Arcadia Exhibitions

A nationally recognized venue for contemporary art in the greater Philadelphia area, Arcadia University Art Gallery is a 1,100-square-foot facility (housed in a 1893 power station) that has for over 30 years provided the region with a stimulating roster of individual and thematic exhibitions shaped by its mission to encourage dialogue among artists, educators, students and the general public about current visual art and its socio-cultural relevance. Along with bringing the work of previously unexhibited or unknown artists to our region, the Arcadia University Gallery is also committed to local artists, actively encouraging innovative approaches to art production and acknowledging the contribution of long-standing, influential members of the art community. Educational programs invite the artists and highly respected scholars and curators to discuss each exhibition with the public.

Thank you to all who attended the opening night of “Tamsen Wojtanowski: Between My Finite Eyes” and “Jennifer Manz...
04/29/2019

Thank you to all who attended the opening night of “Tamsen Wojtanowski: Between My Finite Eyes” and “Jennifer Manzella: City Blocks” on April 18!

Tamsen's "Between My Finite Eyes" will remain on view in the Harrison Gallery through September 2, 2019.

Jennifer's "City Blocks" will remain on view in the Rosedale Gallery through September 8, 2019.

04/25/2019

Arcadia Exhibitions Throwback Thursday Presented “Air Kissing: An Exhibition of Contemporary Art about the Art World,” in spring of 2008.

Curated by Sasha Archibald and featuring 35 works in diverse media by 22 regional and international artists, artist teams and collectives, the show explored the double-bind faced by artists navigating their desire to work (and succeed) in a world they hold in low regard.

Using self-deprecation, humor, sharp criticism, and a deliberate mix of high culture with low, the artists in “Air Kissing” sought to give voice to a number of legitimate grievances about the art world.

Many of the works in the exhibition were examples of institutional critique. The most potent of these might have been David Hammons' Holy Bible: Old Testament (2002), a 1997 softcover edition of The Complete Works of Marcel Duchamp by Arturo Schwartz. Hammond appropriated the book as a "ready made" and rebound it to resemble a Bible, included gilding the edges of its pages and rounding their corners. The resulting transformation suggests (among other things) the art world's canonization of Duchamp as well as its allegiance to accepted dictums.

To read more about Air Kissing: An Exhibition of Contemporary Art about the Art World, please visit: https://www.arcadia.edu/add-content/page-183

Pictured: Installation view of "Air Kissing" including “Everything Must Go" (2008), a work by Philadelphia-based artist James Mills.

04/25/2019
Words from Jamar and Matt

Words from Jamar and Matt:

Come support Arcadia's seniors tomorrow as they present their thesis projects in the Benton Spruance Fine Arts Center! This event is free and open to the public from 8:00 to 10:00 PM.

Arcadia University Alumni Association
04/23/2019

Arcadia University Alumni Association

Join fellow alumni and the Class of 2019 for the annual Visual and Performing Arts Alumni Preview reception at Thesis Day from 8-10 pm on Friday, April 26.

Voting will occur from 7-8 pm at the Benton Spruance Fine Arts Center. The Thesis Prize will be announced by 9 pm. Come celebrate the arts at Arcadia!

04/21/2019
Today's Flip: Impossible Dreams by Pati Hill

Today’s Flip: Impossible Dreams by Pati Hill

Impossible Dreams (1976) by Patil Hill (1921-2014) was crafted with the intention of achieving the effect of a “stopped film.” The 125 chapters of this novel of love, loss, and longing—some only as long as a sentence—are illustrated by 48 photographs (appropriated with permission from approximately 20 photographers) that Hill photocopied "to give them greater unity".

In 2017 Arcadia Exhibitions published "Pati Hill Photocopier: A Survey of Prints and Books (1974-83)", a 200-page catalog which accompanied a traveling exhibition that reintroduced Hill's singular practice. Richard Torchia, Arcadia Exhibitions Director, says that the catalog “represents the initial stirrings of critical interest in Pati Hill’s storied life and practice.”

Copies of the book can be obtained by writing to [email protected] or by phoning 215-572-2131.

04/20/2019
Today's Flip: Dark Archives by Andre Bradley

Today’s Flip: Dark Archives by Andre Bradley

The Dark Archives (2015) by Andre Bradley consists of three saddle-stitched booklets and two single page inserts inside a die-cut folder.

The images and books reveal fragments of Bradley’s autobiography; a provocative exploration of one black man’s memories of childhood. Part story, part lyrical investigation, the work aims to upset the linguistic and visual constrictions placed on black males.

Bradley is an artist, writer, and curator who lives and works in Philadelphia.

The Dark Archives is featured in “Writers Making Books,” which remains on view until April 21.

04/19/2019
Today's Flip: The Money Jar by Simon Cutts and Erica Van Horn

Today’s Flip: The Money Jar by Simon Cutts and Erica Van Horn

The Money Jar (2002), created by Simon Cutts and Erica Van Horn, is a requiem marking the moment when Irish currency was withdrawn from circulation.

Inside are photographs of coins in aged, one-pound jam jars overlaid with information about the number of coins contained inside. The text is printed on transparent graph paper, synthesizing the conceptual nature of the book with its material makeup.

The Money Jar is featured in “Writers Making Books,” which remains on view until April 21.

04/18/2019
Today's Flip: Heart of Darkness by Fiona Banner

Today’s Flip: Heart of Darkness by Fiona Banner

Fiona Banner’s Heart of Darkness (2015) re-contextualizes excerpts from Joseph Conrad’s 1899 classic novel.

Banner’s book evokes the self-conscious objecthood of a oversize luxury magazine, but offers a graphic exploration of greed and power. The book is illustrated by photographs documenting the London's financial district, many of which engage directly with the text—boats on the river, imposing colonnades and doorway.

However, it is the associative dissonance between the glossy material, hybrid contents, and heavy manipulation and reformatting of Conrad’s text that distinguishes this work.

Fiona Banner’s Heart of Darkness is featured in “Writers Making Books,” which remains on view until April 21.

We are only two days away from the opening night of “Tamsen Wojtanowski: Between My Finite Eyes” and “Jennifer Man...
04/17/2019

We are only two days away from the opening night of “Tamsen Wojtanowski: Between My Finite Eyes” and “Jennifer Manzella: City Blocks” on Thursday, April 18!

The discussion, moderated by curator Matthew Borgen, will be followed by a reception in the gallery spaces adjacent to the Great Room. Both events are free and open to the public, so you are encouraged to share this event with your friends and family!

For more information, please visit our event page.

Pictured: students constructing one of the frames for the exhibitions.

04/14/2019
Today's Flip: The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall

Today’s Flip: The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall

Steven Hall’s first book, The Raw Shark Texts (2007), takes readers through the psychological Odyssey of an amnesiac searching for answers regarding memory, death, and the self.

The layout and typesetting of his book are strewn in an inventive array of text-based visual narrative ploys, including inkblots (p. 323), puzzles (p. 74), pictures made from vowels and consonants (p. 94), and a 38-page flipbook of an approaching shark (p. 335-373).

The Raw Shark Texts is featured in “Writers Making Books,” which remains on view until April 21.

Arcadia Exhibitions is saddened to hear of the passing of Philadelphia-based artist, William Larson (1942–2019). Larso...
04/11/2019

Arcadia Exhibitions is saddened to hear of the passing of Philadelphia-based artist, William Larson (1942–2019).

Larson has been a significant figure in the field of fine art photography since the early 1970s. After receiving his Master’s Degree from the Illinois Institute of Technology, Institute of Design in Chicago, he established the photography program at Tyler School of Art, Temple University, where he taught for over twenty years.

Larson commented, “I started to work and think of photography as a system of production, supporting a bias toward the additive possibilities of the medium, and less the subtractive, descriptive, or literal.”

In 2002, Arcadia Exhibitions presented “Back Time: Video Projections by William Larson.” This exhibition was Larson’s first one-person show in the region since 1985. The exhibition introduced three works in video, each demonstrating a concern for depicting time in static space while consciously using one medium to comment on another.

Well known for his exhibition, “Fireflies,” Larson utilized a technology new to the time, a Graphic Sciences DEX 1 Teleprinter, a sophisticated early fax machine, to present a dynamic way of image making that extended the vocabulary of montage.

Tom Gitterman, director of Gitterman Gallery (https://www.gittermangallery.com), recalls “Larson conducted the technology to produce an almost random juxtaposition of dissimilar images. The symbolic, or poetic, potential of the juxtaposition references ‘the imperfect operations of memory or dreams.’”

For more on “Back Time: Video Projections by William Larson,” please visit https://www.arcadia.edu/add-content/page-200

Pictured: William Larson. Untitled, c. 1969–78; electro-carbon print; 11 x 8 ½ in. © William Larson. Courtesy of Gitterman Gallery

04/09/2019
Today’s Flip: Tree of Codes by Jonathan Safran Foer

Today’s Flip: Tree of Codes by Jonathan Safran Foer

Jonathan Safran Foer’s book, Tree of Codes (2010), was created by cutting text from one of Foer’s favorite books, The Street of Crocodiles (1934), a collection of short stories by Polish author Bruno Schulz (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Street_of_Crocodiles).

Foer wanted to “[explore] the idea of the pages’ physical relationship to one another and how this could somehow be developed to work with a meaningful narrative.”

Tree of Codes is featured in “Writers Making Books,” which remains on view until April 21.

Arcadia Exhibitions Throwback Thursday Presents: Martha WilsonMartha Wilson (b. 1947) is a pioneering feminist artist an...
04/04/2019

Arcadia Exhibitions Throwback Thursday Presents: Martha Wilson

Martha Wilson (b. 1947) is a pioneering feminist artist and gallery director, who over the past four decades has created innovative photographic and video works that explore her female subjectivity through role-playing, costume transformations, and “invasions” of other people’s personae.

In 2012, Arcadia Exhibitions presented the U.S. debut of “Martha Wilson: Staging the Self," a touring exhibition organized by Independent Curators International (ICI).

Surveying 40 years of performances, videos, and photo-text works by Wilson—including her musical collaborations in the group DISBAND—the exhibition also included material the artist selected from the archives of Franklin Furnace, the non-profit art organization Wilson founded in 1976 as an archive for artist’s books and variable media.

In her role as an expert on the topic of artist’s books, she met with Arcadia Exhibitions Director Richard Torchia to discuss possible titles to include in the exhibition, “Writers Making Books” (https://www.arcadia.edu/add-content/page-202).

Commenting on Wilson's first projects, in 2001 art historian Jane Wark wrote:

“In her conceptually based performance, video and photo-text works, Wilson masqueraded as a man in drag, catalogued various body parts, manipulated her appearance with makeup and explored the effects of ‘camera presence’ in self-representation. Although this work was made in isolation from any feminist community, it has been seen to contribute significantly to what would become feminism's most enduring preoccupations: the investigation of identity and embodied subjectivity.”

Her project, “Martha Wilson: Staging the Journals” at MFC-Michèle Didier (Paris, France), was selected by Hyperallergic as one of the best twenty international exhibitions of 2018 (https://hyperallergic.com/475249/best-of-2018-our-top-20-exhibitions-around-the-world/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Best%20of%20Art%20of%202018&utm_content=Best%20of%20Art%20of%202018+CID_cd2565c39e93698fd71151e9690a1b6f&utm_source=HyperallergicNewsletter&utm_term=Best%20of%202018%20Our%20Top%2020%20Exhibitions%20Around%20the%20World).

At a recent lecture, Wilson discussed turning gray and how people have started bumping into her in the street due to the fact that she had become literally invisible.

After a performance in which she dyed one side of her hair bright red, and left the other side gray, she discovered that people noticed her again. She has kept her hair that way.

To read more on Wilson’s “Staging the Self,” please visit https://www.arcadia.edu/add-content/page-81

Pictured: Artist Martha Wilson holding “The Goddess,” from her ‘Models’ photo series (1974), in New York, September 2015 courtesy of Hyperallergic.

Tonight is the opening night for Nevermore! The Spruance Gallery has extended hours from 7:30-8:00 PM for those who wish...
04/04/2019

Tonight is the opening night for Nevermore!

The Spruance Gallery has extended hours from 7:30-8:00 PM for those who wish to see "Writers Making Books" before attending Arcadia's performance.

This exhibition is part of "Whitman at 200" (https://www.whitmanat200.org), a citywide celebration of the bicentennial of Walt Whitman's birth and is inspired by the fact that Whitman not only wrote Leaves of Grass, but helped to typeset, design and bind it.

For more information on the play, visit the Theater Arts at Arcadia University page.

For more information on our current and upcoming exhibitions, visit https://www.arcadia.edu/arcadia-exhibitions

When a Gallery becomes a Library:Last week Artblog’s Executive Director and Chief Editor, Roberta Fallon, spoke with R...
04/02/2019

When a Gallery becomes a Library:

Last week Artblog’s Executive Director and Chief Editor, Roberta Fallon, spoke with Richard Torchia and Zachary See, co-curators of Arcadia Exhibitions’ current show, “Writers Making Books” in conjunction with “Whitman at 200: Art and Democracy” (https://www.whitmanat200.org).

In the interview, Richard and Zach discuss the concept of artist’s books and writer’s books along other aspects involved in the curation of “Writers Making Books.”

The podcast is available now at https://www.theartblog.org/2019/03/writers-make-books-gallery-becomes-library-in-writers-making-books-at-arcadia-universitys-spruance-gallery/

“Writers Making Books” remains on view until April 21, 2019.

Photo courtesy of Morgan Nitz.

“Do I contradict myself? Very well then … I contradict myself”To articulate Whitman's interest in revising the tex...
03/30/2019

“Do I contradict myself? Very well then … I contradict myself”

To articulate Whitman's interest in revising the text of Leaves of Grass over time, one of the most widely recognized stanzas from "Song of Myself" has been set in vinyl on a wall in Arcadia Exhibitions’ “Writers Making Books” (https://www.arcadia.edu/add-content/page-202).

The six iterations of the two lines (a rhetorical question and its answer) evolve in terms of both subtle changes in punctuation and phrasing, demonstrating how easy it was for Whitman to "contradict himself,” especially when he was directly involved in laying the type.

Pictured is the vinyl of Whitman’s six revisions featured in “Writers Making Books” taken by Samuel Fritch.

Arcadia Exhibitions’ Throwback Thursday Presents: “Subway Therapy” by Matthew “Levee” ChavezFrom March 1 - Apr...
03/28/2019

Arcadia Exhibitions’ Throwback Thursday Presents: “Subway Therapy” by Matthew “Levee” Chavez

From March 1 - April 2, 2017, Arcadia Exhibitions featured approximately 2,000 sticky notes posted on the walls of New York’s Union Square and 14th Street/6th Avenue subway stations directly after the 2016 presidential election.

Created from a single hand-drawn sign inviting passersby to “express themselves,” the project grew to 50,000 anonymous sticky notes posted around New York City stations and public transportation systems in Boston, San Francisco, Seattle, Chicago, and Toronto.

To forge the experience of walking through a station, Arcadia Exhibitions “removed one of its temporary walls to expose the original subwaylike tiles behind it,” which the Philadelphia Inquirer proceeded to describe as a “brilliant idea for this exhibition.”

Recently, Chavez published “Signs of Hope,” which is meant to portray a “snapshot of society today.”

To read more, please visit http://www.subwaytherapy.com/artinaction.

To learn more about “Subway Therapy” please visit http://www.subwaytherapy.com/.

The seminal American poetry collection Leaves of Grass is a book Walt Whitman not only wrote, but also realized as a phy...
03/26/2019

The seminal American poetry collection Leaves of Grass is a book Walt Whitman not only wrote, but also realized as a physical object.

Between its first printing in 1855 and the final deathbed edition published in 1892, Whitman produced six uniquely typeset versions.

In addition to modifying the content—the total number of poems grew from 12 to 400—he focused on the smallest physical details of his books' design and production, relying on his training as a printer, typesetter, and binder.

Pictured are various editions of Leaves of Grass, accompanied by Whitman’s original six, featured on the cover of Ed Folsom’s “Whitman Making Books, Books Making Whitman.” Published on the occasion of the sesquicentennial of the 1855 edition, this book served as the primary inspiration for “Writers Making Books” (https://www.arcadia.edu/add-content/page-202).

Folsom will be delivering the keynote address for the “Whitman at 200” symposium this Friday, March 29, at the University of Pennsylvania Van Pelt-Dietrich Library. Entitled “Whitman Getting Old”, Folsom’s lecture begins at 5:30 PM.

For more info, please visit: https://www.english.upenn.edu/events/2019/03/29/whitman-200-symposium-march-29-30-2019-penn-libraries

Arcadia Exhibitions is delighted to now be on Instagram!Follow us @arcadiaexhibitions for announcements on our current a...
03/25/2019

Arcadia Exhibitions is delighted to now be on Instagram!

Follow us @arcadiaexhibitions for announcements on our current and upcoming exhibitions along with recent reviews, artist news and more.

Our current exhibition, "Writers Making Books", will remain on view until April 21, 2019.

In 2011, British sculptor, Francis Cape (https://franciscape.com), produced twenty wood benches replicating those used b...
03/25/2019

In 2011, British sculptor, Francis Cape (https://franciscape.com), produced twenty wood benches replicating those used by American Utopian communities for his exhibition, “Utopian Benches” in the Spruance Gallery.

“Utopian Benches” focused on 19th-century American utopian communities with a craft tradition, most famously the Shakers, but also the Amana Inspirationists, the Zoar Separatists, and the Harmony Society.

As part of an effort to examine the local as a site of opposition to the global, the exhibition featured benches from intentional communities within the region of Arcadia University. The benches were arranged in the gallery to face each other as opposed to a dais or altar. The walls were left bare to facilitate the transformation of the room into a site of meeting, discussion, and social idealism.

To this end, the Spruance Art Gallery, housed in a renovated power plant built in 1893, temporarily revealed and restored three arched windows over which walls were built thirty years ago to facilitate the room’s function as a gallery.

Since first being presented in the fall of 2011 at Arcadia, the benches have been exhibited at the venues such as the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) at MECA - Maine College of Art (Portland, Maine), the Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College (Saratoga Springs, NY), Murray/Guy (New York, NY), and Mount Lebanon Shaker Village, New York.

Cape’s benches will be featured in the exhibition "The Value of Sanctuary" (https://www.stjohndivine.org/) at the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine beginning March 26. On April 29, members of the Ganas Community will be discussing communal living.

Please see the flyer attached for more information.

Picture: Aaron Igler (Greenhouse Media)

Address

Spruance Fine Arts Center 450 South Easton Rd
Glenside, PA
19038

From Route 309 North/Cheltenham Avenue: From Cheltenham Avenue, bear right onto Limekiln Pike (Route 309 North). As you approach light at Greenwood Avenue, move into right lane. Proceed through light and take first exit (Route 152/Glenside). At top of ramp, make right onto Easton Road. Make first left turn into Castle entrance. From Route 309 South: Take the Route 152/Easton Road exit. At top of ramp, make left turn onto Easton Road. Go through light and make left turn into Castle entrance. From the Pennsylvania Turnpike: Take the Fort Washington exit (#339). Proceed south on Route 309. Take the Route 152/Easton Road exit. At top of ramp, make left turn onto Easton Road. Go through light and make left turn into Castle entrance. From the Schuylkill Expressway: Take the Lincoln Drive exit (#340A) follow Lincoln Drive past Emlen Street to Mount Pleasant Avenue. Turn right onto Mount Pleasant and follow until it ends at Cheltenham Avenue. Turn left onto Cheltenham Avenue and right onto Easton Road at the Cedarbrook Plaza, before the Holy Sepulchre Cemetary. After crossing over Route 309, make left turn into Castle entrance. From the Tacony Palmyra Bridge or Betsy Ross Bridge: Take Cottman Avenue (Route 73 West). Cottman Avenue becomes Township Line Road (still Route 73). Follow Route 73 as it makes a left turn onto Washington Lane. Make a right turn onto Church Road (Route 73) and continue to Arcadia University. After light at Limekiln Pike, make left turn into campus at second entrance. From southern New Jersey via the Walt Whitman Bridge: Follow signs from your area to the Walt Whitman Bridge. Cross bridge and follow signs for Route 76 West (Schuylkill Expressway). Follow directions from the Schuylkill Expressway. From southern New Jersey via the Ben Franklin Bridge: Follow signs to the Ben Franklin Bridge. Cross the bridge and follow signs to Route 676 West to Route 76 West (Schuylkill Expressway). Follow directions from the Schuylkill Expressway. From northern New Jersey: Take the New Jersey Turnpike to the Pennsylvania Turnpike exit (#6). Go west on the Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276). Follow directions from the Pennsylvania Turnpike. From the Commodore Barry Bridge, Delaware or Points South: Take I-95 North to 476 North. Take 276 East (the Pennsylvania Turnpike). Follow directions from the Pennsylvania Turnpike. From the Philadelphia International Airport: Take I-95 South to 476 North. Take 276 East (the Pennsylvania Turnpike). Follow directions from the Pennsylvania Turnpike. By Train: Take the SEPTA R5 or R2 lines to Glenside Station. Use SEPTA #22 bus or taxicab or walk south along Easton Road to Arcadia University. By Bus: Take the SEPTA #22 to Arcadia University. Connect with the #22 from Broad Street Subway and SEPTA bus routes C, #18 and #26 at SEPTA center at Broad Street and Olney Avenue. From Mt. Airy/Cedarbrook take the SEPTA H bus and transfer to SEPTA #22 at Cheltenham Avenue and Easton Road.

General information

Arcadia Exhibitions (formerly Arcadia University Art Gallery) now programs three venues on campus. The Spruance Gallery, housed in a renovated power station (built in 1892), is part of the Benton Spruance Art Center. The Harrison and Rosedale Galleries are located on the first and second floors of the University Commons, about a minute’s walk from the Spruance Gallery. All events are free and open to the public.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 19:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 12:00 - 16:00
Sunday 12:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(215) 572-2131

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