Know Your Doc

Know Your Doc This page is dedicated to Bill Dunn the curator of the Doc Holliday Museum in Griffin Georgia. Thanks Bill for educating me on Georgia's most famous son, John Henry Holliday.

This page was created to educate and to correct erroneous information and photographs that are being propagated on the internet about a famous Georgian, John Henry Holliday aka Doc Holliday.

Tombstone Chamber of Commerce
05/29/2015

Tombstone Chamber of Commerce

Let’s continue our historic walking tour thanks to the Tombstone Restoration Commission. Today we are going to visit St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. St. Paul’s held its first services on June 18, 1882 with Endicott Peabody officiating. It had just been completed at a cost of $5000. Services had been held in the courtroom of the Mining Exchange Building in Grid Block on Fremont Street until the 1882 fire broke out all the windows. Endicott Peabody, 25 years old and fresh out of seminary school, did much of the fundraising to build St. Paul’s. It is said he did fundraising in the saloons and gambling halls where he received substantial donations.

This beautiful old building still stands almost exactly as it was in 1882. The original bell tower was struck by lightning and was replaced by a lower brick tower. The structure is of hand formed adobe brick, stuccoed in 1970 to protect the adobe. The ceiling and roof were constructed of timber hauled in by ox carts from the Chiricahua Mountains and are still protecting this historic landmark.

The stained glass windows, the pews, altar rail are all the originals unchanged over the years. The light fixtures although now electrified are the originals that came off a chipper ship anchored in San Francisco. The piano dates from 1891 and the altar cross was donated in 1905.

Endicott Peabody went on to become Headmaster of the prestigious Groton School attended by Franklin D. Roosevelt and other boys of wealthy families. George Parsons, Diarist, was the first member to be confirmed in St. Paul’s.

Some authors note that St. Paul’s is the oldest Protestant church in Arizona. St. Paul's has never closed its doors and continues to serve the people of Tombstone and the surrounding area to this day. The building was added to the National Registry of Historic Places in 1971.

Hygiene in the Old West
05/23/2015
Hygiene in the Old West

Hygiene in the Old West

Just how good were the “good ol days?” Folks on the western frontier led a hardscrabble life. They were wan with fever, gaunt, scrawny and peaked. Their...

Curly Bill Laughs at His Fate
05/23/2015
Curly Bill Laughs at His Fate

Curly Bill Laughs at His Fate

Curly Bill Brocius, the leader of the cow-boys in southeastern Arizona, was reportedly always laughing. In the early 1880s, the outlaw was suspected in...

Visit Arizona
05/21/2015

Visit Arizona

It may be the 21st century, but you can still experience the Old West in Tombstone.

True West Magazine
05/21/2015

True West Magazine

Civilization in the form of brick buildings, like the Hotel Arizona shown here, and the horseless carriage reached Springerville by 1915. Yet nearly 30 years earlier, on Christmas Day in 1887, members of an outlaw gang had shot and killed a local citizen, James Hale. The boys’ motive? They claimed they had wanted to “see if a bullet would go through a Mormon.”

– Courtesy Marshall Trimble –

The Outrageous Climax Jim: http://bit.ly/Xy1phF

#Hotel #Arizona #Outlaws #History

Boot Hill Museum
05/21/2015

Boot Hill Museum

Boot Hill is counting down to Summer 2015! Only 3 more days!!

Come on over to Boot Hill Museum Saturday May 23rd, 2015 and watch the World Famous Boot Hill Gunfighters kick off their season! First gunfight of the year will be at High Noon! Don't miss "Conflict on Front Street"!

Tombstone Chamber of Commerce
05/21/2015

Tombstone Chamber of Commerce

This weekend is Wyatt Earp Days!!! To honor one of the West's most famous lawman Wyatt Earp the Tombstone Lion's Club will be raffling off an 1851 44 cal. Black Powder, Navy Colt Revolver.

Saturday, May 23rd, 2015: The weekend kicks off on Saturday the 23rd at 10:00AM with the singing of our National Anthem and will have continuous entertainment until 4:00PM. Once again, we will have the most delicious Chili Cookoff this side of the San Pedro.

Sunday, May 24th, 2015: There will be continuous street entertainment, starting with the National Anthem at 10:00AM and running until 4:00PM or so.

Monday, May 25th, 2015: The day will start at 10:00AM with our National Anthem. There will be continuous entertainment right up until the time for the winner drawing of the 1851 Navy Colt revolver, about 4:15PM.

Some of our entertainment will include: gunfights, hangings, an 1880's fashion show, and a Wyatt Earp look-a-like contest. The event is sponsored by the Tombstone Lion's Club. If you have any questions you can call "Bronco Bill" at 520-266-5266 or email at www.wyattearpdays.com

Tombstone banks on history to attract visitors
05/14/2015
Tombstone banks on history to attract visitors

Tombstone banks on history to attract visitors

In Tombstone, history is a part of the fabric of everyday life, one that draws visitors from all over the world. Reenactments, museums, and tours are big business here. The “Town Too Tough To Die” survives on its history.

Is the lure of the Wild West fading?
05/14/2015
Is the lure of the Wild West fading?

Is the lure of the Wild West fading?

Is the lure of the Wild West fading? Tourism in Tombstone has seen a significant decrease within the past decade.

The Western Online
05/10/2015

The Western Online

Tombstone Times
05/10/2015

Tombstone Times

Fremont Street looking East in 1967.

I sure wish everyone would share the hell out of this, especially when a famous author like Bill O'Reilly included this ...
05/07/2015
John Escapule

I sure wish everyone would share the hell out of this, especially when a famous author like Bill O'Reilly included this photo in his new book Legends & Lies.

This guy is not Doc Holliday. He is John Escapule, born in France in 1856, who came to southeast Arizona in 1877. John became friendly with Tombstone...

Tombstone Chamber of Commerce
05/02/2015

Tombstone Chamber of Commerce

March 24, 1882: William Brocius "Curley Bill" Graham was an outlaw from Texas, wanted for rustling, robbery, and murder. Fleeing to Arizona, he eventually ends up in Tombstone. Curly Bill started one of the first Cowboy-Earp clashes when he killed the Town Marshal Fred White on January 6, 1880. Wyatt Earp pistol whipped him in the street after the killing and sent him to jail. The Marshal declared the shooting an accident, and Curly Bill was released.Some of Curly Bills wilder escapades include holding a Reverend at gunpoint and forcing him to give them religious services, capturing and stuffing the ballot box at San Simon to make sure that Bob Paul did not get elected Sheriff, and ambushing a mule train of silver coming from Mexico. Curly Bill was the wildest and most reckless of the Cowboys. On March 24, 1882, Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday were on their trail of vengeance, to avenge the crippling of Virgil and the murder of Morgan. Curly Bill was killed by their posse, near Iron Springs, shot with two blasts from Wyatt Earps shotgun.

Tombstone Chamber of Commerce
05/02/2015

Tombstone Chamber of Commerce

To continue our Historic Walking Tour – thanks to the Tombstone Restoration Commission we are going to visit the Tombstone Epitaph Newspaper.
The Epitaph Newspaper was founded by John Clum in 1880. In the beginning, he called the paper The Clarion, but changed it when he decided that every Tombstone deserved an Epitaph. The first issue was published on May 1, 1880 on a printing press housed in a large canvas tent on Fremont Street. Tombstone’s first newspaper, The Nugget, was across the street. As one can imagine, the two newspapers quickly became rivals frequently engaging in editorial fencing. The Nugget Newspaper burned down in the fire of 1882 and the Epitaph survived.
John Clum was a colorful character, once an Indian agent on the San Carlos reservation. He was elected Mayor and served as Postmaster before selling the Epitaph and leaving Tombstone in 1882.
The Epitaph has had many owners over the years. It moved from a two story adobe structure next to the Grid Block, on Fremont to its present location on 5th Street in 1927. It was purchased by Tombstone Historic Adventures headed by Harold Love in the 1960s. It is still owned and operated by the Love family.
So much of Tombstone’s history was written and preserved by the newspaper. Daily events, social events, fashions, church services, births and deaths, disasters (natural and unnatural), and economic conditions are preserved on their pages.

I love Bill O'Reilly but he sure as Hell doesn't know Doc. He got his birthdate wrong, he used a photo of John Escapule....
04/29/2015

I love Bill O'Reilly but he sure as Hell doesn't know Doc. He got his birthdate wrong, he used a photo of John Escapule. Whoever researched this story did a crappy job. My friend Bill Dunn, a cousin of Doc's, he runs the Doc Holliday Museum in Griffin, Georgia, Doc's birthplace, he could have been a great help in this research but he was never called upon. I am so sick of all the photos out there being used as Doc's, makes me wanna choke somebody. This is exactly why I started my page; https://www.facebook.com/KnowYourDocHolliday. The internet is flooded with photos of John Escapule saying that it is Doc Holliday. The management of the Boothill graveyard in Tombstone even sells souvenirs with this photo on it and selling it as an image of Doc. I personally spoke to the management about this and he told me that John Escapule looks better than Doc Holliday. I guess it's all about money with them. Deceiving the public is not beneath them.

In March of 2004 we did a cover story on fake photos. Since Bill O'Reilly's new book "Legends & Lies: The Real West" prominently uses a known fake photo of Doc Holliday, perhaps it's time to run the feature again.

O.K. Corral
04/28/2015

O.K. Corral

Spring break may be over, and the snowbirds may be returning to their homes in the Midwest and on the East Coast, but the Corral will be open and ready to welcome you all through the summer of 2015. From the 1880s to today, we'll see YOU at the O.K. Corral!

Allen Street Tombstone AZ
04/28/2015

Allen Street Tombstone AZ

In 1882 George Johnson legitimately purchased a horse. At least he thought he had. Johnson unknowingly bought the horse from the man who stole it. When Johnson was found in possession he was accused of horse theft. He was hanged despite his pleas that he had no prior knowledge the horse was stolen. It wasn’t until after his death that it was determined he had told the truth. The grave marker on the left was photographed over sixty five years ago. The grave marker on the right is the current. The epitaphs on both markers serve as an exoneration of Johnson. He is buried in the Boothill Cemetery in Tombstone, Arizona.
(change in grave marker happened

Keeping the Peace:  Tales from the Old West
04/24/2015

Keeping the Peace: Tales from the Old West

In 1872, an impeccably dressed young woman sashayed along the dusty streets of Fort Griffin in North Texas. Although she looked like a cultured Southern belle with a wardrobe straight from the Paris fashion houses, the red-haired beauty, who went by the name Lottie, was one of Texas’ most notorious gamblers.

Lottie Deno (shown in later years) was a vivacious red-head and well educated Southern lady of culture and refinement who sacrificed her social status for survival. Responding to circumstances, she became one of the most famous women of the West as the "Queen of Cards.” Born Carlotta J. Thompkins in Warsaw, Kentucky on April 21, 1844, she was the eldest daughter of a wealthy, upper class plantation owner.

In time, Lottie also headed west, arriving at Fort Griffin, Texas where she rubbed elbows with such legendary gamblers as Doc Holliday and Wyatt Earp, once winning more than $3,000 from Holliday in one evening.

It was at Fort Griffin, where Lottie lingered for some time, that her notoriety and legend became most established. Fort Griffin, which was a frontier outpost west of Fort Worth near the Texas Panhandle, was known for its saloons and the rough element it attracted.

Lottie Deno both angered and intrigued the hard-bitten men of the Texas frontier forts. Beguiling and mysterious, she handled a deck of cards with maddening dexterity, cleaning out foolish soldiers who had just drawn their pay. Most of the regulars suspected that she cheated at cards, but none could catch her at it.

Once in Fort Griffin, two poker players stood up and shot each other dead across the table. The room emptied out, except for Lottie, who kept her chair at the faro table. When the sheriff ran in and told Lottie he could not see why she didn't run like everyone else. Lottie said, "You have never been a desperate woman."

One night, Doc won $3000 and broke the faro bank. Lottie took over and won all of Doc's money for herself.

http://keeping-the-peace.com

https://twitter.com/@oldwestauthor

O.K. Corral
04/13/2015

O.K. Corral

Big Nose Kate's Saloon - Tombstone AZ
04/06/2015

Big Nose Kate's Saloon - Tombstone AZ

In the 1800s saloons were open 24 hours a day in Tombstone. These included The Oriental, The Crystal Palace Saloon, The Eagle Saloon and The Alhambra. Saloons could be quite decadent and served more than just the watered down whiskey, famous in western movies. The Billiard Parlour at Kelly’s boasted in an 1880 advert in The Tombstone Nugget, that they served Pony Whiskey and Brandy, six-year-old Kentucky Apple Brandy, Gin Rum, Sherry, Port, English Ale, Scotch, Millers Extra and 26 different imported wines. The Oriental bragged at having piano and violin concerts every night and was lit with chandeliers.

Information extracted from: http://elenasandidge.com/2014/07/11/10-things-dont-know-tombstone/
and can also be found:
Tombstone's Treasure Silver Mines & Golden Saloons by Sherry Monahan

Big Nose Kate's Saloon - Tombstone AZ
03/31/2015

Big Nose Kate's Saloon - Tombstone AZ

What do you all think about this?

One of the notorious Cowboys
03/31/2015

One of the notorious Cowboys

March 24, 1882: William Brocius "Curley Bill" Graham was an outlaw from Texas, wanted for rustling, robbery, and murder. Fleeing to Arizona, he eventually ends up in Tombstone. Curly Bill started one of the first Cowboy-Earp clashes when he killed the Town Marshal Fred White on January 6, 1880. Wyatt Earp pistol whipped him in the street after the killing and sent him to jail. The Marshal declared the shooting an accident, and Curly Bill was released.Some of Curly Bills wilder escapades include holding a Reverend at gunpoint and forcing him to give them religious services, capturing and stuffing the ballot box at San Simon to make sure that Bob Paul did not get elected Sheriff, and ambushing a mule train of silver coming from Mexico. Curly Bill was the wildest and most reckless of the Cowboys. On March 24, 1882, Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday were on their trail of vengeance, to avenge the crippling of Virgil and the murder of Morgan. Curly Bill was killed by their posse, near Iron Springs, shot with two blasts from Wyatt Earps shotgun.

12 Things You Might Not Know About Wyatt Earp
03/19/2015
12 Things You Might Not Know About Wyatt Earp

12 Things You Might Not Know About Wyatt Earp

Neatorama presents a guest post from actor, comedian, and voiceover artist Eddie Deezen. Visit Eddie at his website.One of my all-time favorite films is Tombstone (1993), the greatest Western ever made -in my opinion (and with all due respect to the great John Wayne, who I love and am a major fan of…

Tombstone Chamber of Commerce
03/19/2015

Tombstone Chamber of Commerce

Lawman Morgan Earp was ambushed about 10 P.M. on Saturday, March 18, 1882. After going to see a musical, he went to play a late round of pool against owner Bob Hatch at the Campbell & Hatch Billiard Parlor on Allen Street, in Tombstone. A large number of men, including Wyatt, were watching. At 10:50 P.M., while Morgan was chalking his cue, several armed men crept up to the rear door of the pool hall, and two shots were fired into the room. The first slug entered the right side of Morgan's stomach, shattered his spinal column, and emerged to inflict a flesh wound in one of the onlookers, George Berry. Morgan collapsed, and Wyatt, who had been narrowly missed by the second bullet, went to his brother's side and, helped by Dan Tipton and Sherman McMasters, stretched the dying man out.

The rifle shots entered the lighted billiard parlor through a glass-windowed locked door which opened from the rear of the parlor onto a dark alley, which ran between Allen and Fremont Streets, along the side of the parlor. Three doctors rushed to the scene and stated that they could do nothing to help.
The bullet that hit Morgan shattered his spine and passed through his left kidney. After being shot, Morgan was unable to stand even with assistance, and said "This is the last game of pool I'll ever play." Wyatt reported in his biography years later that Morgan, before dying, whispered to Wyatt "I can't see a damned thing," a reference to supposed visions of Heaven seen by dying people, which Morgan and Wyatt had discussed on a previous occasion. To the last, Morgan's behavior is in keeping with what is known of him. He died less than an hour after being shot, while lying on a lounge in an adjoining card room of the billiard parlor, not on the billiard table, as some accounts report.

Morgan was surrounded by Wyatt, Virgil, James, Warren, and the Earp women. Morgan died less than an hour after being shot. It was generally thought that this revenge killing had been performed by Clanton sympathizers Frank Stilwell, Pete Spence, a gambler named Freis, and two half bloods, Florentino Cruz and "Indian Charley." His death sent Wyatt on a three-week rampage in the country around Tombstone, sometimes referred to as the Earp Vendetta Ride, killing anyone Wyatt believed was connected to Morgan's death. Wyatt believed that former Johnny Behan deputy and accused stage-robber Frank Stilwell fired the shot that hit Morgan, while the shot which missed Wyatt was fired by William Brocius, a.k.a. "Curly Bill". Both Stilwell and Brocius were killed in the vendetta.

After Morgan's death, he was laid out in a blue suit belonging to his friend Doc Holliday. His body was then taken by wagon on the next day (Sunday) by family and friends to the nearest railhead, in Benson. From there, accompanied by older brother James Earp, Morgan's body was sent to his family in Colton, California. On the following day (Monday), Virgil and his wife were accompanied under family guard to Tucson, in a second expedition. Morgan was first buried in the old city cemetery of Colton, near Mount Slover. When the cemetery was moved in 1892, Morgan's body was reburied in the Hermosa Cemetery in Colton.

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209 N 13th St
Griffin, GA
30223

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(770) 229-2705

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