North Star Schoolhouse and History Center

North Star Schoolhouse and History Center The North Star schoolhouse is a historical building as well as the history center for the town of Hamlin. We have a collection of many interesting artifacts from the early settlers in our area as well as photographs and letters.

On Redman Road, just north of Roosevelt Highway, on the east side of the road backing up to Sandy Creek, there is a litt...
04/06/2020

On Redman Road, just north of Roosevelt Highway, on the east side of the road backing up to Sandy Creek, there is a little known pioneer cemetery. Here are some recent pictures of the remaining grave stones. Here is an excerpt regarding the cemetery from Mary Smith's book "Remembering Hamlin 1802-2002":

"Pine Tree Cemetery - Hoyt Cemetery

East of Kendall Mills on the east side of Redman Road a short distance north of Roosevelt Highway is an old cemetery. It has been referred to as Hoyt Cemetery, Wentworth Cemetery, Pine Tree Cemetery, and Two Bridges Cemetery because two bridges spanned Sandy Creek in its vicinity. The earliest recorded burial these was in 1823. The last stone bore the date 1865. Apparently the cemetery was unused after the Civil War. Editor Lorenzo Beach reported in the Brockport Republic that there were about 50 graves there in 1890. At that time many graves were without headstones, some marked with ordinary fieldstone and some with broken marble, but all obscured by weeds and bushes. By 1920 the number of tombstones had dwindled to about 20. Now only 2 or 3 remain."

Also nearby there is another pioneer burial site. I am not sure of the exact location of this singular grave might be but here is a brief excerpt regarding the site from Mary Smith's book "Remembering Hamlin 1802-2002":

"A Private Burial Ground
Clyde Wiler

One of the Timmerman aunts is buried on the old Timmerman farm, on the west side of Redman Road north of Roosevelt Highway.. Tom Timmerman's grandfather showed me where she was one time. She was his sister. She married a Kocher-an uncle to my mother. She's buried there under a cherry tree. There's no stone there-just a pile of fieldstones to mark her grave."

On February 15th, I Traveled to Clarence Center New York to acquire a reed organ that was used at the Kendall Mills Inn ...
03/10/2020

On February 15th, I Traveled to Clarence Center New York to acquire a reed organ that was used at the Kendall Mills Inn (Webster Inn) located in Kendall Mills (Hamlin, NY). It was donated by 93 year old John Mosher who was born and raised on Creek Road in Kendall, NY. He moved as a young man, after WW II, to Clarence Center where he owned and operated a farm for many years. Mr. Mosher stated his father, Llewellyn Mosher, who farmed 200 acres in Kendall was given the Organ by the Inn's owner after it was not sold at auction for $5.00 in 1930 and it had been in the family ever since. The organ was manufactured by the Packard Organ Company in Fort Wayne, Indiana. It appears the company changed its focus from Organs to Pianos around the turn of the century. We are still researching the date of manufacture of the organ but it is likely around 1900. The organ is currently not in working order so we are seeking to restore it to working order. If anyone has any knowledge about organs and how they function please let us know. The following pictures show the organ at the History Center.

We will provide more information on the Mosher Family in future facebook updates. Mr. John Mosher is a veteran of WWII and a plaque depicting his service is pictured here as well as a picture of his father who was a motorcycle messenger in WWI. More history of the Packard Organ Company will be researched and provided.

02/04/2020

Recently received the following invitation via email. If anyone is interested you are welcome to attend.

February 3, 2020


You are invited to join Mayor Lovely A. Warren at 11 am on Friday, February 14, 2020, at 271 Hamilton Street to celebrate Frederick Douglass’ birthday with the dedication of a historic marker at the site of the only home owned and occupied by Douglass that is still standing in Rochester today.

Douglass lived in the Hamilton Street property with his daughter, Rosetta Douglass Sprague, son-in-law, Nathan Sprague, and their family from 1873 to 1874. Though he occupied the house only briefly, Douglass maintained ownership of the building for several decades, which allowed him to continue to vote in federal elections following his relocation from Rochester to Washington, D.C., in 1872.

Thanks to a grant from the William G. Pomeroy Foundation, this long-overlooked site will be recognized with a historic marker that will serve to educate the public about the life of one of the city’s most celebrated citizens. The Pomeroy Foundation has funded more than 850 historic markers throughout New York State since 2006.

Mayor Warren will be joined in unveiling the marker by Sherri Dukes, owner and occupant of the former Douglass home; Deryn Pomeroy, the Pomeroy Foundation’s Director of Strategic Initiatives; and Robert J. Benz, Co-Founder and Executive Vice President of the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives.

The dedication ceremony is open to the public. Feel free to share this invitation with anyone who would be interested in attending.


Sincerely,

Christine L. Ridarsky City Historian & Historical Services Consultant, Rochester Public Library

The History Center recently acquired the map below from Lucinda Prat Smith. It originally hung in the house of Claude Ki...
02/01/2020

The History Center recently acquired the map below from Lucinda Prat Smith. It originally hung in the house of Claude King who resided in the brick house on County Line Road, near the intersection with Moscow Road, southeast side of the road. There is no date readily seen on the map so we are researching the date of when it was fabricated.

Attached is a picture of a commemorative plate which was donated to the history center by Mrs. Pearl Hewlett Stutz. Mrs....
01/27/2020

Attached is a picture of a commemorative plate which was donated to the history center by Mrs. Pearl Hewlett Stutz. Mrs. Stutz is in her 90's and currently lives in Penfield, NY but grew up in Walker. Mrs. Stutz is mentioned on the National Women's Hall of Fame (NWHF) due to her career as a photojournalist. Also attached is a letter written in her honor by her daughter which is accessable on the NWHF's website.

Recently Branson Whipple, who resides at 4365 Brick Schoolhouse Road in Hamlin, contacted the history center. He shared ...
01/27/2020

Recently Branson Whipple, who resides at 4365 Brick Schoolhouse Road in Hamlin, contacted the history center. He shared his research on the old Hojack Rail Road, which ran adjacent to his property. It had a water tower and shed which sat directly on his property with the foundation of the shed and the cement foundation pieces still present. The one picture is actually taken from the cover of a book on the Hojack Line which shows the water tower. The second picture shows the property as it is today and the water tank would have stood, I believe, into or slightly forward of the trees.

A little late but here are some pictures from our open house last Saturday. Thank you everyone who came to see us! We wi...
12/12/2019

A little late but here are some pictures from our open house last Saturday. Thank you everyone who came to see us! We will be having a few more open houses this coming year for anyone who missed it!

Attached are portraits circa 1860s of Edwin Bliss and his wife. The portraits are on loan to the museum from Miles Bliss...
11/18/2019

Attached are portraits circa 1860s of Edwin Bliss and his wife. The portraits are on loan to the museum from Miles Bliss. Edwin and his wife were from Chicopee/Springfield, Massachusetts but moved to Clarendon, NY at some point. They had a son who became a doctor. Doctor Bliss practiced in Clarendon. According to Miles, Edwin and his wife settled in Kendall later in life. Miles' father Dwight lived for 40 years on Moscow Road in Hamlin but recently moved. This is just some preliminary information. More research to follow.

The Cobblestone Museum in Childs, NY donated a couple of pieces of antique farm equipment to the North Star History Cent...
10/15/2019

The Cobblestone Museum in Childs, NY donated a couple of pieces of antique farm equipment to the North Star History Center. These will eventually be housed and placed on display in the stone barn at the history center. The roof has been replaced on the barn. We are currently seeking stones from local farmers to use to rebuild the stone wall in front. We have lined up a mason who is familiar with stone work to donate his time to do the work. We are still trying to figure out what to do with the floor as it is currently dirt. Probably looking at wood but on this time we are not sure. If anyone has ideas please let us know. The barn is 50' x 30'.

The farm equipment we acquired is a corn binder which was used to bind stalks of corn together in the early part of the 20th century. It could be pulled by tractor or perhaps horses. The motion from pulling the equipment is how it operates.

The other piece of equipment is a potato sorter which was used to sort potatoes into different sizes and was chain driven by an engine.

The pictures were taken on October 5th when my family and friends picked up the equipment at the Cobblestone Museum Blacksmith Shop. Below I attached a YouTube video which shows this equipment in operation.

https://youtu.be/yK2j6z-3w1M

In the the early part of the 20th century Hamlin businessman Frank Newman sold bicycles but in 1913 he graduated to sell...
09/08/2019

In the the early part of the 20th century Hamlin businessman Frank Newman sold bicycles but in 1913 he graduated to selling cars. He started selling REOs and eventually sold Fords and Fordson tractors in the early 1920s. In 1923 Frank sold more cars and tractors than any Ford Agency in the Country and was visited first by Bill Ford that year and then by Henry Ford the following year to study his methods (pictured below). Frank sold his Fords on Lake Road just north of the current Crosby's. Frank Newman had other businesses as well to be discussed in a future posting.

According to Jerry Nesbitt, his grandfather James Nesbitt was a salesman for Mr. Newman and in 1927 was a top salesman. Jerry stated his grandfather and his grandmother were invited to Detroit by Henry Ford and they were wined and dined for a week. James was also given an engraved watch by Henry Ford for being the top salesman in the United States. Here are some pictures of the Fords being assembled at Frank Newman's as well as a Ford being delivered by horse drawn sleigh on Lake Road. Also included are pictures of a 1921 Fordson Tractor, an REO and the watch James Nesbitt was gifted.

Thanks for your continuing interest.

Cobblestone schoolhouse district #12 was built in 1833 and is located at the northeast corner of Church road and Redman ...
08/20/2019

Cobblestone schoolhouse district #12 was built in 1833 and is located at the northeast corner of Church road and Redman road. Attached are photos of the school as it was and is now in 2019 as well as students who attended the school and their teacher.

At times postings on this page will not always pertain to the town of Hamlin specifically but history in genera...
08/13/2019

At times postings on this page will not always pertain to the town of Hamlin specifically but history in general. The North Star History Center recently acquired an egg scale, which is a tool used to help egg farmers classify eggs to price for selling at the market. Attached are some pictures as well as some basic history. Thank you for your continued interest.

Egg Scale History

Grading of eggs by weight began about 1900 as a way of selecting the ideal size egg for hatching purposes. Early “egg graders” were preset to select eggs of a certain weight. During World War I, the U.S. War Department bought eggs in large quantities and paid for them on the basis of size, which was determined by weight. Since poultry farmers were paid a premium for graded eggs, i.e., eggs that were sorted by size, World War I created an immediate market for “egg scales.” Farmers graded eggs to sell to retailers as a source of cash, thus perpetuating the need for egg scales. World War II created the greatest single demand for egg scales as the U.S. War Department bought eggs in huge quantities to feed the troops overseas. Most egg scales were invented and manufactured between 1920 and 1940.
Acme egg grading scales were produced by Specialty Mfg. Co., St. Paul, Minn., founded by William Boss in 1900. Specialty’s first products included a grass catcher for a lawn mower, clothesline reel and garden hose reel followed by several other items, including the Acme egg grading scale. In 1922, Acme inventor N.E. Chapman filed for a patent for what he referred to as an egg grading device. The patent was granted in June 1924.
Still in operation today, Specialty manufactures numerous products for various industries. The company chairperson is Heidi Sandberg McKeown, great-granddaughter of the company’s founder.

Early Acme egg scales were of aluminum construction. Later models have tin bases that tended to rust over time. The scales work on the weight-lifting principle. Each scale has nine fins that are lifted to determine an egg’s weight. The weight of the egg lifts individual fins that rise until the precise weight of the egg is determined.
The egg cup on the 1924 patent for the Acme scale is generally oval like an egg and is parallel to the scale. However, the cup on some scales is positioned at right angles to the scale. Those models were probably produced after 1933. The egg cups are attached with aluminum rivets or with two slots cut in the cup and an aluminum strip holding the cup in place. The weight shown on the scale is the calculated weight per dozen, not the weight of one egg.

The Acme egg grading scale sold for $3 in 1928 ($38.64 today) and $4.49 in 1962, when production may have ended.

The following centennial button was recently donated to the History Center by Michelle Chalker who was cleaning out her ...
08/06/2019

The following centennial button was recently donated to the History Center by Michelle Chalker who was cleaning out her mother's home, Marie Knittle, located at 1932 County Line Road in Hamlin.

The button allowed those who purchased one to shave off their beards and if they did not purchase one they could not shave.

Up until the 70's it was a custom in small town America for a community to issue "shaving permits" to those men in the town who chose to shave during a centennial, bi-centennial or some such landmark celebration in the town. For most celebrations like this the men of the town would grow beards. At that time there were not many guys who wore facial hair like there are today. Usually cost a couple bucks, the money going to the organization that was sponsoring or coordinating the community celebration. The guy who shaved was to wear the "shave permit" button when he was out and about in his community. Failure to do so could result in a fine if the fine could be collected. This is really nothing serious. They were actually unenforceable. But it was a way of making some money to offset the cost of the celebration and to have some fun doing it.

My sincere apologies for the delay in updating the page. Hopefully we will get better as we go forward.I was at...
07/30/2019

My sincere apologies for the delay in updating the page. Hopefully we will get better as we go forward.

I was at the Cobblestone Museum on Ridge Road in Childs, NY recently. I was there looking at a couple of pieces of antique farm equipment that they offered to donate to the Hamlin History Center as part of the Barn Restoration project. While I was there the director, Doug Farley, called my attention to a small building which was being used to house their used book store. He informed me that the building was donated to the museum by the Town of Hamlin in 1999. It was originally built in 1909 as a portable polling place for the town of Hamlin and was used as such for many years. It was restored by the Museum. I am going to do more research to find out more about the building and its uses as we go forward but for now here are some pictures of the building in the condition in which it was donated and its current condition. Thanks for your interest.

The roof on the barn at the history center has been completed with 50 year architectural shingles. The roof is solid and...
06/26/2019

The roof on the barn at the history center has been completed with 50 year architectural shingles. The roof is solid and dry inside.

Also a display on early education in Hamlin has been setup at the Hamlin Library. Please stop by and take a look. If you have any questions or suggestions please pass them on.

I will attempt to be more timely with additions to this page. Thanks for your patience and interest.

Here are some photographs taken of Hamlin around the turn of the 20th century. We will be adding to this as time and pic...
06/08/2019

Here are some photographs taken of Hamlin around the turn of the 20th century. We will be adding to this as time and pictures allow. For those of you who might not know what a cooperage is it was where wooden barrels were manufactured to then be used by farmers to store and ship produce.

Happenings at the NorthStar History Center:Thanks to a grant from New York State and the Hamlin Town Board in selecting ...
06/03/2019

Happenings at the NorthStar History Center:

Thanks to a grant from New York State and the Hamlin Town Board in selecting a contractor at the last town board meeting, work has begun to repair the roof on the turn of the century stone barn at the history center. The roof will match the current roof of the History Center itself and be architectural style shingles versus the metal roof that was there. Reverting to cedar shake shingles which was likely the original roofing material or something similar would have been cost prohibitive. It is hopeful that down the road the building could house old farm equipment which honor the legacy of the agrarian foundation upon which the town of Hamlin was built and still thrives. Also shingles missing from the History Center and the missing slats from the cupolo have been replaced.Below are some pictures of the barn prior to and during its current construction phase.

The History Center acquired a number of letters from the nineteenth century which were written to the Lambert family, wh...
05/26/2019

The History Center acquired a number of letters from the nineteenth century which were written to the Lambert family, who were living in Hamlin at that time. As we were going through these letters we found a letter from a Josiah Bacon, who lived in Barre, New York, to his brother Solomon Bacon, who lived in Waterville, New York (Oneida County), written in 1831. In trying to determine a connection between the Bacon and Lambert families we have ascertained the following information:

Josiah Bacon was born in 1779 and he died in 1866. His death was not as imminent as he believed when he wrote the letter. He was married to wife Laura who was born in 1786 and died in 1826 of consumption at the age of 39. They had four children who all died at relatively early ages: Alexander (1808-1812), William (1811-1836), Augustus (1817-1840), and Charlotte (1821-1853). They are all buried in a cemetery in Waterville, NY. It is not known why Josiah was living in Barre, NY in 1831.

Solomon Bacon was born in 1751, he died in 1836, and he married his wife Margaret in 1775. His wife was born in 1753 and died in 1840. They had one son, William who was born in 1790 and died in 1811.

Below is the original letter as well as the transcribed version. The letter is transcribed as it was written with misspellings and missing or essentially no punctuation.

Address

864 Walker Lake Ontario Road
Hamlin, NY
14464

Telephone

(585) 727-3855

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Comments

What year did Hamlin's Wilder Road become Wyler Road?
I am delighted to have found this page! My father was John Quivey, who was born 1908 on Railroad Avenue in Hamlin, the son of Burton H. Quivey and Louise S. Blodgett.