embodies the healing mission of aspiring medical students. The taro motif hearkens back to ancient Hawaiian medicinal practices, when healing plants were used to treat myriad ailments. ⁠⠀
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Several symbolic nuances specifically reminisce upon uniquely Hawaiian healing beliefs. The number four, embodied by the four taro leaves, was considered a healthful number, suggesting the four corners of the earth and the four gods at these corners. Verticals were also revered, the up-down connection inviting a parallel connection between heaven and earth. The airy sculpture also involves sun, wind and water elements, believed by Native Hawaiians to aid in healing. Carpenter gathered a plethora of keywords to guide his drafting process: renewal, reclamation, gathering, collector, attractor, upwelling, thrust, revelation, gateway, rebirth, unfolding, celebration, seed, and exuberance.⁠⠀
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Central for Carpenter was the heart-shaped imagery of taro, its veins and tissues at home within the medical context. The artist reiterates: "The heart-shaped leaves of the taro plant symbolize the important connections humans have with taro, one another, and the earth... We are reminded of veins, of hearts. We feel small in this giant world, but it is comforting, reassuring, with friendly forms - we feel protected, amazed, curious." In Native Hawaiian lore, taro was deemed the progenitor of the human race, as well as the physical embodiment of Kane, ancient Hawaii's powerful god of life and fulfillment.⁠⠀
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This piece is a work in the Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts’ Art in Public Places Collection.⁠⠀
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#ArtinPublicPlaces #PublicArt

07/21/2020

Jaimey Hamilton Faris is Associate Professor of Art History and Critical Theory at the University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa. Based in Honolulu for 14 years, she writes and organizes artist residencies, events, and exhibitions. Her most recent project is an environmental art exhibition called Inundation: Art and Climate Change in the Pacific for UHM Art Gallery, Honolulu, now travelling to Donkey Mill Art Center in Kona, Hawaii. The exhibition is related to her current writing on how art addresses the emotional, community and cultural aspects of climate change. She is most interested in how artists translate water's life force into the most important lessons for our times.

Jaimey’s PK: EARTH presentation is titled “The Ocean is Woven.” This is an experimental poetic presentation of the ocean as a topological ‘surface’ fabric (even as its deepest depths), that moves in relation to the earth’s mantle, atmospheric currents, and all of the earth's bodies of water. Its interfacing movements are essential to our current climate. Is the ocean's weaving unraveling and what needs to be done to reweave it?

Today's #MuseumPetMonday is "Once Upon a Cowboy" by Margo Ray (multi plate etching, 2011).⁠⁠"Once Upon a Cowboy" belongs...
07/20/2020

Today's #MuseumPetMonday is "Once Upon a Cowboy" by Margo Ray (multi plate etching, 2011).⁠

"Once Upon a Cowboy" belongs to a larger body of work inspired by Hawaiian ranching culture. Margo Ray creates surreal compositions using landscape allegories. She integrates drawn and photographed images of animals, plants, explosions, comets and airplanes. In her prints, she explores notions of displacement, vulnerability and authenticity, as well as her relationship to natural and supernatural worlds. Her themes often focus on the complicated triangular relationships between mankind, land and animals, and the notions of freedom, domestication and prey.⁠

This work is a piece in the Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts’ Art in Public Places collection. Our #MuseumPetMonday series explores works of art in the collection that feature animals!

07/20/2020

We kick off our second week of PechaKucha Honolulu videos with a talk on African wildlife photography with Dr. Ian Evans!

Ian M. Evans, PhD is a retired professor of clinical psychology who grew up in South Africa, trained in England, and came to the University of Hawaii in 1970. He has also taught in universities in upstate New York and in New Zealand, and he has published four novels.

Ian’s PechaKucha: EARTH presentation focuses on his experience with wildlife photography and offers some tips and tricks of the trade he picked up on his own adventures.

07/17/2020

Nathan Eagle is an editor at Honolulu Civil Beat. Prior to this, he covered everything from state government and commercial fishing to ocean-related issues and politics as a Civil Beat reporter.

Nathan’s PechaKucha: EARTH presentation is about a feature he did for @civilbeat with the Maui Forest Bird Recovery Project, focused on their efforts to save the native Hawaiian bird, the kiwikiu.

07/16/2020
PechaKucha Honolulu: EARTH with Gaye Chan

Gaye Chan, co-founder of Eating in Public (EIP), implements interventions in public and private spaces to make trouble with - and fun of - capitalism and the state. Its activities are primarily spontaneous and/or unauthorized sharing of goods. EIP has initiated projects at over 1,000 non-art sites & occasionally participates in gallery and museum programming.

Gaye’s PK HNL: EARTH presentation focuses on EIP's newest initiative: WEEDS UP FRONT - front yard gardens focusing on edible weeds found in the neighborhood. Knowledge about edible weeds is timely during the pandemic as capitalism pits us against each other and resources always go to the highest bidder.

Follow along on social media:
IG: @foraged_in_entirety and @uhmanoa_freestore
FB: https://www.facebook.com/gaye.chan

Join us on Zoom tomorrow for our next #HiSAMfromHome - a painting workshop with @maidensofthepacific Sara Knighton!⁠⠀⁠⠀I...
07/16/2020

Join us on Zoom tomorrow for our next #HiSAMfromHome - a painting workshop with @maidensofthepacific Sara Knighton!⁠⠀
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Inspired by Marsha Feigin’s intaglio print “Shades” (1970) from the Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts’ Art in Public Places Collection, Hawai'i resident Sara Knighton wants to teach you a way to create your own sense of depth and perspective with magazine clippings. The original print includes a strong silhouette in the foreground that is printed over another figure that creates a sense of depth.⁠⠀
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You will need black and white paint or an eraser and black marker. Pick out several pages from the magazine. People and animals are fun, but cars can work too.⁠⠀
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List of recommended supplies: magazine clippings, black and white paint, scissors, tape or glue stick, cardboard, paper or art board, paint brush or sharpie, eraser if you do not have paint and finally - open to creativity!⁠⠀
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Click the link below to join the class at 10:00am HST tomorrow!

https://zoom.us/j/91310511452?pwd=dC8weVZNaXRCbk82Q05La0xCTWo5Zz09

07/15/2020

We are kicking off our PechaKucha: EARTH series with Danya Weber and her presentation on Hawaii’s flora and fauna.

Danya is a conservationist and scientist. Her artwork aims to spread awareness of Hawaii’s endangered and threatened species. She hopes to engage the community in protecting native Hawaiian flora and fauna.

You can follow Danya’s work on Instagram: @laulimahawaii

Art Ventures is coming next week!⁠⠀⁠⠀⁠⠀⁠⠀If you've been enjoying our interactive Zoom classes on Tuesdays, this is the v...
07/14/2020

Art Ventures is coming next week!⁠⠀⁠⠀
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If you've been enjoying our interactive Zoom classes on Tuesdays, this is the virtual camp for you! And best of all, it's FREE!⁠⠀⁠⠀
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Session 1: In Song! Songwriting Workshop with Jonah "Big Mox" Moananu - 10:00am-11:00am HST⁠⠀
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Session 2: Art off the Walls Performance Workshop with James McCarthy⁠ - 11:15am-12:15pm HST.⁠⠀
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Sign up for one or both workshops by emailing our Arts Education Specialist, Danica Rosengren at [email protected]. For students in grades 2 - 5, each session is limited to 22 participants, and students must attend all five days of the workshop.⁠ Visit the link below for additional information.⠀⁠⠀
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We hope you'll join us for Art Ventures next week!

https://hisam.hawaii.gov/event/hisam-from-home-art-ventures/?instance_id=12144

Address

250 South Hotel St. Second Floor
Honolulu, HI
96813

Several TheBus routes stop in front of the building on South Hotel St., or around the corner on Alakea St. Waikiki Trolley: Red Line State Capitol stop. Biki racks: 120 and 121. Bike racks: lawn between state capitol and Iolani Palace.

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(808) 586-0900

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The Hawai‘i State Art Museum (HiSAM) is the “People’s Museum”. HiSAM is a venue for the Art in Public Places Collection of the Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts; most of the collection is out in public buildings including schools, libraries, hospitals, and legislative offices. The collection is primarily contemporary works of art that have a connection to Hawaii (e.g. artist born and raised in Hawaii). For more information about the SFCA, visit their website, www.sfca.hawaii.gov. Admission to museum galleries and activities is always FREE. The museum cafe is Artizen by MW, www.artizenbymw.com, (808) 524-0499. The museum shop is run by HiSAM Museum Gallery Shop x MORI, www.shophisam.com, (808) 566-6615. Parking is available across S. Hotel street in the Alii Place building (entrance at 1099 Alakea St), cash only, across Richards St. at Iolani Palace (parking meters, quarters only). TheBus has several lines stopping in front of or close to the building. Call TheBus at (808) 848-5555 or visit their website at www.thebus.org for more information about routes and schedules. The Waikiki Trolley Red Line State Capitol Stop is a short walk from HiSAM. A Biki bike rental rack is in front of the building on South Hotel St. If you are taking a cab, there is a pull-in on the right side of Richards St. from N. Beretania St. Wheelchair/stroller/walker access: the Richards St gate (across from the State Capitol building) path goes to a side entrance with a ramp. When entering the main hallway, turn left to go to the lobby and elevators. COMMENT POLICY This is a limited public forum that serves as the official page for the Hawaii State Art Museum to share information about the work of the Hawaii State Art Museum with the people of Hawaii and our friends outside of Hawaii. We welcome your comment on our topics or posts, but please comment with “Aloha” since this page is family friendly. Please take personal responsibility for and be respectful in your comments. If your comment is deleted per the provisions below, you have the option of sending a hardcopy version of your comment to the following address: Public Information Officer Hawaii State Art Museum 250 South Hotel St., Second Floor Honolulu, Hawaii 96813 RE: DELETION OF COMMENTS. A comment that violates the Facebook‘s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities may be removed by Facebook. For information on what Facebook allows and does not allow, read the Facebook Community Standards both of which are available at the links below. We have activated the Profanity Blocklist feature provided by Facebook. This feature will block the most commonly reported words and phrases marked as offensive by the broader community. We will delete a comment, content, or expression (“comment”) that disrupts, disturbs, impedes, is contrary to, is inappropriate for, or interferes with function of and ability of this limited public forum to fulfill its purpose, such as a comment that is: · Off-topic; · Profane or sexually explicit; · Using an offensive term that targets a specific individual(s) or groups, including a term based on race, religion, gender, or sexual orientation; · Invasive of a person's privacy; · A commercial solicitation or advertisement, a chain letter, or a pyramid scheme; · Containing personal information such as a driver license number, a social security number, and other information protected by law; · Disclosing any detail about an ongoing investigation or court or administrative proceeding that could prejudice the process or interfere with the rights or claims of a person or entity; · Part of or is a repetitive post copied and pasted by multiple users; · Spam or could constitute spam; and · Speech for which content-based restrictions are permitted, including incitement, obscenity, defamation, speech integral to criminal conduct, so-called “fighting words,” child pornography, fraud, true threats, and speech presenting some grave and imminent threat the Government has the power to prevent. This page is subject to amendment or modification at any time. Thank you for taking the time to read this page. Facebook‘s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms Facebook Community Standards https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards

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