University of Hawaiʻi Museum Studies Program

University of Hawaiʻi Museum Studies Program The Museum Studies Graduate Certificate Program at the University of Hawai‘i offers students an opportunity to learn about museums, acquire professional experience, and develop research skills while earning a certificate.
(1)

About Museum Studies Museums Studies includes both the scholarly study of museums and the training of the people who work in them (e.g., collection managers, curators, educators, exhibition designers, facility managers, registrars, to name only a few). Hence, Museum Studies programs provide students with conceptual tools to examine and evaluate the historic and contemporary roles of museums and their contributions to societies, and the practical information necessary to operate museums according to professional guidelines (e.g., in areas such as collections care, exhibition development, and educational and outreach programs). Since the 1980s, museum scholarship has drawn heavily from the field of cultural studies and its interdisciplinary approaches to understand how visitors learn about themselves and the world around them within the “informal” setting of museums, as opposed to the “official” setting of schools. Through their studies, Museum Studies students are introduced to theoretical concepts and research methodologies from art history, anthropology, history, linguistics, literary studies, and continental philosophy, and taught to analyze the links between the daily practices of museums and the production of cultural knowledge by museums. In recent years, museums have undergone significant changes. Along with shifts in collection care protocols, creation of interactive exhibitions, and development of substantial outreach programming, museums are rethinking their relationship and obligations to the communities represented in their collections. According to Eilean Hooper-Greenhill, museums are moving from being “sites of authority” for social elites to becoming “sites of mutuality” where everyone is putatively welcomed. Many museums are actively soliciting the views of social groups previously ignored or considered unimportant. In the process, some have actively or inadvertently challenged widely held social practices and beliefs. In these instances, they have been at the frontlines of “culture wars,” becoming embattled sites over the role of public institutions, government funding, and diverse viewpoints. Museum Studies courses examine these ideological shifts and some of the theoretical and pragmatic issues that underlie them and how these shifts index larger global transformations in cultural institutions. Museum Studies in Hawai‘i The Museum Studies Graduate Certificate Program at the University of Hawai‘i offers students an opportunity to learn about museums, acquire professional experience, and develop research skills while earning a certificate. Currently housed in the Department of American Studies, it is the only official program in the state to offer formalized training for people interested in making a career in museums. The program is the result of a working partnership between the university, local museums, and the Hawai‘i Museums Association. Through classes, field trips, guest speakers, workshops, and internships, the program offers a broad spectrum of practical and scholarly experiences for enrolled students. In addition to learning about the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals, students become familiar with the multiple challenges facing local, national, and international museums. In Hawai‘i, many museums, historic homes, and cultural centers work closely with the multi-ethnic communities in the islands to document, display, and preserve immigrant histories, historic objects, and cultural practices. In addition, many cultural institutions consult with Native Hawaiian scholars, practitioners, and community leaders to develop exhibits that accurately and respectfully present Native Hawaiian perspectives. A few museums are involved in the repatriation process and the return of Native Hawaiian sacred and funerary objects guided by (and in certain instances going beyond) policies articulated in the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (1990). Museum Studies students in Hawai‘i are encouraged to situate and understand the concerns and criticisms voiced by Native Hawaiians and other indigenous peoples about museum practices within the larger contexts of colonial histories and indigenous struggles for political independence specific to a geographic space. In Hawai‘i, there are over 90 museums and related places. Among the larger institutions are the Bishop Museum, with the world’s largest collections of Polynesian and scientific objects, and the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument at Pearl Harbor. The latter, managed by the National Park Service, includes the U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, one of the most popular tourist destinations in the islands, attracting over 1,500,000 annual visitors. The recently renovated Hawaiian Hall at Bishop Museum (2009), and the new exhibits at Pearl Harbor (2010), offer examples of innovatively designed displays and informative interpretive texts. Bishop Museum now offers three floors of Native Hawaiian historic and modern objects presented from the perspective of Native Hawaiians. The Pearl Harbor exhibits are notable for depicting the “states of mind” of both the United States and Japan as a way of providing insights on the “road to war” and events that led to December 7th, 1941, when Japanese aircrafts bombed military installations on the Hawaiian island of O‘ahu. The Honolulu Museum of Art (formerly the Honolulu Academy of Arts) is most widely-known for its large collections of Chinese and Japanese art. In late 2011, the museum designated its Spalding House site (formerly The Contemporary Museum) as an experimental place where the curation of exhibitions is guided by the museum’s education department. This unique opportunity for the education staff supports and updates many of the mandates set forth by the American Association of Museums in its 1992 report, “Excellence and Equity: Education and the Public Dimension of Museums.” Students who intern at Spalding House will be able to participate in and learn from the innovative exhibitions and programs planned for this space. The King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center in downtown Honolulu is one of the smaller museums in Hawai‘i. Located in a historic building, school groups learn about citizenship and civic education by taking tours of the exhibition gallery, viewing films, and/or participating in mock-court trials presided over by local judges. One of center’s specialties is teacher training. In 2009 and 2011, public and private school teachers attended summer institutes on “The Constitution and Native Hawaiian Self-determination” and the “Challenges of American Citizenship for Native Peoples.” Sponsored by national and local organizations, teachers learned to develop interactive curricula around historic events and legal issues after attending a series of lectures by prominent Native and non-Native legal scholars, and presentations by national educators. Responding to questions about the effectiveness of the institutes, some teachers acknowledged that it “changed my life,” “changed the way I teach,” and “made me a more effective teacher.” Lastly, the Waikīkī Aquarium and the Lyon Arboretum and Botanical Garden are vital institutions in Hawai‘i for their significance to visitors and the scientific community. Both are affiliated with the University of Hawai‘i and highly regarded for their displays of living collections unique to the Pacific, for conducting scientific research on species and problems in the region, and for promoting environmental awareness and sustainability practices through their educational and outreach programs.

Operating as usual

Mahalo a nui loa to Theo Gonzales for joining us last night and for sharing his many stories of becoming a tenured profe...
02/27/2019

Mahalo a nui loa to Theo Gonzales for joining us last night and for sharing his many stories of becoming a tenured professor and later a curator for the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. It was a full house, and the audience was captivated the entire time!

#museumstudies #uhm #manoa #museumshawaii #theogonzales

Lyon Arboretum - University of Hawai'i at Mānoa
05/03/2018
Lyon Arboretum - University of Hawai'i at Mānoa

Lyon Arboretum - University of Hawai'i at Mānoa

NEW TRAIL BUILDING INTERNSHIP OPEN (PAID) - Lyon is now recruiting for a Trail Building summer intern! Assess, restore and create critical trails throughout the Arboretum's collections while implementing public safety and accessibility, water flow and erosion control, and engineering in a tropical rainforest setting. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS MAY 15th! See link below for details. ALSO STILL OPEN: Tropical Arboriculture internship.

Share the news! Our affiliate program the University of Hawai'i Historic Preservation Graduate Certificate Program if of...
04/20/2018

Share the news! Our affiliate program the University of Hawai'i Historic Preservation Graduate Certificate Program if offering a graduate field school on the battle of Nuʻuanu.

#Hawaii #Museums #historicpreservation #fieldwork

Are you interested in taking classes from the only museum studies program in the State of Hawaiʻi? Check out our class r...
04/16/2018

Are you interested in taking classes from the only museum studies program in the State of Hawaiʻi? Check out our class roster for the Fall 2018 semester!

#museums #hawaii #UHManoa #museumstudies

Last week, our Museum Interpretations class had the opportunity to tour Lyon Arboretum. Students learned about the histo...
04/09/2018

Last week, our Museum Interpretations class had the opportunity to tour Lyon Arboretum. Students learned about the history of the arboretum, and were able to learn more about the diverse array of plants that grow there.

#museumstudies #UHM #Hawaii #museums #LyonArboretum

Lyon Arboretum - University of Hawai'i at Mānoa
04/09/2018

Lyon Arboretum - University of Hawai'i at Mānoa

Save the date - our Spring Plant Sale will be held on Saturday May 12th! Visit https://bit.ly/2JmvL2k for details.

Pictures from our visit to Kawaii Kon at the Hawaii Convention Center with our Material Culture (AMST 625) class this pa...
03/06/2018

Pictures from our visit to Kawaii Kon at the Hawaii Convention Center with our Material Culture (AMST 625) class this past weekend.

#museumstudies #UHM #Hawaii #Kawaiikon

COMBINED RECEPTION AND CONCURRENT OPENINGS FOR 3 ART EXHIBITIONS on Sunday, March 4, UH Mānoa: 2018 MFA Thesis Exhibitio...
03/01/2018
You're invited! 3 exhibitions opening on March 4 at UH Manoa

COMBINED RECEPTION AND CONCURRENT OPENINGS FOR 3 ART EXHIBITIONS on Sunday, March 4, UH Mānoa:

2018 MFA Thesis Exhibitions
March 4 – April 6, 2018
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM)
Robert Flowers, Terra Keck, Nisha Pinjani, Atis Puampai, Khari Saffo, and Chiho Ushio, MFA candidates from the Dept. of Art + Art History, UHM, present their thesis exhibitions.

Material Slip
March 4 – April 6, 2018
Commons Gallery, UHM
Artists Margery Amdur, Diana Baumbach, Josephine Cachemaille, Michelle Forsyth, Wendy Kawabata, and Io Palmer examine the the role of materials and the handmade in the 21st century.

The Extended Hawaiian Body
March 4 – May 4, 2018
John Young Museum of Art, UHM
Hawai'i artists Maile Andrade, Kaili Chun, Kaui Chun, April Drexel, Noelle Kahanu, Kapulani Landgraf, Marques Marzan, Maika'i Tubbs consider aspects of the Hawaiian body extended.

A friendly reminder of the lecture tonight by Lonnie Bunch! We hope to see you all there. #UHM #Hawaii #Museums #Museums...
02/27/2018
University of Hawaiʻi Museum Studies Program

A friendly reminder of the lecture tonight by Lonnie Bunch! We hope to see you all there.

#UHM #Hawaii #Museums #Museumstudies

Please spread the word about this upcoming event on the UHM campus!

Educating a Nation: The Challenge of Building a National Museum
A Public Talk by Lonnie G. Bunch III

Art Auditorium, UH Mānoa
Tuesday, February 27, 2018
6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

LONNIE G. BUNCH III is the Founding Director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) where he has identified the museum’s mission and develops exhibitions, public programs, and fundraising. Under his leadership, the NMAAHC opened seven exhibitions in its gallery located in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. Bunch is a prolific and widely published author, writing on topics ranging from the black military experience, the American presidency, and all-black towns in the American West to diversity in museum management and the impact of funding and politics on American museums. His talk will be based on his experience of building and developing the museum.

Please RSVP here (copy and past the url below) so that we may plan accordingly.

Co-sponsors:

Better Tomorrow Speaker Series
Scholars Strategy Network
Shangri La, Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art
UH Manoa Vice ChanUH Mānoa Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
University of Hawaii - West Oahu Public Policy Center,
College of Social Sciences, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
University of Hawaiʻi Museum Studies Program
College of Arts & Humanities, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Halekulani

If you are unable to join us, you may view the livestream remotely at this link: https://zoom.us/j/672273745

https://coe.hawaii.edu/about/announcements/2018/01/2018-carl-and-alice-daeufer-education-lecture-series

#hawaii #museums #UHManoa #Museumstudies

Please spread the word about this upcoming event on the UHM campus! Educating a Nation:  The Challenge of Building a Nat...
02/23/2018
2018 Carl and Alice Daeufer Education Lecture Series | College of Education, The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Please spread the word about this upcoming event on the UHM campus!

Educating a Nation: The Challenge of Building a National Museum
A Public Talk by Lonnie G. Bunch III

Art Auditorium, UH Mānoa
Tuesday, February 27, 2018
6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

LONNIE G. BUNCH III is the Founding Director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) where he has identified the museum’s mission and develops exhibitions, public programs, and fundraising. Under his leadership, the NMAAHC opened seven exhibitions in its gallery located in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. Bunch is a prolific and widely published author, writing on topics ranging from the black military experience, the American presidency, and all-black towns in the American West to diversity in museum management and the impact of funding and politics on American museums. His talk will be based on his experience of building and developing the museum.

Please RSVP here (copy and past the url below) so that we may plan accordingly.

Co-sponsors:

Better Tomorrow Speaker Series
Scholars Strategy Network
Shangri La, Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art
UH Manoa Vice ChanUH Mānoa Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
University of Hawaii - West Oahu Public Policy Center,
College of Social Sciences, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
University of Hawaiʻi Museum Studies Program
College of Arts & Humanities, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Halekulani

If you are unable to join us, you may view the livestream remotely at this link: https://zoom.us/j/672273745

https://coe.hawaii.edu/about/announcements/2018/01/2018-carl-and-alice-daeufer-education-lecture-series

#hawaii #museums #UHManoa #Museumstudies

Important updates for faculty, staff, and students of the UH COE

Last week Thursday, we attended Walter Echo-Hawk’s keynote lecture titled “The Need for an Indigenous Land and Sea Ethic...
02/12/2018

Last week Thursday, we attended Walter Echo-Hawk’s keynote lecture titled “The Need for an Indigenous Land and Sea Ethic: Restoring Harmony with the Natural World.” Walter is the Spring 2018 Dan & Maggie Inouye Distinguished Chair in Democratic Ideals, and the event was sponsored by the William S. Richardson School of Law and the Department of #AmericanStudies. #uhmanoa #indigenous #hawaii

Yesterday, our Museum Interpretations class visited the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai'i to learn about the stunning ...
02/09/2018

Yesterday, our Museum Interpretations class visited the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai'i to learn about the stunning design and interpretation within "Okage Sama De: I am what I am because of you." Immersive, engaging, and thought-provoking, the exhibit is a hidden gem in urban Honolulu that exemplifies stellar exhibitionary practices. Stop by when you have the chance!

#UHM #Museumstudies #JCCH #AMST457 #MuseumInterpretations

For those of you who might be interested in this keynote lecture occurring tonight. #UHM #Hawaii #Manoa #WalterEchoHawk
02/08/2018

For those of you who might be interested in this keynote lecture occurring tonight.

#UHM #Hawaii #Manoa #WalterEchoHawk

Aloha kākou, Please consider joining us for this event and forwarding this announcement to others who might be intereste...
02/07/2018

Aloha kākou,

Please consider joining us for this event and forwarding this announcement to others who might be interested:

Kulāiwi: Restoring the Ancestral Foundation
February 13 (Pōʻalua, Tuesday), 6:30 - 8:00pm
Ka Waiwai Collective
1110 University Ave.

Join us for a conversation on national and international repatriation with legal experts and advocates Walter Echo-Hawk, Edward Halealoha Ayau, and Office of Hawaiian Affairs Ka Pouhana, Dr. Kamanaʻopono Crabbe.

We will also be holding the space after, from 8-9 pm, for additional conversation, accompanied by music and food & awa (for purchase).

About Ka Waiwai Collective
Located at the corner of University Ave. and Coyne St. in the Varsity Building, Ka Waiwai Collective is a contemporary Hawaiian space for community, culture, and commerce. The mission of the collective is to cultivate a community that takes the necessary creative risks to put collective values into daily practice, affirm shared responsibilities, and learns together to create a more waiwai future.

Parking
Parking is free in the adjacent makai lot - entrance on Coyne street across from Burger King.

This event is sponsored by the Dan and Maggie Inouye Chair of Democratic Ideals

#UHM #MuseumStudies #WalterEchoHawk #InouyeChair #Hawaii

Check out these photographs from our most recent event, "A Conversation with Walter Echo-Hawk," which was held on Februa...
02/06/2018

Check out these photographs from our most recent event, "A Conversation with Walter Echo-Hawk," which was held on February 1, 2018. It was a pleasure to host Walter and to hear more about his life experiences as a Native American attorney and activist.

Echo-Hawk is currently the Spring 2018 Dan & Maggie Inouye Distinguished Chair in Democratic Ideals, which means that he will be at UHM for the next month co-teaching a class on Indigenous comparative law and speaking at various public events. We'll try to share some of those events with you all over the next few days.

#museumstudies #UHM #WalterEchoHawk

Last week, we were busy hosting Dr. Lois Horton and Dr. Michelle Zacks during our three day long series of lectures and ...
11/21/2017

Last week, we were busy hosting Dr. Lois Horton and Dr. Michelle Zacks during our three day long series of lectures and workshops titled "Slavery & Public History, In Honor of James Oliver Horton: Addressing the "Tough Stuff of American History." All of the events were a success and everyone who attended left inspired.

Mahalo again to all of our partners for collaborating to make this happen:

Hawai'i Council for the Humanities, University of Hawaiʻi Museum Studies Program, Department of American Studies at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center, East-West Center Arts Program, University of Hawai'i Maui College, Chaminade University, Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, and the National Endowment for the Humanities Legacy of Race Initiative

Hawai'i Council for the Humanities
11/18/2017

Hawai'i Council for the Humanities

A public lecture tonight by historian Lois E. Horton titled, IF IT'S SO HARD, WHY TALK ABOUT IT? SLAVERY IN AMERICAN HISTORY & MEMORY @judiciaryhistorycenter #uhmuseumstudies
#legacyofrace #race #ethnicity #ohthehumanities #hch #hawaiicouncilforthehumanities #buildingcommunity #hawaii #civicengagement #nehgov #neh #humanities #georgemasonu

Today is the day of our two roundtable discussions on slavery and public history! Will you be there to join us? Friday, ...
11/18/2017
In Honor of James Oliver Horton: Addressing the Tough Stuff of American History and Memory

Today is the day of our two roundtable discussions on slavery and public history! Will you be there to join us?

Friday, November 17, 2017, 5:00 to 7:30 PM - Two Roundtable Discussions
At the East-West Center Gallery Annex, Burns Hall, 1st floor, adjacent to UH-Mānoa

Two roundtable discussions will focus on teaching the “tough stuff” of American history in museums, high schools and the university.

Free and open to the public.

First Roundtable: “Teaching and Learning the ‘Tough Stuff’ of American History In and Out of the Academy”
Lois Horton, Professor of History Emerita, George Mason University
Allison Paynter, Professor, English, Chaminade University
Elizabeth Colwill, Associate Professor, American Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Noelle Kahanu, Assistant Specialist Public Humanities/Native Hawaiian Programs, Amerian Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Robert Perkinson, Associate Professor, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Moderator: Karen Kosasa, Associate Professor, American Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Second Roundtable: “Bringing the ‘Tough Stuff’ of American History to Schools and Communities”
Frank Middleton, Education specialist, WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument (USS Arizona Memorial)
Russell Motter, History Teacher, Iolani School
Lorey Ishihara, Social Studies Teacher, Kahuku High School
Michelle Zacks, Associate Director, Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Abolition, and Resistance, Yale University
Moderator: Stacy Hoshino, Director of Grants & Special Projects, Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities
For more information: hihumanities.org/Horton/

Contact: Stacy Hoshino, [email protected], 808-469-4551

Program Partners:
Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities; Museum Studies Graduate Certificate Program and Department of American Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa; King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center, East-West Center Arts Program; Chaminade University; The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition at Yale University; and the National Endowment for the Humanities Legacy of Race Initiative.

http://hihumanities.org/Horton/

#hawaii #museumstudies #slavery #publichistory #UHM #Mānoa

Join us for three programs, November 16, 17, & 18, that honors the memory and important work of James Oliver Horton who had close ties to Hawai‘i. Horton passed away on February 20, 2017, after a long illness. He was a public historian, scholar, and visiting professor in the Department of American S...

Hawai'i Council for the Humanities
11/14/2017

Hawai'i Council for the Humanities

Please join us for a provocative public lecture "If It’s so Hard, Why Talk About It? Slavery in American History and Memory" by Lois E. Horton, professor of history emerita, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
on Nov. 16, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m., at King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center, Honolulu

She will discuss how understanding America's "original sin" of slavery is important in understanding our present-day problems as well as our present-day and future understanding of justice in America.

Aloha all, There will be three upcoming events (1 public lecture and 2 roundtables) for those of you who are interested ...
11/06/2017
In Honor of James Oliver Horton: Addressing the Tough Stuff of American History and Memory

Aloha all,

There will be three upcoming events (1 public lecture and 2 roundtables) for those of you who are interested in learning more about slavery and public history. These events are in commemoration of Jim Horton, who had close ties to Hawai‘i. He and his wife, Lois E. Horton, received their MA degrees at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, and in 2009, received Distinguished Alumni Awards from UH. From 2006-2009 they were visiting professors in the Department of American Studies at UHM.

For more information on our events, follow the link to the official website!

http://hihumanities.org/Horton/

Program partners: Hawai'i Council for the Humanities, University of Hawaiʻi Museum Studies Program, Department of American Studies at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center, East-West Center Arts Program, Chaminade University, Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, National Endowment for the Humanities

Join us for three programs, November 16, 17, & 18, that honors the memory and important work of James Oliver Horton who had close ties to Hawai‘i. Horton passed away on February 20, 2017, after a long illness. He was a public historian, scholar, and visiting professor in the Department of American S...

Please join us for the following memorial program:In Honor of James Oliver Horton: Addressing the “Tough Stuff” of Ameri...
10/20/2017
In Honor of James Oliver Horton: Addressing the Tough Stuff of American History and Memory

Please join us for the following memorial program:

In Honor of James Oliver Horton: Addressing the “Tough Stuff” of American History and Memory
This two-day program honors James Oliver Horton, George Washington University professor emeritus, scholar, and public historian who had close ties to Hawai‘i as a visiting professor at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and for his work with community organizations. He was Benjamin Banneker Professor of American Studies and History at GWU in Washington, D.C., and historian emeritus of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History. He edited, authored or co-authored ten books including The Landmarks of African American History (2005). With his wife and scholarly collaborator, Lois E. Horton, he edited Slavery and Public History: The Tough Stuff of American Memory (2006). The Hortons were staunch advocates of public history, working closely with museums and teachers to offer new insights on slavery and African American history.

Thursday, November 16, 2017, 5:30 PM
At the King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center, located across ‘Iolani Palace
Lois E. Horton, Emeritus Historian, George Mason University, will give a public lecture titled, If It’s so Hard, Why Talk About It? Slavery in American History and Memory. She will link the historic arguments used to justify slavery to current conflicts over Confederate memorials, the Black Lives Matter movement, mass incarceration, and economic inequality
Free and open to the public.

Friday, November 17, 2017, 5:00 to 7:30 PM
At the East-West Center Gallery Annex, Burns Hall, adjacent to UH-Mānoa
Two roundtable discussions will focus on teaching the “tough stuff” of American history in museums, high schools and the university.
Free and open to the public.

For more information: http://hihumanities.org/Horton/
Contact: Stacy Hoshino, [email protected], 808-469-4551
Partners:
Hawai'i Council for the Humanities, University of Hawaiʻi Museum Studies Program, Department of American Studies at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center, East-West Center Arts Program, Chaminade University of Honolulu, National Endowment for the Humanities

Join us for three programs, November 16, 17, & 18, that honors the memory and important work of James Oliver Horton who had close ties to Hawai‘i. Horton passed away on February 20, 2017, after a long illness. He was a public historian, scholar, and visiting professor in the Department of American S...

Address

1890 East-West Road, Moore 324
Honolulu, HI
96822

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when University of Hawaiʻi Museum Studies Program posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to University of Hawaiʻi Museum Studies Program:

Nearby museums


Other Honolulu museums

Show All