The Titan Missile Museum

The Titan Missile Museum Titan II was the largest and most powerful ICBM America ever built. The Titan Missile Museum invites you to come and see this wonder of the Cold War!
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Open daily except Thanksgiving and Christmas.

The museum has a couple of updates for everyone.  First, please note that our summer hours are now in effect.  Sunday - ...
05/04/2019

The museum has a couple of updates for everyone. First, please note that our summer hours are now in effect. Sunday - Friday hours are 9:45am to 4:00pm. Saturday hours remain the same--8:45am to 5:00pm. Second, we're doing some access road and parking lot repairs the entire week of May 13. So watch for the signs and traffic control.

In the wee hours of the morning on May 1, Global Strike Command conducted a successful test launch of a Minuteman III IC...
05/02/2019
Minuteman III GT230M

In the wee hours of the morning on May 1, Global Strike Command conducted a successful test launch of a Minuteman III ICBM pulled from Minot AFB. Here's some video of the launch.

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile launches during an operational test at 2:42 A.M. Pacific Time May 1, 2019, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.

So, this is what YouTube thinks Chuck is saying when he talks about one of the shock isolated platforms in the silo.  Wo...
04/27/2019

So, this is what YouTube thinks Chuck is saying when he talks about one of the shock isolated platforms in the silo. Wouldn't the world be a better place if MAD had been about protecting our nuclear chocolate?

04/27/2019
The Most Dangerous Toy in the World

Check out one of the most dangerous toys ever produced, the Gilbert U-238 Atomic Energy Lab. It came complete with 3 separate sources of radiation!

What is the world’s most dangerous toy? Ranking pretty highly on the list is probably the Gilbert U-238 Atomic Energy Lab, created by the company A.C. Gilber...

April 7-13 is National Volunteer Week, a time when we are reminded to thank our volunteers, for surely the visitor exper...
04/07/2019

April 7-13 is National Volunteer Week, a time when we are reminded to thank our volunteers, for surely the visitor experience at the Titan Missile Museum would not be the same without their selfless dedication and service. Our volunteers are the museum’s ambassadors to the world. They greet our visitors and make them feel welcome. They provide safety briefings to everyone before they go on the tour; they give all of our tours; they volunteer in the classroom to teach our visiting school groups; they work in the archive and in administration; and they help keep the missile silo clean and functioning in good order. They help the museum in so many different ways, and because of their enthusiasm, support and tireless efforts, the Titan Missile Museum is thriving. If you visit the museum this week, please take an extra moment to thank our volunteers for their service. If you’re a friend of the museum, please comment on this post and thank our volunteers. I have said this before, and I’ll say it again, the volunteers at the Titan Missile Museum are the best of the best. OUR VOLUNTEERS ROCK!!!

04/06/2019
Blast Door Operation

Four blast doors in each Titan II missile site contributed to the security and survivability of the missile sites. In this video, Chuck takes a deep dive into their operation. Get some popcorn and settle in. This video is 11 minutes long!

03/24/2019
Silo 1A

Continuing our exploration of level 1 of the silo, here's a short primer on silo level 1A where the rest of the equipment is located that operates the silo closure door. Enjoy.

03/16/2019
Silo 1C

The silo closure door covered the launch duct and protected the Titan II on a daily basis. That protection came with a weight of 760 tons. Yet during the launch sequence, the silo closure door opened in just 19 seconds! Here's a short primer on Silo level 1C where some of the equipment that operated the silo closure door is located. Enjoy!

03/09/2019
Deluge system

A number of engineering developments made the Titan II a credible threat. One such development was the water deluge system that made it possible to launch the Titan II from its underground launch duct. Here's a short primer on how it worked. Enjoy!

03/02/2019
Level 2--the far side

Hello Everyone. Here's a short primer on the far side of level 2 of the missile silo. Enjoy!

Status update on Friday afternoon at 1pm.  We are resuming limited tours for people wearing rubber soled shoes and who c...
02/22/2019

Status update on Friday afternoon at 1pm. We are resuming limited tours for people wearing rubber soled shoes and who can descend and climb 55 stair steps. The elevator is not available for use. Watch this page for updates. When the temperature starts to drop, tours will be discontinued and we'll post a notice here.

This is not something we thought we'd ever see at the museum.  A big shout out to Brady McCahey for his excellent snowma...
02/22/2019

This is not something we thought we'd ever see at the museum. A big shout out to Brady McCahey for his excellent snowman! We've got several inches of snow and the steps in to the missile site are iced over. We're not able to give tours at this time. We're hoping it's going to warm up, but if you're planning to visit the museum on Friday or Saturday morning, February 22 and 23, please call before you come so we can give you the tour status. Enjoy the photos and if you can play in the snow today, have a great time. Thanks for the photos Judie!

The Titan Missile Museum is featured on Rosie on the The House this coming Saturday.  Give a listen at 7am on KGVY  1080...
02/14/2019

The Titan Missile Museum is featured on Rosie on the The House this coming Saturday. Give a listen at 7am on KGVY 1080AM/100.7FM and KNST 790AM Tucson. Thanks for the support!

Did you hear who are surprise guest was last week? Rosie joined up for the 9 and 10 am hour and is planning a repeat performance! Tune in as we entertain and inform our Arizona friends.
10am - Plumbing trends, repair or replace plumbing fixtures, and Cost vs Value report continued- with Rosie!
9am#water heater- learn to drain yours! Open hour for you and your questions!
8am Jay Harper in studio talking Tomatoes and Peppers
7am Learn the intriguing story of the The Titan Missile Museum from Museum Director, Yvonne Morris who was a crew chief when the Missiles were active.
https://www.rosieonthehouse.com/blog/new-plumbing-trends

RED ALERT!  On February 26, 2019 the Titan Missile Museum will close early at 4pm for our annual event to honor our awes...
02/14/2019

RED ALERT! On February 26, 2019 the Titan Missile Museum will close early at 4pm for our annual event to honor our awesome volunteers. The last tour of the day will be at 2:45pm. Thank you for your support and understanding!

02/02/2019
Secret Ladder

Here's a short primer on the "secret" ladder on level 5. Chuck could tell you more, but then we'd have to...well you know. Enjoy!

01/30/2019
Targeting

Here's a short primer on the targeting system for Titan II. Enjoy!

01/19/2019
Weather Gear

Here's a short primer on the weather gear at the missile sites.

01/12/2019
Preventing Intruders

In this short primer Chuck explains why intruders were not a problem at the missile sites.

01/11/2019
HF Hard Antenna

Here's a short primer on the HF hard antenna. You'll need to boost your audio in the first portion of the video before Chuck descends into the HF antenna silo and turn it down once he's inside the antenna silo. Enjoy!

01/05/2019
Propellant Vapor Detection

In previous posts Chuck has explained how propellant was loaded and unloaded from the missile. Now here's an overview of the system that was used to monitor the missile sites for propellant leaks.

Happy New Year!
01/01/2019

Happy New Year!

12/29/2018
Oxi burner

Here's a short primer on the oxidizer burner. Enjoy!

Happy Holidays from everyone at the Titan Missile Museum!  50 years ago today, on Christmas Eve 1968, Apollo 8 Astronaut...
12/24/2018

Happy Holidays from everyone at the Titan Missile Museum! 50 years ago today, on Christmas Eve 1968, Apollo 8 Astronaut Bill Anders captured “Earthrise,” one of the most iconic photographs of the space age. May the coming year bring us all the peace and beauty promised by this photo. Photo: NASA.gov

12/21/2018
Dump Tanks

Here's a short primer on the propellant dump tanks. Enjoy!

12/11/2018
Blast Dampers

Here's a short primer on the purpose and operation of the blast dampers. Enjoy!

11/24/2018
Battery Power

Here's a short primer on the batteries and motor generator located on level 3 of the control center. Enjoy!

11/14/2018
IRCS system

Here's a primer on the IRCS communications system. Enjoy!

We know a  lot of our friends and fans have been anxiously waiting for us to post our Top to Bottom Tour Schedule for 20...
11/04/2018

We know a lot of our friends and fans have been anxiously waiting for us to post our Top to Bottom Tour Schedule for 2019. The good news is that the schedule is almost done! We'll be posting it late on November 6 and accepting reservations for 2019 Top to Bottom Tours beginning on November 7.

“The island of Elugelab is missing!”  This is what Atomic Energy Commission Chairman Gordon Dean said to President D...
11/01/2018

“The island of Elugelab is missing!” This is what Atomic Energy Commission Chairman Gordon Dean said to President Dwight Eisenhower when he explained the results of the first US test of a thermonuclear (hydrogen) device. Code named Ivy Mike (“M” for megaton), the test was conducted on November 1, 1952 (shortly before Eisenhower's election) on the island of Elugelab in the Eniwetok Atoll in the Marshall Islands about 3,000 miles west of Hawaii. The Ivy Mike device—it wasn’t a deliverable bomb since it weighed in at a hefty 82 tons—produced a fireball that was 3 miles wide and reached a height of 120,000 feet. The mushroom cloud that followed the fireball was 100 miles wide. The yield of the explosion was a little over 10 megatons, more than 700 times larger than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. Elugelab was vaporized and the crater left behind was more than a mile wide and more than 160 feet deep.

New documents released by the National Security Archive provide an interesting insight on the origins of nuclear nonprol...
10/29/2018
60th Anniversary of Irish Resolution: A Forerunner of the NPT | National Security Archive

New documents released by the National Security Archive provide an interesting insight on the origins of nuclear nonproliferation starting with the Irish Resolution.

Washington D.C., October 29, 2018 — Sixty years ago, in October 1958, Irish Minister of External Affairs Frank Aiken bought before the United Nations the first version of a resolution addressing the dangers of nuclear proliferation. U.S. State Department officials initially found it “potentially...

We had an interesting weather day at the museum today. The lightening photo is by Chuck Penson.  The rainbow photo is by...
10/24/2018

We had an interesting weather day at the museum today. The lightening photo is by Chuck Penson. The rainbow photo is by Craig Bennett.

October 16, 1962:  On this day in history President John F. Kennedy was briefed by the CIA that an American U-2 spy plan...
10/16/2018

October 16, 1962: On this day in history President John F. Kennedy was briefed by the CIA that an American U-2 spy plane had taken photographs of Soviet nuclear missile launch sites under construction in Cuba—sites that could launch missiles capable of reaching the US. Over the next 13 days the Cuban Missile Crisis would unfold, bringing the US and the former Soviet Union the closest we have ever been to nuclear war. Read more about it here: http://www.titanmissilemuseum.org/pdf/CubanMissileCrisis.pdf
The crisis ultimately came to a peaceful resolution with both sides having learned valuable lessons about avoiding nuclear conflict. President Kennedy later said in a speech at American University in June of 1963: “Above all, while defending our own vital interests, nuclear powers must avert those confrontations which bring an adversary to the choice of either a humiliating defeat or a nuclear war.” Thirteen Days, a Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Robert F. Kennedy, p. 97 (W.W. Norton & Company, New York, 1968). His words are just as meaningful 55 years later. Photo courtesy of www.cia.gov

10/09/2018
Titan Launch

Here's some archival footage of a Titan II test launch. To go along with it, you can download the launch checklist from the museum's website here: http://www.titanmissilemuseum.org/pdf/launch_checklist.pdf
We're working on conververting other documents to PDFs that can be downloaded from our website. We'll post alerts as other documents become available. Enjoy!

10/07/2018
Titan II Antennas

In this short video Chuck explains all of the antennas that are visible on the surface of the missile site.

ICYMI:  FEMA intends to conduct a nationwide test of the Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) and Emergency Alert System (EAS...
10/02/2018

ICYMI: FEMA intends to conduct a nationwide test of the Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) and Emergency Alert System (EAS) on October 3, 2018. The WEA portion of the test commences at 2:18 p.m. EDT, and the EAS portion follows at 2:20 p.m. EDT. Cell towers will broadcast the WEA test for approximately 30 minutes beginning at 2:18 p.m. EDT. During this time, WEA compatible cell phones that are switched on, within range of an active cell tower, and whose wireless provider participates in WEA should be capable of receiving the test message. Some cell phones will not receive the test message, and cell phones should only receive the message once. The WEA test message will have a header that reads "Presidential Alert" and text that says: “THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.” Read all about it here: https://www.fema.gov/emergency-alert-test
Photo: FEMA
Also ICYMI, according to an article from Bloomberg.com (complete with cartoon illustrations), if their cell phones ever receive an actual Presidential alert of IMPENDING DOOM, here’s how some people will respond: https://www.bloomberg.com/features/2018-rich-new-zealand-doomsday-preppers/.

October 4 marks the 61st anniversary of the tiny beep heard around the world.  The Soviet Union launched Earth’s first...
10/02/2018

October 4 marks the 61st anniversary of the tiny beep heard around the world. The Soviet Union launched Earth’s first artificial satellite, Sputnik-1, on October 4, 1957, and it announced its presence for all to hear as it orbited the globe. Sputnik -1 was launched on an R-7 rocket from the 5th Tyuratam test range in Kazakhstan, now the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Located about 125 miles east of the Aral Sea, it was founded on June 2, 1955 as a long-range missile center. The US first learned of its existence when a U-2 high-altitude reconnaissance plane found and photographed the complex for the first time on August 5, 1957. Baikonur is the world’s oldest and largest operational space launch facility.
Sputnik-1—meaning “Co-traveler-1”—was the first artificial satellite to be put in geocentric orbit around the Earth. It was the first of 41 satellites that would be launched by the former Soviet Union as part of the Sputnik Program. The space age had dawned. Sputnik -1 was almost 23 inches (58 cm) in diameter—more than twice the size of a basketball—and it weighed almost 184 pounds (83.6 kg). It traveled at 18,000 miles/hour (28,968km) and emitted radio signals from two transmitters at 20.005 and 40.002 MHz. These signals were monitored by Amateur radio operators around the world for 22 days, until the transmitter batteries ran out on October 26, 1957. Sputnik-1 had four antennas, and its sphere was polished to a high sheen to aid in tracking by telescopes. Sputnik-1 traveled 1,440 orbits, or 37 million miles, around the earth before its orbit decayed and it re-entered Earth’s atmosphere in early January of 1958. Hear the beep, beep, beep that started it all here: https://history.nasa.gov/sputnik/
Sputnik’s launch came as an unnerving surprise to the US and the impact of this tiny satellite can still be felt today. Average Americans worried that the US was losing its technological edge over the Soviets. To the US military analysists and planners, Sputnik signaled something even more sinister. The Soviets had recently announced that they had successfully tested an ICBM that was capable of reaching targets in the United States. If the Soviet Union could launch a satellite into space, then its claims about an ICBM that could reach America were probably true. Sputnik-1 launched the Space Race and the Arms Race between the US and the Soviet Union. US plans for an ICBM program that had been shelved years earlier because they were too costly were dusted off and the concept of the Titan II ICBM was born in 1958.

The nuclear “football” is the stuff of legends, movies, and much debate.  Recently declassified documents published ...
09/29/2018

The nuclear “football” is the stuff of legends, movies, and much debate. Recently declassified documents published by the National Security Archive indicate that Russian President Boris Yeltsin thought that the US and Russian should get rid of their nuclear footballs. But President Bill Clinton declined to do so because he viewed the nuclear football as a symbol of the civilian control of nuclear weapons. Read more about the nuclear football and President Yeltsin’s discussion with President Clinton here: https://nsarchive.gwu.edu/briefing-book/nuclear-vault/2018-07-09/presidential-control-nuclear-weapons-football
Photo courtesy of William J. Clinton Presidential Library

Are you interested in researching and preserving your family history? Do you want to know the story of your home or neig...
09/29/2018

Are you interested in researching and preserving your family history? Do you want to know the story of your home or neighborhood? Do you know someone who has a passion for southern Arizona history?

More than 15 organizations are coming together to present the Southern Arizona Archives Bazaar on Saturday, November 3, 11 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Arizona History Museum, 949 E. 2nd St. The event is free and open to the public. Free parking is available at Main Gate Garage.

This is the chance to talk with experts and enjoy workshops about preserving your family history and digital files, genealogy and property history research. Be sure to visit the information booths to learn more about the historical collections available throughout the southern Arizona region.

“This is the first time the public will have an opportunity to explore the historical collections of more than 15 Southern Arizona repositories under one roof. If you want to learn more about history and culture, and the resources available, this event is the place for you” says Alexis Peregoy, Associate Archivist at the Center for Creative Photography. The Titan Missile Museum will be there, along with the 390th Memorial Museum, Arizona Council for Professional Genealogists, Arizona Historical Society, Arizona Queer Archives, Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum, Center for Creative Photography, Jewish History Museum/Holocaust History Center, Pima County Genealogy Society, Tohono O’odham Nation Cultural Center and Museum, University of Arizona Libraries, Special Collections, University of Arizona Museum of Art Archives of Visual Arts and many more!
For more information, visit https://southernazarchivesbazaar.wordpress.com/

Address

1580 W Duval Mine Rd
Green Valley, AZ
85614

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Opening Hours

Monday 09:45 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:45 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:45 - 17:00
Thursday 09:45 - 17:00
Friday 09:45 - 17:00
Saturday 08:45 - 17:00
Sunday 09:45 - 17:00

Telephone

(520) 625-7736

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