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Harpers Ferry National Historical Park

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park Welcome to the official page for Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. For more information visit http://www.nps.gov/hafe Department of the Interior.

This page is maintained by National Park Service employees at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Park Mailing Address:
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
P.O. Box 65
Harpers Ferry, WV 25425

Commenting policy
While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow ou

This page is maintained by National Park Service employees at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Park Mailing Address:
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
P.O. Box 65
Harpers Ferry, WV 25425

Commenting policy
While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow ou

Operating as usual

Photos from Fossil Butte National Monument's post
02/03/2023

Photos from Fossil Butte National Monument's post

Maggie Lena Walker devoted her life to civil rights advancement, economic empowerment, and educational opportunities for...
02/03/2023

Maggie Lena Walker devoted her life to civil rights advancement, economic empowerment, and educational opportunities for Jim Crow-era African Americans and women. As a bank president, newspaper editor, and fraternal leader, Walker served as an inspiration for pride and progress. Today, Walker’s home in Richmond, Virginia is preserved as Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site, a tribute to her enduring legacy of vision, courage, and determination.

Black history and heritage—including achievements, contributions, and historical journeys—are remembered and commemorated in national parks across the country. Find resources to learn, teach, experience, and reflect during and beyond at: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/black-history-month.htm

Image: Closeup view of a bronze statue of Maggie L. Walker in the Maggie L. Walker Memorial Plaza. Walker chartered the St. Luke Penny Savings Bank and served as the bank's first president, which earned her the recognition of being the first African American woman to charter a bank in the United States.

It's ! Wetlands provide a source of clean water, control erosion, reduce the effects of flooding, and provide a habitat ...
02/02/2023

It's !

Wetlands provide a source of clean water, control erosion, reduce the effects of flooding, and provide a habitat for many plant and animal species. In late 2022, the National Park Service completed the restoration of 20 acres of wetlands at the former Watergate Recreation Site within Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. In the 1900s, this area was manipulated to create shallow ponds, mowed lawns, dams, and levees along Van Campens Brook which resulted in the loss of the historic wetlands. The restored wetland and stream are already benefiting the surrounding area by providing excellent bird habitat, diverse native plant species, an improved cold-water fishery in Van Campens Brook, and reduced flooding downstream during storm events.

Did you know that constructed wetlands can also be used to treat polluted water from abandoned mines? The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) has used constructed wetlands at several sites, including at Flight 93 National Memorial. The Flight 93 Memorial – located on a former coal mine near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and the site of the September 11, 2001, crash – honors the flight’s passengers and crew with spaces for reflection, habitat restoration, and educational initiatives. In 2012, OSMRE provided funding and technical assistance to construct wetlands and treat polluted water containing iron and manganese leaking out of the former mine into nearby streams. The wetlands are now a self-sustaining natural habitat and aquatic ecosystem.

To learn more about the Watergate Wetlands Restoration Project at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, visit: https://www.nps.gov/dewa/learn/nature/wetlands-restoration.htm

Learn more about OSMRE’s ongoing projects at: https://www.osmre.gov/news/stories/WWD

Image: Before and after photos of restored wetlands within Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park is where an American legend began. Born Araminta Ross in Ma...
02/02/2023

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park is where an American legend began. Born Araminta Ross in Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Tubman resisted her enslavement from an early age and ultimately escaped alone and on her own in 1849. She returned to the Eastern Shore at least 13 times and freed more than 70 people trying to keep family and friends from being separated due to enslavement. Tubman went on to aid the US Army during the Civil War and continued to advocate for the rights of African Americans, women, and Americans with disabilities after the war.

African American history is preserved and shared in many national parks with some being created as monuments to remember specific individuals in our nation's history. Explore national parks that were named after people and visit their websites to take a deeper look at their life's achievements, contributions, and lasting legacies. Learn more at: https://www.nps.gov/articles/000/parks-named-in-honor-of-african-americans.htm

Image: Numerous depictions of Harriet Tubman tell the story of every stage in her life and are paired with interactive exhibits at the visitor center.

I’m a rodent, not a meteorologist…It’s Groundhog Day…again. Apparently, a shadow was seen, six more weeks of winter was ...
02/02/2023

I’m a rodent, not a meteorologist…

It’s Groundhog Day…again. Apparently, a shadow was seen, six more weeks of winter was declared, and it’s still cold outside.

If you're not venturing out this winter, stay connected with national parks throughout the season. Many parks have virtual experiences to enjoy from the warmth of your own burrow. Follow the latest news and activities with on social media or on the web. Learn more at: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/winter-season.htm

Investing in the future of parks! In 2023, the National Park Service is making significant advancements to increase recr...
02/01/2023

Investing in the future of parks! In 2023, the National Park Service is making significant advancements to increase recreational opportunities, improve visitor facilities, enhance climate and fire resilience, ensure critical moments in our shared history are honored and preserved, and provide economic benefits for people and communities throughout the country. The National Park Service will also work to build access to parks, create opportunities to tell new stories and provide experiences that help tell a history more representative of all Americans.

Learn more about upcoming projects that will enable the National Park Service to continue to preserve and share the nation's most important places and stories at: https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1207/national-park-investments-in-2023.htm

“I’m going on an adventure!” - Bilbo BagginsWhether you’re headed to Mordor to destroy the ring of power, or looking to ...
02/01/2023

“I’m going on an adventure!” - Bilbo Baggins

Whether you’re headed to Mordor to destroy the ring of power, or looking to spend a few days on the beach, it’s never too early to plan your next travels. The best way to begin a national park visit is with a trip to NPS.gov. Park websites have ideas about where to go, what to see, what to bring, what to do, and most important, what to include in your planning. Flexibility and a backup plan are key, too, in case of changing weather conditions, road closures, orc encounters, etc.

Every experience in a national park is unique. A little trip planning can ensure that your only surprises are happy ones. Is that tree talking to me? No, but you might be overheated.

Find vacation planning tips at: https://www.nps.gov/aboutus/news/plan-like-a-park-ranger.htm

Image: A park ranger looking up at a snow-covered mountain at Mount Rainier National Park.
NPS/D. Robinson

Photos from Martin Van Buren National Historic Site's post
01/31/2023

Photos from Martin Van Buren National Historic Site's post

When you say yes to too many projects…Sure! I got this! During the warmer months, it’s not unusual to see starlings or c...
01/31/2023

When you say yes to too many projects…

Sure! I got this! During the warmer months, it’s not unusual to see starlings or cowbirds riding on the back of a bison. All aboard!!! As far as bird transportation goes, think of it as the food car on a musty, slow moving train with multiple unscheduled stops. Nice.

What’s on the menu? Bugs! The birds get to feed on insects in the bison fur. The birds may also gather seeds displaced in the grass by the large moving animal. It’s a win-win situation for both. Except for the occasional hair ball.

Learn more about bison found in national parks at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/bison

Image: A group of starlings sitting in a line on the back of a grazing bison at Wind Cave National Park, SD. Possibly wondering what the holdup is.

01/30/2023

Meet Bert and Ernie, a pair of longleaf pine pals that live on Sesame—er, Sandhill—Street.

Ernie, on the left, is in his grass stage, when the longleaf pine looks like a big clump of grass. He’s several years old. Bert, on the other hand, is growing into his “bottlebrush” stage, with shaggy needles as he reaches to the sky, perhaps around 10 years old.

During these phases of life, the shaggy awkward appearance has a purpose—the long needles protect the tree’s terminal buds from fire. Longleaf pines are adapted to occasional fires, which add nutrients to the soil and reduce competition from other trees and shrubs.

👋 Today’s photo is brought to you by the letter L, for longleaf pine.

NPS Photo / Scott Sharaga

Photos from Apostle Islands National Lakeshore's post
01/29/2023

Photos from Apostle Islands National Lakeshore's post

There’s an App for that! Download the free  for interactive maps to use while visiting national parks. Many parks includ...
01/28/2023

There’s an App for that!

Download the free for interactive maps to use while visiting national parks. Many parks include places of interest, self-guided tours, and suggested trip itineraries included on their maps.

The NPS App was created by National Park Service staff—people who know national parks—to help you make the most of your visit. Learn more at: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/digital/nps-apps.htm

We’re just getting started. If you don’t find what you are looking for now, check back regularly as rangers continue to add more ways for you to experience parks through the App. The National Park Service is also planning to expand features, so stay tuned for more!

Image: A ranger hat with a smartphone resting against it displays the Russell Cave National Monument page on the NPS App.

If you think someone is staring at you: 1. Yawn.  2. If they yawn, they were staring. Who's ready for a wild weekend? Pa...
01/27/2023

If you think someone is staring at you:

1. Yawn.
2. If they yawn, they were staring.

Who's ready for a wild weekend? Pace yourself.

Image: Fox sitting in snow yawning at Yellowstone National Park. NPS/Bob Fuhrmann

Timeline photos
01/26/2023

Timeline photos

Bison in the alpine? At nearly 8,000 ft above sea level?!

While bison are an iconic species of the Great Plains, a recent discovery in Glacier National Park's high alpine environment changed how we understand these animals and the people who interacted with them.

Find out how bison teeth helped paint a picture of the past and help us support future conservation efforts in this story: https://www.nps.gov/articles/000/bison-roamed-the-mountains-too.htm

Photos from Harry S Truman National Historic Site's post
01/25/2023

Photos from Harry S Truman National Historic Site's post

Red-tailed hawk: "I’m not an eagle, but I play one on TV.⁣"⁣Did you hear that? Must’ve been a soaring bald eagle! Wait. ...
01/25/2023

Red-tailed hawk: "I’m not an eagle, but I play one on TV.⁣"

Did you hear that? Must’ve been a soaring bald eagle! Wait. You say the loud screech associated with a bald eagle may belong to a different bird? True story.

Whether on a hike or watching a bald eagle soar across your TV screen, you're most likely hearing the call of the red-tailed hawk. The smaller hawk has a mightier voice than its larger cousin. Our eagle friend usually goes with a series of high-pitched whistling or piping notes, while the hawk makes the familiar hoarse, screaming kee-eeeee-arr! Do it with us. ⁣KEE-EEEEEe-ARR!!!! Now that everyone in the house is awake, go tell them about the red-tailed hawk.

What's a bird call that you know instantly who it belongs to?

Image: Young red-tailed hawk stares at camera at Colonial National Historical Park, VA. NPS/Linda Williams⁣

Photos from Capulin Volcano National Monument's post
01/24/2023

Photos from Capulin Volcano National Monument's post

Photos from Reconstruction Era National Historical Park's post
01/23/2023

Photos from Reconstruction Era National Historical Park's post

01/22/2023

Ever wonder what these black, palm-sized leathery cases are that sometimes wash up on Gateway beaches?

Sometimes known as “mermaid’s purse,” these pouches are the egg cases of skates, a wide, flat fish that resemble rays. Each species of skate has differently shaped egg cases. These egg cases are probably from the Little Skate (Leucoraja erinacea), a skate commonly found along the Jersey shore.

Skates lay eggs year-round, so these egg cases can be found at any time of the year along Gateway’s beaches. Each egg case has four “horns” on each corner, which help anchor the case to seaweed on the bottom of the sea floor, as well as facilitate with gas and waste exchange of the growing skate embryo. When the skate embryo has finished developing, the pouch opens on one end, and the skate emerges. Most of the time, the egg cases you find washed up on shore are empty.

The egg cases pictured above were found on Sandy Hook after the Christmas Eve flooding, most likely washed ashore by the rough surf and tall waves.

NPS image: 4 black, leathery egg cases lying in the sand

LT

Photos from Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area's post
01/22/2023

Photos from Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area's post

I believe I can fly….Aww, nuts!!!Flying squirrels are found in many national parks. But this is a rock squirrel. Althoug...
01/21/2023

I believe I can fly….

Aww, nuts!!!

Flying squirrels are found in many national parks. But this is a rock squirrel. Although the rock squirrel belongs to the ground squirrel family, it can be seen reaching for the sky by climbing boulders, rocks, and trees. Although they may look cute and come right up to you, please remember that squirrels are wild animals—don't feed them, and keep your distance—because they can bite, usually from the front, or “bitey end.”

Image: A rock squirrel attempting to sploot but ending up with a splat at Carlsbad Caverns National Park, NM. NPS/Anthony Mazzucco

Just horsing around...
01/20/2023

Just horsing around...

Have an “itch” to travel? Come on over to Assateague Island!

Make sure to stop into the National Seashore visitor center to check out the exhibits, aquariums, and bookstore before grabbing a map and heading out to explore!

The Maryland District visitor center is open daily from 9am-4pm and the Tom’s Cove visitor center is open Fridays through Mondays from 9am-4pm.

NPS Photos: C. Cook

Cool story, Poe.On this day in 1809, Edgar Allan Poe, notable writer, poet, editor, and literary critic best known for h...
01/19/2023

Cool story, Poe.

On this day in 1809, Edgar Allan Poe, notable writer, poet, editor, and literary critic best known for his poetry and short stories, particularly his tales of mystery and the macabre, was born in Boston, Massachusetts. Poe lived in several places where he left his mark, including Richmond, Virginia, Baltimore, Maryland, and New York City. Have you visited a site connected to Poe?

The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site in Philadelphia preserves the home once rented by Poe. The site is managed part of Independence NHP, Edgar Allan Poe NHS & Thaddeus Kosciuszko NM. Though he lived in many houses over several years in Philadelphia (1838 to 1844), it is the only one which still survives. While living in Philadelphia, Poe published some of his most well-known works, including "The Tell-Tale Heart," "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," and "The Gold-Bug." What’s your favorite literary work written by Poe?

Are you an avid reader? Did you know the National Park Service preserves the work and world of many great writers, poets, and storytellers? Explore the places and stories that inspired their most-notable works at: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/literature

Epilogue: Did you know Poe enlisted in the US Army in 1827? During his time with the Army, he was assigned several different posts, including Fort Moultrie and Fortress Monroe which today are managed by the National Parks Service as Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park and Fort Monroe National Monument.

Image: The home once rented by American author Edgar Allan Poe, located at 532 N. 7th Street, in the Spring Garden neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

01/19/2023
Photos from Yosemite National Park's post
01/19/2023

Photos from Yosemite National Park's post

01/18/2023

📣 If you’re interested in biology, fisheries, aquaculture, ecology, or environmental science, this new Fish and Feathers program might interest you! The program is funded by the National Park Service (NPS) and administered by Environment for the Americas! Interns will focus on supporting, implementing, and possibly leading community outreach programs that focus on fishing and birding activities. The overall goal is to increase diverse community engagement with NPS partners during the program and in years to come.

Through this program, interns will get to:
✅ Reach out to local communities to increase engagement in fishing and birdwatching
✅ Understand regulations regarding fishing and ethical birding and communicate this information to program participants
✅ Lead and/or support the implementation of fishing and birding program
✅ Manage and maintain program equipment

Apply by Monday, February 6th to work as a Fish and Feathers intern at national parks, such as Niobrara National Scenic River, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, New River Gorge National Park and Preserve, Indiana Dunes National Park, Upper Delaware Scenic & Recreational River, Cane River Creole National Historical Park, Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, Everglades National Park, Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park, American Memorial Park, Gateway National Recreation Area, Grand Portage National Monument, Big Thicket National Preserve, War in the Pacific National Historical Park, and Bandelier National Monument ➡️ https://environmentamericas.org/diversity-internships/available-internships/

📸 Courtesy of Environment for the Americas - Fish and Feathers program flyer

When you leave a bag of potatoes in the pantry for a month…The walrus spends almost its entire life in the sea, primaril...
01/17/2023

When you leave a bag of potatoes in the pantry for a month…

The walrus spends almost its entire life in the sea, primarily relying on sea ice for resting spots. Several adaptations help them with this aquatic lifestyle. Air pouches located in their upper necks keep them afloat when they are sleeping. Their head is small in comparison with its heavy body, and the upper lip is thick and fleshy with a stiff moustache made up of bristles which are important sensory
organs. Although there are other teeth in the upper jaw, it is the greatly enlarged canine teeth, called tusks, that give the walrus its distinctive “spout-like” appearance. Spudtacular!

Image: A group of walrus with long tusks at Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, AK.

Address

171 Shoreline Drive
Harpers Ferry, WV
25425

General information

Page Expectations and Guidelines: We hope this will become a place where fans feel comfortable sharing information and experiences about Harpers Ferry National Historical Park with one another. While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. Please be considerate of other fan's opinions. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines here. If you do not comply, your message will be removed. We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions, nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Such posts and/or links are subject to deletion. People who continue to post such content and/or links may be subject to page participation restrictions and/or removal from the page. We do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. Posting of external links on this site that are intended as advertising (or to drive traffic to websites unrelated to Harpers Ferry National Historical Park), or do not contribute to dialog and discussions about Harpers Ferry may be deleted. People who continue to post such links may be subject to page participation restrictions and/or removal from the page. External links do not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. National Park Service or the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm
Saturday 9am - 5pm
Sunday 9am - 5pm

Telephone

(304) 535-6029

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Harpers Ferry National Historical Park posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Park Mailing Address: Harpers Ferry National Historical Park National Park Service P.O. Box 65 Harpers Ferry, WV 25425

Nearby museums


Comments

My solo hike in Harpers Ferry. Enjoy! :)
MY GREAT GRANDFATHER CORPORAL HORACE G. RIKER WAS ON MARYLAND HEIGHTS ACCORDING TO HIS 1864 DIARY IN JULY WHEN JUBAL EARY'S ARMY ARRIVED. HE WAS IN THE 161ST OHIO NATIONAL GUARD CO. E UNDER A FAMILY FRIEND FROM NEW PHILADELPHIA, OHIO COLONEL O.P. TAYLOR. THESE ARE A FEW PAGES OF HIS TIME FROM MAY TO SEPTEMBER 1864 IN THE 161ST OHIO.
We are new to the area...Martinsburg...and want to walk around Harpers Ferry. Is there anywhere to park close enough. ?
Is the park open today? I cannot get anyone to answer the phone...
Does anyone have a good picture taken that shows the point cliffs I'd love to see the cliffs themselves. Please post if you do..
The park has lost a great person today. Rest in peace Mr Jim. James Prentice
We were planning on hiking Maryland Heights but the trail head parking is closed/blocked. Could you let us know why?
Quick question, is the Footbridge to get to Maryland Height's Trail open to walk across?
Hello, I just joined the page and am looking for details on the park for a book I am writing. Is there anyone out there that can answer some questions about the geography of the Maryland Heights Park?
Will the park be open the day after Thanksgiving and Saturday?
Not sure if this is allowed but I lost a small gold hoop earring (pictured here) on the maryland heights trail on my way down yesterday sometime between 1 and 2pm. I think my mask took it off accidentally 😞 Anyways, they’re very sentimental to me and if found I would be enternally grateful!
x

Other Harpers Ferry museums (show all)

The John Brown Wax Museum Harpers Ferry-Bolivar Historic Town Foundation Bolivar-Harpers Ferry Public Library Brunswick Heritage Museum Brunswick Railroad Museum Lovettsville Historical Society and Museum The Peter Burr House Peter Burr House George Townsend Museum Shepherdstown Ghost Tours Tolson's Chapel and School Sharpsburg Civil War Ghost Tours & High Priestess Tarot Newcomer House Waterford Foundation Inc. Washington County Rural Heritage Museum