National Museum of the American Sailor

National Museum of the American Sailor Welcome to the National Museum of the American Sailor, an official Navy museum dedicated to telling the story of the Navy's enlisted Sailor!
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Kamikaze pilots were first used during the Battle of Leyte Gulf in 1944 when they successfully sank the USS St. Lo (CVE-...
04/17/2020

Kamikaze pilots were first used during the Battle of Leyte Gulf in 1944 when they successfully sank the USS St. Lo (CVE-63) causing her to go down with all 114 hands. However, it was during the Battle for Okinawa that they truly wreaked havoc and instilled fear in U.S. naval forces. The Japanese named the attack Operation Kikusui or 'Floating Chrysanthemums'. Kamikaze pilots were typically young, minimally trained Japanese men, who sought glory in sacrificing their lives for the honor of their families. At the start of WWII, Japanese naval pilots received 700 hours of training, but that number was reduced to just seven days of training by 1944. The pilots were only taught how to take off, fly in formation and where to slam into ships to inflict the most damage possible. Kamikazes were not trained how to navigate nor land because those skills were unnecessary for their mission. During Okinawa, hundreds of kamikazes dive bombed the U.S. Fifth Fleet in waves that seemed like they would never end. Totally unfazed by antiaircraft fire, the kamikaze pilots became human missiles slamming into U.S. ships. According to the Naval History and Heritage Command, at Okinawa alone, at least thirty U.S. ships were sunk and many more damaged. By wars end, over 300 ships and 15,000 men were killed by kamikazes. Apart from the 9/11 hijackers, the U.S. would not see this type of warfare after the end of WWII.
#Okinawa75 #WWII75 #NavyReadiness

#OTD in 1915, Chief Gunner’s Mate Frank W. Crilley is working on the salvage operation of sunken submarine USS F-4 (SS-2...
04/17/2020

#OTD in 1915, Chief Gunner’s Mate Frank W. Crilley is working on the salvage operation of sunken submarine USS F-4 (SS-23). USS F-4 experienced loss of depth control and sunk in 300 feet of water off the coast of Honolulu on March 25, 1915. All 21 men on the sub perished. On April 17th during the salvage operation, CGM William F. Loughman found himself entangled and trapped 250 feet below the surface. Facing certain death due to the immense water pressure and the amount of time already underwater, CGM Crilley acted quickly and put on a diving suit to save Loughman. After 2 hours and 11 minutes, both Crilley and Loughman returned to the surface alive. For this act of courageousness and skill, CGM Crilley is awarded the MoH in 1929 by President Coolidge. CGM Crilley is our #SailorSpotlight this week. CGM Crilley went on to assist in numerous other salvage operations during his naval career, including the ill-fated USS Squalus (SS-192) in 1939. In addition to the MoH, CGM Crilley is awarded the Navy Cross for going above the call of duty as a diver during the salvage of USS S-4 (SS-109) that sank in icy waters off the coast of Massachusetts in December 1927. The USS Crilley (YHLC-1) was named in honor of CGM Crilley. #NavyReadiness

#OTD the USS Bowers (DE-637) is struck by a kamikaze in 1945 off the coast of Okinawa. Upon her arrival to Okinawa on Ap...
04/16/2020

#OTD the USS Bowers (DE-637) is struck by a kamikaze in 1945 off the coast of Okinawa. Upon her arrival to Okinawa on April 1st, Bowers was assigned to radar picket duty then later antisubmarine screen duty. She successfully fended off multiple kamikaze attacks, with her gunners splashing down three planes. On April 16, 1945, the Bowers ran out of luck and a kamikaze hit the ships flying bridge. High octane fuel sprayed all over the bridge and pilot house. The planes bomb continued to rip into the ship for twenty feet before detonating. The crew had the fire under control in less than an hour, but major damage was inflicted. 37 men from the ship were killed, 11 were reported missing, and many of her 56 wounded died later. Under her own power, Bowers made way to Pearl Harbor and eventually to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for conversion to a high-speed transport vessel. USS Bowers was redesignated APD-40 on June 25, 1945. The USS Bowers earned four battle stars for her service during WWII. #Okinawa75 #WWII75 #NavyReadiness

Standing beside the Stars and Stripes, a soldier watches his battalion wade the shallow reef to the shore of the Ryukyus...
04/16/2020

Standing beside the Stars and Stripes, a soldier watches his battalion wade the shallow reef to the shore of the Ryukyus Islands, Okinawa. Note the naval fleet in the background. April 1945. NHHC Photo # 80-G-314687. #Okinawa75 #WWII75 #NavyReadiness

The USS Solace (AH-5) started off as the passenger ship SS Iroquois before receiving her coat of white paint and signatu...
04/15/2020

The USS Solace (AH-5) started off as the passenger ship SS Iroquois before receiving her coat of white paint and signature red cross. Acquired by the Navy in 1940 and commissioned the USS Solace in August 1941, the ship was designated to become a floating hospital. The USS Solace was stationed just north of Battlefield Row in Pearl Harbor when she saw her first real action on December 7, 1941 during the Attack on Pearl Harbor. Surgeons and corpsmen on the Solace immediately sprung into action and sent out crews to rescue men trapped onboard the blazing USS Arizona (BB-39) and USS West Virginia (BB-48). The rescue teams bravely went into harms way to help those struggling in the water and oil slicks. At 8:20 AM- less than an hour after the attack- the Solace received her first critically injured patients. In total the USS Solace received and treated 141 patients during the attack. She would go on to play a vital role in battles all around the Pacific, especially in the Iwo Jima and Okinawa Campaigns. USS Solace was decommissioned in March 1946 and sold to the Turkish Maritime Line. #Okinawa75 #WWII75 #NavyReadiness

Who doesn’t feel a swell of pride when they see the flag flying? Do we ever think about where the flags come from? In 19...
04/15/2020

Who doesn’t feel a swell of pride when they see the flag flying? Do we ever think about where the flags come from? In 1917, women worked in flag shops to create the flags needed for the Navy. Photo by Bain News Service, from the Library of Congress. #NavyReadiness

Looking for an #AtHomeActivity to keep the kids entertained? Check out this cool DIY anemometer project from the Southea...
04/14/2020

Looking for an #AtHomeActivity to keep the kids entertained? Check out this cool DIY anemometer project from the Southeast Regional Climate Center (SERCC) at the University of North Carolina! Wind can be difficult to measure because it is hard to see and moves quickly. To measure wind speed and pressure, the Navy uses a special gadget called an anemometer. The USN primarily relies on two types of anemometers, vane and cup anemometers pictured below. Measuring wind speed can help naval aviators predict if a storm is approaching and provides important data to those on the flight deck. Build an anemometer at home and see if YOU can predict an incoming storm!
Directions-https://sercc.com/education_files/anemometer.pdf
#NavyReadiness #NavyMuseumFromHome

Hello? Can you hear me?  The USN uses signal flags. Here LT Maureen P. Gardner spends her off hours on the USS Repose “t...
04/14/2020

Hello? Can you hear me? The USN uses signal flags. Here LT Maureen P. Gardner spends her off hours on the USS Repose “talking” to other ships. From Naval History and Heritage Command. #NavyReadiness

Our Administrative Officer Therese, received some help today from Libby while preparing the budget report. Great work, L...
04/13/2020

Our Administrative Officer Therese, received some help today from Libby while preparing the budget report. Great work, Libby 12/10! #NavyReadiness #NavyMuseumFromHome

Happy 277th birthday, Thomas Jefferson! The nation's third president may not have always been the Navy's biggest fan, bu...
04/13/2020
Happy Birthday Thomas Jefferson - National Archives Foundation

Happy 277th birthday, Thomas Jefferson! The nation's third president may not have always been the Navy's biggest fan, but we won't hold that against him. Join the US National Archives for a livestream storytime and Q&A with Thomas Jefferson himself, beginning in 15 minutes.

Thomas Jefferson Livestream Date: Monday, April 13 Time: 1:00 p.m. ET On Monday, April 13, Thomas Jefferson will join us for a live, virtual event to celebrate his birthday. Elementary school kids and parents will love this fun, educational opportunity, …

Lions and tigers and bears! Oh my! The Navy has a long tradition of animal mascots serving on ships. Here Coxswain Degle...
04/13/2020

Lions and tigers and bears! Oh my! The Navy has a long tradition of animal mascots serving on ships. Here Coxswain Deglen feeds their bear mascot during the Great White Fleet World cruise circa 1908. From the Collection of Lieutenant Commander Richard Wainwright, Jr., 1928. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command. #NavyReadiness

Today's Easter Sunday may look different this year, but sailors are used to celebrating holidays in extreme circumstance...
04/12/2020

Today's Easter Sunday may look different this year, but sailors are used to celebrating holidays in extreme circumstances. On April 1, 1945 Marines and Navy Seabees attend an open-air Easter service on the blood-stained island of Iwo Jima. A small choir sings, accompanied by organ music. Meanwhile, fellow Marines and Army troops invade Okinawa, hundreds of miles away from this small Easter service. #Okinawa75 #WWII75 #NavyReadiness

Long before the days of video calls, group calls, and virtual meetings, sailors sent postcards to their loved ones back ...
04/10/2020
Old School Communications

Long before the days of video calls, group calls, and virtual meetings, sailors sent postcards to their loved ones back home for news about their time in the Navy. Read more about this Old School Communication on our blog!

Feeling inspired? Postcards and letters are still a fun way to communicate with friends and family.

For most recruits, their time is Naval Station Great Lakes is their first time away from home. They take on new experiences and carry the memories of the loved ones they’ve left. For some, it’s a w…

Have you wiped down the surfaces of your home today?  It probably takes you quite a bit of time, but can you image clean...
04/10/2020

Have you wiped down the surfaces of your home today? It probably takes you quite a bit of time, but can you image cleaning all the surfaces of a naval ship instead? It would take ages! Here are some sailors doing just that sometime between 1890 and 1901. Don’t forget to wipe down your phone! Photo by Detroit Publishing Co. From Library of Congress. #NavyReadiness

#OTD  the USS Sterett (DD-407) is attacked by kamikaze during the Battle for Okinawa. This photograph is from April 11, ...
04/09/2020

#OTD the USS Sterett (DD-407) is attacked by kamikaze during the Battle for Okinawa. This photograph is from April 11, 1945 when the ship was towed to nearby Kerama Retto for repairs. Collection of Lieutenant David Longmaid, USNR. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.
Catalog #: NH 98062. Photo Courtesy of NHHC.
#Okinawa75 #WWII75 #NavyReadiness

Communication is key during this time we are all physically apart. Here J.M. Price, Signalman First Class sends a light ...
04/09/2020

Communication is key during this time we are all physically apart. Here J.M. Price, Signalman First Class sends a light signal message from the USS Dyess (DD-880) to USS Turner (DD-834) in the Mediterranean on 2 December 1968. From the National Archives. #NavyReadiness

Our Archivist wears many hats; she also serves as our Records Manager! Here she is seen in her natural habitat, attempti...
04/08/2020

Our Archivist wears many hats; she also serves as our Records Manager! Here she is seen in her natural habitat, attempting to unmask the complexities of Records Retention Schedules. #NavyMuseumFromHome #NavyReadiness

Do you know what day it is? It's Hump Day! While on a world cruise of the Great White Fleet, three sailors experienced t...
04/08/2020

Do you know what day it is? It's Hump Day! While on a world cruise of the Great White Fleet, three sailors experienced the rolling gait of camels instead of the rolling of the sea on a visit to the Sphinx in Egypt circa 4 January 1909. From the Collection of Chief Quartermaster John Harold. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command. #NavyReadiness

The U.S. Navy Sub Force celebrates their birthday on April 11th. Test your submarine knowledge this #TriviaTuesday. Thes...
04/07/2020

The U.S. Navy Sub Force celebrates their birthday on April 11th. Test your submarine knowledge this #TriviaTuesday. These 12-ships, part of the _____ class will replace the existing Ohio-class nuclear ballistic submarine force; the first patrol of the lead ship, SSBN 826, is scheduled for its first patrol in FY 2031. Happy 120th Birthday Sub Force!
A. Virginia Class
B. Columbia Class
C. Seawolf Class
D. Balao Class

#NavyReadiness

#OTD in 1945 during the Battle for Okinawa, Carrier Task Force 58, part of the Navy’s Fifth Fleet, sunk the largest batt...
04/07/2020

#OTD in 1945 during the Battle for Okinawa, Carrier Task Force 58, part of the Navy’s Fifth Fleet, sunk the largest battleship of all time. Under the command of VADM Marc Mitscher, the airmen of TF 58 rained down machine gun fire and torpedoes on the mighty Japanese battleship Yamato. She displaced nearly 72,000 tons, had an overall length of 863 ft. and a top speed of 27 knots. In comparison, the newly constructed U.S. Iowa-class battleships were about 887 ft. long, had a top speed of 33 knots but only displaced 45,000 tons. When the Yamato exploded, a black plume of smoke was visible on the Japanese mainland over one-hundred miles away. #Okinawa75 #WWII75 #NavyReadiness

Today we’re remembering Bill Withers, who passed last week at the age of 81. An icon of soul music, Withers spent nine y...
04/06/2020
3x Grammy Award winner, Navy vet Bill Withers dies at 81

Today we’re remembering Bill Withers, who passed last week at the age of 81. An icon of soul music, Withers spent nine years in the Navy as an aviation mechanic. Fair winds and following seas, shipmate.
#NavyReadiness

He passed away Monday in Los Angeles due to heart complications.

With all your time at home, have you changed your social media profile pictures anytime soon?  A carte-de-visite was the...
04/06/2020

With all your time at home, have you changed your social media profile pictures anytime soon? A carte-de-visite was the original profile picture. They were calling cards popular in the 1850s-1860s to give to friends. Here is a carte-de-visite of Ensign Francis W. Sanborn in his USN uniform. Photo by F. Forshew. From the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.
#NavyReadiness

If I fits, I sits! Happy Cat-urday! Ship Cat Wockle poses on the capstan of USS Flusser (DD-289) in Italy circa 1934-193...
04/04/2020

If I fits, I sits! Happy Cat-urday! Ship Cat Wockle poses on the capstan of USS Flusser (DD-289) in Italy circa 1934-1935. From Jack Howland,1892. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command.
#NavyReadiness

Did you know that the first naval hospital ship has roots in Illinois? Upon seizure from the Confederacy in 1862, Union ...
04/03/2020

Did you know that the first naval hospital ship has roots in Illinois? Upon seizure from the Confederacy in 1862, Union forces began to outfit what would be known as the USS Red Rover for hospital purposes. Renovations were completed in Cairo, IL which is the southernmost city in the state. The USS Red Rover was ready for Civil War service on June 10, 1862 and received its first patient on June 11th. Throughout the war, she would move patients up and down the Mississippi River and her tributaries to less crowded hospitals away from the battlefront. USS Red Rover was decommissioned on November 17, 1865. During her career, she admitted over 2,400 patients.
In May, keep an eye out for a blog on the USS Red Rover and naval hospital ships written by our Archivist, Jennifer.
#navyreadiness

Some days we all need a little pep in our step, especially on a Friday when we are all stuck in the house! Here is a Chi...
04/03/2020

Some days we all need a little pep in our step, especially on a Friday when we are all stuck in the house! Here is a Chief and goat helping lead the crowd in rousing cheers at the San Diego stadium in the 1920's. From the scrapbooks of Fred M. Butler. Courtesy of Mrs. C.R. DeSpain, Forrest Knolls, Maryland. From Naval History and Heritage Command.
#NavyReadiness

At home activity alert! In the 1800s, bored sailors kept themselves occupied by carving scrimshaw. Today, bored kiddos c...
04/02/2020

At home activity alert! In the 1800s, bored sailors kept themselves occupied by carving scrimshaw. Today, bored kiddos can create soap scrimshaw! Curator of Education Tricia made this piece with items she found around the house - an extra bar of soap, a paper clip, push pin, and ashes from her fire pit. Find complete instructions for this activity on our website: www.history.navy.mil/nmas
#NavyReadiness #NavyMuseumFromHome

04/02/2020
U.S. Navy

Take a virtual mini vacation to Boston for a tour of the USS Constitution! This livestream is appropriate for all ages and will take you behind the scenes on America’s Ship of State.

When the museum reopens to the public, check out our newest exhibit- Sails Unfurled: The Dawn of the United States Navy, 1776-1865 that features a recreated ships deck based on the Constitution.

We are LIVE with a Virtual Tour of USS Constitution This tour is educational for all ages and provides a unique chance to learn about the world’s oldest commissioned warship afloat, “Old Ironsides.” Ask us questions in the comments.

We all have stocked pantries, but can you imagine how much food you would need stocked away to feed a whole ship of sail...
04/02/2020

We all have stocked pantries, but can you imagine how much food you would need stocked away to feed a whole ship of sailors? Here a battleship’s bakery produces lemon pies. From U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command.
#NavyReadiness

Happy Birthday, CPO’s!#NavyReadiness
04/01/2020

Happy Birthday, CPO’s!
#NavyReadiness

Happy Birthday to all the U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officers around the fleet! Today we celebrate the anchor you all earn every day. May you all continue to lead, your guidance is needed now more than ever.

#OTD in 1945 the start of the three month battle for Okinawa (Codename: Operation Iceberg) began. More than 1,600 ships ...
04/01/2020

#OTD in 1945 the start of the three month battle for Okinawa (Codename: Operation Iceberg) began. More than 1,600 ships and 350,000 naval personnel from task forces under ADM Raymond Spruance’s overall command would assemble to form the largest amphibious assault force of WWII. Their objective would be to secure the island of Okinawa, thus removing the last barrier standing between the U.S. forces and Japan. With both this and Iwo Jima firmly in hand, the U.S. military could finally bring its full might to bear upon the Japanese. The U.S. Navy lost 32 ships and craft, mostly by kamikaze attacks, and 368 ships and craft were damaged. 763 aircraft were lost with over 4,900 sailors killed or MIA, with an additional 4,824 being wounded. Okinawa was declared secure on June 21, 1945. #Okinawa75 #WWII75 #NavyReadiness

Address

Building 42, 2531 Sheridan Road
Great Lakes, IL
60088

Public transportation to the National Museum of the American Sailor is available via Metra's Union Pacific North Line. The train stop is Great Lakes, and the museum is located north of the station at the Naval Station Great Lakes Gate 1.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(847) 688-3154

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National Museum of the American Sailor

As an official Department of the Navy Museum under the Naval History and Heritage Command, the National Museum of the American Sailor’s mission is to collect, preserve, and interpret the history of the United States Navy’s Enlisted Sailor for the benefit of the US. Navy and the people of the United States.

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I found this in a local antique store and thought I would share it. It indicates it is Recruit Company 1009 of 1942 and dated October 2, 1942.
went in the NAVY 1961
HAPPY 4TH OF JULY TO ALL OF YOU SAILORS 🇺🇸⚓️🇺🇸⚓️ BE BLESSED AND STAY SAFE ALWAYS SEMPER FI
**Help Support the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery Memorial Campaign** @SSHMarinersGenealogy The Descendants of Sailors’ Snug Harbor Mariners have been reaching out to Historical and Genealogical Societies, Museums, Military Veterans Groups, and Concerned Citizens, to invite them to join a Letters of Support Campaign to support their efforts to gain access to the old Sailors’ Snug Harbor Cemetery on Staten Island to honor their Ancestors, and all of the 6,500 Merchant and Naval Mariners interred there (1834-1976), by installing a Memorial Monument (Obelisk) and holding an annual Memorial Service. Some of the Mariners were famous Sea Captains and some sailed on famous Merchant and Naval ships dating back to the American Revolution. Many were just average seamen whom sailed and endured for many years on the sea under arduous conditions. Sadly, the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery is devoid of gravestones or markers, except for 15 remaining gravestones. The Cemetery is closed and not open to the public. The Board of Trustees of Sailors' Snug Harbor have rejected the Descendants' requests to access the SSH Cemetery to honor their Ancestors. The Descendants are collecting Letters of Support to persuade the Trustees of Sailors’ Snug Harbor to change their decision. For more information and Support Letter Writing Instructions, use the following link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sZv5VFLNWw0HA-pW2i33RhbgVFQ6oExx
I have two electronics training books in better condition than the one on display that I would to donate to the Great Lakes Museum. Can I mail them to you? Address? Donald Helgeson, 847 676 4604